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SPORTS Derby High School sports teams have an almost perfect run The past year has been a solid one for DHS sports teams, as 15 of 18 had the opportunity to compete at the state level.

Page 15

Final Online Survey Results

NEW ONLINE SURVEY

What should Derby Days do?

Have you purchased or do you plan to purchase a utility service line warranty?

back next year o Come back as o Come something else as it was

o Partner with the BBQ o Not come back at all o Yes - 17% Answer this question at derbyinformer.com

o No - 83% Results as of June 3

THE DERBY

If It’s Derby News – We Know It! Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • www.derbyinformer.com • 50 cents

Optometrist sentenced to federal prison for fraud By Linda Stinnett linda@derbyinformer.com

A Derby optometrist was sentenced this past week to 41 months in federal prison. Dr. Wade D. Abbey, 47, was also ordered to pay $583,060 in restitution to Vision Doctors Optometry in Derby. Abbey pleaded guilty in February to five counts of wire fraud which had resulted in the embezzlement of funds from Vision Doctors Optometry in Derby In the February plea agreement, Abbey admitted to the wire fraud. In that agreement, he said that he inflated the number of eye exams performed by himself and his wife, Dr. Mindy L. Abbey, when submitting payroll information to Vision Doctors. During the 15 years the Abbeys worked for Vision Doctors, they were paid an hourly wage and additional fees for each full eye exam they conducted, according to information from U.S. Attorney Barry Grissom. Wade Abbey inflated the number of eye exams they performed and provided false information to an accountant who paid them based on the false information, Grissom said. In his plea Abbey admitted to the following, which he said he knew was not true: • Sending an email on Jan. 6, 2010 stating he provided 177 full eye exams and his wife provided 160 full eye exams. • Sending an email on Jan. 20, 2010, stating he provided 197 full eye exams and his wife provided 186 full eye exams.

City irons out local water conservation plan By Linda Stinnett linda@derbyinformer.com

please see

Derby’s water conservation plan draft gained approval May 28, with city council members noting the city is already in the first stage. Despite recent rains, South Central Kansas was listed in severe to extreme drought by the U.S. Drought Monitor – NOAA service, in its May 28 release. According to the new draft of the plan, the time to begin actively working on water conservation is here, said Cheryl Bannon, council member. “We are there, folks,” she said. “Everyone needs to start conserving.” Under the final draft, the city will work on a three-tier system for water conservation. It is much like weather notices to the public – beginning with a watch, moving to a warning and then to an emergency status. The Stage 1 Water Watch is implemented as regional drought conditions exist and relies on heavy public notices and education for consumers. Kathy Sexton, city manager, said the city has started that process with educational endeavors through Arbor Day and the Water Wise seminars held this past month. please see

PLAN,

page

Wichita’s long-range water supply plan may come late in year Despite concerns of the drought causing Cheney Reservoir to dry up, Wichita has yet to implement a longrange water supply plan. Joseph Pajor, deputy director of Wichita’s department of public works and utilities, said he expects one to be announced late this year. Wichita has 11 wholesale water customers including Derby. Its primary water source is Cheney

Wednesday

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Reservoir, where water levels had dropped before recent rains to less than 60 percent. It was 72 percent full as of Monday morning. “Typically at this point of the year we would be about 110 or 120 percent full,” said Pajor. Prior to recent rains, Wichita officials said consumer water usage continues as normal and the drought continues as it has been, Cheney Reservoir will be dry by August 2015, with Wichita’s wells drying up by 2020 to 2021, he said. Cheney Reservoir provides 64

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percent of Wichita’s water source with the Equus Beds Aquifer wells making up the rest. “In 2015, when Cheney Reservoir goes dry, we’re going to reach a critical point and we won’t be able to meet the total demand,” said Pajor. “Not only will we not be able to meet the total demand, we won’t be able to meet the average day wintertime demand.” If that happens, Pajor said the city please see

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By Linda Stinnett linda@derbyinformer.com

Good news for Derby Days fans and the community at large – Ottaway Amusements will open its carnival June 13-16 in Derby and will benefit the Derby Historical Museum. The Carnival will set up on the south grounds of Derby High School from June 13 to 16 and be open the same hours it typically is during Derby Days. Derby Days has been postponed this year, so the high school will not be open. The carnival will have concessions and porta-potties on site. The carnival will offer wristband sessions. In those sessions riders can pay a $22 fee and ride all the rides.

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Get daily weather details for Derby derbyinformer.com

30% chance of thunderstorms

30% chance of thunderstorms

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Event will benefit Derby Historical Museum

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LINDA STINNETT/Informer photo

news@derbyinformer.com

page

Carnival to open June 13-16

Rainfall on May 29 had water rushing down street gutters, drainage basins and off of city hall gutters, as shown above. The runoff helps replenish streams and rivers and, thanks to even heavier rainfall north of the lake, raised the level of Cheney Reservoir nearly 10 percent.

By Ginger G. Golden

ABBEY,

Click on Derby Weather

Owner Danny Ottaway said the late decision by Derby Days to postpone this year’s event left him with no booking for the carnival that weekend. He decided to go forward with the carnival and agreed to donate $4,000 to the community’s Historical Museum, according to Charlie Hubbard, president of the Derby Historical Society. Those who enjoy the carnival will find it returns with the full array of rides, including the new ride, Rock Star, which made its debut a year ago. Rock Star is shaped like a giant guitar and thrill-seeking riders sit on a platform, which stays parallel with the ground, but please see

CARNIVAL,

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Editorial

Page 2 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Sun-Times, they are a changin’ Several Twitter feeds The Informer follows were buzzing Thursday with the breaking news that the Chicago Sun-Times had just laid off its entire photography staff. R e p o r t e d l y, t h e newspaper will use freelance photographers, and reporters will be using the cameras on their phones. The newspaper issued a statement saying the demand from readers is for more video and other multimedia elements, so it is restructuring the way it manages those, according to a story done by the SunTimes competitor, The Chicago Tribune. Of course, those Twitter buzzes were about more than video and changes. It would seem that of the 20 or so photographers the metro paper had on staff that at least some could be retrained, if that is the single reason for the changes. Instead, it comes across as an excuse to lay off employees. Knowing the true reasons for the change is difficult. What we do know is many of the large newspapers have had tough times financially and the Sun-Times went through bankruptcy just a few years ago. Corporate decisions are just as tough to sift through. Many of us have known the times when tissues were no longer provided for employees by the company at the same time when presidents of corporations were being given multimillion-dollar raises. Hometown papers have done better, primarily because an owner has the

hands-on opportunity to bend with the local needs. We all know, though, that the times continue to change. Many of us remember the days of film and cameras, when film was doled out sparingly and photos were few and far between in the newspaper. Soon digital cameras were on scene .... followed by the demise of each paper’s darkroom. There has also been the demise of local press operations for most newspapers and the staff which both did the printing, the hand layout of the paper and a variety of other things. Today’s children have video play opportunities in which they can connect with each other via the Internet, talk and compete without leaving their own living room. Baby Boomers like to put down the generation which has those toys, but most of us have to admit those gadgets also can make us drool with envy and we are guilty of buying some of them. Those in the news industry will be watching the SunTimes’ decision and whether it is a sign of technology and change, financial problems or something else. We will also be watching those new games and videos that so many enjoy and seeing how they can be applied to our industry. We just hope that along the way we don’t forget that after a summer storm passes, the old creek across the street will have water in it and is still the best place to be. – By Linda Stinnett

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Joe Heller’s View

Joe Heller is a nationally syndicated cartoonist who gives a lighthearted look at the world’s events each week.

Schools operate under ‘will’ not ‘can’ achieve By Craig Wilford cwilford@usd260.com

Over the course of this school year we have spent significant time discussing and updating our community about bond projects. We will continue to do so over the next several years as we implement what our community approved in April 2012, for which we are very thankful. It is also important to make sure we are keeping you informed concerning other major initiatives going on in the district. This is the first year of a new five-year strategic

Craig Wilford

Superintendent of schools

Community Voice

plan developed by staff, parents, community members and students. The strategic plan focuses on five areas: college and career readiness, facilities, funding, technology, and quality staff. Over this past year, our staff has worked hard to implement the specific results identified for year one.

Journalists act as watchdogs protecting your right to know By Jeff Cott

Jeff Cott

mail@derbyinformer.com

In light of the recent announcement of the Department of Justice investigation of a Fox News reporter and Associated Press phone records, I am reminded of how big an impact free press can have on keeping government in check. Obtaining two months of Associated Press phone records as well as surveillance, obtaining personal emails and phone records of a Fox News reporter – without any prior notice of probable cause or subpoena – is a massive and unprecedented intrusion.

Casual Comment

A journalist must have open access to information for the public’s benefit, not the government’s. Limiting the press will only prove harmful to the public’s right to know. Overzealous actions like this will hamper the ability of a reporter to obtain valuable information and could discourage people from talking to reporters. It could even affect the course of history. The 1970s Watergate

investigation which resulted in President Nixon’s resignation is a clear example of how a journalist’s uninhibited access to sources and information helped to expose a corrupt situation. In an attempt to redefine the Open Meetings Act and make it easier for Kansas legislators to do their jobs, our own State Representative Jim Howell encouraged legislation that could potentially harm the ability for the public to fully engage with its right to know in the legislative process. This action could hamper the press’ ability to do their job as well. At this time, a bill has not received

Telephone: 316-788-4006 Fax: 316-788-4573

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Sedgwick County Annual $44.81 (52 weeks) Six months $28.84 (26 weeks) Three months $19.57 (13 weeks) Outside Sedgwick County Annual $59.04 (52 weeks) Six months $45.16 (26 weeks) Three months $30.87 (13 weeks) Single copy price .50

The Derby Informer, USPS #019686, is published weekly on Wednesdays for $41.57 (not including sales tax) per year by The Derby Informer, Inc., 219 E. Madison, Derby, Kansas 67037. Periodicals postage paid at Derby, Kansas. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Derby Informer, P.O. Box 842, Derby, KS 67037. Jeff Cott Owner/Publisher Monica Woolard Layout and Design

Linda Stinnett Managing Editor

Mark Sinclair Advertising Sales

Scott Elpers Ginger G. Golden Sports Editor Reporter/ Editorial Assistant Web News Manager

Davi Stuhlsatz Contributing Writer

Anne Dewvall Contributing Writer

please see

PRESS,

page

4

Across 1. Chums 5. Lieu 10. ___ Verde National Park 14. Christiania, now 15. Another name for Murcotts 17. Fall follower 18. Nullify 19. Athletic supporter? (golf) 20. Barely get, with “out” 21. Brightly colored perching birds 22. Eyes, poetically 24. Gambia’s basic unit of money 27. Long, long time 28. Change from a solid to a liquid 29. Architectural projection 31. Ancient colonnade 32. Star explosions 37. Impractically ideal 39. Those opposed to 1960s liberalism 40. Walker 42. Gout-causing ___ acid 43. Assassinated 44. Baby’s first word, maybe 45. Appear 48. Acute anxieties 51. Cicatrix 52. ___ terrier 54. Foot digit 55. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 56. Excessive 59. Dirty 60. Ingrained (hyphenated) 61. Con 62. Achy 63. Kind of game board 64. Doctrines

RATES: Vol. 11 • Issue 23

any priority from house leadership. Even locally with the Derby City Council, we hear occasional statements or witness actions that push the line of tolerance in adhering to the open and free flow of public access or information. Yes, it can be difficult for a governing body to process information and do its job because of the public’s right to see and hear government actions. It can also be difficult for a journalist to get access to information that the public has the right to know, but when a reporter’s phone records

Difficulty: Easy

When the board of education approved the strategic plan, they also approved four objectives for us to meet. These objectives include: 1. 100 percent of our students will graduate. 2. All students will be reading at or above grade level by the end of third grade. 3. Each of our students will score at “meets standards” or above on state assessments. 4. We will simultaneously improve the achievement of all students while closing the achievement gap. As we progress through the summer, we will collect data in relationship to our objectives and then report back to the board. This data will help guide us to determine resources and support for the plan’s year two activities. I am very proud of our strategic plan committee and board for developing and approving the strategic plan. One of the critical components to this plan is we believe all students will achieve – not that they can, but they will. This takes a strong commitment by the staff, students and community to ensure success. One of the ways we will accomplish our objectives is to continue to build the types of relationships with students that are necessary to help them engage in the learning process. We also will continue to work at creating the type of climate that is conducive to the teaching and learning process. We want every student to have a positive connection

with school staff. We also want to have a positive relationship with parents and work with them to build a partnership with a focus on how together we will help their child achieve. We also strongly believe that when students graduate from high school they need to be college and career ready. It is not enough to be one or the other. In order to accomplish this we have developed career pathways that actually start at the elementary level to build a strong instructional foundation in the essential skills all students need. At the middle level we continue to build on these skills and to seek input from students on what it is they want to do as a profession. At the high school level there are a multitude of pathways that will allow a student to pursue a focus that is of interest to them. By engaging students in areas they feel strongly about and building the relationships I spoke of above, we are well on our way to accomplishing what our strategic plan set out to do – ensure every student will attain a high level of personal growth and academic achievement. We want every student to be a productive member of our society. We l o o k f o r w a r d t o working with our parents and community to help foster the support needed for every one of our students to be successful. Through reinforcing the importance of education and providing opportunities for students to learn through real life experiences, we will meet our objectives.

Solutions on page 17

Down 1. Informal drinking toast (2 wds) 2. Female theater assistant 3. Member of aristocracy (2 wds) 4. Ground cover 5. Enclosed in a pigpen 6. Five-line Japanese verse 7. Wrap 8. ___ Khan 9. Vina ___ Mar, Chile 10. Calf-length skirt 11. Related maternally 12. Begin (2 wds)

13. Association of Southeast Asian Nations (acronym) 16. Full orchestra 23. Stirrup-shaped bone in middle ear 25. “Gladiator” setting 26. Femme fatale 30. Doctors who temporarily substitute for others 32. “Paradise Lost” character 33. Strip a ship’s sails of its ropes 34. Ravenous

To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box must contain the numbers 1 to 9.

35. Theory that humans lack a spiritual nature 36. Variety of endive (pl.) 38. Hawaiian ___ 41. Establish in office 45. Litmus reddeners 46. Brief appearance of a prominent actor 47. Kitchen counter? 49. Carries 50. Top competitors, often 53. Lariat 57. Common Market inits. 58. “Go team!” 59. Mr., in India


The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Op-Ed Page

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 3

Limit government overreach through Free Flow of Information Act By Caroline Little

Newspaper Association of America

The nation learned in May that the Justice Department secretly obtained the phone records of more than 100 Associated Press reporters and monitored Fox News reporter James Rosen’s personal email and cell phone records, branding Caroline him a “possible Little co-conspirator” in a classified leak case for asking questions to a government source. These revelations sent shockwaves throughout newsrooms nationwide. Reporters can no longer assure their sources that interviews will remain confidential because there is no way to tell whether the government is listening. This attack on journalism reaches far

beyond hardworking journalists and their sources. Make no mistake: The ultimate victims are the millions of Americans who rely on investigative journalism to inform them about their communities. When the government creates a chilling effect in newsrooms, it keeps important news away from the American public. In Washington, real change often occurs in response to a crisis. That is precisely what is happening here. For centuries, the American public has assumed that journalists are the public’s watchdog, overseeing and revealing government abuses. But the AP and Fox News stories have exposed a sad truth: The government is overseeing journalists. The only way to limit this government overreach is through passage of a law that lays out clear rules for when the government can obtain information from the press.

Members of Congress from across the political spectrum recognized that need when in May they proposed the Free Flow of Information Act of 2013, which would prohibit federal prosecutors, criminal defendants or civil litigants from subpoenaing information from journalists unless they convince a federal judge that the need for the information outweighs the public interest in the free flow of information. The shield law would be a huge improvement from the current federal system, which enables prosecutors to decide whether to notify the media of a subpoena and how broad the request should be, without any oversight or any effective ability of the press to challenge these government actions. Rep. Ted Poe, a Texas Republican and a former judge, said that he sponsored the shield law because maintaining confidentiality “is critical

to ensuring the free flow of information without government interference.” His co-sponsor, Rep. John Conyers, a Michigan Democrat, noted that 49 states and the District of Columbia protect journalists’ sources, and “it is long past time that our federal government provides similar protections.” Sens. Charles Schumer, R-N.Y., and Lindsey Graham, R-Fla., co-sponsored a similar measure in the Senate. Schumer aptly observed that a law is needed, as “there’s no supervision.” President Obama recently reaffirmed the administration’s support for a shield law and said that journalists “should not be at legal risk for doing their jobs.” The response can be summed up in one word, which is rare these days in Washington: bipartisanship. The swift reaction of legislators of both parties demonstrates that press freedom is not a Democratic or a

Republican talking point. It is a quintessentially American value that transcends politics and shaped our nation’s founding. As Thomas Jefferson famously wrote, the “only security of all is in a free press.” As the organization representing the nation’s newspapers, the Newspaper Association of America is a proud member of a coalition of more than 50 media organizations that supports a federal shield law. Over the next few weeks, we will urge senators and representatives nationwide to sign on to the shield law (H.R. 1962 and S. 987) and codify this fundamental American principle. We encourage you to contact your members of Congress to tell them why a free press matters to you. ––– Caroline Little is president and CEO of the Newspaper Association of America in Arlington, Va.

Budweiser’s new cans The government is coming the customer for your health insurance records squeeze by nearly an ounce By Christopher Jacobs www.heritage.org

Thanks to Obamacare, all Americans will now have to submit their health insurance information to the Internal Revenue Service. S a d l y, t h i s n e w requirement comes at the same time that serious questions have been raised about the IRS’s ability to manage personal health records competently. As American Enterprise Institute scholar Scott Gottlieb noted: An unnamed health care provider in California is suing the IRS and 15 unnamed agents, alleging

that they improperly seized some 60 million medical records of 10 million Americans, including medical records of all California state judges, on March 11, 2011. The complaint alleges that IRS agents exceeded the scope of their search warrant, seizing not just financial records, but “information on psychological counseling, gynecological counseling, sexual and drug treatment, and other sensitive medical treatment data.” The alleged data seizure occurred at roughly the same time in which employees in another division of the IRS targeted tea party and other

conservative groups due to their political beliefs. If true, these new allegations regarding seized medical records would further undermine trust in the IRS’s ability to conduct its affairs properly and to manage the sensitive and confidential information all Americans submit to the agency every year. The IRS’ reach within Obamacare seemingly knows no bounds. Armed with new bureaucrats and funded by a massive spending blitz, the IRS will implement trillions of dollars in tax increases; issue new regulations, edicts, and orders; impose

new paperwork burdens on all Americans; and increase the scope of government intrusion into the lives of ordinary, law-abiding citizens. Prior to the recent scandals, many Americans thought the IRS could not be trusted to implement Obamacare in a competent and impartial manner. Now they know it. It’s one more reason why Congress should repeal Obamacare once and for all. ––– Article printed from The Foundry: Conservative Policy News Blog from The Heritage Foundation: http://blog.heritage.org.

The Pentagon has a systemic problem with foxes guarding henhouses By Martha Burk www.otherwords.org

Americans have honored our soldiers and those killed in U.S. wars in late May for nearly 150 years. Memorial Day, which became an official holiday in 1868, was originally called Decoration Day and got started when civilian women decided to decorate military graves from both sides of the Civil War. There were already female warriors in our military back then, mostly disguised and fighting as men. In today’s armed forces, women no longer need to hide their gender. But lately it seems like our women in uniform might be better off if they did. While men still comprise the overwhelming majority of our troops and officers, the number of women has risen substantially in the last decade. Unfortunately, so has the numbers of rapes and other sexual assaults. In fact, military women are much more likely to be sexually assaulted by a fellow soldier than killed by an enemy. This month, the Pentagon released the latest grim statistics on this front: There were 3,374 reported cases of sexual assault in the ranks over the course of the 2012 fiscal year, and officials believe an additional 26,000 sexual assaults went unreported. Despite all the attention this problem has garnered for years, sexual assault is growing more common. The official rate is up by 13 percent and the

unreported estimated rate has climbed 35 percent in the past two years. Those shameful numbers don’t have to speak for themselves. The Pentagon’s report came just two days a f t e r L t . C o l . J e ff r e y Krusinski, the Air Force officer in charge of sexual assault training, was arrested for – you guessed it – getting drunk and sexually assaulting a complete stranger in an Arlington, Va. parking lot. A week later, the military said it was investigating whether Sgt. 1st Class Gregory McQueen, a man whose job it was to prevent sexual abuse and harassment at Ft. Hood in Texas, was himself committing a battery of sexual offenses – and even running a prostitution ring. Soon after, Lt. Col. Darin Haas was relieved of his duties running the sexual assault response program at Ft. Campbell in Kentucky after he was arrested for sending his exwife threatening texts and stalking her in violation of a court order. It sure looks like the military has a systemic problem with foxes guarding henhouses. Most of the victims were afraid of being punished by superiors if they reported what happened. And for good reason. In virtually every case, senior officers – not civilian law enforcement – get to decide guilt or innocence. They can even overturn jury decisions in the very few cases that

actually go to trial. President Barack Obama gets that this must change. He took to the airwaves to denounce a system that’s clearly not working. Meanwhile, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III was busy blaming the victims in testimony before the Senate Armed Services committee. He said the assaults were the result of a “hook up mentality,” and besides, many of the women had already been raped once before they joined the military. Wow. The reality is that one in four U.S. military women experience sexual trauma in the ranks sooner or later – and about 1 percent of military men are raped or assaulted each year. Members of Congress are pressing for a thorough overhaul of the way military assaults are prosecuted. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel is still defending the good-ol’-boys-decide system now in place, although he has given some hints that he might be more open to letting non-military prosecutors take over that role. Let’s hope when the next Memorial Day rolls around, the good news will be that changes have been made. Our military women and men deserve to be safe from assault by their own ranks. Those who assault their peers and their own country in the bargain deserve to be punished, not protected. It’s a matter of simple military justice. –––

Martha Burk is the director of the Corporate Accountability Project for the National Council of Women’s Organizations and the author of the book “Your Voice, Your Vote: The Savvy Woman’s Guide to Power, Politics, and the Change We Need.” Follow Martha on twitter @MarthaBurk.

