Page 1

FALL  /  WI NTER 2014  /  2 0 1 5

T hi nk , Shop & Bu y

LOCAL

go

Local FLATHEAD

guide to FLATHEAD BUSINESSES

A FREE Guide to Supporting Locally Owned FLATHEAD VALLEY Businesses


Shop Local Businesses! The Flathead Valley is unlike any other place in the world. By choosing to support locally owned businesses, you help to maintain our community’s diversity and distinctive flavor. This Go Local Flathead shopping guide has been cooperatively produced by the businesses featured in this publication. The goals of this guide are to encourage education and awareness about the benefits of buying local, and to increase support for local business owners in their stewardship of our community. One-of-a-kind businesses are an integral part of the distinctive character of the Flathead Valley. A growing body of economic research shows that in an increasingly homogenized world, entrepreneurs and skilled workers are more likely to invest and settle in communities that preserve their one-ofa-kind businesses and distinctive character. Here in the Flathead Valley – preserving our distinctive community character also helps to support and benefit our tourism businesses. Benefits of Buying Local: • It keeps dollars in our economy. Of every $1.00 spent at a local business $.45 is reinvested locally. For every $1.00 spent at a non-local business only 15 cents is reinvested locally. • It makes us unique. There’s no place like the Flathead! Homegrown businesses are part of what makes us special. • It creates local jobs. Local businesses are the best at creating higher-paying jobs for our neighbors. • It helps the environment. Buying locally saves transportation fuel. Plus you get products that you know are safe and well made, because our neighbors stand behind them. • It nurtures our community. Studies show that local businesses donate to community causes at more than twice the rate of chains. • It supports local farms and helps preserve the Flathead Landscape. In the 1950s, we in Montana grew 70% of our food. Today, we grow only about 13% of the food we eat. This guide recognizes the value of all businesses in the community, but it is beyond the scope and scale of this publication to include businesses with national/international corporate structures. Best Wishes for Winter Fun in the Flathead, From Your Local Business Community Email us at golocal@golocalflathead.org or call us at 756-8993

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Index of Businesses Bigfork DINE & UNWIND

Paint Metal and Mud..................inside front cover GROW

Somers Bay Café................................................65 Tamarack Brewing Company.............................50

SERVICE

ARTrageous........................................................64

ShowThyme.......................................................12 Whistling Andy/The Raven................................13

Potting Studio....................................................49

EXPERIENCE

Able Body Collision Repair................................26 AirWorks............................................................43 Alpine Interiors..................................................54 Calm Animal Care.............................................54 Centennial Timber Frames.................................40 Evergreen Compounding Pharmacy...................32 Lowitz Custom Shoppe......................................59 M and C Tire.....................................................37 McGarvey, Heberling, Sullivan & Lacey, PC............40 Measure, Sampsel, Sullivan & O’Brien, PC........59 Medical Arts Pharmacy......................................61 Montana Tile and Marble ..................................31 Paper Chase Copy Center..................................26 Park Side Credit Union......................................49 Silverbrook Estates...........................................578 Valley Bank........................................................38 Western Building Center....................................66 Whitefish Credit Union.....................................82 Whitetail Bookkeeping.......................................59

Persimmon Gallery.............................................12 INDULGE

Bigfork Beauty Shop............................................9 Bigfork Dance....................................................83 SERVICE

Partners West Realty.............................................9 Pets Plus.............................................................11 SHOP

Brett Thuma Gallery..........................................11 Jug Tree................................................................9 Kehoe’s Agate Shop..............................................9 STAY

Islander Inn........................................................13

C o l u m b i a F a l l s / We s t G l a c i e r DINE & UNWIND

Belton Chalet.....................................................21 EXPERIENCE

Swan Mountain Snowmobiling..........................24 SERVICE

Freedom Bank....................................................19 Imagine Health..................................................23 Park Side Credit Union......................................49 Western Building Center....................................66 Whitefish Credit Union.....................................82 SHOP

Bad Rock Books.................................................21 Eagles Nest Antiques & Home Décor................24 Hungry Horse Liquor Store................................24 The Montana House..........................................20

K alispell DINE & UNWIND

Bonelli’s Bistro...................................................37 Ceres Bakery......................................................32 Hop’s Downtown Grill.......................................57 Kalispell Brewing Company...............................27 The Knead Cafe.................................................59 EXPERIENCE

Conrad Mansion................................................28 Hockaday Museum of Art..................................28 Joanna Griffin Pottery..........................................37 Kalispell Downtown Association. inside back cover Museum at Central School.................................28 Noice Studio and Gallery...................................59

SHOP

Beckman’s Fine Furnishings.................... 44-45, 57 Brix Bottleshop...................................... 33, 44-45 Buckskin Clothier..............................................27 Coins & Carats..................................................55 Fawn Boutique...................................................48 First Choice Décor.............................................55 Flowers by Hansen.............................................53 Imagination Station............................................82 J2 Office Products..............................................53 Kalispell Antiques Market..................................29 Mountain Valley Foods......................................39 Norm’s News......................................................51 Powder Horn Trading Co...................................48 Rocky Mountain Outfitter.................................33 Sassafras.............................................................31 Snappy’s Sport Senter.........................................41 The Bookshelf....................................................26 Think Local........................................................86 Trailhead Supply................................................46 Western Outdoor...............................................51 Wheaton’s..........................................................29 Wheeler Jewelry.................................................53 Withey’s Health Foods.......................................61 STAY

Aero Inn.............................................................55

L a ke s i d e / S o m e r s DINE & UNWIND

Farmhouse..........................................................43

EXPERIENCE SERVICE

Remedies Lakeside.............................................42 SHOP

Lakeside Ski & Sports........................................65 Remedies Lakeside.............................................42

Whitefish DINE & UNWIND

Amazing Crepes.................................................81 Central Ave. Bakery & Deli................................71 Jersey Boys Pizzeria.............................................74 Stumptown Marketplace.............................. 44-45 EXPERIENCE

Heart of Whitefish.................... outside back cover North Valley Music School.................................69 Stumptown Art Studio.......................................74 The Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery..........69 Whitefish Pottery...............................................71 Whitefish Theatre Company..............................69 INDULGE

Copperleaf Chocolat Company..........................75 Healing Spirits Therapeutic Massage..................81 Whitefish Dance................................................83 SERVICE

Bohemian Hall...................................................80 Park Side Credit Union......................................49 Western Building Center....................................66 Whitefish Credit Union.....................................82 Wildwood Eccentrics.........................................78 SHOP

Bookworks.........................................................83 Copperleaf Consignment Clothing....................75 Crystal Winters..................................................68 Don K Subaru......................................................6 Imagination Station............................................82 Nelson’s Ace Hardware.......................................79 Northwind Shirt Co...........................................75 Rocks & Things.................................................80 Sage & Cedar.....................................................77 Sprouts...............................................................71 Stumptown Marketplace.............................. 44-45 Third Street Market............................................68 The Treasure Outpost.........................................78 Voyager Booksellers............................................75

F l at h e a d Va l l e y

Citizens for a Better Flathead.............................62

A c kn o wl ed gem en t s A special Thank You to the volunteers who helped with this issue and without whom this publication couldn’t happen: B.J. Carlson, Jeanne Carlson, Susannah Casey, Sarah Dakin, Sharon DeMeester, Dianne Grove, Cathy McDevitt, Jan Metzmaker, Linda Newgard, Don Schwennesen, Pauline Sjordal, KC Voermans, Lynn Wallingford-Cochrane, and the staff of Citizens for a Better Flathead – Hilary Doran, Mayre Flowers, Julian Lafaye, and Patrick Malone. Cover Photo: John Ashley Fine Art Photography.