By Jim Hightower www.otherwords.org

Anyone who says that America has lost its innovative edge in technology and m a n u f a c t u r i n g h a s n ’t chugged a can of Bud recently. The buzz is back, baby! Well, actually, Budweiser is no longer American. It’s now part of a Belgian outfit called Anheuser-Busch InBev, the world’s largest maker of suds. And the brew crew overseeing the “King of Beers” knows what we American quaffers want in a beer: a new and improved can. Huh? Yes, says Pat McGauley, Budweiser’s “vice president of innovation.” “ We ’ r e c o n s c i o u s l y working to bring innovation to the packaging side” of the beer market, he told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. That’s why the corporation’s containershapers have devised a “bowtie” can that kinks inward in the middle. How exciting is that? Plus – get ready to bust your beer gut – there are 8.5 fewer calories in the new can. How did they manage that?

Well, the bowtie design allows the multibilliondollar brew kings to short you by almost an ounce of beer in every can. But, come on, we experienced hoisters of the brewer’s art will definitely feel that loss of product, so they can’t fool us into paying more for less. Well, that’s where their innovative genius trumps our consumer instincts. To keep us off balance, Anheuser-Busch InBev’s bowtie can has nearly doubled the amount of aluminum of its regular can, making the new feel just as heavy as the old. Less beer, more metal – that’s heavy innovation, my friends. Oh, there’s one more innovative twist. In case some of you trend-seekers try to compare ounces in the new six-packs, you’ll find that the bowtie cans only come in eight-packs. Gotcha again! If you want honest beer, try the craft brews at your local pub or store. ––– J i m H i g h t o w e r, a n OtherWords columnist, is a radio commentator, writer, and public speaker. He’s also editor of the populist newsletter, The Hightower Lowdown.

Food stamps don’t stimulate economic growth By Rachel Sheffield and T. Elliot Gaiser www.heritage.org

The number of Americans on food stamps, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, is at historic highs, but some on the left – like Paul Krugman – think that’s not such a bad thing because, as they argue, food stamps “stimulate” the economy: “We desperately needed (and still need) public policies to promote higher spending on a temporary basis. … [E]ach dollar spent on food stamps in a depressed economy raises G.D.P. [gross domestic product] by about $1.70 – which means, by the way, that much of the money laid out to help families in need actually comes right back to the government in the form of higher revenue,” Krugman said. Others on the left have made similar statements

about SNAP stimulus. What’s the problem with this argument? First, food stamps are intended to serve as a temporary safety net for those who face economic hardship, not as an economic stimulus. To justify food stamps as a stimulus to raise government revenue ignores the long-term economic consequences of welfare spending. Total government welfare spending has reached nearly $1 trillion annually, and the food stamps program i s o n e o f t h e l a rg e s t o f t h e g o v e r n m e n t ’s approximately 80 welfare programs, costing taxpayers roughly $80 billion a year. A d d i t i o n a l l y, f o o d stamp dollars come from the taxpayers, meaning that as program spending increases, fewer dollars are available in the private sector. Heritage research explains that, for example, $100 of government aid

“can be spent at a grocery store, which, in turn, can use that $100 to pay salaries and support other jobs. … [B]ut because government borrows the $100, that same money is now unavailable to the private sector – which would have spent the same $100 with the same multiplier effect.” Also, while food stamp spending might increase some spending on food, sound economics considers the long-term, less visible effects of policy. The argument for stimulus “assumes that consumption spending adds to immediate economic growth while savings do not.” However, private savings help lift people out of poverty and boost the economy, but high rates of government borrowing can weaken the economy and harm Americans. The United States just hit the please see

STAMPS,

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The Record

Page 4 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

fire runs June 1

1:58 a.m., 2000 block Zachary, EMS call 11:38 a.m., 600 block Mulberry, EMS call 12:02 p.m., 1300 block N. Briarwood, unauthorized burning 6:03 p.m., 2000 block N. Nelson Dr., EMS call 6:40 p.m., 100 block W. Market, motor vehicle accident 9:54 p.m., 300 block S. Woodlawn, EMS call 11:19 p.m., 1100 block Sunset, EMS call 11:48 p.m., 400 block Derby Hills, EMS call

May 31

1:04 p.m., 1700 block Walnut Grove, EMS call 5:41 p.m., 1700 block Walnut Grove, EMS call 8:40 p.m., 1100 block Hackberry, EMS call

May 30

1:19 p.m., 900 block Chet Smith, EMS call 4:47 p.m., Rock Road/63rd Street South, motor vehicle accident 6:26 p.m., 2800 block N. Rock Road, EMS call 9:04 p.m., 400 block N. Westview, EMS call 11:30 p.m., Madison Ave./ Westview, EMS call

May 29

8:02 a.m., 800 block Hawthorne, trash fire 7:42 p.m., 200 block S. Woodlawn, EMS call 9:26 p.m., 300 S. Woodlawn, arcing lines 10:15 p.m., Kay/Brookwood, arcing lines

May 28

8:31 am., 1400 block N. Patriot, EMS call

obituaries 1:34 p.m., 200 block S. Woodlawn, EMS call 5:17 p.m., Buckner/Red Powell, motor vehicle accident 5:27 p.m., 1900 block Quail Hollow, EMS call

May 27

3:30 a.m., 700 block N. Georgie, EMS call 6:04 a.m., Kay/Sontag, motor vehicle accident 4:20 p.m., 1400 block N. Rock Road, EMS call

May 26

8:06 a.m., 1000 block N. Kokomo, EMS call 10:31 a.m., 2800 block Rough Creek, EMS call 12:03 p.m., 400 block N. Derby, EMS call 1:03 p.m., 2100 block Sommerhauser, smoke detector activation 5:56 p.m., 400 block N. Westview, assist citizen 7:29 p.m., 500 block Spring Creek, EMS call

May 25

1:00 a.m., 1400 block N. Rock Road, EMS call 6:36 a.m., 1600 block Amber Ridge, EMS call 10:35 a.m., 400 block N. Westview, EMS call 10:41 a.m., 300 block Aspen, EMS call 11:06 a.m., 1600 block Oxford Cr., EMS call 2:00 p.m., 1700 block Walnut Grove, EMS call 5:36 p.m., 200 block Springwood, assist citizen

May 24

9:51 a.m., 700 block Dogwood Ct., EMS call 1:10 p.m., 400 block N. Derby, EMS call 7:12 p.m., 1000 block N. Westview, cooking fire

community activities June 5 Derby Senior Services Advisory Board meeting, 10 a.m. at Senior Center, 611 Mulberry Old Fashioned Burger Burn, 5-8 p.m. at Derby VFW/American Legion, 101 S. Baltimore Derby Lions Club meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Friends Church, 1034 N. Woodlawn June 6 Derby Lions Club meeting, 6:30 p.m. at Friends Church, 1034 N. Woodlawn American Legion Post 408 meeting, 7 p.m. at VFW/American Legion, 101 S. Baltimore June 7 Rotary Club, noon at Derby Public Library Community Room, 1600 E. Walnut Grove Steak Night, 5:30-8 p.m. at VFW/ American Legion, 101 S. Baltimore June 9 Sons of the American Legion Breakfast, 8-11 a.m. at VFW/ American Legion, 101 S. Baltimore. Adults $6; ages 4-11 $3

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June 10 Prairie Land Food registration deadline. Call Mary Lee at 788-5520 Board of Education meeting, 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Go to usd260.com for meeting agenda Derby Garden Club meeting, 7 p.m. at library, 1600 E. Walnut Grove VFW Men’s Auxiliary meeting, 7 p.m. at VFW/American Legion, 101 S. Baltimore June 11 City Council meeting, 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Go to derbyweb.com for meeting agenda June 12 Lions Club meeting, 12 p.m. at Dillons Marketplace Community Room Old Fashioned Burger Burn, 5-8 p.m. at Derby VFW/American Legion, 101 S. Baltimore June 14 Rotary Club, noon at Derby Public Library Community Room, 1600 E. Walnut Grove Steak Night, 5:30-8 p.m. at VFW/ American Legion, 101 S. Baltimore

Zenetta Modene Burden Clifford Zenetta Modene Burden Clifford, 88, loving mother, grandmother and greatg r a n d m o t h e r, died Thursday, May 30, 2013. A funeral service w a s h e l d Saturday, June 1, at Resthaven Mortuary. Clifford Zenetta was born to the late Rev. William Henry and Minnie Burden on Feb. 24, 1925 in Oklahoma. She was a believer in the Lord Jesus Christ and served faithfully alongside her pastor-husband, Rev. Vernon Clifford, who preceded her in death. Zenetta was also preceded in death by two grandchildren, Clifford T. Coats and Sonja M. Murphree; three greatgrandchildren, Chase, Nicole and Michael Clifford; and two sisters, Ruth Clegg and Ailene Roberston.

Survivors include sons and spouses, Randall L. and Ruth Clifford of Winfield, Michael D. and Sharon Clifford of Topeka, and RoyLee Clifford of the home in Siloam Springs, Ark.; daughters and spouses, Cynda M. and Charles Coats of Siloam Springs, and Susan G. and David Fyffe of Towanda; sisterin-law and husband, Bonita and Paul McCluer of Derby; 14 grandchildren; and 27 greatgrandchildren. Memorials may be made to Circle of Life Hospice, 901 Jones Road, Springdale, Ark. 72762, or in her name at your home church. Condolences may be offered at www. resthavenmortuary-cemetery. com. Dale Doffing Dale Doffing, 63, retired service technician for Central Air Co. and loving family man, passed away Thursday, May 30, 2013. A funeral mass was held on Tuesday, June 4, at St. Mary Catholic Church in Derby.

He was preceded in death by his parents, George and Winifred; and brother, Billy. Dale is survived by his loving wife of 42 years, Gail; children, Staci (Kelly) Farber, Brian (Susan) Doffing and Kristin (Jeromy Scofield) Doffing; siblings, Marty, Danny, Chuck, Rick, Bobby, Carol, Georann, Janice, Donna, Lori and Tina; eight grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be sent to St. Mary’s Catholic Church Building Fund, 2306 Meadowlark Blvd., Derby, Kan. 67037. Connan D. “C.D.” Swaim DERBY – Connan D. “C.D.” Swaim, 79, retired NC programmer for Boeing, passed away Monday, May 27, 2013. A funeral service was held on Friday, May 31, at Smith Mortuary, Derby. C.D. was preceded in death by his parents, James and Lucille Swaim; children, Cynthia and Steven Swaim; grandson, Brian Maphet; siblings, Jean Holman,

Ru b y G u t h r i e a n d Pr e s t o n Swaim. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Swaim; children, Buck (Heather) S w a i m , Swaim Jeffery Swaim; stepchildren, Ro b e r t ( S h e l l y ) M a p h e t , Gregory (Amy) Maphet and Tami Maphet; grandchildren, Justin, Sarah, Brandon, Kelsey, Nicole, Chance, Nick, Taylor, Templ, Courtney and Bryson; great-grandchildren, Rachel, Audrey and Zoey; siblings, Lola Vestal, Lois (Dale) Agee, Nita (Nathan) Shipman; many nieces, nephews and cousins. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Derby Public Library, 1600 E. Walnut Grove, Derby, Kan. 67037. Send condolences and view tributes via www. smithfamilymortuaries.com.

police calls Arrests June 2, Michael Jareth Glaser, 30, from Derby, domestic battery. J u n e 2 , Pete r Way n e Henderson, 50, from Derby, aggravated battery, aggravated assault, criminal damage to property. June 1, Robert E. Martin Jr., 39, from Wichita, failure to appear. June 1, Jesse F. Talbert, 33, from Wichita, failure to appear. May 31, Clifford James Short, 53, from Derby, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. M a y 3 1 , Te reze C h e r i e Thomas, 26, from Mulvane, failure to appear. May 31, 16-year-old male, from Derby, burglary. May 31, 16-year-old male, from Haysville, burglary. May 30, Kera J. Clemons, 38, from Park City, failure to appear. May 30, Myranda Payge Cowan, 20, from Wichita, failure to appear. M a y 3 0 , A n ge l a N i co l e Norwood, 35, from Wichita, failure to appear. May 30, Robert M. Spiegel Jr., 48, from Derby, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. May 29, Bradley A. Brubaker, 27, from Wichita, failure to appear. May 29, Jennifer Lynn Kelly, 39, from Rose Hill, failure to appear. May 29, George Strubhar, 20, from Rose Hill, failure to appear. May 28, Dustin Montgomery, 18, from Derby, possession of certain hallucinogenic drugs,

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use/possess with intent to use drug paraphernalia. May 28, 16-year-old male, from Derby, possess or attempt to possess cigarettes/tobacco, curfew violation. May 27, Melissa Diane Jantz, 44, from Belle Plaine, driving under the influence, transporting an open container. May 27, Kilte Michael Walsh, 32, from Derby, driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. May 27, 15-year-old male, from Derby, curfew violation. M a y 2 6 , J a c o b We s l e e Hayhurst, 18, from Derby, possession of certain hallucinogenic drugs, use/ possess with intent to use drug paraphernalia. May 25, Wintilio OrtizValdivia, 42, from Valley Center, failure to appear. M a y 2 5 , D av i d Ry m e r, 56, from Wichita, lewd and lascivious behavior. May 25, 16-year-old, from Derby, curfew violation. Traffic Accidents June 2, 8:42 p.m., non-injury accident at S Rock Rd. and E. Chet Smith Ave. June 2, 6:13 p.m., non-injury hit-and-run accident at 400 block W. Patriot Ave. June 1, 6:40 p.m., injury accident at E. Market St. and N. Baltimore Ave. June 1, 3:24 p.m., non-injury accident at 700 block S. Buckner St. June 1, 10:01 a.m., non-injury accident at 900 block E. Market St. May 30, 8:35 p.m., non-injury

accident reported at police dept. May 30, 4:46 p.m., injury accident at E. 63rd St. South and N. Rock Rd. May 29, 5:30 p.m., non-injury accident at 1400 block E. Patriot Ave. May 29, 12:13 p.m., noninjury accident at 200 block E. Greenway St. May 29, 8:16 a.m., non-injury accident at E. Patriot Ave. and 63rd St. South. May 28, 6:06 p.m., non-injury accident at N. Rock Rd. and E. Meadowlark Blvd. May 28, 5:17 p.m., injury accident at N. Buckner St. and W. Red Powell Dr. May 27, 5:35 p.m., non-injury accident reported at police dept. May 27, 6:04 a.m., injury accident at E. Kay St. and S. Rock Rd. May 26, 7:15 p.m., non-injury accident at N. Rock Rd. and E. Madison Ave. May 25, 7:25 p.m., non-injury accident at 800 block N. Linden Ln. May 25, 4:16 p.m., non-injury hit-and-run accident at 200 block W. Greenway Blvd. May 25, 2:35 p.m., non-injury accident at 2000 block N. Nelson Dr. May 24, 6:10 p.m., non-injury accident reported at police dept. May 24, 2:01 p.m., non-injury accident at 2000 block N. Nelson Dr. Larceny June 2, 8:24 a.m., report at

PRESS: Right to know From Page 2

have unknowingly been accessed by government, it’s a blatant abuse of power. A true journalist’s job is to get the facts and report the story. If the story results in exposing inappropriate activities or inside information that may directly or indirectly benefit the well-being of the public,

• Personal & Business Tax Returns • Estate & Fiduciary Planning & Tax Returns • Payroll & General Accounting Services • New Business Setup • Financial Statements • Tax Planning • Affordable Rates

1200 block N. Patrick Henry St. June 2, 2:46 a.m., report at 800 block N. Beaver Trail Rd. May 31, 4:35 p.m., larceny at Walmart, 2000 block N. Nelson Dr. May 31, 4:31 p.m., report at 200 block E. North Point Dr. May 31, 12:55 p.m., report at police dept. May 31, 2:53 p.m., larceny at 500 block S. Riverview Ave. May 30, 9:46 a.m., report at 1600 block N. Rock Rd. May 28, 5:36 p.m., larceny at Kohl’s, 2800 block N. Commerce Dr. May 25, 3:20 p.m., report at 1400 block E. Deer Trail St. May 24, 9:36 p.m., report at 1100 block N. Dry Creek Dr. Burglary May 29, 10:52 p.m., report at 100 block W. Rosewood Ln. May 28, 7:24 p.m., report at 400 block S. Kokomo Ave. May 25, 2:32 p.m., burglary at 300 block E. Walnut St. May 24, 2:12 a.m., burglary at 700 block E. Meadowlark Blvd. Fraud/Forgery June 2, 7:22 a.m., forgery at Kwik Shop, 200 block W. Patriot Ave. May 31, 8:08 p.m., fraud at 600 block N. Oak Forest Ln. May 31, 3:45 p.m., forgery report at Walmart, 2000 block N. Nelson Dr. May 24, 9:50 a.m., fraud at 400 block S. Kokomo Ave.

that journalist is doing his job, and doing it right. People make the ultimate call on what they want to know about the process of governing. The voice of citizens in numbers is more powerful than any government or any news organization. Speak out and keep your right to know alive and well and help journalists help you.

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325 E. Madison • Derby • 788-0555

Ken & Becky Peoples with Grandson Arran

Something’s Happening! Ken and Becky Peoples have been doing business with K-15 Auto for 12 years now and see no reason to ever go anywhere else when it’s time to purchase another car. They have purchased cars from K-15 Auto for themselves and their sons, and even talked Ken’s Mom and Dad into buying from them. “They are just pretty dog-gone honest and we feel comfortable that we can trust Tom and his staff.” Ken and Becky say that Tom has always answered any questions they have had and has always kept his word with them. “That goes a long way with us.” Derby Residents Ken & Becky Peoples

K-15 Auto Sales 2500 N. Nelson Dr. • Derby • 788-0410 See our inventory at www.K15Auto.com


Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 5

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Derby Church Directory Aviator Church Derby High School Auditorium, 920 N Rock Rd. Sunday – Services, 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Lead pastor: Joe Boyd Web site: www.aviatorchurch.com Church phone: 854-5555. Calvary Baptist Church 1636 E. Patriot Ave. (63rd Street S.) Sunday – Sunday school, 9:15 a.m., worship 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., senior high youth 7:15-8:30 p.m.; Wednesday – 7 p.m. Prayer meeting, 6:30 p.m. Awana for ages 2-eighth grade (during school year) Senior Pastor: Kent Holcomb; Youth Pastor: Caleb Bowman; Music Pastor: Rob Fuller. Web site: www.cbcks.org. Church phone: 788-0864. Church of Christ 225 N. Derby Sunday – Bible classes, 9:30 a.m.; worship, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday – Ladies Bible Study, 9:30 a.m., Bible study, 7 p.m. Pulpit minister: Larry Scarth. Web site: www.derbychurchofchrist.com Church phone: 788-2672. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 1409 S. Rock Road Sunday – Ridgepoint Ward: 8:30 a.m.; Park Hill Ward: 11 a.m.; Glen Hills Ward: 1:30 p.m.; Wednesday – Youth Activity Night, 7 p.m. Church phone: 788-5936. 2300 N. Buckner Sunday – Harrison Park Ward: 9 a.m.; Kellogg (Spanish) Branch: 10:15 a.m.; Rock Road (Young Single Adult) Branch: 1 p.m.; Wednesday – Youth Activity Night, 7 p.m. Web site: www.LDS.org. Church of the Nazarene 840 N. Woodlawn Sunday – Sunday school, 9:45 a.m., worship, 10:50 a.m., Wednesday – youth service, children’s groups and adult study and fellowship, 7 p.m. Senior pastor: Jon Shellenberger; Pastor to youth: Paul McKee. Web site: www.derbynaz.org Church phone: 788-1801. Cross of Glory Lutheran Church, ELCA 1315 S. Rock Road Sunday – Sunday school, 9:00 a.m., Worship, 10 a.m.; Wednesday – Bible study at Copperstone Retirement Center, 430 N. Derby Ave., 4:00 p.m., Prayer Team, 5:155:45 p.m.; Thursday – 3D:Diet, Discipline and Discipleship, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; 2nd/4th Thursday – Mah Jong, 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Saturday –Bible Study, 8 a.m. Pastor: Bruce Freeman Web site: www.crossofgloryderby.org Church phone: 789-8200. Cross Way Church 421 N. Westview Sunday – Sunday school, 9:15 a.m., worship 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Wednesday – 7 p.m. service Pastor: Joplin Emberson Web site: www.crosswayderby.com Church phone: 295-4210. Crosswinds Community Church 208 N. Georgie Sunday – Prayer ministry, 8:45 a.m., Sunday school, 9:15-10:10 a.m., worship, 10:20-11:50 a.m.; Wednesday – Prayer Ministry, 6:30 p.m., High school youth, Men’s and Women’s Discipleship groups, Children’s music program, 7 p.m.; First Saturday of the month – High school/ Middle school fun night, 7 p.m. Pastor: Jeff Wisner Web site: www. crosswindscommunitychurch.com Church phone: 788-7555, 304-5296.