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Inside this Issue Local Business Spotlight Bigfork Beauty Shop by Patrick Malone Freedom Bank by Mayre Flowers Sassafras by Patrick Malone Flowers by Hansen by Barb Nelson Hop’s Downtown Grill by Patrick Malone Whitefish Pottery by Patrick Malone Sage & Cedar by Barb Nelson

Bigfor k 7 8 18 30 52 56 70 76

What The Locals Think Bigfork

Pets Plus.........................................................11 Whistling Andy..............................................12

Columbia Falls

The Montana House......................................20 Park Side Credit Union..................................20 Bad Rock Books.............................................21 Swan Mountain Snowmobiling......................24

Kalispell

Kalispell Antiques...........................................29 Montana Tile and Marble...............................31 Brix Bottleshop..............................................33 M & C Tire....................................................37 J2 Office Products..........................................53 Calm Animal Care.........................................54

Lakeside/Somers

Farmhouse......................................................16 Lakeside Ski & Sports....................................67

Less Stuff, More Heart: 5 Gifts on a New Dad’s Christmas List........................... 10 by Christopher Zumski Finke

Bank Local for Economic Growth......... 14 by Patrick Malone and Mayre Flowers

Columbia Falls / West Glacier

17

Gateway to Glacier Trail: Invest in Our Future Community, Safety & Families.... 22 by Alan Ruby

Kalispell 25 Surprising Finds Await Holiday Explorers.......................................... 34 by Anne Clark

Pharmaceutical Waste in the Flathead.................................. 60

Lakeside/Somers 63 Whitefish................ 67 Remedial Burns................................. 72 by Gary Ferguson

Flathead Valley Community Calendar.... 84

Whitefish

Central Ave. Bakery........................................71 Copperleaf Chocolat Company......................74 Nelson’s Ace Hardware...................................78 Rocks & Things.............................................80

Cover photo by John Ashley Fine Art Photography. Prints are available at www.johnashleyfineart.com.

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Bigfork To Kalispell

Stage Ridge Rd.

35 Holt

Dr.

Commerce St.

N

Osborn Ave.

Electric Ave.

Grand Dr.

Bridge St.

35

To Polson

To Evergreen

35 To Kalispell

83

Hanging Rock Dr.

Holt Dr.

82

Flathead Lake

Chapman Hill Rd

Holt Dr. Holt Dr.

Swan Highway

35 83

Bigfork To Polson

To Swan Lake


Local Business Spotlight • Bigfork Beauty Shop

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

B

igfork Beauty Shop began in the early 1940s reports current owner Amber Rae McCoard. Amber and her family relocated to Bigfork from Ogden, UT in 2007. After working at Bigfork Beauty for only two years, she purchased the business in October 2012 when the previous owner decided to either sell or close. “Owning my own full service beauty shop was the last thing on my mind; or I thought I would always simply lease booth space,” states Amber Rae. Amber Rae received the professional training to transform a hobby into a profession and the ultimate career while she was still in Utah. It was her training at Stacy’s Hands of Champions that led to her certification. She’s been a licensed beautician for 23 years. “Helping people look and feel good is why I do this. I really get paid to do something I love to do,” notes Amber. One of the most challenging things about owning and operating a beauty shop is keeping up with beauty trends. New styles and changes in popular looks among Hollywood and other celebrities present challenges when customers come in whose hair type or texture and whose facial features don’t fit the style. “Convincing someone to explore their own unique appearance and set aside the picture from the magazine they walked in with is both challenging and rewarding,” says Amber Rae. “My other big challenge is fixing home mistakes. Some customers attempt to copy a style they like and then I often end up fixing their mistakes.” Amber Rae’s advice for someone desiring to go into the industry is to “stick with it and build a strong client

base. It can be very rewarding.” Part of her initial inspiration came from an uncle who was also in the beauty industry and kept encouraging and teaching her. As a full-service shop, Amber Rae not only offers haircuts but also full service coloring, permanent waves waxing, nails, manicures, pedicures, and have staff trained in all aspects of hair and nail care. The shop also offers numerous retail products for sale. “This shop has always been a cornerstone business in the community and builds on a strong tradition,” states Amber Rae. “We are very family oriented, and men represent about one-third of our clients. We have a very loyal customer base. Everyone is welcome. You’re treated like friends and family.” Amber Rae currently leases two booths in the shop to other beauty professionals and is looking to hire and expand herself. When not in her shop, Amber Rae loves to garden and fish. “Especially fish. Anywhere along the Swan River or Lake.” The Bigfork Beauty Shop is open Monday through Saturday from 8am to 8pm “or as late as they need me here.” Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments are recommended. In addition to the newly remodeled interior (which received a lot of customer input), Amber Rae also says that a new partnership with the Bigfork Food Pantry through an annual November-December fundraiser has been well received in the community. Amber and the Shop can be reached at 406.837.4303 and are located at 8270 Highway 35 in Bigfork.

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– Patrick Malone


9

Bigfork

Big fork Beauty Shop FULL SERVICE FAMILY HAIR CARE Hair Image Professionals Permanent Waves • Master Colorist Gel Nail Manicures Wedding Up-Dos Manis • Pedis • Waxing Walk-in Always Welcome

406 837.4304 Cell 270.8273

“The BEST Little Beauty Shop in Bigfork!”

Custom Jewelry | Agates Montana Sapphires | Treasures Precious Stones | and Engagement 1020 Holt Dr. Bigfork, MT 59911 406.837.4467 | kehoes11@centurytel.net www.kehoesagateshop.com

8270 Hwy 35, Bigfork, MT 59911

WHEN YOU BUY LOCAL YOU ARE

helping people in your community, not helping a CEO buy a third vacation home. You are helping a little girl get dance lessons, a little boy get a team jersey, a mom or dad put food on the table, a family pay mortgage, or a student pay for college. When you buy from local stores, you are not just being trendy, you are

MAKING THE PLACE YOU LIVE A BETTER PLACE.

Rose and Don Schwennesen rose@partnerswestrealty.com don@partnerswestrealty.com

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M otch ystack N r e Ha Crat

Call us for real estate (406) 837-2575

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THE FLATHEAD IS A RARE JEWEL HELP KEEP IT THAT WAY

104 Jewel Basin Court, Bigfork, MT 59911 www.partnerswestrealty.com


Less Stuff, More Heart 5 gifts on a new Dad’s Christmas List

This is my first Christmas as a father. Since my baby has never known holiday commercialism, it’s made me re-examine what I really want to ask for this year.

By Christopher Zumski Finke

Joshua Reap

A

s the snow falls over Bedford Falls in the final scene of It’s a Wonderful Life, the townspeople gather in the home of George Bailey to donate what money they can to help him stay out of the clutches of Mr. Potter. George has just returned to his family from his travels with the angel Clarence, who, in response to George’s suicidal contemplation, shows him what the world would lose if he’d never been born. George returns to his life, reinvigorated by a spirit of hope for the future and bolstered by the goodwill of those who love him. It’s a Wonderful Life is a Christmas movie, but it’s not about commercial exploitation and presents and marketing. It’s about real giving. No image of giving at Christmas means more to me than this film’s finale.I do sometimes wonder, now that we’ve got a child in the house, about how I should deal with the Christmas craze that has earmarked an entire season for buying and giving gifts. Six months ago I became a father, and this year will be my first Christmas with a child. I’m very much looking forward to it. My son doesn’t yet understand what happens in post-Thanksgiving American culture and Christmas does not yet mean anything to him—historically, religiously, or, best of all, commercially. I plan to make the most of these years while he’s young enough to not need gifts to be happy at Christmas; to try to show him it’s not about presents, but giving. To be sure, he’ll get presents. Many. He has two grandmothers, and they want his life to be full of love and learning—and toys. I do not blame them because I want his life to be full of these things too. But I do sometimes wonder, now that we’ve got a child in the house, about how I should deal with the Christmas craze that has earmarked an entire season for buying and giving gifts. I love Christmas. A whole lot. I try to be a conscious consumer, but it can be difficult in the overzealous commercial environment that is the United States in December. I get swept up in the season. I love the music and movies, the tree, the nog, the spirit of wonder and joy. I know