Damascus Road Church 621 N. Derby Sunday – Worship, 10:30 a.m., evening worship, 6:00 p.m.; Tuesday – Bible study, 7 p.m.; Thursday – Prayer meeting, 10:00 a.m. Pastor: Traci Bennett Web site: damascusroadchurch.webs. com Church phone: 789-9425 Derby Friends Church 1034 N. Woodlawn Sunday – Worship and kid’s service, 10 a.m.; The Source, Kids Connection, Connection classes, 11:30 a.m. (except 4th Sunday of the month, The Source meets at Derby Plaza Theaters at 10 a.m.) Pastor: Thayne Thompson; Youth pastor: Shawn Penrose Web site: www.derbyfriendschurch. com Church phone: 788-1751. Church fax: 316-788-9527. Faith Lutheran Church 214 S. Derby Ave. Sunday – Worship, 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., Sunday school, 9:30 a.m.; Wednesday – Bible study for all ages, 6:30 p.m. (during school year). Pastor: Rev. Thomas Johnson Web site: flcderby.com Church phone: 788-1715. First Christian Church 201 N. Derby Saturday – Worship, 5:30 p.m., Education Building, 201 N. Derby. Childcare provided for under 2 yrs old. Sunday – Worship, 9 and 10:30 a.m., Powerhouse, 302 N. Georgie, Children’s Sunday school, 9 and 10:30 a.m. (Education Building); High school Impact, 6 p.m. (Powerhouse); Wednesday – Middle school Impact, 6 p.m. (Powerhouse). Senior minister: Rick Wheeler; family and counseling minister: Rik Alspaw; youth minister: Andy Jones; adult education minister: Nick Pannone,; children’s minister: Shonda Kooser. Web site: www.derbyfcc.org Church phone: 788-5503. First Presbyterian Church 324 N. Baltimore Ave. Sunday – Koinfinders Sunday school, 8:00 a.m.; traditional worship, 9 a.m., Sunday school, 10:10 a.m., Praise and worship, 11:15 a.m.; Wednesday – Meal, 6 p.m., Adult choir, 6:30 p.m., Awana, 6:45 p.m, youth activities, 6:45 p.m., choir, 6:45 p.m. Pastor: Rev. Ben Ray; Youth Director: vacant; Director of Christian Education: vacant Web site: www.fpcderby.org Church phone: 788-2831. Glorious Life Church 230 Fernell Sunday – Sunday school, 9:30 a.m., worship, 10:30 a.m.; Wednesday – Bible study, 7 p.m.; Thursday – Adult Bible study, 1:30 p.m. Pastor: Keenan Darnell Web site: www.gloriouslifechurch.org Church phone: 788-1863. Madison Ave. United Methodist 900 E. Madison Ave. Sunday – Sunday school, 9:45 a.m., worship 11 a.m.; Wednesday - Stitch ‘n Chat Quilting Group, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Pastor: Rev. Ed Friesen Web site: www.kswestumc.org/ churches/detail/89 Church phone: 788-1073 New Heights Christian Fellowship 710 N. Woodlawn Sunday- Worship 9 a.m. Pastor: Rev. Mark Britton. Church phone: 788-1556.

North Woodlawn Baptist 1409 N. Woodlawn Sunday – Sunday school, 10 a.m., worship 11 a.m., evening worship, 6 p.m.; Wednesday – midweek service, 7 p.m. Pastor: Jim Talbert Web site: www.northwoodlawnbaptist. org Church phone: 788-3729. Pleasantview Baptist Church 1335 N. Buckner Sunday – Classic Blend Worship Service, Nursery (birth - age 4), 8:30 a.m.; LifeGroups for all ages, 9:45 a.m; Modern Mix Worship Service, Children’s Worship: First Look (Pre-K – K), 2:52 (1st – 6th grade), Nursery (birth – age 3), 11:00 a.m.; Wednesday – Family meal, 5:30 p.m.; AWANA, LifeGroups for adults, youth groups, 6:30 p.m.; Thursday – Kid’s Day Out, 9:30 a.m. Senior pastor: Dr. Donald Mayberry; Associate pastor, Brad Beets; Associate Pastor, Worship and Community Impact: Keith Barger; Minister to Students’ FAmilies: Rob Dent; Minister to Preschool/Children’s Families: Erin Talley; Office Manager/ Care Coordinator: Cathy Winnerling; Administrative Assistant/Events and Connections Coordinator: Jenny Long. Web site: www.pbcderby.com Church phone: 788-3734. Praise Assembly of God 321 S. Derby Sunday – Sunday school, 9:30 a.m., worship, 10:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.; Tuesday – 9:30 a.m., Ladies Bible study; Wednesday – 7 p.m., Missionettes and adult programs; Youth 6:45pm Pastor: Rick Crossette Student ministries pastor: Tim Richard & Austin Glanville Web site: www.praiseassembly.com Church phone: 788-5523. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church 1062 Chet Smith Dr. (Across from Garrett Park) Sunday –Communion Service, 10:30 a.m.; Healing service, 10:30 a.m. (last Sunday of month); Children’s Christian Education during 10:30 Church service.. Web site: www.standrewsderby.org Church phone: 788-2595. St. Mary Catholic Church Faith Center – 2300 E. Meadowlark Weekend masses – Saturday, 5 p.m., Sunday, 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.; Weekday masses – Tuesday through Friday, 8 a.m.; Confessions – Wednesday, 5-6 p.m., Saturday, 3:30-4:30 p.m. and by appointment. Pastor: Father David Lies; Pastoral associate: Sister Marie Zoglman. Web site: www.stmarysderby.com Church phone: 788-5525. Turning Point Church 710 N. Woodlawn Sunday – Worship service 11:15 a.m. Pastor: Ty Flanagan E-mail: tpcderby@hotmail.com. Church phone: 788-1556. Woodlawn United Methodist 431 S. Woodlawn Sunday – Traditional worship, 8:30 and 11 a.m.; contemporary worship, 9:45 a.m.; Sunday school, 9:45 a.m.-adults, 11 a.m.-children, youth and adults; Church Anew, 5:30 Senior pastor: Dr. Paul Wilke; Associate pastor: Rev. Adam BarlowThompson; Director of adult ministries: Shelly Westfall; Director of Youth ministries: Daniel Kipp; Director of Children’s ministries: Dynaa’ Gallegos; Congregation Care Pastor: Vic Calcote. Web site: www.woodlawnumc.net Church phone: 788-1507.

Are we missing information on a Derby church? Call The Derby Informer at 788-4006 with information and it will be included in this listing.

news on the side • Establish maximum allowed brightness. • Establish maximum height A new law in the city of of the signs. Derby invokes mental images • Control potentially adverse of wooden barrels and tourist impacts of the signs while destinations which attract people working to not limit the artistic from miles away to taste craft nature of the variety of signs beer or locally brewed alcohol. technology allows. Derby’s zoning ordinance was amended by the city council this Library explains week, to allow the addition of a microdistillery in the B-4 and weather policy During severe weather Derby M-1 districts. Those districts are primarily located around Public Library staff has a policy K-15 from James south to the if action is needed. Library staff will constantly city limits. The city’s zoning already keep a close eye on the weather allows a microbrewery – which at such times, via computer and produces no more than 5,000 television. The televisions in barrels of beer a year. The the adult media area and at the microdistillery produces no circulation desk will be turned to more than 50,000 gallons of the weather so patrons can stay spirits per year. Both must be in informed. The digital clock to the left a completely enclosed facility and are licensed by the state’s of the library doors will scroll Alcoholic Beverage Control information about any watches or warnings for the Sedgwick division. The city laws on the facilities County area. In the event of a also provide for a 200-foot severe thunderstorm warning, separation of the microbrewery the library will stay open and and the microdistillery from staff will be watching the radars. In the event of a tornado church and school properties. The changes to the law initially warning, the library staff will had a limit of 10 employees jump into action only if the on the businesses, but in the sirens go off for the Derby area. Planning Commission review of All library services will halt the amendments, commissioners immediately. A staff member will make an said they were concerned the announcement over the intercom limit was unnecessary. informing everyone a tornado warning was issued for the Derby Middle School area and everyone is to head to Addition approved the community room. The staff The final plat of the proposed will also quickly walk through U S D 2 6 0 M i d d l e S c h o o l the library to ensure everyone Addition was approved by the is in the designated shelter and city council on May 28. the inside library doors will be The nearly 46 acres on the east locked. side of Rock Road, one-fourth The outside doors will remain mile north of Patriot, will be the unlocked so others may take home of the new Derby North shelter, if necessary. Everyone Middle School. will have the option of leaving As part of the platting effort, the library or staying in the the city coordinated revisions community room. created by needed infrastructure Minors will be allowed to call requirements – turn lanes, their parents from the phone in traffic signals and sidewalk the community room. Children i m p r o v e m e n t s – w i t h t h e will not be permitted to leave existing petitions provided by the shelter unless the parent or the Anderson Farm Commercial responsible adult comes to pick additions. them up. With those revisions, the The library will stay closed improvements totalled $4.37 until the all clear has been issued. million, with only 9 percent In the event of the warning lasting to be paid by the city-at- past library hours, everyone will large, $387,200 for the city’s be welcome to stay in the shelter share of traffic signals. Those until the all clear has been issued improvements include the but library services will not infrastructure inside the addition, resume until the next day. During too. this time, the staff will monitor Due to the traffic increases the situation. anticipated with the new school, the city is also planning the Agreement with reconstruction of Rock Road in that area before the school judge amended The city of Derby amended opens. The estimated cost of that reconstruction is $1.6 million, its agreement with its municipal which does include the $387,200 judge, allowing him to increase the number of municipal court cost of the traffic signals. days he misses per year. He can now be unavailable Definitions set for for three days, without financial electronic signs penalty. Previously he was The Derby City Council has allowed two. approved amendments to the In addition, the city will up zoning ordinance which covers the ante for pay to the pro tem electronic message signs. judge during that time, from The new regulations will, $150 a day to $250 per day. according to Cody Bird, city The raise is necessary to ensure planner: knowledgeable and capable • Help protect single family attorneys serve as judge in his residences from potentially absence, according to a report injurious effects of electronic by Stephanie Knebel, assistant message signs, by creating a city manager. 100-foot setback.

City will allow microdistilleries

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Page 6 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Jackson takes command of 22nd ARW By Airman 1st Class Victor J. Caputo 22nd Air Refueling Wing Public Affairs

Col. Ricky Rupp relinquished command of the 22nd Air Refueling Wing to Col. Joel Jackson during a change of command ceremony, Friday, May 31. Lt. Gen. Darren McDew, 18th Air Force commander, presided over the ceremony, which has been a military tradition since the beginning of the Air Force. The transfer of the unit guidon symbolizes the transfer of authority from the previous commander to the new commander. “This is a very special day for our Air Force and for this team as we bid farewell to one outstanding leader and welcome another,” said McDew. “It is a privilege and a sacred trust that demands great commitment and even greater character.” Rupp expressed thanks to his teammates for the past

two years, including those of the 184th Intelligence Wing and the 931st Air Refueling Group as he relinquished his command, coincidentally on his birthday. “Traditionally on your birthday, it’s a time where you’re the receiver of gifts,” said Rupp, “but it seems like today I’m actually giving something away.” He leaves the 22nd ARW after two years of managing the largest KC135 Stratotanker wing in the world. He commanded more than 5,500 personnel and 63 aircraft. During the ceremony, Rupp was awarded the Legion of Merit medal by McDew in recognition of outstanding service during his command. Jackson, who has previously served as the 380th Air Expeditionary Wing vice commander in Southeast Asia, is a command pilot with more than 4,700 hours flown in the KC-10 Extender.

He has served in a variety of squadron, group and wing level positions, including tours on the Air Staff, the Office of the Secretary of Defense and U.S. Transportation Command. “The next few years, some may say, will be challenging,” said Jackson, “but when I see what McConnell Air Force Base has done, I know that you do not see challenges here; you see opportunities.” Taking the guidon from McDew, Jackson accepted the responsibility of command. He expressed his confidence that the total force Team McConnell was ready to go above and beyond in carrying out the mission. “To be successful, we must put together a complete team effort,” he said. “It’s been shown that when the 22nd, the 931st, the 184th, and our community partners all pull together, McConnell can do anything.”

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Katrina M. Brisbin

Lt. Gen. Darren McDew, 18th Air Force commander (at left), passes the 22nd Air Refueling Wing guidon to Col. Joel Jackson, during a change of command ceremony May 31 at McConnell Air Force Base. Jackson has served in a variety of squadron, group and wing level positions, including tours on the Air Staff, the Office of the Secretary of Defense and U.S. Transportation Command.

Derby grad named outstanding senior at Ft. Hays Courtesy of The Hays Daily News mail@derbyinformer.com

Jessica Tormey, Derby, was named as the recipient of the Torch Award as the outstanding graduating senior from the Class of 2013 at Fort Hays State

University. She received a bachelor of science in business education and a B.S. in secondary education at commencement, on Saturday, May 18. The announcement of the Torch Award came at the annual Graduate and Faculty

B r u n c h , sponsored by the FHSU A l u m n i Association. D r. M a r c y Ay c o c k , a 1984 graduate of FHSU and president of the

PLAN: City can lead cultural change From Page 1 “It’s a water watch (to) start getting people more concerned and more aware,” she said. “Perfect example, we had two inches of rain ... there is no reason why anybody should even have their automatic sprinkler systems on.” But, that is happening and it is believed that irrigation is the top water user in the summer. The city will work, especially with businesses, to tell those who are running irrigation systems that the more overwatering done now will lead to shallow root systems on grass and require even more water later when summer heats up. However, the city’s plan does not call for specific measures for conservation. Sexton said it is meant to be a plan which can stay viable for years, so it allows the city the flexibility to create conservation measures or programs which work best for the time and place the drought occurs. The final draft will be presented to the Kansas Water Office and the city of Wichita for approval. When that approval is gained, the city presents the first municipal ordinance on June 11 and takes it to final approval on June 25, according to Eddie

Sheppard, assistant public works director. In the meantime, the city of Wichita is working on its own drought response plan. It went before the council on Tuesday, after city staff recommended on Monday that the city table options including penalties for high-end water users and a $1,000 fine for the worst offenders. The staff’s recommendations came after heavy rains raised Cheney Reservoir water levels significantly. Some of the other same objectives, including a rebate program for high efficiency appliances and irrigation system options, are on Derby’s short list. Sexton told Derby’s council she has served on Wichita’s Water Advisory Task Force and voiced concerns with aspects of that city’s drought response plan. It initially had called for a $1,000 fine for customers using over 310 percent of average winter consumption. That idea received negative feedback from the public, Sexton said. “I did speak in that meeting and say ‘Wow, if somebody is trying and they go one gallon over, they get a $1,000 fine vs. if someone goes 50,000 gallons over,’” she said. “It’s like setting the speed limit and then ripping

Jessica Tormey

everybody’s speedometer out.” The Wichita and Derby plans may need some tweaking to fall in line with each other as they are finalized. For example, Derby calls for restrictions on car washes and golf courses. At the same time, Wichita is recommending that businesses which rely on seasonal water usage be exempt from its plan. Sexton said she has had feedback from those business owners who are telling her it is unfair to shut down their business when their competitors a couple of miles down the road won’t be shut down. Making changes in summer water usage will require changes of habit. But, even though Derby’s El Paso Water Co. customers are using water well below regional levels and they use less than 5 percent of Wichita’s total water consumption, the city can still lead the effort, Sexton said. “Derby cannot change the water culture in the Wichita area,” she said. “We can help. We can lead just like we did on the trash and recycling.” ––– What do you think? Comment on this story at www.derbyinformer.com.

FHSU Alumni Association, introduced Tormey as the Torch Award winner. O n e f a c u l t y m e m b e r, said Aycock, wrote of Tormey, “This student has demonstrated the self-will and determination to make her a successful student and contributor in society. It was very evident when I first met this individual that she would be a very special student to Fort Hays State University.” She has been actively engaged in the Phi Beta Lambda and Collegiate DECA business o rg a n i z a t i o n s a s w e l l a s F H S U ’s M a r k e t i n g Management Association, Student Government Association and Anderson VIP Ambassadors. She

is also a former flutist in FHSU’s marching and concert bands and wind ensemble. In her work with the SGA, Tormey headed the highly important and sometimes very difficult Appropriations Committee for more than two full terms. The Pilot Award for outstanding faculty member and the Navigator Award for outstanding faculty advisor were also announced. Eugene Rice, associate professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy, w a s t h e P i l o t Aw a r d Recipient, and Scott Jones, instructor of management and marketing, was given the Navigator Award. The Alumni Association instituted the Torch and Pilot awards in 1974 to

emphasize the importance of excellence in teaching and learning. They are presented every year at the Graduate and Faculty Brunch in advance of Commencement. T h e T o r c h Aw a r d candidates are nominated by members of the faculty on the basis of classroom excellence, participation in professional organizations and involvement in student or civic activities. The Pilot Award is given on the basis of classroom excellence, ongoing research and service activities. Candidates are nominated by graduating seniors. Nominations for the Navigator Award are also made by graduating seniors in a process conducted by the Student Government Association.

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Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 7

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

City steps toward North Gateway TIF district By Linda Stinnett linda@derbyinformer.com

Courtesy photo

Guitarist returns for second concert

Dorian Michael, a fingerstyle acoustic guitarist, will be in concert on Monday, June 10 at 7 p.m. in the community room of the Derby Public Library. He first appeared at the library in June 2011. Admission to the concert is free.

The city of Derby took its first step toward creating the North Gateway Tax Increment Financing District at the May 28 council meeting. No one spoke at the public hearing on the issue, so the council moved forward with the needed step – the creation of the TIF district. Notification had gone to four taxing districts, 37 parcels of land and 15 different property owners, including the city, according to Allison Moeding, director of economic development. The ordinance which was approved to create the district now allows Derby Public Schools and Sedgwick County 30 days to either allow the district to move forward unopposed or either or both can oppose the action. Kathy Sexton, city manager, said the school board has placed the matter

DROUGHT: El Dorado may not be solution It could also place a permanent order requiring customers to boil their water in order to make it sanitary which Pajor said is “absolutely not normal.” “Then, just to add insult to injury, at the very time when we’re trying to get along with less water than we would normally have, because we’re sending this water out through this pipe system in an abnormal condition, we’re going to increase the number of breaks in the mains and water leaks,” said Pajor. This water shortage would also create problems for the fire department’s effort to put out fires.

From Page 1 may resort to rolling water outages where customers will have limited access to water. Wichita would send water to certain portions of the city and wholesale customers on select dates and times. “This sounds a little Third World,” he said. “The problem is, we’d spend a lot of money building a very robust distribution system, the pipes underground that deliver the water to each customer, to make sure those systems are looped and have redundancy in them to ensure good water supply.”

It has been suggested that Wichita could tap into El Dorado Lake as an additional water source, but Pajor said this has problems as well. “We can’t get El Dorado online and built for our uses before the Cheney dry date,” he said. “El Dorado’s got 25,000 customers. We’ve got 156,000 customers. They’ve got some commercial and industrial. We’ve got a whole lot more commercial and industrial. “El Dorado today, even with the drought in the last 2-1/2 years, could sustain two 1950s droughts backto-back before they’d run out of water,” he said. “If

on its June 10 meeting for review. Under a TIF plan, the nearly $4.6 million taxes currently being raised on the property in the plan continue to go to all entities. However, once the plan goes into force and through the payoff of the bonds, any increases in taxes go to the TIF project. In this case, the city wants to use the TIF to finance the just over $2 million revamping of Nelson Drive. The funds would allow the Nelson Drive/Patriot intersection to be moved to Commerce Drive – the roadway between Lowes and Kohl’s. Sexton has said the trigger in this project is Menards, the major retailer to be included in the TIF district. The TIF will not be implemented until Menards files its building permit. The city does not know when Menards will file its building permit. In a

you hook Wichita up and we start taking what we’d like, they’re out of water in six months. We have a much bigger straw than they do.” The drought in the 1950s lasted five years. The other issue Wichita faces with purchasing water from El Dorado is that El Dorado is not interested in selling only drought response water, Pajor said. It would look for Wichita to become a wholesale customer. “We shouldn’t go out in a panic and sign the deal because we’re going to have to live with it year-round for probably 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 years,” he said.

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statement earlier this year, the retailer said construction of the Derby store was on hold until economic conditions improved. “It was not a reflection on Derby at all,” Sexton said. The city remains confident the store will be built, she said, due to the time and effort put in to the plans. “Nobody can predict the future, but what we’ve done with setting this up is said we won’t (move forward) until Menards pulls a building permit,” she said.

The effort to create the TIF district is going forward now, as the city must also create a redevelopment plan for the district. It must include a financial feasibility study, descriptions of the area and a map of the area and other information to show the public the intent of the plan. Once the required public hearing on that portion of the plan is held, the city must allow a 60-day protest period before the bonds can be issued.

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Page 8 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Upgrades to school district’s disaster recovery plan could protect sensitive data By Scott Elpers news@derbyinformer.com

With the severe storm season well underway, Derby Public Schools administrators have looked into ways to upgrade its

data center in the case a tornado destroyed sensitive electronic material like student and financial records. “Disaster recovery means something different t o a l o t o f d i ff e r e n t

Talking our walk By the Rev. Forest Lawson

Shhh. Listen for the whisper The Bible says: He stilled the storm to a whisper, the waves of the sea were hushed. Psalms 107:28-29 In your life it means: We are all aware of the raging storm that destroyed Moore, Okla. Our hearts and prayers go out to them still. We who are in Tornado Alley are very familiar with this kind of destructive weather. All storms do not happen in Tornado Alley or on the high seas. Some happen physically and spiritually. Genesis 21 tells us of a woman named Hagar and her son Ishmael who were driven from their home by her lover and his father because of a jealous wife. During their Forest time of destitution they listened for and heard a whisper. It was the voice of God, who restored Lawson and blessed them tremendously. A new nation of wealth and prosperity was started because of it. Periodically we all have these storms in our lives. Remember that sometimes there is a whisper or a still small voice speaking. Listen for it.

organizations,” said Drew Lane, director of technology for the district. “The long and short of it is, what would it take to make sure the district’s business could continue in the event of a disaster?” Upgrades to the data center and a firm backup recovery system that could withstand the impact of a natural disaster, like a tornado, are needed to protect electronic information that is stored on servers in the district’s administrative center, Lane said. “If we had a large enough tornado, our current backup storage solution relies on the bus barn and a little vault that is there for tapes,” Lane said. “If something happened that prevented that data center from functioning, how could we get the business of the district back up and running in a fairly short amount of time?” Lane told school board members this past week that the technology department has looked into several upgrades. Lane

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will recommend changes to the board for a vote later this summer. The upgrades will be funded as a capital outlay project for the 2014 fiscal year. Part of the upgrades would move a backup storage facility to Derby High School, where there is an underground data center that would work as host for the backup equipment. “When we put new equipment in our current data center, the plan is to take the equipment we currently have in there,

move it to another site, which would probably be (at Derby High School),” Lane said. “We would be able to carry on the essential business function of the district.” “Anything that involves Skyward would be up and running in a very short amount of time,” Lane added. “Skyward encompasses all financial services and all student information services.” The goal would be to get the system up and running within 24-to-72 hours after a disaster.