it’s sappy, but still love it. My love of the holiday relates directly to the connectedness it breeds: Connection to my family and friends, yes; but even more, a connectivity within our culture. Whether you celebrate Christmas or ignore it or despise it, you certainly cannot escape it. And one way connection occurs is through exchanging gifts to show appreciation for one another. A sizeable portion of our calendar and budgets are devoted to gift-giving. According to Gallup, the average American consumer will spend $786 this year on presents. Americans, it seems, love to buy gifts for others. Whether you find that number too high (or perhaps not high enough), apparently we’re going to spend it. And not just on babies. My son’s grandmothers also asked me for a Christmas list. I look around my home and our shelves are already full of the bits and bobs we give each other for the holidays. We’ve enough books to open a library and no place left to put any additions. Yet we keep asking for more (we all have our toys). Now, with the baby, our home is filled with even more stuff—plush animals and bouncy chairs and swings. And he’s yet to experience a single Christmas or birthday. So this year I made a holiday wish list, keeping in mind the good people of Bedford Falls. I know it’s not really necessary to spend almost $800 on stuff for our shelves— even on adorable six-month-old-baby stuff.

— 10 —

continues on page 58


11

B ifgof r o kr k Big

11

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12

Bigfork Go Local for Great Spirits Whistling Andy

“Its fabulous to have a local distillery in our community. It’s a warm and friendly atmosphere and the whiskey is excellent. Lots of flavour. It tastes the way it should. This is award winning.” Gina Burns and Pete Kobelt Whitefish


13

Bigfork

   



    “ True Artisan Craftsmanship” ~ Esquire pts Tasting Panel Magazine

Open 12-8 pm Thursday - Monday

Find Us: 8541 Hwy 35 Bigfork, MT 59911

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Bank local for

O

ngoing global and national financial crises have many of us wondering what happened to the good ol’ days when the money we earned, saved and invested was put to work locally to create new jobs and businesses in support of “Main Street” rather than “Wall Street.” How we spend, save and invest our money can have big implications for the health of our local economy. Nowhere may that be truer than where we deposit our money and who we turn to when we need a loan. Tracking Deposits of Local Financial Institutions:

Local banks and credit unions, by reinvesting the money we deposit here in the Flathead, and keeping it local, provide most of the lending to fuel new and existing local business growth. Public data available for Flathead County from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) reveal just how important banking locally can be to the Flathead economy. For purposes of this analysis we have divided all 15 financial institutions serving the Valley into three

Financial Institution: Freedom Bank Park Side Credit Union1 Three Rivers Bank Valley Bank West One Bank Whitefish Credit Union2 Flathead Bank Glacier Bank Rocky Mountain Bank American Bank Mountain West Bank First Montana Bank First Interstate Bank US Bank Wells Fargo

% Total Institutional Deposits Held Locally as of 6/30/14 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 46% 17% 12% 10% 8% 8% 4% <1% <1% $1,437,180,032,000 or a little more than 1.4 trillion dollars in total institutional deposits within all U.S. branches.

Grouping Local Local Local Local Local Local Regional Regional Regional Regional Regional Regional Non-Local Non-Local Non-Local

categories: “Local”, “Regional”, and “Non-Local.” The determinate we used was the percentage of their TOTAL bank wide deposits that are held in branches within the County. (So for instance, Wells Fargo (defined as NonLocal) had less than 1 percent of its total institutional deposits residing within its Flathead Valley branch whereas 100 percent of 6 community-based financial institutions deposits are held locally (and therefore they’ve been defined as Local). But, as you’ll see, defining “local” is not always cut and dry. Here then is a Table identifying all financial institutions, the percent of their total institutional deposits that are held locally, and then their grouping (as to local, regional or non-local): Local institutions were those with more than 50% of their total institutional deposits held locally. Regional institutions were those that held between 5 and 49% of their total institutional deposits within Flathead County and Non-Local were defined as those holding less than 5% of their total institutional deposits in the County. The pie chart on the next page presents summary information for deposits held by all three categories of financial institutions in Flathead County as of June 30, 2014. As you can see, local banks and credit unions are currently attracting 50 percent of all local deposits, followed by regional banks at 36 percent, and then followed by nonlocal banks at only 14 percent. What this data reveals is that of the roughly $2.9 billion in local financial institution deposits made in the Flathead, $1.47 billion is held by the six financial institutions we’ve deemed local and provides the basis for their local lending ability. Of the 36 percent of local deposits that regional banks attract in the Flathead, Glacier Bank is the biggest player here in the Flathead, and its share of this 36 percent is approximately 80 percent. All of the regional and one of the “non-local” banks (First Interstate) listed in our chart are headquartered in Montana. Each of these regional banks also have branches in other areas of the state and most in other states as well. Glacier Bank was founded and remains headquartered in Kalispell and has branches in other states as well. Glacier Bank and Rocky Mountain Bank, along with Wells Fargo, US Bank, and 1st Interstate also have stockholders and