Moving to a cloud-based system would also be a protective measure, Lane said. “If a tornado took out the entire school district, it would not impact our ability to continue to have email, unless the infrastructure was destroyed and we didn’t have an Internet connection,” Lane said. “We’ve already pushed for disaster recovery in terms of decentralizing where those servers are located. If there was a disaster here, our email services are on the East or West Coast.”

ABBEY: Optometrist sentenced From Page 1

• Sending an email on Feb, 3, 2010, stating he provided 206 full eye exams and his wife provided 185 full eye exams. • Sending an email on March 31, 2010, stating he provided 207 full eye exams and his wife provided 185 full eye exams.

• Sending an email on June 23, 2010, stating he provided 187 full eye exams and his wife provided 176 full eye exams. As a result of the fraud, Wade Abbey was paid $583,060. The Abbeys were each originally indicted on charges of five counts of

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wire fraud and one count of theft. With Wade Abbey’s admission that he falsified the payroll reports without his wife’s knowledge, the court dismissed the case against her. The dismissal was without prejudice, meaning the court can reinstitute the charges in the future if it finds cause to do so. Vision Doctors Optometry is owned by Dr. Michael Gordon. Gordon has filed a civil suit against the couple. In the suit, he said they fraudulently billed his company for 37,708 patient visits over a 10-year period and he lost $970,789 due to the inflated billing. The federal criminal charges were for approximately five years of that time period.

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fear and trusting God! Bible learning, crazy games, snacks, crafts and activities. You have a ticket for fun!! Students entering first-fifth grades. Bring a friend! 9 a.m. to noon • Monday-Friday • June 10-14 Powerhouse – 302 N. Georgie, Derby

Summer Camps – July 20th - 26th Camp Hiawatha ~ Wichita, KS

Kids attend camp according to grade they enter in fall 2013. Kindergarten-fifth grade

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Fun Fridays ~ June 21, June 28, July 12 • Fun day trips for third through fifth grade Tuesdays Together ~ July 25, July 9, July 16 • Afternoon of fun for first and second grades

Preschool Nursery Park & Play Dates ~ TBA Fall Upward Soccer ~ Registration now through July 19. Games in September & October.

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For more information on any of these events or to sign up, call 788-5503 • www.derbyfcc.org Email: shonda@derbyfcc.org.

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The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Business

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 9

people and places Moling, Garinger earn awards

LINDA STINNETT/Informer photo

Wal-Mart associate Matt Farmer stocks pharmacy items in the new Derby Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market. The new store is scheduled to have its grand opening at 7:30 a.m. on June 12.

Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market prepares for June 12 opening By Linda Stinnett linda@derbyinformer.com

D e r b y ’ s n e w Wa l - M a r t Neighborhood Market is preparing for its rapidly approaching June 12 opening. The store, at 1106 S. Rock Road on the southeast corner of Rock and Chet Smith in Derby, has a 7:30 a.m. opening planned for that day. Associates are currently working to stock the shelves in the 40,600-square-foot store. The new Neighborhood Market will have a complete line of groceries and an assortment of general lines, including health and beauty, greeting cards, pets, hardware and self-serve deli. It will have a full-service pharmacy, with a drive-up window. Store Manager Steve Marten said that while some residents may view the store as more of a convenience

stop because it is smaller than the SuperCenter on Derby’s north side, they will find it has 92 percent of the groceries available in the larger stores. It also carries a small selection of some other lines, but will not have apparel or the tire/lube express. The new store is a little larger than the other Wal-Mart Neighborhood Markets in the area and has an additional cash register, Marten said. Marten has 30 years experience in Wal-Mart management, his most recent at the north Rock Road store in Wichita. He said he likes the smaller store and its atmosphere. “I chose to come back to this format,” he said. The neighborhood part of the name follows through to the smaller staff, Marten said. With 80 employees he has time to get to know all of them and is able to listen

to them, he said. “For me, that’s what it’s all about,” he said. Marten credits the contractor for the quick turn-around and recovery, following major vandalism as interior work began. The new store is also energy efficient through LED lighting and lights which turn on as customers go up and down the freezer aisles. The employees will work through the final night, placing perishable products out for the June 12 opening, he said. “ Wi t h m a j o r c o n s t r u c t i o n complete, we are headed into the home stretch for our grand opening,” Marten said. “We are proud of our new store and look forward to welcoming members of the community to come visit us.”

CARNIVAL: Refurbished rides From Page 1 rotates around on the arm of the guitar to give riders a high flying feel. Returning this year is the ferris wheel, newly refurbished after being damaged a year ago by the tornado which struck

Events scheduled

HISTORICAL MUSEUM OPEN: The Derby Historical Museum will be open Saturday, June 15, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.

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Courtesy photo

On Rock Star, an Ottaway Amusements’ guitar-shaped ride, riders sit on a platform, which stays parallel with the ground, but rotates around on the arm of the guitar to give riders a high flying feel.

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This high-tech paint booth features a unique multi-level air flow system. High volume blowers will help dry the new environmentally friendly waterborne paint. Once the final clear coat is applied, the booth temperature ramps up to 190 degrees in less than five minutes to cure the paint. Shelton’s new state-of-the-art paint booth will assist in speedier turnaround times, which means customers will be back in their vehicles sooner.

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Derby Public Schools has approved the following employee changes: Contracts – Sara Carruthers and Leah Grim - social workers; Melanie Lee - special education, Derby Middle School; Brigid O’Hara - part-time physical therapist; Janell Stithem - fifth grade, El Paso Elementary; and Stephanie Stroh - second grade, Tanglewood. Resignations – Darcy Alexander - second grade, Caitlin Edwards - special ed para, Park Hill Elementary; Christine Baker - math, Shanice Davis and Sarah Packard special ed paras, Derby High School; Allison Perry - reading, and Brittney Vonnahmen, ELL para, both at Cooper Elementary; Conner Camfield - custodian, Janis Hagler - office clerk, both at Pleasantview Elementary; Stephanie Chambers - early childhood para, Hillary Clark and Mynnette Kitchen - special ed paras, Swaney Elementary; Emily Hedden - media para, Pleasantview/El Paso elementaries; Linda Testerman - cook, central kitchen; Ciahna Tillis - early childhood para, Wineteer Elementary; and Chaw Xiong - custodian, Oaklawn/ Carlton schools. Work agreements – Sheila Keopke - GTC, Swaney Elementary; and Mary McManus - food service server, Wineteer Elementary.

business bytes Commercial building permits issued

The following commercial building permits have been issued by the city of Derby: • Trax Car Wash, 2825 N. Rock Road, $528,671. • Derby Middle School Remodel, 801 E. Madison, $1,075,502. • Target Remodel, 2024 N. Rock Road, $400,000.

Planning Commission agenda

The Derby Planning Commission will meet on Thursday, June 6, at 6:30 p.m. The only agenda item is the preliminary plat of the K-15 Plaza 5th Addition.

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Sue Wenger of Mulvane has been appointed by Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback to a four-year term on the Kansas Real Estate Commission. Wenger has been a licensed real estate agent in Kansas since 1979 and is currently associated with J.P. Weigand and Sons. She is on the board of directors of the Kansas Association of Realtors. The Real Estate Commission consists of five members appointed by the governor – one from each of the four congressional districts and one member at large. Three members must have been real estate brokers for five years and at least one member cannot have been engaged in business as a real estate broker and must not be in that business while serving on the commission.

Justin Smith, president of Smith Family Mortuaries, was recently installed as president of the Kansas Funeral Directors Association at the Tri-State Funeral Directors Convention held May 5-8, in Overland Park. Smith received a bachelors degree in business administration from Emporia State University. He is president and a licensed funeral director for Smith Family Mortuaries, which has funeral homes in Derby, Wichita, Haysville, Mulvane, Douglass and Belle Plaine. He serves on the Derby Community Foundation board, and the Zoning Appeals Board for the city of Derby. He is

OTTAWAY CARNIVAL: Open from 6 to 10 p.m. on Thursday and Friday (June 13-14); noon to 10 p.m. on Saturday (June 15) and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday (June 16). Wristband sessions are 6-10 on Thursday and Friday; 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. and 5-10 p.m., both on Saturday; and 1-5 p.m. on Sunday.

We’re M oving

Wenger named to commission

Smith installed as KFDA president

Oaklawn and south Wichita. After repairs, a good sandblasting and a new paint job, it has returned for those who love the traditional ride. “It looks like brand new,” Ottaway said. “It has an all new LED light package that’s just gorgeous.”

SAFE KIDS CAR SEAT CHECK: The annual Safe Kids Car Seat Check is sponsored by the Derby Optimist Club from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 15, in front of the Derby Senior Center, 611 N. Mulberry. There is no cost for the check. Trained technicians will inspect child car seats and their installation and families are asked to bring their children along so the adjustments and inspections are most effective. Serial numbers on car seats will also be checked against recall information. Derby police will be on hand to assist, along with Optimist members. Certificates will be issued, showing proper decisions and checks have been made. New car seats are also available, according to need.

Tw o D e r b y A m e r i c a n Family Insurance agents have been recognized for providing outstanding customer experience under the American Star Excellence in Customer Experience Certification. Lisa Moling and Jean Garinger join other agents who have demonstrated the highest level of commitment to outstanding customer service. Moling has been an agent for American Family since January 2004. Garinger has been an agent since August 2007. The service excellence distinction was determined through an evaluation conducted under guidelines established through the American Star Excellence in Customer Experience certification process. It consists of a customer satisfaction survey which measures customers’ overall experience with their current American Family agent. Only agencies that perform in the top 20 percent of all insurance agencies nationwide, based on customer satisfaction surveys, are eligible to become American Star Excellence in Customer Experience certified. “When choosing an insurance agent, consumers can rely on the American Star Excellence in Customer Experience Certification to help them identify agents with a proven dedication to meeting customer needs,” said Dan Schultz, American Family president and chief operating officer. “This is an outstanding accomplishment.”

a past member of the Derby Planning Commission and a past board member of the Derby Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the Woodlawn United Methodist Church, where he has served on several committees. Smith resides in Derby, with his wife Deyna and sons, Hayden and Hudson, and daughter, Hadley.

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Bittersweet


Area News

Page 10 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Haysville terminates agreement with Sedgwick Co. By Ginger G. Golden news@derbyinformer.com

H AY S V I L L E – Sedgwick County will no longer inspect and enforce construction codes for the city of Haysville, following a decision by the city council. The council has terminated a two-year agreement with Sedgwick County after discovering the county’s agreement to conduct code inspection and enforcement was faulty. “Homes are being finalized and certificates of occupancy are being issued without the city being allowed to inspect items such as the lot drainage,” said Will Black, Haysville’s deputy administrative

Courtesy photo

Traci Becker (right), Mulvane Middle School principal, receives the KAMSA “Exemplary” Middle School Award from Joe Handlos, team member of the evaluation committee and principal at Fort Riley Middle School.

Mulvane Middle School is ‘exemplary’ By Ginger G. Golden

officer. “Plan review is taking place at the county prior to the permit fee being paid. “After comparing permits issued with completed inspections, it appears some inspections are not being done at all,” he said. The agreement with Sedgwick County was that the county perform inspections and enforcement on building, electrical, mechanical, plumbing and manufactured housing installation codes. Black would not comment on which county inspections had not been done. Haysville entered into an agreement with Sedgwick County in February 2011, believing it would have cost benefit, said Black.

Billing statements sent by Sedgwick County over the past 24 months have totaled $27,165. “The agreement calls for the county to receive 50 percent of all permit and inspection fees and 100 percent of all plan review fees,” he said. “Adjusted to the average permit revenue over the past 10 years, inspection fees paid to the county would be approximately $29,500 per year. Based on the peak three years out of the last 10, that amount would be around $44,500.” Those three years were 2006, 2007 and 2008. Both Black and Thomas Stolz, director of the Metropolitan Area Building and Construction

Department, said the city of Haysville did not contact the county before deciding to terminate the agreement. Stolz was hired in November to help merge the Wichita Office of Central Inspection and the Sedgwick County code department into the Metropolitan Area Building and Construction Department. That merger began in January. Stolz said he first began hearing of problems in Haysville on Wednesday of last week. He then began sending emails around to verify if it was true and received Haysville’s letter of termination on Friday. “If municipalities are displeased with the service please see

HAYSVILLE,

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news@derbyinformer.com

MULVANE – Mulvane Middle School has been named as a 2013 “Exemplary” school by the Kansas Administrators of Middle Schools Association. Traci Becker, MMS principal, said KAMSA requested information about the school after it pre-qualified based on its performance in state assessments and programs she had implemented after attending KAMSA conferences the past two years. The programs are designed to meet the needs of students and the school must show how it has improved on those programs. “Teachers and staff must also provide students with motivation through recognition and awards,” said Tom Keil, director of human resources. Those have included students of the month recognitions, weekly awards for students who have gone above and beyond expectations and rewards for good conduct, Becker said. A team of faculty and staff reviewed and submitted the information by March 31. “They gave us the criteria and then KAMSA had a team that took the application and information we put together and evaluated it from there,” said Becker. This is the first time Mulvane Middle School has won the award, she said. “It means a lot because to me it showcases the work our teachers do in spite of all the budget cuts,��� said Becker. “That they continue to find whatever it takes to reach all kids and not just let a few kind of slip.” The award was given to 16 Kansas middle schools, including Andover, Maize South and Coleman in Wichita.

New program will educate parents about drug abuse By Ginger G. Golden news@derbyinformer.com

MULVANE – A new program in Mulvane will help parents identify, respond and react to their child’s drug addiction. Change Your Life Enterprises was awarded a $9,659 grant by the Mulvane City Council for a new program targeting residents called The Parent’s Survival Guide to Dealing with Teen Substance Abuse. The grant will pay staff salaries, said Stephanie Roberts, owner of Change Your Life Enterprises. “We’re aware that there are adolescents and pre-adolescents in the Mulvane area who already are experiencing these problems,” she said. “We’ve heard it from the churches, we’ve heard it from the schools, law enforcement, so we know

those issues are out there.” Roberts is a clinical social worker and licensed addiction counselor. She is also a substance abuse professional who conducts assessments for the Department of Transportation. “We did a little survey by sending out emails to different professionals within the city of Mulvane,” she said. “What came back was a lot of people marked that they felt there was a need for some kind of program to help parents of teens who might have substance abuse problems.” Partnering with First Baptist Church, Roberts said the program will start with informational meetings to answer questions. “From that group, we hope to help parents identify if their teen might be starting to experiment or actually have a problem with substances,” said Roberts. “Then that group we’re

going to encourage to sign up for the second part of the program, which is the parent boot camp.” The parent boot camp will consist of three, two-hour intensive sessions. “It’s going to go into things in a little more depth and also offer support and guidance to parents who are a little confused about what to do about their child’s substance abuse problem,” said Roberts. “Parents often either hide their head in the sand and think it’ll go away or they overreact. The problem is either over or under reacting or just being confused or naïve about what’s going on.” Programs will be offered for free to all parents in the Mulvane district, Roberts said. “We’re not wanting any barriers,” she said. “We’re wanting to get parents in and make it as easy as possible for them.”

Healing Center breaks ground in Bel Aire By Ginger G. Golden news@derbyinformer.com

BEL AIRE – Ground was broken Friday in Bel Aire for a 20,000 square foot holistic medicine facility. The Concierge Surgical Recovery Suites and Wellness Center at Tierra Verde will be the first stage of The Healing Center located on Webb Road north of 45th Street. The center will be constructed in three stages, with a healing spa being added in stage two and a culinary school and venue being added in stage three. “Dr. George Watson has

49 percent ownership in the Concierge Surgical Recovery Suites and Wellness Center,” said Terrie Grillot of Tierra Verde Development. “A lot of what he does is holistic type medicine,” said Ty Lasher, Bel Aire city manager. “He has a hyperbaric chamber that he uses for healing and he does other types of healing remedies that are more natural.” Holistic medicine is therapy aimed at treating a person as a whole rather than just the symptoms. The Healing Center will not accept insurance, Lasher

Artist rendering

The Concierge Surgical Recovery Center at Tierra Verde broke ground Friday.

said. “More and more doctors are starting to do that,” he said. “You just pay cash for the services and they can offer the services at a lower

price if they’re not dealing with insurances and the government.” Construction for The Healing Center should be completed by spring 2014,

said Grillot. Tierra Verde is a 77-acre development designed to be an environmentally responsible urban community. In addition to

The Healing Center, future construction will include assisted living, medically focused facilities, residential housing and a hotel.

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Region & State

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 11

Fiscal follies: Kansas cost estimates draw criticism By Travis Perry travis@kansaswatchdog.org

When lawmakers craft a piece of legislation, they rely on state departments to give an honest account of what it could cost. But when it comes to making sense of these fiscal facts, critics say things aren’t always what they seem. It is not hard to find cost estimates that raise an eyebrow or two. Take for example the Kansas Department of Revenue, which says it will cost $5,000 to stop waiving a vehicle registration fee. Currently, counties with multiple vehicle registration locations are allowed to charge an extra fee – usually about $5 – at all but one location. With the passing of SB96, though, that requirement will be lifted. A fiscal note attached to the bill says it will cost the state nearly $5,000 just to start charging a fee at these locations. Never mind the

fact that this process is already done at countless other locations around Kansas. So, what is the problem? The system is just too massive to make this an easy switch, said Jeannine Koranda, communications director for KDOR. The agency estimates that it could take up to 30 hours to program and test the new functions allowing these locations to process the extra fee. “Sometimes one small change over here can cause problems elsewhere,” Koranda said. Then there is the Personal Financial Literacy Incentive Program that would have been established by the long-dead HB2282. Under the purview of the Kansas Department of Commerce, the legislation would have rewarded teachers who incorporate personal financial instruction into an existing curriculum. The fiscal note compiled by the KDOC

estimates the agency would need $20,000 to $30,000 to hire a part-time employee to operate the program. When questioned about the matter, agency communications director Dan Lara said it is more likely those duties would have been absorbed inhouse. “Honestly, that probably would be the first option that we would look at,” he said. If that is so, then why ask for so much in the first place? “I don’t know, to be honest with you,” Lara said. “It could have been the way the request came through.” Digging deeper, there is also the matter of SB171, which is still alive and well. The bill would require public school districts to post new financial information on their websites in an effort to increase transparency about education spending. The Kansas State Department of Education says in order to post this information, it will cost

Top 10 bizarre bills of the 2013 Kansas legislative session By Travis Perry travis@kansaswatchdog.org

While the Kansas Legislature is mired in debate over budget and tax issues – the meat and potatoes of any state government – it is easy to forget that elected officials are not always dealing with such substantial issues. For every reasonable piece of legislation that passes through the halls of the capitol building, there is at least one or two bills that make residents question the motives or intelligence of the elected officials pushing the matter. And with the 2013 legislative session now in overtime, it is hard not to wonder if some of these

bills – which range from the benign to the absurd – did not siphon-off precious time lawmakers could have used to avert the current stalemate over the state sales tax. Considering the overtime session costs Kansas taxpayers $45,000 for every day it continues, these matters become all the more pertinent. Here are the Top 10 Bizarre Bills of the 2013 Kansas legislative session: • HB 2054 – The “strippers are destroying our communities” act • SB 144 – A legislative attempt to force a KU/WSU basketball game • HB 2240 – In which lawmakers attempt to ban unmanned aerial luminaries

• SR 1736 –Congratulating the 2012 Miss Kansas pageant winner • HB 2046 – A bill increasing golf cart speed limits to 35 mph • SR 1757 – The “drugs are bad” resolution • HB 2187 – An attempt to license massage therapists • SB 120 – Creating a central farmers market registry • SR 1747 – Recognizing the Boy Scouts of America • HB 2402 – Establishing National Cowboy Day in Kansas Bonus entry: HR 6031 – Apparently Kansas has a relationship with the Republic of Armenia.

$17,000. Dale Dennis, KSDE deputy commissioner, said the cost lies in creating a standardized program to ensure the data is presented uniformly. “You can’t let 286 people across the state do it, you’re going to get variations,” Dennis said. “The idea was to try and save money for the taxpayers,” he said. B u t D a v e Tr a b e r t , president of the Wichitabased Kansas Policy Institute, is not buying any

travis@kansaswatchdog.org

In the past few days, the Kansas Legislature has been known more for its fiscal failures than monetary acts of common sense. With the 90th day having come and gone, state lawmakers are hunkered down in overtime as the House and Senate bash heads in an attempt to sort out the Sunflower State’s future tax policy. But at $45,000 a day (only $35,000 on the weekends), talk on this matter is anything but cheap. To counter this,

some legislators, like House Minority Leader Paul Davis, have opted to donate their pay to charity. Others have decided to turn down their legislative salary altogether while the Capitol remains in extra innings. “I believe that our constituents believe that we should get our job done within the allotted time,” said Sen. Jeff Longbine (R-Emporia). “This session has been extremely difficult, but we need to complete our work. I will not charge my constituents for the failure to agree within the allotted time.”