— 14 —


economic growth 15

Bigfork

Flathead Valley Financial Institution Deposits by Type

14%

36%

50%

n Local n Regional n Non-Local

are publicly traded on national stock exchanges. So in addition to servicing and meeting the needs of those making deposits in their banks , they work to provide a good return to their stock holders. Local and regional banks, as we have defined them are sometimes lumped together as “community banks.” (See endnote iii and the section below on the challenges local banks face), As the term community implies these banks are often very committed to the local community where they are located and can provide generous donations and leadership to back numerous service and community projects as well as being a source of significant employment in the local economy. All banks and credit unions do much more than just safely hold our deposits. They are also a critical resource for a wide range of savings, lending and investment products that further compound money circulating in our local economy. For you and for me as customers, this means that while it’s good to bank local we also want to make sure we’re taking out locally generated and owned home mortgages, car loans, home equity loans, business loans and buying local Certificates of Deposit or creating locally owned and controlled IRAs and related investment products. When choosing between a local or regional bank you may want to ask if the loan you request will be held locally or packaged and sold on a secondary market. We are fortunate in the Flathead to celebrate many strong locally owned and controlled financial institutions, but to guarantee a healthy future we must continue (if not expand) our participation in them for all our banking needs. Like other parts of our economy, local banking

remains under intense pressure as larger regional and national banks are actively seeking to buy out smaller local banks. Choosing where to bank is no different than what we’ve experienced in the bookstore, grocery, general retail, and fast food markets – independent locally owned businesses face intense competition. If we want a strong and locally controlled economy, where decisions (like loans) are made right here in the Valley, and where the money we deposit is turned into local loans that stimulate our local economy then we must bank and shop locally. Local Banks Face Big Challenges According to The Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR), the ability of small businesses to finance growth today is largely dependent on the capacity of local community banks to lend them money. “Although small and mid-sized banks ($10 billion or less in assets) control only 22 percent of all bank assets nationally, they account for 54 percent of small business lending. Big banks, meanwhile, allocate relatively little of their resources to small businesses. The largest 20 banks, which now command 57 percent of all bank assets, devote only 18 percent of their commercial loan portfolios to small business.” (http://www.ilsr.org/overview-banking) “The number of community banks — those with a $1 billion in assets or less — has fallen by more than half, while the four biggest banks — Citigroup, JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo — now hold 42 percent of U.S. deposits and control nearly half of all bank assets”, according to research cited by ILSR.3 They conclude, “…This delinking of banks from their communities has opened up a vast distance between depositor, borrower and lender, and has spawned a financial system that devotes an increasing share of its resources to speculative activities over productive investments. Today, a growing number of economists, policymakers, and citizens believe that this separation was at the root of the financial sector’s collapse and that we ought to look at the benefits of moving toward a financial system that is primarily composed of independent banks and credit unions. Although severely diminished as a result of public policies embraced over

— 15 —


Bank local (continued from page 15) the last 30 years, our nation is still home to about 7,100 credit unions and more than 6,700 community banks” We Each Have a Role to Play in Growing the Flathead Economy by Banking Local As you can see from the data above, locally owned and/or controlled financial institutions in the Flathead represent the largest share of all Flathead County deposits as of June 30, 2014. At 50 percent of all deposits they are substantially larger than their regional and non-local bank counterparts. But…what if we still wanted to promote more local banking and experience a 1, 5, or even a 10 percent shift in banking from regional and non-local banks to local ones. Here is the result we would experience (these calculations are based upon the $1,457,572,000 deposits held in Flathead County by regional and nonlocal banks):