Legislative salary for elected officials is about $88 per day. In all, 22 Kansas legislators have declined salary during the overtime. Only two lawmakers, Topeka Republicans Sen. Vicki Schmidt and Rep. Santi Gandhi, declined subsistence pay during the overtime session. Here’s the list of decliners: SENATE: Tom Holland (D-Baldwin City), Jeff Longbine (R-Emporia), Carolyn McGinn ( R - S e d g w i c k ) , Vi c k i S c h m i d t ( R - To p e k a ) and Kay Wolf (R-Prairie

By Travis Perry travis@kansaswatchdog.org

Bob Dole, former United States senate majority leader and Kansas Republican powerhouse, offered sharp words to his fellow party members Sunday, May 26, when speaking with Fox News’ Chris Wallace. “I think they ought to put a sign on the national committee doors, ‘closed for repairs,’ until New Year’s Day next

www.hawvernews.com

They’re back home, probably trying to remember just what you do with an actual bill for drinks and meals, but at least the freshmen legislators can now tell their coffee crowds about working until 2 a.m. hammering out a year’s worth of government. The 2013 session of the Legislature, which adjourned early Sunday, was more complicated than some in recent years, maybe partly because of record numbers of new members who probably didn’t realize just what all the state does and how it pays for it.

Martin Hawver At the Rail

Also, the session may have surprised some folks who thought it would get done in the 80 days – instead of 99 – that some legislative leaders predicted. Wouldn’t a conservative Republican g o v e r n o r, H o u s e a n d Senate all work smoothly together, they reasoned. Nope: Family squabbles can morph into the most intricate, complicated battles you’ll find anywhere. The 0.6 percent sales tax

expiration? A small majority of Republicans, some grudgingly, resuscitated all but a dab of it, and how that sells back home is going to be interesting. It was the biggest campaign issue last fall that most of the public apparently didn’t care that strongly about. We’ve heard no stories of a spouse being told he/she would have to get cloth seats in the new car because of the sales tax. And the budget, it’s the 600-plus page bill that very few have actually read, but the key is that it spends about $104 million less than Gov. Sam Brownback proposed. That’s not bad for lawmakers who still

year,” Dole said in the interview. Speaking with Wallace on his past accomplishments and the current state of the GOP, Dole said Washington gridlock has become a serious issue. He also lamented the cultural shift the party has seen in the last several decades. “I doubt Reagan could have made it (in today’s GOP),” Dole said. “Certainly Nixon couldn’t have made it.”

Turnpike cuts employee hours, blames Affordable Care Act By Travis Perry travis@kansaswatchdog.org

As the wave of unintended consequences rolls on, some Kansas government employees have become the latest targets in the saga of the Affordable Care Act. The Lawrence-Journal

Village). HOUSE: John Barker (R-Abilene), Steven Becker (R-Buhler), David Crum (R-Augusta), Diana Dierks (R-Salina), Blaine Finch (R-Ottawa), Shanti Gandhi (R-Topeka), Ramon Gonzalez (R-Perry), Larry Hibbard (R-Toronto), Don Hill (R-Emporia), Don Hineman (R-Dighton), Russ Jennings (R-Larkin), Peggy Mast (R-Emporia), Tom Moxley (R-Council Grove), Virgil Peck (R-Tyro), Tom Phillips (R-Manhattan), Richard Proehl (R-Parsons) and Ron Ryckman Sr., (R-Meade).

Legislature hammers out government plan By Martin Hawver

of the KSDE database and they’re getting it from the spreadsheets the schools are already submitting.” Trabert charges the state agencies with making a cash grab, and said, “They’re not going to actually spend money doing it, they’re going to absorb it.” It is an accusation the state says just is not true. “ We d o n ’t ( p a d t h e numbers),” said Lara. “We always try to give an accurate range when the legislature asks us.”

Dole: Reagan couldn’t cut it in today’s GOP

Lawmakers refuse overtime pay By Travis Perry

of it. “Fiscal notes are used, in some cases, if you don’t want to do something you create a fiscal note that says, ‘This is going to cost a lot of money,’” Trabert said. “It becomes a reason not to do something, when in fact it won’t cost anything out of pocket…the data that’s required to be posted on the school districts’ websites, it already exists,” he said. “That’s where we’ve gotten the information from. We’re getting that information out

have stacks of anti-“tax and spend” government palm cards around, yet they are going to have to wait, probably until they hear complaints, to learn just what locally important spending cuts they unknowingly voted for … and how it plays in the community. But, they’re out of town, and the bookkeepers throughout state government agencies, school districts, state universities and such will be spending the next couple weeks figuring out how they did, what services they can continue and which are going to be ratchetedplease see

HAWVER,

page

23

World reports part-time toll booth employees for the Kansas Turnpike Authority will see a decline in their work hours in order to come into compliance with the nation’s new health care law. Because the ACA mandates health coverage for any employee working more than 30 hours per w e e k , t h e K TA p l a n s to lower hours for an unspecified number of parttime workers. “ We p l a n t o r e m a i n consistent with our longterm policy of not providing coverage for part-time KTA employees,” a KTA memo to toll collectors said earlier this month. “In order to achieve that goal and remain consistent with the law, we will need to limit the number of hours that parttime collectors work each week.” According to the Lawrence-Journal World, “The part-time collectors will be scheduled for a maximum of three eighthour shifts per week.” “KTA has 131 full-time toll collectors and 93 part-

time collectors,” according to Mike Johnston, president and chief executive officer of the KTA. Johnston said he didn’t know how many toll collectors will see a change in their hours. “Since the 236-mile turnpike that runs from Kansas City, Kan., to the Oklahoma border south of Wichita is a 24-hour, sevendays-a-week operation, the change in policy will have a ripple effect. “Some part-time collectors, ‘whose willingness to work a variety of shifts has been very limited,’ may be ‘required to improve their availability,’” the memo said. The requirement to provide health insurance to employees working over 30 hours per week only applies to employers with at least 50 workers. “There is nothing nefarious going on,” said Johnston. “We are taking steps administratively that would make certain that we continue not to provide benefits to part-time people.”


Page 12 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Heart & Soul

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

60-mile walk builds teens’ faith By Davi Stuhlsatz news@derbyinformer.com

An arduous three-day, 60-mile trek of faith – on foot – marked the beginning of summer for 21 young Derby teenagers and their adult chaperones. “I think the best part was that the kids had to push their limits and see what they could do,” said adult leader Danielle Hoch. “We live in a world where we try to make things as easy as possible. This was not easy.” The youth group members walked from Wi c h i t a t o P i l s e n i n the fifth annual Father Kapaun pilgrimage this past weekend. “I thought the pilgrimage was a great way to grow DAVI STUHLSATZ/Informer photo closer to Christ, and to From left, Preston Williams, Austin Williams, Clayton McGovern, Ryan Williams, and Daniel Dawdy, all of St. Mary Parish in Derby, Paula Kear and learn more about Father Father Eric Weldon walk during the 60-mile Father Kapaun Pilgrimage. Kear is the mother of Chase Kear, whose miraculous recovery from a poleKapaun and his life and vault head injury is attributed to prayers for Kapaun’s intercession. Weldon initiated the pilgrimage five years ago. what he went through,” said Daniel Dawdy, who will be a freshman at Derby High School this fall. Father Emil Kapaun is the U.S. Army chaplain from Pilsen who selflessly should be a slam dunk. By Davi Stuhlsatz rescued wounded men and Wilson volunteered with then ministered to fellow news@derbyinformer.com the church’s Upward Sports prisoners of war, before Cameron Wilson’s new for six years while earning job at Derby First Christian a living providing computer please see WALK, page 23 support for a tax software company. Now he will be a full-time outreach minister. Loren Gerwick Jr. “I realized through has been recognized Upward Sports that my passion was spreading for his generosity! the love of Christ to kids through sports,” he said. Part of the Derby Community I started with Upward Foundation’s 20 Acts of Generosity “Once I knew I was in the wrong line of work.” Wilson is a lifelong Derby resident. He graduated from Derby High School in 1999 and got his computer engineering degree from Kansas State in 2003. He is married, with two children, and has been a member at First Christian since October 2007. He has coached Upward Soccer and refereed and directed Loren Gerwick Upward Basketball. For years, Loren Gerwick has made incredible commitments as “I also served as the a volunteer with the Derby High School booster club known as DAVI STUHLSATZ/Informer photo church treasurer, have been Panther PAC. This organization runs the concessions at DHS Cameron Wilson, First Christian Church’s new outreach minister, loaded supplies for involved with our Men’s sporting events and donates the proceeds back to DHS. The funds assist all sports programs as well as other organizations Ministry, and helped out Oklahoma tornado victims this past week. at DHS. Loren has served on the Panther PAC board for over with children’s activities, as 20 years. As the concessions manager, Loren has stocked, well,” he said. This past week, it meant community events, Wilson invited by someone who cleaned, re-supplied and worked behind the counter serving As Outreach Minister, packing and transporting wants to make sure the goes here,’” he said. thousands of people in Derby and from other communities. The Wilson’s job is to connect supplies for Oklahoma people of FCC are there, When he was 9, Wilson countless hours of tireless and sometimes backbreaking work the church with the people of tornado victims. It will also representing Christ in a way made a layup, free throw, define Loren’s commitment to DHS, the community and of course Derby and the surrounding include responsibility for that makes people notice. and three-pointer as part the students – who he always puts first. Quite simply, without Loren Gerwick Jr., there would be no Panther PAC. communities. First Christian’s website “The strength of our of a half-time contest at a “My job is to make the and social media accounts church is our people,” Wichita State basketball Congratulations Loren Gerwick! He is now a love of Jesus felt throughout and connecting with people he said. “People here are game. He played three candidate for the Derby Community Foundation’s the community,” he said. “I through those avenues. incredibly giving individuals sports at DHS. annual Distinguished Generosity Award. am responsible for providing “ M y h i s t o r y i n t h e and willing to sacrifice their However, his lifelong the congregation with both technology field is a real time, talents, or finances for p a s s i o n f o r s p o r t s i s Do you know a generous Derby person? information about what is plus,” he said. “My goal the well-being of others.” surpassed by his love of Nominate them – Go to: www.derbycf.org happening throughout the is to provide as many Wilson is impressed with Derby and of Christ. and fill out a nomination form TODAY! city and opportunities to opportunities as possible how open FCC members “I would love nothing serve the community.” for the people of FCC to be are about their faith and m o r e t h a n t o s e e t h e Wilson said he loves to the hands and feet of Jesus connecting others to the message of Christ spread not just be a name and face to others in our community.” church. throughout Derby,” he said. associated with something Whether through Upward “It is amazing to me how “This is a wonderful town, and let others do the work but Sports, volunteering in many times we ask visitors with wonderful people who to be a “hands-on, present schools, the Great Day how they found us and they deserve to know a love that part of the activities.” of Service, or helping at respond with, ‘We were is greater than any other.” Inspiring Vision & Generosity

Outreach minister finds new job a slam dunk

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Sports

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 13

Twins wallop Denver in season opener Derby Twins play a nearly flawless game in 14-0 victory By Scott Elpers sports@derbyinformer.com

It was difficult to find any negatives to the Derby Twins’ impressive start, opening the summer baseball season with a 14-0

shutout against the Denver Cougars at Panther Field on Sunday. The Twins played a nearly flawless game on both sides of the baseball. Sparked by eight runs in the bottom of the fifth

inning, Derby rattled off 14 total on 10 hits. The pitching staff held Denver to two hits in the entire game. “We did a good job of throwing strikes, first and foremost,” said Derby coach Jacob White. “That really set the tone for the game.” With a 6-0 lead and the bases loaded in the fifth inning, Derby scored two consecutive runs after Denver walked Jake Ward and hit Jason McMurry with a pitch. A single by Drew Luther and an error by Denver

helped clear the bases on Derby’s next at-bat. Luther scored on a wild pitch and Kaden Moore rounded out the inning with a double that scored two more runs for a 14-0 lead. McMurry, Moore and Derby native Zack Steadman combined for six of Derby’s nine RBIs in the game. Jeff Tanner pitched five innings for Derby, striking out five batters and allowing one hit. Graylon Brown pitched two and struck out three. Jacob Westerhouse finished out the game with

two strikeouts in two innings pitched. “You have to pitch and play defense. That’s the biggest thing,” White said. “We were able to score some runs and played well. The guys played hard. That’s what we like to teach them to do. They need to come out and play the game the right way and everything else will take care of itself.” The start was a considerable improvement from the previous season when the Twins opened the season with a 2-6 record. Derby only had three practices leading up to the season opener this year, and a handful of players are still trickling in with NCAA postseason baseball still in full swing. “We have a great group of guys,” White said. “They have worked hard in these few days leading up to our first game. I think they are

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enjoying it.” Derby (1-0) hosts El Dorado (2-0) at home tonight and travels to Liberal (2-0) for its first weekend series beginning on Friday. Derby 14, Denver 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E Denver 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 Derby 0 3 3 0 8 0 0 0 x 14 10 0 W - Tanner, Derby L - Kannenberg, Denver

Derby Twins’ schedule June 5 7:05 p.m. – Derby Twins v. El Dorado Broncos (Panther Field) June 7 7 p.m. – Derby Twins at Liberal Bee Jays (Brent Gould Field) June 8 7 p.m. – Derby Twins at Liberal Bee Jays (Brent Gould Field) June 9 7 p.m. – Derby Twins at Liberal Bee Jays (Brent Gould Field) June 11 7:05 p.m. – Derby Twins v. Wellington Heat (Panther Field)

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Dylan Boston slides into home to score one of eight runs in the fifth inning of Derby’s 14-0 victory over Denver in the Twins’ season opener at home on Sunday.

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Page 14 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

All-league rosters include Derby athletes

Rankin, Cheatham – all-league selections By Scott Elpers sports@derbyinformer.com

Juniors Garrett Rankin and Aaron Cheatham were the lone Derby High School baseball players to earn AVCTL-I all-league recognition this past week. Rankin was named all-league first-team at third base. He was named all-league second-team as a sophomore at the same position and honorable mention as a pitcher in his freshman season. Cheatham, a first-time all-leaguer, was named an honorable mention as a first baseman. Maize, Hutchinson, Salina Central, Newton and Campus each had eight players earn all-league recognition. Salina South had 11 players. Although Derby had the least amount of players of any school in the AVCTL-I with two, the Panthers were the only team with a successful run in the postseason. After finishing the regular season 7-11, Derby went on to win the regional championship and place fourth in the Class 6A state tournament after upsetting a string of top teams in the state. AVCTL-I all-league baseball First team Pitcher: Cody Miller, Hutchinson; Joel Baxley, Campus; Seth Troll, Maize; Lucas Schauer, Maize. Catcher: Joel Baxley, Campus. First base: Brady Hoover, Maize; Second base: Tanner Higgins, Hutchinson; Third base: Colton Flax, Campus; Garrett Rankin, Derby; Shortstop: Mark Vaughn, Salina Central; Outfield: Jarod Zerr, Campus; John Labelle, Campus; Trevor Turner, Hutchinson; Zach Nachbar, Salina South; Aaron Mar, Salina South. Designated Hitter: Andrew Shock, Campus. Utility: Matt Rowe, Salina Central. Player of the year: Joel Baxley, Campus Coach: Rocky Helm, Maize Second team Pitcher: Robert James, Salina South; Drew Johnson, Maize; Keil Stauffer, Newton; Trevor Turner, Hutchinson. Catcher: Mason Brightbill, Salina Central. First base: Tanner Rothe, Campus. Second base: Trent Early, Salina Central. Third base: Gunar Drinnen, Newton. Shortstop: Conner Ryan, Salina South. Outfield: Colin Blackin, Salina Central; Austin Gronau, Newton; Cody Stineman, Newton; Seth Troll, Salina Central. Designated hitter: Todd Humiston, Salina Central. Utility: Ryan Stoecklein, Hutchinson.

Informer file photo

Senior Piper Hahn (right) was the only Derby High School soccer player to earn AVCTL-I first-team all-league honors this season. Six more Derby players were named honorable mentions or to the all-league second-team.

Informer file photo

Garrett Rankin was one of two Derby baseball players to earn all-league recognition in the AVCTL-I this season. Rankin was named all-league first-team and Aaron Cheatham was an all-league honorable mention. Honorable mention Pitcher: Austin Drinnen, Campus; Nick LaGreca, Hutchinson; Conner Lungwitz, Maize; JW Maldaner, Salina Central; Logan Meis, Salina South; Zach Nachbar, Salina South; Dalton Wassenberg, Salina South; Seaver Williams, Hutchinson. Catcher: Cole Hoover, Salina South; Collin Nitcher, Maize. First base: Ethan Casey, Salina Central; Aaron Cheatham, Derby; Austin Resser, Newton. Second base: Logan Driscoll, Salina South; Matthew Johnson, Campus. Third base: Cody Miller, Hutchinson. Shortstop: Keil Stauffer, Newton; Braydon Wells, Hutchinson. Outfield: Clay Commerford, Salina Central; Robert James, Salina South; Logan Meis, Salina South. Designated hitter: Lucas Schauer, Maize; Dalton Wassenberg, Salina South.

7th Annual

Panthers on the Green Golf Tournament

Saturday, July 27th • Derby Golf & Country Club Proceeds help support the DHS football program. A portion of this year’s proceeds will go to the Braxton Kooser Memorial Fund. Registration 7 a.m. • Tee off 8 a.m. Cost $320/team of four Entry includes green fees, range balls, golf cart, and lunch. Shotgun start, no handicaps required, mulligans sold–two per person limit.

Registration Form Team Captain Name: Email and contact #:

Team Player #2: Email and contact #:

Team Player #3: Email and contact #:

Team Player #4: Email and contact #: Checks made payable to DHS Football Booster Club. Registration deadline is July 25, 2013. Complete this form and mail with payment to: DHS Football Booster Club c/o Chris Palmer, P.O. Box 2, Derby, Kan. 67037. Please contact Chris Palmer with any questions at 833-0161, or Tammy Greiving at 706-7302. (email: cpalmer1182@yahoolcom).

Hahn makes first-team all-league soccer By Scott Elpers sports@derbyinformer.com

Senior Piper Hahn led a sizable list of Derby High School soccer players named to AVCTL-I all-league teams this past week. Hahn, who recently signed a letter of intent to play soccer at Friends University, was the only Derby player to make AVCTL-I first-team all-league. The Derby midfielder was one of 13 league players to make the first team. Six other Derby players earned other all-league honors. Forward Megan Martinez, midfielder Katie Hartman and defender Sara West were named all-league second-team. Midfielder Hanna Newhouse, defender Wynter Keetso and goalkeeper Elizabeth DeCristoforo picked up allleague honorable mentions. AVCTL-I all-league soccer First team Forward: Abby Cinotto, Maize; Jordan Downing, Hutchinson; Jorrie Dykes, Salina Central; Whitney

Lucas, Maize. Midfield: Madison Holmes, Maize; Devon Schmidt, Salina Central; Madison Brady, Hutchinson; Piper Hahn, Derby. Defender: Shannon Bradbury, Salina Central; Kelsey Quick, Maize; Laura Sellers, Hutchinson; Ardys Woodward, Newton. Goalkeeper: Kelsi Langley, Newton. Player of the year: Whitney Lucas, Maize Coach: Jay Holmes, Maize Second team Forward: Brianna Bosley, Campus; Jazmin Hartsborn, Hutchinson; Megan Martinez, Derby; Paige Thompson, Maize; Katelyn Zinn, Newton. Midfield: Hadley Davis, Maize; Tyler Edson, Newton; Katie Hartman, Derby; Carson Jett, Salina Central. Defender: Madi Carlgren, Salina Central; Addison Kingrey, Maize; Brittany McClelland, Hutchinson; Molly Proffitt, Hutchinson; Sara West, Derby. Goalkeeper: Bailey Shupe, Maize. Honorable mention Forward: Marysa Bradshaw, Salina Central; Katie McClure, Maize; Paige Swanson, Maize. Midfield: Becca Andrus, Maize; Morgan Cossette, Salina South; Sara Ingrassia, Salina Central; Leilani Medina, Newton; Dani Nahrendorf, Campus; Hanna Newhouse, Derby; Stacy Rottinghaus, Hutchinson; Hannah Yoder, Newton; Ashley Zane, Maize. Defender: Hanna Carlgren, Newton; Cassidy Cook, Salina South; Allison Francis, Campus; Gena Hake, Campus; Wynter Keetso, Derby; Dulce Munguia, Campus; Courtney Olson, Salina Central; Katie Snyder, Salina South; Gabby Ybarra, Maize; Tyler Young, Maize. Goalkeeper: Elizabeth DeCristoforo, Derby; Jordan Keck, Campus; Shea Myers, Salina Central.

Softball leads all-league, first-team honors By Scott Elpers sports@derbyinformer.com

The Derby High School softball team had the most all-league first-team selections in the AVCTL-I with six this season. Derby’s six players made up nearly half of the 14 total selections on the all-league first-team roster this past week. Senior Kennedy Long was named to her third consecutive all-league firstteam at second base, while senior Montanna Whiteman made her second straight all-league first-team at first base. Freshman Kenzie Young and senior Jessica Egan also made first-team honors in the outfield. Carly Gum, who was an all-league second-team selection in 2012, made the jump to firstteam as a utility player in her sophomore season. Kelly Mason was also named to the all-league first-team as a designated player for Derby. All-league secondteam selections for Derby included senior Britney Wimberly at third base and sophomore pitcher Ashlynn Godown. Freshman Lindsay Webb (catcher) and junior Tori Miller (shortstop) were all-league honorable mentions. Derby tied Maize with the most all-league selections with 10 each. Maize, who won the AVCTL-I league

Informer file photo

Derby’s Kennedy Long was named to her third consecutive AVCTL-I all-league first-team this past week. Long was one of six players to make all-league first-team honors for Derby, the most of any school.

title this year, had one less all-league first-team player than Derby with five total. AVCTL-I all-league softball First team Pitcher: Brittany Finney, Maize; Kacia Hilty, Hutchinson; Meghan Grimes, Maize. Catcher: Lexi E i s e n b a r t, M a i z e . Fir s t ba s e : M o n t a n n a W h i t e m a n , D e r b y. Second base: Kennedy Long, Derby. Third base: Allie Jurgensen, Maize; Shortstop: Sarah Rothe, Hutchinson. Outfield: Kenzie Young, Derby; Emily Griggs, Maize; Cadie O’Donnell, Salina South; Jessica Egan, Derby; Designated player: Kelly Mason, Derby. Utility: Carly Gum, Derby. Player of the year: Emily Griggs, Maize Coach: Jenny Meirowsky, Maize Second team Pitchers: Ashlynn Godown, Derby; Whitney Long, Campus; Bre Hogan, Salina South. Catcher:

Saige Otter, Salina South; Sarah Roche, Hutchinson. First base: Taylor Knopp, Salina Central. Second base: Tyler Downs, Campus. Third base: Britney Wimberly, Derby. Shortstop: Sarah Glass, Maize. Outfield: Gabby Harding, Maize; Michelle Perales, Salina Central; Leah Taliaferro, Maize; Emily Wessell, Hutchinson. Utility: Jessica Motes, Newton. Honorable mention Catcher: Alexis Southern, Newton; Lindsay Webb, Derby. First base: Emily Idler, Hutchinson; Krisha Kackley, Campus. Second base: Kelsi Baird, Salina South; Katlyn Bond, Campus. Third base: Afton Miller, Salina Central. Shortstop: Kaci Isaacson, Salina South; Megan Vanatta, Campus; Tori Miller, Derby. Outfield: Morgan Bryant, Salina South; Breanna Feight, Salina Central; Madison Livengood, Salina Central; Morgan Regier, Newton; Taylor Stahly, Newton. Designated player: Marlo Streit, Salina Central; Bailey Weese, Maize. Utility: Alyssa Saenz, Newton.


Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 15

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Almost perfect

Derby reached state in 15 of 18 sports this year By Scott Elpers sports@derbyinformer.com

Informer file photo

Derby hoists up the third-place trophy after its 62-57 victory over Shawnee Mission East in the Class 6A state basketball tournament. The third-place finish was the highest in school history.

Expectations are rarely low for any team or individual athlete at Derby High School, but few have had the overall success as the past academic year. From fall to spring, Derby made it to a Class 6A state tournament, the pinnacle of high school athletics in Kansas, in 15 of 18 different sports in the 2012-13 school year. The only three sports that did not have a Derby team represented were volleyball, girls basketball and girls soccer. Cross country kicked off Derby postseason success by qualifying both girls and boys teams for the state meet in October. Senior Brandon Lewis went on to place fourth individually at state. Derby’s girls golf team qualified its entire roster for the state meet. The girls tennis team also qualified singles player Morgan Hughes and doubles partners Bailey Farris and Mackenzie Hughes for the state meet. Under first-year head coach Paul Burke, Derby made its deepest run since 2007 in boys soccer, coming within one game of the state semifinals. Derby’s football team capped off the fall sports season by making it to the substate final, one game short of the state championship. Winter sports picked up where fall left off. Derby had its best-ever finish in boys basketball, placing third in the state tournament. The wrestling team also placed

third at state after qualifying in 13 of 14 weight classes, and had an individual state champion with Ben Becker winning a title at 152 pounds. The girls bowling team qualified for state, as did individual boys swimmers Carl Mayou and Bryce Hill, and the relay teams for the 200-yard freestyle, 200-yard individual medley and 400-yard freestyle. Arguably the biggest surprise for Derby came in spring sports, when the baseball team placed fourth at state in its first trip since 2001. The softball team also place fourth at state after winning its third consecutive regional title. Derby qualified its entire boys tennis team, both singles players and doubles teams, for state. Three relay teams, along with individual swimmer Alyssa Newbury and diver Martha Wilson, competed at the girls state swim meet. The boys golf team missed qualifying its entire team by five strokes, but sent individual golfers Kevin Gurley and Jeremy Dunham to the state meet. To end the year, Derby’s track team qualified for 19 state events. Some events even had multiple Derby athletes, including Alyxis Bowens and Tihler Wright in the 400 meters and Eric Hornbeck and Christian Compton in the pole vault. Bowens and Morrigan Crow had the best individual performances for Derby at the state track meet, bringing home second-place medals in the 400 meters and 100-meter hurdles respectively.

Baseball leads DHS spring sports awards I imagine everyone has been on the edge of their bleacher seats waiting for this column to come out. The end of another sports season means it is time to comb through the past three months and hand out a few accolades to those who I felt did especially well this spring. These nods were conjured up in my head based on statistics and what I witnessed first-hand over the past three months. Now let’s hand out some spring sports awards. Outstanding Derby Team: Baseball Is there a team in the state that had as much unexpected success toward the end of the season as Derby baseball? After a sluggish regular season, accompanied by a 7-11 record, Derby players and coaches alike were scratching their heads wondering if they could salvage the season. They did by winning the games that mattered most, upsetting Campus and Wichita East for the Panthers’ first regional title in 12 years. Derby also upset top-seeded Wichita Heights in extra innings in the opening round of the Class 6A state baseball tournament, finishing fourth in its first state appearance since 2001. Honorable Mention: Softball, boys tennis A sure sign a team is good is when it is almost expected that they make the state tournament, which is what the Derby softball team did for the third consecutive time this spring. The Panthers also won their first state game since 2007 this year with an upset over Lawrence Free State. Derby finished fourth, its best finish in the state tournament in six years. Derby’s magic ran out by the time it reached the state tournament, but that did not keep boys tennis from qualifying the entire team in regional competition. The Panthers took a full roster,

Scott Elpers Scott’s Thoughts

both singles players and both doubles teams, to the Class 6A state meet after placing second at regionals. Outstanding Male Athlete: Garrett Rankin, junior, baseball Garrett Rankin did things on the baseball field that directors make movies about, like hitting a grand slam to give Derby a one-run victory over Campus to advance to the regional championship, where he hit another home run to help win the regional title. He also pitched in all eight innings of the regional championship. Rankin did more than provide fireworks in the big games. He was their w o r k h o r s e all s eas o n , leading the team at home plate (.400 batting average, 11 RBIs, three home runs) and on the pitching mound (31 strike outs). Oh yeah, he also played third base throughout the season. Head coach Todd Olmstead was not exaggerating when he said the team relied heavily on Rankin for almost everything. Honorable Mention: Kevin Gurley, senior, golf It took Kevin Gurley a few golf tournaments to find his groove in his senior year. Once he did, he took his normal seat as Derby’s best golfer. Gurley became a four-time state qualifier after placing 10th at regionals. He also placed seventh at league and finished 10 strokes out of first at the Class 6A state meet this year. Outstanding Female Athlete: Alyxis Bowens, senior, track It is crazy to think Alyxis Bowens had somewhat of an off year even though she placed second in the 400 meters (58.17) and third in the 200 meters (26.88) at the Class 6A state track meet this season. The former state track champion also won

regional and league titles in the same two races this season. Not a bad senior season for Bowens, who was also in this same category of the Winter Sports Awards column I wrote earlier in the year. Honorable Mention: Morrigan Crow, junior, track; Alyssa Newbury, senior, swimming Morrigan Crow gave Bowens a run for her money as best track athlete on Derby’s roster this season. Crow dominated the hurdles competition this year. She placed second in the 100-meter hurdles (15.19) at the Class 6A state meet, and missed qualifying for the finals in the 300-meter hurdles by six-tenths of a second (49.41). She also won regional and league titles in the 100-meter hurdles. Alyssa Newbury was the most consistent swimmer in Derby’s pool in her senior season. As one of two individual swimmers to qualify for state, Newbury placed tenth in the consolation finals of the 200-yard individual medley with a time of 2:20.00. She also placed 14th in the 100yard butterfly (1:03.64). She won both races multiple times during the regular season. Boys Newcomer of the Year: Quincy Stith, sophomore, golf Quincy Stith had a hot start on the golf course this season. The sophomore had the best individual performances in several Derby tournaments this spring, placing sixth at Newton, fifth at Salina and 12th at Winfield. Stith also shot a 75 to win the individual title at Derby’s home meet this season. Honorable Mention: Justin Ash, sophomore, baseball Justin Ash found himself among a bevy of solid talent on the mound for the Derby baseball team. The sophomore right-hander was called on in several games throughout the season and pitched in the

Informer file photo

Left to right: Derby players Nick Watson, Derek Newcome and Travis Young celebrate after Derby upset top-seeded Wichita Heights in the first round of the Class 6A state baseball tournament in May.

Derby’s final game of the Class 6A state tournament. Ash struck out 15 batters in 18 innings during the regular season, placing him among the top three Derby pitchers. Girls Newcomer of the Year: Katie Hartman, freshman, soccer No one knew exactly how good Katie Hartman was going into the season, but the freshman quickly became one of the Derby soccer team’s best offensive weapons. Hartman’s best game came midway through the season when she scored half of Derby’s six goals for a hat trick against Wichita South. Honorable Mention: Kenzie Young, freshman,

softball Kenzie Young finished up her first high school year by lettering in her third varsity sport. After playing extensive minutes in varsity volleyball and basketball as a freshman, Young also earned a starting spot in center field and as leadoff hitter for the Derby softball team. Outstanding Coach: Christy Weve, softball Head coach Christy Weve can make winning look easy, like she did when the Derby softball team won its third consecutive regional title by 23 combined runs against Wichita Southeast and Garden City. Did I mention Derby was the underdog

against Garden City, even though the Panthers eased past the Buffaloes with a 14-6 victory? Derby also made an early statement in the Class 6A state tournament, upsetting No. 3 Lawrence Free State. Honorable Mention: Todd Olmstead, baseball Make room in the trophy case for the Derby baseball team, thanks to first-year head coach Todd Olmstead. The longtime assistant coach rallied the troops late in the season, turning a lackluster year into a fourth-place finish at the Class 6A state tournament with a string of late upsets.


Page 16 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Lifestyles

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Chilcott competes in Miss Kansas pageant By The Informer staff mail@derbyinformer.com

LINDA STINNETT/Informer photo

City presented award for budget

Jean Epperson, Derby director of finance/city clerk (at left), and Mayor Dion Avello hold the granite plaque presented to the city of Derby for Distinguished Budget Presentation. This is the ninth year the city has received the award from the Government Finance Officers Association. The GFOA assesses how the city’s printed budget serves as a policy document, a financial plan, an operations guide and a communications device, Epperson said.

school news Schools honor IMAD winners

huge difference in her students’ school career and Derby Public Schools has honored personal lives as two I Make A Difference Award well according to winners. information from Vi c k i S m i t h the school district. received an IMAD Becky Eppler Award for her work received an as an employee of Becky I M A D Aw a r d Swaney Elementary. Eppler for her volunteer Her constant work at Park Hill encouragement Elementary. Eppler is an active board and praise for her member of PTO and also regularly Vicki students helps them volunteers in the building. She tutors Smith attain their goals. students on a regular basis, making a Her tireless efforts difference in student learning. on her students’ behalf makes a

Derby resident Chelsea Chilcott is in Pratt this week for the 2013 Miss Kansas competition. She was crowned as Miss Augusta 2013 on Oct. 6. Rehearsals began Sunday. On Wednesday she will have private interviews with the judges. On Thursday she will participate in the swimsuit competition followed by the evening gown competition on Friday. The finals for the top 10 will be held on Saturday, June 8. Chilcott is a ventriloquist and for her talent performance will sing, I’ve Been Everywhere, by Johnny Cash.

Be aware of the potential for severe weather before traveling By The Informer staff mail@derbyinformer.com

Wi t h i m a g e s o f t h e Oklahoma devastation fresh in their minds, thousands of Kansans will take to the highways this summer. Unfortunately, no evasive or protective action can guarantee safety if caught in a car as a tornado approaches, and every situation is unique. But a few precautions could prevent serious injury or death. area news briefs Know before you go. this Thursday through Sunday. Mulvane student to Check weather reports They will explore the prairie compete in pageant Addyson Schiffelbein, who will be a seventh grade student at Mulvane Middle School next year, will compete in the National American Miss Pageant on July 21 in Wichita. Schiffelbein will compete Addyson in the pre-teen Schiffelbein age division, along with other young ladies from across Kansas. The winner will receive cash and other prizes and air transportation to compete at the national level in California.

Ballet in the Park

Ballet Wichita dancers will be giving free performances

ecosystem in five performances of A Prairie Tale, an original Ballet Wichita production. A Prairie Tale follows Macy, an inquisitive monarch butterfly, as she migrates south meeting and making new friends on her flight across Kansas. In this story-based ballet, Macy meets and befriends a meadowlark bird, a box shell turtle and a sweet, but lazy, bison. Performances last approximately 45 minutes. MULVANE – 7 p.m. Thursday, June 6 at Main Street Park. HAYSVILLE – 7 p.m. Friday, June 7 at Riggs Park. WICHITA – 11 a.m. Saturday, June 8 at Warren Plaza in Old Town. ANDOVER – 2 p.m. Saturday, June 8 at Central Park Gazebo WICHITA – 1 p.m. Sunday, June 9 at Aviation Museum.

Her Miss America platform is “Building the Circle,” based on peer mentoring. Good luck wishes may be sent to Chilcott at the following address: Miss Augusta, Pratt Community College, 348 NE ST 61, Pratt, Kan. 67124. Chilcott is the daughter of Bart Chilcott and Diane Chilcott, Derby. She is pursuing a degree in mass communications in radio and television. “I hope to be on the radio as well as a videographer and documentary producer,” she said. “I will be able to continue my education because of the scholarships I win through the Miss Chelsea Chilcott America organization.”

and be aware of the potential for severe weather along your route before leaving home. KDOT’s 511 traveler information services provide weather warnings through a website, phone line, and text and email alerts. Learn more by visiting www.kandrive. org. • While en route to your destination, be aware of developing conditions by tuning to a local radio station. Electronic highway message signs provide road conditions, but don’t have the data support to provide current tornado warning

messages. • If a tornado is approaching, weather experts advise the best course of action is to seek shelter inside a building if possible. Attempting to outrun a tornado in a vehicle puts the traveler (and other travelers) at risk of a crash. Nearby roads may not provide an escape angle. • Don’t seek shelter under a highway overpass. Experts say there is a high risk of being struck by swirling debris or being sucked out into the storm. • Weather safety experts

are in some disagreement about whether the next safest course is to leave the vehicle to take shelter in a ditch or low-lying area, or remain in the car, buckle up and duck down as low as possible. Be aware there are risks to both. For safety tips and information about how to protect yourself and others while driving in severe weather, visit websites of organizations such as the National Weather Service or American Red Cross.

Dave says: pay off that home equity loan Dear Dave, I’m retired, and I have $400,000 in an IRA that’s earning 10 to 12 percent. The only debt I have is $20,000 on a home equity line of credit, and my home is worth $500,000. Should I pay off the home equity loan using funds from my IRA? – Janet Dear Janet, Wow, you have a halfmillion dollar home on the line for only $20,000? There’s no way I’m going to have a $500,000 asset pledged for that kind of money. No way! If I were in your shoes, I’d pay off the loan today. You’re obviously a smart lady. You’ve got an IRA that’s busting it, and this little loan is the only thing standing between you and complete financial freedom. But that loan represents risk you don’t need in your life. I know you probably haven’t been lying awake at night

Dave Ramsey Dave Says

worrying over it, but you’re going to have a wonderfully weird experience when you knock this thing out. A wave of peace is going to wash over you, and you’re going to feel lighter and more liberated than ever before. Your retirement isn’t at risk, and it won’t cost you much money. Pay it off today, Janet, and discover the true meaning of financial peace! – Dave

Are ETFs good investments? Dear Dave, How do you feel about an exchange-traded fund as an investment device? –Charles Dear Charles, The main reason to do an ETF is it allows you to trade your stocks or mutual fundraisers funds easily and often. I can’t The following fundraisers or recommend them because benefits are being held by local I don’t advise buying and residents or to benefit local residents. To get your fundraising event listed, call 788-4006 or email mail@derbyinformer.com.

Golf tickets benefit Knights of Columbus

The Derby Knights of Columbus are selling tickets to the Air Capital Golf Tournament, June 10-16 (formerly called The Wichita Open). Tickets cost $10 per day and are available from Tony Hug at 788-2652. Proceeds go to the Knights of Columbus charitable work.

selling all the time where your investments are concerned. In most cases, getting into this kind of thing implies that you’re trying to time the market. It means you’re trying to buy at the low point and ride them up to the high point. Based on my understanding of the market, I’m a buy-and-hold kind of guy. So, I have no need for ETFs whatsoever. – Dave

Fix the transmission or sell the truck? Dear Dave, I have $2,400 in transmission repair work that needs to be made on my old truck, and I don’t have the money to pay for it. I tried to get a loan, but was turned down. I’m single and make $26,000 a year. Do you have any ideas? –Eric Dear Eric, As you probably know, I teach people not to borrow money. So, I’m glad you were turned down for the loan. That’s the last thing you need in your life right now, plus the terms of the

loan would’ve been a rip-off. My advice is to sell the truck as-is. You probably could still get between $500 and $1,000 for it. Combine that with as much money as you can save in the meantime. This could put you in a little beater that would last a while, then save up some more and get a nicer beater a few months down the road. Sell the truck, save money and work your way up through some better vehicles. That’s what I had to do years ago in a very similar situation! ––– Dave Ramsey is America’s most trusted voice on money and business. He’s authored four New York Times best-selling books: “Financial Peace,” “More Than Enough,” “The Total Money Makeover” and “EntreLeadership.” The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 5,000,000 listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the web at daveramsey.com.

college news McPherson College names class of 2013 130 students in the McPherson College class of 2013 marked their graduation r e c e n t l y. S t u d e n t s w h o graduate cum laude (with honors) have attained a grade point average of 3.55; graduates with magna cum laude (with high honors) have attained a grade

Are you 55 or over and looking for work?

The Senior Employment Program at Senior Services, Inc. in Wichita helps workers find business or in home health/housekeeping/ handyperson jobs. We help with weekly job lists, Job Club, and resume and interviewing assistance. Simply come to 200 S. Walnut to apply in person Monday through Fridays between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. Questions? Call 267-1771.

point average of 3.75; and graduates with summa cum laude (with highest honors) have attained a grade point average of 3.9. Derby students include Kasey Lee Miller, Bachelor of Science in Biology, Summa Cum Laude and Jacob D. Snodgrass, Bachelor of Science in Biology, Magna Cum Laude.

OU names spring 2013 graduation candidates Students from 47 states and the District of Columbia are among candidates for degrees this spring on the University of Oklahoma Norman campus. Derby students include Joanna G. McFarland, Bachelor of Science and Kale Michael Mosley, Master of Arts.

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Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 17

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

The smoke and mirrors of summer movies By Kevin Cott

The Movie Minute

mail@derbyinformer.com

The last weekend in May the first real onslaught of summer movies left moviegoers with a lot to ponder. Here are a few things I learned from last weekend’s box office report. First: The ‘90s are long gone, and Will Smith’s days as the reigning King of Summer may be also. His latest flick After Earth performed weakly, and will officially go down as a grade-A flop. Second: If you are curious as to what Hollywood’s target demographic is, then simply look to Universal’s Fast & Furious franchise. The series’ sixth installment was number one at the box office for the second week in a row, leaving this moviegoer to wonder if Fast & Furious 25 will someday be a reality. Lastly: Sleight of hand and trickery may cause a few surprises at the box office, but prestidigitation

Now You See Me - PG-13

Kevin’s rating:

alone does not a movie make. This last point leads me to the number two movie in America, and the source of this week’s review. Now You See Me, a crime thriller about the inner workings of a group of magicians beat out After Earth for the number two spot this past weekend. Riding on the heels of what can officially be labeled a genre picture with the likes of films like Ocean’s Eleven, The Prestige, and The Illusionist, Now You See Me does an awful lot of winking and very little revealing. The film’s prologue introduces us to a story of great potential, and then

spends 116 minutes failing to deliver on that promise. We meet four separate illusionists all with names equally belonging in the pages of a comic book. Daniel Atlas (Jesse Eisenberg) is a card shark and woos a coed with an impressive misdirection type of trick. S e c o n d l y, M e r r i t t M c K i n n e y ( Wo o d y Harrelson), a mentalist and con artist, is able to hypnotize a married couple, reveal dark unsettling secrets, and then extort the husband for money. Jack Wilder (Dave Franco) is a young pickpocket on a ferryboat of tourists, and the vivacious Henley Reeves (Isla Fisher) performs an underwater escape stunt with literally bloody results. The concept seems entertaining enough. The script will bring the four entertainers together, reveal that they have a limited back-story, and before you know it, they are headlining a Vegas show as “The Four

derby archives 1891 – 122 years ago

In the Derby Mimeogram: • A small piece of charcoal placed in the pot when boiling cabbage will prevent any disagreeable color. • Emma Patterson of Belle Plaine has leased a newspaper and married a husband. Patterson, like General Jackson, is not afraid to assume responsibility.

1963 - 50 years ago.

• Pope John XXIII died June 3 in the fifth year of his reign as pontiff. The 81-year-old suffered another collapse late Sunday but then strengthened to give blessings to the world. Special prayers for the health of the pope were offered in Derby Sunday, Father Baumstark, local St. Mary’s pastor, said. The prayers were said to be

in conjunction with regular masses. Cardinals began arriving in Vatican City today and there will probably be a nine-day mourning period. • Stage one of a Titan Missile passed through Derby June 4, en route by truck convoy to one of the missile complexes to the southeast. The missile stopped briefly in Derby so that accompanying Air Force personnel and civilian engineers could give the transporting vehicles a maintenance check on brakes, shock absorbers, clamp bars and more. The second stage of the missile was immediately behind the first portion in the motorcade. Police Chief Emerson Hayden and Larry Bodine, patrolman, served as escorts through Derby.

1988 - 25 years ago

• Derby is a fast-growing community with many great possibilities, one of which might be a high volume retail center. With Derby’s continued growth, there will naturally be the need to accommodate this growth with the widening of Rock Road. “I see Rock Road as a vital part of Derby becoming a serious competitor in the retail market,” said Mark Schroeder, 5th District county commissioner. “Rock Road serves a significant number of residents not only in Derby but also in Wichita and Mulvane.” • Members of the Derby High School girls and boys track teams made their marks at the Kansas State High School Championship Track and Field Meet held at Wichita

Horsemen”. In the show’s finale, they seem to rob a Parisian bank thousands of miles away with the help of an audience participant. Despite the events unfolding in real time, we know we are privy to an elaborate hoax. That the money actually turns up missing makes the issue much more complicated. The FBI gets involved in a case that becomes sillier by the minute. With a team headed by agent Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo) and an Interpol detective (Melanie Laurent), the group attempts to track the team of illusionists who continue to pull heists during their performances and then reward their audiences with the cash. There’s talk of a mystical secret society known as “The Eye,” elaborate set pieces, car chases and heists that are explained later in mind numbingly stupid naïveté, and more stars than actual flesh and blood character.

Courtesy photo

Isla Fisher, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, and Dave Franco star in Now You See Me.

critics-you’ll-actually-loveit” films. Fine. I have no trouble suspending belief. All I ask from a filmmaker is that I’m given a reason to care. Now You See Me arrives with the air of importance. There are elaborate camera movements, rapid jump cuts, and a pulsating soundtrack. What’s missing in all of the over-crowded plots is a single story with which to connect. You might do worse on a summer day at the movies, but Now You See Me is all State University this weekend. north edge of the community. smoke and mirrors. Morgan Freeman, whose “Thaddeus Bradley” exposes magicians for a living, exists on screen to give us all the exposition involved in explaining the horsemen’s elaborate tricks. Michael Caine is Tressler, the group’s financial backer. Now You See Me is one of those “don’t-listen-to-the-

Placing the highest in 6A competition was the girls 4x400 meter relay team. The 4x400 relay squad’s performance was an improvement over Derby’s 4x200 and 4x100 relay teams. Both squads were knocked out of the running in the preliminaries.

That location was specifically needed because the natural rise of the ground away from the Arkansas River makes it difficult for the city to maintain good water pressure in northeast neighborhoods. With that goal in mind, Professional Engineering Consultants decided on a location near the northwest corner of 63rd and Rock Road 2003 - 10 years ago • The location and costs and a tentative agreement associated with a new water has been reached with the tower, along with appraisal property owner. At $23,400 and building permit fees, per acre, the city will buy a created concern for Derby 400 by 400 foot site (or 3.67 City Council members on May acres) from the estate of Aileen Anderson. 27. The new 1.5 million gallon water tower is only a portion of several major improvements the city is making in the water supply. It is being located on the

Solutions

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HOME IMPROVEMENT

Opp Concrete

CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE! • Concrete/brick work

• Just about anything concrete • oppconcretewichita.com LICENSED, PROFESSIONALLY DONE AND GUARANTEED

“If it’s CONCRETE we do it!”

789-0058

Nearly new Black & Decker 18-inch electric lawn mower, $45. Call 316680-2917.

Life Science Faculty Position Cowley College-Mulvane Center

Cowley College is seeking a highly motivated and knowledgeable individual to instruct life science classes in the Natural Science Department at the Mulvane Center. Classes will include, but are not limited to: Biology, Microbiology, and Anatomy and Physiology. Typical teaching load is 30 credit hours per academic year. Master’s degree with 18 hours in discipline required. Higher education teaching experience and online teaching experience preferred. Please send cover letter, resume, copies of transcripts and completed application found at www.cowley.edu/employment to KreutzerL@cowley.edu or mail to Cowley College, Human Resources, 125 South Second, Arkansas City, KS 67005. EOE.

Moving sale. ThursdaySaturday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 430 Stonegate Cir.

Affordable Lawn Care and Tree

ESTATE SALE. Thursday, June 6, 9 a.m. 1314 N. El Paso. Family sale. LOW PRICES!

Michael Logue 1804 E. Osage Rd. #M4, Derby Kan. 67037. Items will be disposed of as of July 5th, 2013 if not claimed.

FOR RENT

Legal Publication

• Licensed & Insured • Mowing • Edging • Cleanup • Tree Removal & Trimming FREE Estimates

316-737-0242

Build & Repair Fence Handyman

For lease – 113 E. Market. Offices and storage space. 788-3012.

880-7347 • Roy Hladik

FOR SALE Double bed: $100. Two double reclining sofas: $300/each. Six-seater Hotsprings hot tub (4-1/2 years old) $5,000. Call 788-2757 or 207-4043.

LAWN, TREE & GARDEN CARE

AUCTIONS Upcoming

ESTATE SALE

in DERBY by Beyond the Tea Garden Estate Sales

June 13, 14, 15

Opens at 8:00 AM 210 Park Place Ct. in Derby One mile south of Madison off Baltimore. Watch for our white and green ESTATE SALE signs.

House full of nice furniture, plus all the other household, garage, and eclectic collections! Address will be posted in The Derby Informer and on craigslist (item listing and pics also on craigslist)

MISCELLANEOUS

WANTED Trees or shrubs trimmed or removed. Call Tom in DCS Automotive pays top Mulvane. 316-200-6749 or dollar for all scrap metals. 417-825-2126. 1631 S. Hoover Ct. Wichita 316-977-8807. Christian Lawn Care. Seasonal mowing $20, scalping, overseeding, new lawns, core PUBLIC NOTICE aerating, fertilization, fall cleanup, gutter cleaning, Legal Publication shrub trimming, top (Published in The Derby s o i l , s n o w r e m o v a l , Informer on June 5, 2013) hauling. Residential In the Matter of the Marriage of and commercial. Senior Juria Robinson discount. Reasonable and and Levi Robinson reliable. Call Steve 685Case No. 13DM1304 Notice of Suit 2145. GARAGE SALES Need tables and racks for your garage sale? Call Dianna, 304-6188, 1208 Fontenelle Dr., Derby. $7.50 each. Huge sale, 2003 Countryview. Wedding d e c o r, h o u s e h o l d , furniture, clothes, misc. Thursday-Friday.

The State of Kansas to Levi Robinson. You are notified that a Petition for Divorce was filed in the District Court of Sedgwick County, Kansas asking that the person filing the divorce be granted a divorce and asking that the court make other orders in that divorce matter. You must file an answer to the Petition for Divorce with the court and provide a copy to the filing spouse on or before July 1, 2013, which shall not be less than 41 days after the first publication of this Notice of Suit, or the court will enter judgment against you on that Petition. Juria Robinson

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013)

(Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) Mohammed Alwashmi 1804 E. Osage Rd. #F3, Derby Kan. 67037. Items will be disposed of as of July 5th, 2013 if not claimed.

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) Saxton and Shaunice Calton 1804 E. Osage Rd. #A5, Derby Kan. 67037. Items will be disposed of as of July 5th, 2013 if not claimed.

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) In the Matter of the Marriage of Asher Joseph and Cassondra Joseph Case No. 13DM764 Notice of Suit The State of Kansas to Cassondra Joseph. You are notified that a Petition for Divorce was filed in the District Court of Sedgwick County, Kansas asking that the person filing the divorce be granted a divorce and asking that the court make other orders in that divorce matter. You must file an answer to the Petition for Divorce with the court and provide a copy to the filing spouse on or before July 10, 2013, which shall not be less than 41 days after the first publication of this Notice of Suit, or the court will enter judgment against you on that Petition. Asher Joseph


Page 18 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTE OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE

ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING B O DY ( S A N I TA RY S E W E R IMPROVEMETNS/ANDERSON FARM COMMERCIAL AND USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITIONS). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 202013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the

Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 20-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING B O DY ( S A N I TA RY S E W E R IMPROVEMETNS/ANDERSON FARM COMMERCIAL AND USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITIONS). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed

improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Construct eight inch (8”) sanitary sewer improvements to serve Lots 5 through 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition and Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $144,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date

of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lots 5 through 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition and Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Lot 5, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall pay 1,922/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; Lots 6 and 7, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall each pay 294/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; Lot 8, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall pay 6,784/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; Lot 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall pay 706/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; and Lot 1, Block A, USD 260 Middle School Addition, shall pay 5,000/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, shall pay 5,000/20,000 of the costs of the improvements. (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to

be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. S e c t i o n 4 . R e p e a l e r. Resolution No. 35-2007 is hereby repealed. Section 5. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lots 5 through 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition; Lot 4, Block  A , Anderson Farm Commercial 2nd Addition; and Lot 1, Block A and 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: 47% of the costs of the improvements shall be assessed to the west side of Rock Road according to the following fractions: Lot 4, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial 2nd Addition shall pay 1,090/10,000; Lot 5, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition shall pay 1,713/10,000; Lots 6 and 7, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition shall each pay 262/10,000; Lot 8, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition shall pay 6,045/10,000; Lot 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition shall pay 628/10,000; and 53% of the costs of the improvements shall be assessed to the east side of Rock Road according to the following fractions: Lot 1, Block A, USD 260 Middle School Addition shall pay 5,000/10,000 and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition shall pay 5,000/10,000. (e) The apportionment of

the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lots 5 through 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition; Lot 4, Block A , Anderson Farm Commercial 2nd Addition; and Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Lot 5, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall pay 1,713/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; Lots 6 and 7, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall each pay 262/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; Lot 8, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall pay 6,045/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; Lot 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition, shall pay 628/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; Lot 4, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial 2nd Addition shall pay 1,090/20,000 of the costs of the improvements; and Lot 1, Block A, USD 260 Middle School Addition, shall pay 5,000/20,000 of the costs of the improvements, and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, shall pay 5,000/20,000 of the costs of the improvements.

(e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. S e c t i o n 4 . R e p e a l e r. Resolution No. 108-2007 is hereby repealed. Section 5. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF

THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (LEFT TURN LANE ON ROCK ROAD/ ANDERSON FARM COMMERCIAL AND ANDERSON FA R M C O M M E R C I A L 2 N D ADDITIONS AND USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 212013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required

by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO 21-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (LEFT TURN LANE ON ROCK ROAD/ ANDERSON FARM COMMERCIAL AND ANDERSON FA R M CO M M E RC I A L 2 N D ADDITIONS AND USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed

improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Construct a continuous accel/ decel lane along the west side of Rock Road from the north line of Lot 3, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial 2nd Addition north to the north line of Lot 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition left turn lane on Rock Road from the north line of Lot 3, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial 2nd Addition, north to a point 575 feet north of the north line of USD 260 Middle School Addition, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $211,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE

COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (TRAFFIC SIGNALIZATION IMPROVEMENTS/ANDERSON FARM COMMERCIAL A N D A N D E R S O N FA R M COMMERCIAL 2ND AND USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITIONS). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 222013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the

Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 22-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (TRAFFIC SIGNALIZATION IMPROVEMENTS/ANDERSON FARM COMMERCIAL AND ANDERSON FARM COMMERCIAL 2ND AND USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITIONS). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent

of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Construct a traffic signalization system on Rock Road at Independence Avenue, to serve Lots 5 through 9, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial Addition; Lot 4, Block A, Anderson Farm Commercial 2nd Addition; and Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $244,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per


Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 19

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE

ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (INTERNAL SANITARY S E W E R I M P R OV E M E N T S / USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None.

Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 232013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 23-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING

OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (INTERNAL SANITARY S E W E R I M P R OV E M E N T S / USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS:

Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Install 10” and 8” sanitary sewer improvements to serve Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $269,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large.

Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

along the east side of Liberty Lane from the south side of Freedom Street to the north side of Independence Avenue; along the north side of Independence Avenue, from the east side of Liberty Lane to the west side of Rock Road; and from a point approximately 530 feet west of Liberty Lane, north from Independence Avenue approximately 500-feet, to serve to serve Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block  B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $342,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the

Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

following improvements: Install 8” water main improvements along the south side of Freedom Street from the east side of Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition; and along the north side of Independence Avenue, from the east side of Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition, to serve to serve Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $53,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is:

100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 262013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the

Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 26-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF

DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING B O D Y ( WAT E R M A I N IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 1/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White . Nay: None. Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 242013; was directed to be signed

by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 24-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING B O D Y ( WAT E R M A I N IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 1/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition

was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Install 8” water main improvements along the south side of Freedom Street from the west side of Rock Road to the east side of Liberty Lane;

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None. The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L

IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING B O D Y ( WAT E R M A I N IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 2/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White. Nay: None. Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City

Council, it was given No. 252013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 25-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING B O D Y ( WAT E R M A I N

IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 2/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell

Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was

presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT

DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (INTERNAL SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 2/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll

please see

26-2013,

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26-2013 From Page 19 ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (INTERNAL SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 2/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk

of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing

body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: C o n s t r u c t 5 fo o t w i d e sidewalks along Freedom Street from Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition, and along Independence Avenue from Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition, all inside USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby,

Sedgwick County, Kansas, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $19,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: 100% assessed against Lot 1, Block B. (e) The apportionment of

the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after

the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

(a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Grade, pave, curb & gutter and otherwise improve Freedom Street, from Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition; and Independence Avenue, from Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition, along with storm water sewer and other appurtenances, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $246,500, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to

be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: C o n st r u c t sto r m wa te r detention basin and mass grading improvements to serve Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $1,254,500, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to

be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Grade, pave, and otherwise construct an acceleration/ deceleration lane along the East side of Rock Road from approximately 475 feet South of USD 260 Middle School Addition to approximately 475 feet North of USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $195,500, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the

Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING

O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (STREET AND STORM SEWER IMPROVEMENTSPHASE  2/USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority

vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 272013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 27-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING

BODY (STREET AND STORM SEWER IMPROVEMENTSPHASE  2/USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that:

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE

ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (DETENTION BASIN AND MASS GRADING IMPROVEMENTS/USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None.

Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 282013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 28-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING

OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (DETENTION BASIN AND MASS GRADING IMPROVEMENTS/USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS:

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING

O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (ACCEL/DECEL LANE IMPROVEMENTS-ROCK ROAD/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye : R a n d y W h i te , J i m Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution

having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 292013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 29-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E

FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (ACCEL/DECEL LANE IMPROVEMENTS-ROCK ROAD/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and


Wednesday, June 5, 2013 • Page 21

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE

ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (TRAFFIC SIGNALIZATION IMPROVEMENTS-ROCK ROAD/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White. Nay: None.

Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 302013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 30-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING

OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (TRAFFIC SIGNALIZATION IMPROVEMENTS-ROCK ROAD/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS:

Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Construct traffic signalization improvements at the intersection of Rock Road and Freedom Street, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $240,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 20% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 80% to be paid by the City-at-large.

Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Construct a 5 foot wide sidewalk along the East side of Rock Road from the north side of 63rd Street to the north line of USD 260 Middle School Addition, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $58,500, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is: 100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large.

Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that: (a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Construct 5 foot and 8 foot wide sidewalks along Freedom Street, Liberty Lane, and Independence Avenue, all inside USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $114,500, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block A and Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: Equally per lot (2 lots). (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is:

100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

5.16 (Alcoholic Liquor and Cereal Malt Beverages) of the Derby Municipal Code or any other applicable city ordinances. S EC T I O N 4 . S u bs e c t i o n 414.A.26. of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows: 26. Microbreweries and Microdistilleries. SECTION 5. All original provisions of sections 202, 411, 412, and 414 of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas, as hereby amended, shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION 6. If any part of this ordinance is determined by a

court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the validity of the remaining parts of this ordinance. SECTION 7. This Ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its adoption and publication once in the official City newspaper. ADOPTED BY THE GOVERNING BODY this 28th day of May, 2013. Dion P. Avello, Mayor ATTEST: Jean Epperson, City Clerk Approved as to form: Kevin O’Connor, City Attorney

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE

ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (ROCK ROAD SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS/USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None.

Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 312013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 31-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING

OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (ROCK ROAD SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS/USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A RESOLUTION DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE

MAKING OF A CERTAIN INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (INTERNAL SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 1/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution

having been adopted by majority vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No. 322013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 32-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN

A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING BODY (INTERNAL SIDEWALK IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 1/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS:

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) ORDINANCE NO. 2160 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SUBSECTIONS 202, 411, 412 AND 414 OF THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS; SECTION 1. Section 202 of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows; provided, that except as amended hereby, said section 202 shall remain in full force and effect: a. The following definition contained in said section shall be amended to read as follows:

MICROBREWERY: Means a facility which produces no more than 5,000 barrels of beer per year and is licensed by the director of alcoholic beverage control of the department of revenue to manufacture, store and sell beer. A microbrewery facility must operate within a completely enclosed building. b. Said section shall be amended by addition thereto of a definition of the following term: MICRODISTILLERY: Means a facility which produces no more than 50,000 gallons of spirits per year from any source or substance that is licensed by the director of alcoholic beverage

control of the department of revenue, and is licensed by said director to manufacture, store and sell spirits. A microdistillery facility must operate within a completely enclosed building. SECTION 2. Subsection 411.A. of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas is hereby amended by addition thereto of the following new paragraph, designated 26, and the succeeding paragraphs of said subsection shall be redesignated consecutively: 26. Retail Liquor or Cereal Malt Beverage businesses, provided that there is no conflict with Chapter 5.16 (Alcoholic Liquor and Cereal Malt Beverages) of

the Derby Municipal Code or any other applicable city ordinances. SECTION 3. Section 412 of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas is hereby amended to read as follows: a. Subsection A.6. of said section shall read as follows: 6. Microbrewery or Microdistillery. [See 412.F.5.] b. Subsection F of said section is hereby amended by addition thereto of the following new paragraph, designated 5, and the succeeding paragraphs of said subsection shall be redesignated consecutively: 5. MICROBREWERY an d MICRODISTILLERY locations shall not conflict with Chapter


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Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) GILMORE & BELL, P.C. 05/16/2013 EXCERPT OF MINUTES OF A MEETING OF THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS HELD ON MAY 28, 2013 The governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, met in regular session at the usual meeting place in the City, at 6:30 p.m., the following members being present and participating, to-wit: Dion Avello, Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Absent: None The Mayor declared that a quorum was present and called the meeting to order. (Other Proceedings) Thereupon, and among other business, there was presented to t h e gove r n i n g b o d y a Petition which has been filed in the Office of the City Clerk requesting the making of certain internal improvements in the City pursuant to the authority of K.S.A. 12-6a01 et seq. Thereupon, there was presented a Resolution entitled: A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING

O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING B O D Y ( WAT E R M A I N IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 2/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). The Resolution was considered and discussed; and thereupon on motion of Councilmember Haynes, and seconded by Councilmember Downing, the Resolution was adopted by the following roll call vote: Aye: Randy White, Jim Craig, Tom Haynes, Cheryl Bannon, Chuck Warren, Darrell Downing, Vaughn Nun and Randy White Nay: None Thereupon, the Resolution having been adopted by majority

vote of the members of the City Council, it was given No.332013; was directed to be signed by the Mayor and attested by the City Clerk; and the City Clerk was further directed to cause the publication of the Resolution one time in the official City newspaper and to record the Resolution in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas, all as required by law. (Seal) City Clerk RESOLUTION NO. 33-2013 A R E S O L U T I O N DETERMINING THE ADVISABILITY OF THE MAKING O F A C E RTA I N I N T E R N A L IMPROVEMENT IN THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS, AND SETTING FORTH THE GENERAL NATURE OF THE IMPROVEMENT, THE ESTIMATED OR PROBABLE COSTS THEREOF, THE EXTENT OF THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT TO BE ASSESSED FOR THE COSTS THEREOF, THE METHOD OF ASSESSMENT, AND THE APPORTIONMENT OF THE COSTS BETWEEN THE IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT AND THE CITY AT LARGE; AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE MAKING OF THE IMPROVEMENT IN A C C O R DA N C E W I T H T H E FINDINGS OF THE GOVERNING

B O D Y ( WAT E R M A I N IMPROVEMENTS-PHASE 2/ USD 260 MIDDLE SCHOOL ADDITION). WHEREAS, a Petition was filed with the City Clerk of the City of Derby, Kansas (the “City”) proposing certain internal improvements; and said Petition sets forth: (a) the general nature of the proposed improvements; (b) the estimated or probable cost of the proposed improvements; (c) the extent of the proposed improvement district to be assessed for the cost of the proposed improvements; (d) the proposed method of assessment; (e) the proposed apportionment of the cost between the improvement district and the City at large; and (f) a request that such improvements be made without notice and hearing as required by K.S.A. 12-6a04(b) (the “Act”); and WHEREAS, the governing body of the City hereby finds and determines that said Petition is sufficient. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS: Section 1. Findings of Advisability. The governing body hereby finds and determines that:

(a) It is advisable to make the following improvements: Install 8” water main improvements along the south side of Freedom Street from the east side of Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition; and along the north side of Independence Avenue, from the east side of Liberty Lane to the east line of USD 260 Middle School Addition, to serve to serve Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, in accordance with the City of Derby Standard Specifications (the “Improvements”). (b) The estimated or probable cost of the Improvements is: $53,000, to be increased at the pro rata rate of 1 percent per month from and after the date of adoption of this Resolution. (c) The extent of the improvement district (the “Improvement District”) to be assessed for the cost of the Improvements is: Lot 1, Block B, USD 260 Middle School Addition, to the City of Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas. (d) The method of assessment is: 100% assessed against Lot 1, Block B. (e) The apportionment of the cost of the Improvements, between the Improvement District and the City at large, is:

100% to be assessed against the Improvement District and 0% to be paid by the City-at-large. Section 2. Authorization of Improvements. The abovesaid Improvements are hereby authorized and ordered to be made in accordance with the findings of the governing body of the City as set forth in Section 1 of this Resolution. Section 3. Bond Authority; Reimbursement. The Act provides for the Improvements to be paid by the issuance of general obligation bonds of the City (the “Bonds”). The Bonds may be issued to reimburse expenditures made on or after the date which is 60 days before the date of this Resolution, pursuant to Treasury Regulation 1.150-2. Section 4. Effective Date. This Resolution shall be effective upon adoption. This Resolution shall be published one time in the official City newspaper, and shall also be filed of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Sedgwick County, Kansas. ADOPTED AND APPROVED by the governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas, on May 28, 2013. (Seal) Dion P. Avello, Mayor Jean Epperson, City Clerk

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 2158 O n M ay 2 8 , 2 0 1 3 , t h e governing body of the City of Derby, Kansas passed an ordinance entitled: AN ORDINANCE OF THE GOVERNING BODY O F T H E C I T Y O F D E R BY, KANSAS, ESTABLISHING A REDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT WITHIN THE CITY AND MAKING CERTAIN FINDINGS IN CONJUNCTION THEREWITH (DERBY NORTH GATEWAY REDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT). The Derby North Gateway Redevelopment District is established pursuant to K.S.A. 12-1770, et seq. (the “Act”) and consists of the real property

described on Exhibit A hereto. A map depicting the boundaries of the Derby North Gateway Redevelopment District is attached hereto as Exhibit B. The governing body found that the area comprising the Derby North Gateway Redevelopment District constitutes a “blighted area” and is therefore an “eligible area” (as said terms are defined in the Act), and the conservation, development or redevelopment of such area is necessary to promote the general and economic welfare of the City. The buildings and facilities to be constructed or improved in the Derby North Gateway Redevelopment District include existing commercial

EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF REDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT 37 individual parcels of land located largely on the south side of East Patriot Avenue, and bordered by K-15 Highway on the west and North Buckner Street on the east in the City of Derby, Kansas, and more particularly described as follows: A tract of land located in the SE ¼ and the SW ¼, Section 25, Township 28 South, Range 1 East and in the NW ¼, SW ¼ and the NE ¼ of Section 36, Township 28 South, Range 1 E of the 6th Principal Meridian, Derby, Sedgwick County, Kansas, more particularly described as: Beginning at the southwest corner of Lot 3, Block C, Stone Creek Addition; thence west 150’ to the southeast corner of Lot 1, Block A, Stone Creek Commercial Addition; thence west along the south line of said Lot 1 and along the south line of Stone Creek Commercial 3rd Addition to a point 10 feet east of the southwest corner of Lot 1, Block A; thence north along a line 10’ east of and parallel with the east rightof-way line of Commerce Drive to the south line of reserve “A” as platted in Stone Creek Commercial 3rd Addition; thence west along the south side said Reserve “A” to the west line of Stone Creek Commercial 3rd Addition; thence north along the west line of said Stone Creek Commercial 3rd Addition to a point on said west line and 325’ north of the south line said Reserve “A”, thence west 70’ to the east line of Stone Creek Commercial 2nd Addition; thence south along the said east line to the south line of said Stone Creek Commercial 2nd Addition; thence west along said south line to a point on the easterly right-of-way line of State Highway K-15; thence southeasterly on

property as well as a new retail center consisting of a Menards home improvement store and creation of 6-pad-ready development sites adjacent to Menards. The City intends to acquire the necessary property and construct a realignment of Nelson Drive within the Derby North Gateway Redevelopment District, including drainage improvements and landscaping. No privately owned property within the Derby North Gateway Redevelopment District shall be acquired and redeveloped pursuant to the Act if the Board of County Commissioners of Sedgwick County or the Board of Education of Unified School District No.  260 determines

that the Derby North Gateway Redevelopment District will have an adverse effect on Sedgwick County or Unified School District No. 260, respectively. A complete text of the Ordinance may be obtained or viewed free of charge at the

office of the City Clerk, City This Summary is hereby Hall, 611 N. Mulberry, Derby, certified to be legally accurate Kansas 67037. A reproduction and sufficient pursuant to the of the Ordinance is available for laws of the State of Kansas. not less than 7 days following DATED: May 28, 2013 the publication date of this City Attorney Summary at www.derbyweb. com.

EXHIBIT B – MAP OF REDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT

said right-of-way line to a point on the S line of said Sec. 25, 188.61 feet, more or less, east of southwest Corner of said Sec. 25; thence south 60 feet; thence west parallel with said south line 39.09 feet, more or less, to a point on the extended westerly edge of the State Highway K-15 Frontage Road pavement; thence southerly on said westerly edge of pavement, and westerly edge of pavement extended to a point on the north line extended of Wal-Mart Addition said point also being on the north line of the southwest ¼ Section 36, Township 28 south, Range 1E; thence east along north line of said Wal-Mart Addition extended to the east line of State Highway K-15 right-ofway; thence east 233.82 feet, north 128.01 feet and east 814.90 feet more or less, along the northerly line of said Wal-Mart Addition to a point being 24.73’ west of the northeast corner of said Wal-Mart Addition, said point also being on the west line of Lot 20, Block 1, Old Ranch Addition; thence northerly 43.74 feet to the northwest corner of said Lot 20; thence east along the north line said Lot 20 to the west line of Duckcreek Lane; thence north along the west line of Duckcreek Lane to the southeast corner of Lot 19, Block 1, Old Ranch Addition; thence west along south line of said Lot 19 to the southwest corner said Lot 19; thence northeasterly along the westerly line of Lots 6-19 inclusive to the north line of said Old Ranch Addition; thence east along said north line and north line extended to a point being 40’ east of the west line of NE ¼ Section 36, T28S, R1E; said point being on the east right-of-way line of Buckner Street; thence north along east right-of-way line of Buckner to the northwest corner Lot 1, Block 1, Ridgepoint 4th Addition; thence north 150’ to the point of beginning.

Legal Publication (Published in The Derby Informer on June 5, 2013) ORDINANCE NO. 2159 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SUBSECTIONS 701, 702, 704, 705 AND 706 OF ARTICLE 7 OF THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS. BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF DERBY, KANSAS; SECTION 1. Section 701 of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas, is hereby amended to read as follows; provided, that except as amended hereby, said section 701 shall remain in full force and effect: a. The following definitions contained in said section shall be amended to read as follows: ANIMATED SIGN: A sign or display manifesting either kinetic or illusionary motion utilizing natural, manual, mechanical, electrical or other means. (See also and note difference from Changeable Copy Sign.) Animated signs include the following types: 1. Electrically Energized: Illuminated signs whose motion or visual impression of motion is activated primarily by electrical means. [See Flashing Sign and Illusionary Movement Sign.] 2. Mechanically Energized: Signs manifesting a repetitious pre-programmed physical

movement or rotation in either one or a series of planes activated by means of mechanically based drives. 3. Naturally Energized: Signs whose motion is activated by wind or other atmospheric influence. Wind-driven signs include flags, banners, pennants, streamers, spinners, metallic disks or other similar devices designed to move in the wind. COPY: The graphic content of a sign surface in permanent, removable or electronic letter, pictographic, symbolic or alphabetic form. ELECTRONIC MESSAGE SIGN: For the purpose of this regulation, the term electronic message sign shall refer to all electrically activated changeable signs whose variable message and/or graphic presentation capability can be electronically programmed by computer from a remote location. Electronic Message Signs also include Video Display Signs. FLASHING SIGN: Illuminated signs exhibiting a preprogrammed repetitious cyclical interruption of illumination from one or more sources in which the duration of the period of illumination (on phase) is either the same as or less than the duration

of the period of darkness (off phase), and in which the intensity of illumination varies from zero (off) to 100% (on) during the programmed cycle. An Electronic Message Sign is considered flashing if the intensity of illumination fluctuates from high to low in a single frame or if copy changes more frequently than 1 frame per 2 seconds. ILLUMINATED SIGN: A sign with an artificial light source, either projecting through its surface (internally illuminated) or reflecting off its surface (externally illuminated). b. Said section shall be amended by addition thereto of definitions for the following terms: BLINKING SIGN: See Flashing Sign. CANDELA: The basic unit of measurement of light in metric units. C A N D E L A P E R S Q UA R E METER (cd/m²): The metric measurement unit used to describe the luminance of a light source or of an illuminated surface that reflects light. Also referred to as Nits. DISPLAY TIME: The amount of time a message and/or graphic is displayed on an Electronic Message Sign.

DISSOLVE: A mode of message transition on an Electronic Message Sign accomplished by varying the light intensity or pattern, in which the first message gradually appears to dissipate and lose legibility with the gradual appearance and legibility of the second message. DYNAMIC FRAME EFFECT: An Electronic Message Sign frame effect in which the illusion of motion and/or animation is used. FADE: A mode of message transition on an Electronic Message Sign accomplished by varying the light intensity, where the first message gradually reduces intensity to the point of not being legible and the subsequent message gradually increases intensity to the point of legibility. FRAME: A complete, static display screen on an Electronic Message Sign. FRAME EFFECT: A visual effect on an Electronic Message Sign applied to a single frame. See also Dynamic Frame Effect. ILLUMINANCE: The amount of light falling upon a real or imaginary surface, commonly called “light level” or “illumination.” ILLUSIONARY MOVEMENT SIGN: Illuminated sign exhibiting

the illusion of movement by means of a pre-programmed repetitious sequential switching action in which illuminated elements of the sign are turned on or off to visually simulate the impression or motion characteristic of chasing, running, blinking, oscillating, twinkling , scintillating or expanding and contracting light patterns. LUMINANCE: Light that is emitted by or reflected from a surface. Measured in units of luminous intensity (candelas) per unit area (square meters in metric measurement units). Expressed in metric units as cd/m². Commonly referred to as “nits.” MESSAGE SEQUENCING: The act of displaying portions or segments of a single message on multiple frames, thus requiring the receiver of the message to hold attention on a sign for a prolonged period of time in order to comprehend the complete message. NIT (NITS): A photometric unit of measurement referring to luminance. One nit is equal to one candela per square meter (cd/m²). SCROLL: A mode of message transition on an Electronic Message Sign in which the

message appears to move vertically across the display surface. TRANSITION: A visual effect used on an Electronic Message Sign to change from one message to another. TRAVEL: A mode of message transition on an Electronic Message Sign in which the message appears to move horizontally across the display surface. VIDEO DISPLAY SIGN: A sign on which the copy changes in a manner or method of display characterized by motion, pictorial imagery or text and depicts action or illusionary movement. SECTION 2. Section 702 of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas is hereby amended to read as follows; provided, that except as amended hereby, said section 702 shall remain in full force and effect: a. Subsection E. of said section shall be amended to read as follows: E. Flashing, Blinking, and Strobe Lights. b. Said section shall be amended by addition thereto of the following subsections: please see

2159,

page

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2159 From Page 22 K. Electronic Message Signs on moving vehicles. L. Signs which employ sound projecting devices or audio content. SECTION 3. Section 704 of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas is hereby amended to read as follows; provided, that except as amended hereby, said section 704 shall remain in full force and effect: a. Subsection A.2. of said section shall read as follows: 2. Electronic message signs may be approved by the Planning Commission if presented during Site Plan Review. Existing signs may be replaced with an electronic message sign or the electrically activated changeable copy feature may be added to an existing sign with the approval of the Zoning Administrator or his designated representative. b. Subsection E. of said section is hereby amended to read as follows: E. Illuminated Signs:

1. Residential Restriction: Illuminated signs located in any residential district shall be shaded as necessary to avoid casting bright light upon adjacent property. 2. Electronic Message Signs: The following provisions shall apply to all existing and new electronic message signs: a. Electronic message signs greater than 25 square feet that comprise all or part of a sign shall not exceed 25% of the gross surface area of the sign; provided, however, that no electronic message sign comprising all or part of a sign shall exceed 50 square feet. b. No electronic message sign shall be installed, nor shall any existing sign be replaced by or modified by the addition thereto of an electronic message sign within 100 ft. of a property zoned R-1, R-1A, R-1B or R-1C, as measured from the nearest edge of the sign to the nearest property line of the residential zoned property. c. No electronic message sign or portion of a sign with an

electronic message feature shall be located closer than 50 linear feet to an existing electronic message sign. d. Brightness limits shall be set at a maximum of 5,000 nits between sunrise and sunset, and at a maximum of 500 nits between sunset and sunrise. Each electronic message sign shall be equipped with a light sensing device to automatically adjust the brightness in accordance with these standards. e. F ra m es s h a l l h ave a minimum display time of two (2) seconds per frame. Display times less than two (2) seconds per frame shall be considered flashing. f. The owner of an electronic message sign shall provide contact information for a person who is available to be contacted at any time and who is able to turn off the electronic sign promptly if a malfunction occurs. g. If at any time, the display of an electronic message sign malfunctions or is no longer working, said electronic

message sign shall be subject to the maintenance provisions of Section 704.G. h. Should any electronic message sign be found by the Zoning Administrator to compromise the safety of vehicular or pedestrian traffic, or otherwise be injurious to surrounding properties, the owner of the sign shall reduce the intensity of the sign to a level acceptable to the City. S EC T I O N 4 . S u b s e c t i o n 705.C.2. of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas, is hereby amended by addition of subparagraph “h.” and shall read as follows: h. Political signs shall be picked-up or removed within seven (7) days from the end of the election or from the time the candidate or issue is no longer relevant. The Zoning Administrator or designee is authorized to remove political signs remaining after seven (7) days from the end of an election or from the time the sign is no longer relevant. SECTION 5. Section 706

of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas is hereby amended to read as follows; provided, that except as amended hereby, said Section 706 shall remain in full force and effect: a. Subsection B.4. of said section shall read as follows: 4. Illumination: Illuminated signs shall be authorized in accordance with Section 704.E. of this Ordinance. b. Subsection C.4. of said section shall read as follows: 4. Illumination: Illuminated signs shall be authorized in accordance with Section 704.E. of this Ordinance. c. Subsection D. of said section shall hereby be amended by addition thereto of the following sub paragraphs 3. and 4.: 3. Required Setback: None. 4. Illumination: Illuminated signs shall be authorized in accordance with Section 704.E. of this Ordinance. d. Subsection E.4. of said section shall read as follows: 4. Illumination: Illuminated signs shall be authorized in

accordance with Section 704.E. of this Ordinance. SEC TION 6. All original provisions of sections 701, 702, 704, 705 and 706 of the Zoning Ordinance of the City of Derby, Kansas, as hereby amended, shall remain in full force and effect. SECTION 7. If any part of this ordinance is determined by a court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid, such invalidity shall not affect the validity of the remaining parts of this ordinance. SECTION 8. This Ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after its adoption and publication once in the official City newspaper. ADOPTED BY THE GOVERNING BODY this 28th day of May, 2013. Dion P. Avello, Mayor ATTEST: Jean Epperson, City Clerk Approved as to form: Kevin O’Connor, City Attorney

HAYSVILLE: City finds county not performing home inspections From Page 10 we’re giving, we would surely like to reconcile that,” said Stolz. “It’s just going to be the philosophy of this merged operation. Since the merger, we’re trying to make an effort to complete the merger successfully and to work with small municipalities within the county. No one from Haysville ever formally

contacted our office to talk about some of these issues, all of which could have been worked out. “Small municipalities have home rule,” said Stolz. “They can do what they want and I would never for a second try to tell them what to do. In hindsight, I guess I wish I would have reached out to Haysville and made sure that everything was OK, but I didn’t hear

anything so I assumed everything was OK.” Stolz said he plans to contact the city of Haysville to talk through its decision. “It would be my hope that in the future as we work through this merger, that we can have dialogue between all the municipalities in Sedgwick County, not just Wichita, and come up with streamlined approaches to consolidate whatever we

WALK: Pilgrimage tests youth From Page 12 dying in a Korean War POW camp. Kapaun posthumously received the Medal of Honor in April. He was recognized by the Roman Catholic Church as a “Servant of God” in 1993 – the second step in the process for canonization as a saint. Dawdy said one of the things that impressed him about Kapaun was that when he was a boy he would get to school early so he could help serve mass. “He was always really dedicated to Christ and I could relate to that, and try

to be more like him at my age,” he said. Dawdy, who is an avid basketball player, said his feet were very sore, but he made it through the 60-mile journey without blisters. Sophee King, who will be an eighth grader at St. Mary Parish Catholic School this fall, had a rougher time physically. “When my pains in my knee first started, I thought that the walk was a waste of time,” she said. “But as they gradually got worse, I realized that I was only experiencing a little of what Kapaun faced.” King said she kept in mind a relative who is

having troubles in life right now and has fallen in his faith. “I tried to keep my mind on him and forget about the pain, even though that was hard,” she said. “When we prayed a rosary it felt in my mind like our own war. I learned that as long as I set a new goal each time I can always succeed.” King said she also learned that making the pain a mental offering to God helped. “It felt amazing after we finished,” she said. “I plan on telling my children one day about the story of Kapaun and how I became a part of the pilgrimage.”

HAWVER: Sine die is June 20 From Page 11 down due to budget cuts. The process will continue long after lawmakers have returned home to real work. Next? It’s the usually largely ceremonial sine die (that’s Latin for “without d a y, ” w h i c h m e a n s “without assigning a day for a further meeting or hearing”). June 20 is the absolute adjournment of the Legislature for this year. Will it be just a meet-

and-greet? Or will there be some so-far undiscovered problem that will require actual legislation? We won’t know for a couple weeks… But most legislators will have until June 20 to do some other important work. They can’t legally drop in the mail requests for campaign contributions from corporations, unions and political action groups until the gavel falls on sine die. So, they’ll probably be busy figuring out how to

write those letters seeking contributions based on what they voted for and against this session. –– Syndicated by Hawver News Company LLC of Topeka; Martin Hawver is publisher of Hawver’s Capitol Report. To learn more about this nonpartisan statewide political news service, visit the website at www.hawvernews.com.

can between governments to facilitate building and construction in our cities and our county,” he said. The termination agreement takes effect 30 days from the time it is received, Black said.

The city employee who conducted inspections before the 2011 agreement with the county will reassume the position once again. “He has kept up inspection credentials the

past two years,” said Black. “He’s been working on the inspections that the county did not do per the agreement plus code enforcement and other tasks.”

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STAMPS: Welfare doesn’t create jobs From Page 3 debt ceiling with $16.7 trillion in debt, and spending on means-tested welfare programs, which include food stamps, is the fastest growing component of government. Not only can high debt from increased spending reduce opportunity, but welfare spending itself can impose substantial non-economic costs: discouraging work, rewarding government dependence, and eroding p e r s o n a l d i g n i t y. A s President Franklin Roosevelt, certainly no conservative, said in 1935: “Continued dependence upon relief induces a spiritual and moral disintegration fundamentally destructive to the national fibre. To dole out relief in this way

is to administer a narcotic, a subtle destroyer of the human spirit.” When President Lyndon B. Johnson launched the “War on Poverty” in the 1960s, he stated that it would strike “at the causes, not just the consequences of poverty,” and also said that the goal “is not only to relieve the symptom of poverty, but to cure it and, above all, to prevent it.” Yet, for the past five decades the federal government’s approach to helping those in need has meant getting more people onto welfare. Policies over the past decade or so, for example, have loosened the requirements for food stamp enrollment, and today the U.S. Department of Agriculture even operates food stamp outreach programs. For example,

government-paid recruiters hold bingo games and “parties” to try to get more people on food stamps who might not otherwise seek taxpayer assistance. A growing welfare system is not only bad news for the economy, but bad news for Americans in need. Instead of continuing on this same failed course, Congress should work to ensure that welfare programs like food stamps promote selfsufficiency through work. Also, the continuous growth in welfare spending which has taken place – recession or not – should be rolled back when employment rates recover. Not only is this sound fiscal policy, but it is policy that puts the best interests of individuals first.

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Page 24 • Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Derby Informer • www.derbyinformer.com

Online fundraiser a success for DHS band The band will keep all money donated, minus a news@derbyinformer.com 5 percent fee kept by the website. Donations can be The Derby High School band made through Saturday, June raised its goal of $5,000 in just 13 8. days. The dollars raised The online campaign is a first for band members who asked people to will be used for music, make donations at www.kickstarter. choreography and equipment. “I would like to thank com instead of traditional fundraiser everybody,” said Adam tactics such as car washes or sales. Devault, director of The band had 30 days to raise bands. “It’s been a $5,000. If the band failed to reach really successful that goal, all pledges would be fundraiser and we lost. As of Monday, the band had will probably use raised $5,835, said Suzanne Lane, it again in the fundraising chair for the Derby future.” Band Boosters. By Ginger G. Golden

GINGER G. GOLDEN/Informer photo

Rain doesn’t dampen spirits at Cub Scout camp Over 160 Cub Scouts attended the Quivira Council Day Camp Thursday through Saturday. Rain Thursday caused the camp to move from High Park to Madison Avenue Central Park. Campers took a swim at Rock River Rapids Friday morning before resuming activities at High Park. From left, Derby scouts Jeremy Miranda, Bobby Harvey and Adrian Romero test their skills at firing BB guns at paper targets.

Ottaway Amusement Carnival Rides

AMUSEM

E N T CO.

COMING TO DERBY

June 13, 14, 15 and 16th

Located at the Derby High School parking lot

How to donate

• Go to www.kickstarter.com and search for Derby Panthers Marching Band. Use a credit card to pledge a donation. The money will not be taken off the card until fund-raising goals are met. Rewards for donors: • Donate $10 and receive a digital ringtone of the Derby Panther Fight Song. • Donate $25 and receive a ringtone and a band T-shirt. • Donate $100 and receive a ringtone, a band T-shirt and two tickets to a home football game to watch the band perform live at halftime. • Donate $500 and the band will perform live at an event of your choosing. This could be a party, a parade, a grand opening or a community event. The time will have to be coordinated with Adam Devault, band director, so as not to conflict with regular marching events.

Back again this year

“Rock Star” ese See th rides ar popul ny other a m d an tes! favori

Down Draft More fun than you can imagine!

Every Day is Wrist Band Day!!

Wrist Band Sessions

Thurs..........6-10 p.m. Fri...............6-10 p.m. Sat..............11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat..............5-10 p.m. Sun.............1-5 p.m.

EASY PARKING! Park close this year – no shuttles. Parking is available on the north side of the high school. This provides easy access to the carnival rides and offers plenty of room.

Ride ALL the rides Concessions Available Stay cool with ice cold with a wristbandon beverages. Enjoy some No butt required tasty treats, too! only $22 this year!

Courtesy photo

Tanner Beilman marches w i t h t h e D e r by H i g h School band.

Father’s Day

June 16th Get some fast, easy gift ideas next week in our Father’s Day Gift Card Guide!


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