1% shift 5% shift 10% shift

= = =

$14,576,000 $72,879,000 $145,757,200

Go Local and Eat Well Farmhouse in Lakeside Town Center

If we were successful in shifting upwards of 10% of current deposits from regional and non-local banks to local financial institutions, it would represent an increase of just over $145 million in new deposits. An additional $145 million held by local financial institutions would have dramatic economic and financial impacts for Flathead County. Imagine the long-term economic impact from new loans for local small business, home mortgages, new home equity loans and lines of credit, new home improvement loans, new car and truck loans, new camper loans, etc. keeping and recirculating money locally would have a huge multiplier affect for many businesses throughout the Valley. Historically, across the nation about two-thirds of net new job creation has come from small business growth. Studies show locally owned businesses contribute significantly to the economic well-being and social capital of communities. Banking local where you live keeps your money growing the local economy. So make the shift, Bank Local and Shop Local.

– Patrick Malone and Mayre Flowers

Endnotes 1

Park Side Credit Union has seven branches located in the Flathead Valley and Missoula. Whitefish Credit Union has branches in Eureka, Polson and Thompson Falls. The Whitefish Credit Union was unable to provide us a percent breakout of deposits received at those branches as we go to print, but indicate they are a minor portion of their deposits.

2

Slightly more recent data available indicates an increase in the funds held by large banks. “As of third quarter 2012, there were approximately 5,600 commercial banking organizations in the U.S. The bulk of these—roughly 5,500—were community banks with assets of less than $10 billion. These community-focused organizations accounted for 98.6 percent of all banks but only 12 percent of total industry assets. Another group numbering nearly 70 banking organizations— with assets of between $10 billion and $250 billion—accounted for 1.2 percent of banks, while controlling 19 percent of industry assets. The remaining group, the megabanks—with assets of between $250 billion and $2.3 trillion—was made up of a mere 12 institutions. These dozen behemoths accounted for roughly 0.2 percent of all banks, but they held 69 percent of industry assets.” http://thinkprogress.org/ economy/2013/01/28/1502421/chart-largest-bank-assets/

3

“Came over for our wedding. The restaurant was recommended to us by locals. Very interesting menu with lots of locally sourced ingredients. Great food and service.”

Brien Thame and Janet Masella Bellingham, WA

— 16 —


R

St

C St

2nd St 3rd St

3rd Ave E

1st Ave E

1st St

2nd Ave E

A St

4th Ave E

B St

5th Ave E

ad ailro

6th Ave E

Columbia Falls/ West Glacier

7th St

5th St 4th Ave E

1st Ave W

6th St

Nucleus

9th St

8th St 9th St 3rd Ave E

5th Ave W

2

2nd Ave W

To Kalispell & Whitefish

3rd Ave W

4th Ave W

5th St

2nd Ave E

4thSt

11th St

Bills Ln To Glacier National Park

2 Glacier National Park West Entrance West Glacier

2 Coram To Columbia Falls

2 To Essex, East Glacier & Browning

N


Local Business Spotlight • Freedom Bank

Basement Start-up Makes Columbia Falls Proud

D

on Bennett smiles as he recounts how he and his wife, Barbara, first began Freedom Bank in the basement of their home in 2005. Their slogan at the time was “You have to start somewhere!” This slogan held true when later they moved the bank into a trailer house complete with a cracked window, a resident mouse, and all the challenges a trailer home can have. All this time, though, they were working hard, saving and planning for the bank’s future home. Today, Freedom Bank is located at 530 9th St. W., just off of US Hwy 2 in Columbia Falls, in an eye-catching, handsomely designed, energy efficient, low maintenance, and beautifully landscaped building, which they had built by local contractors. Bennett was no stranger to the banking business before founding and opening Freedom Bank. He spent most of his career with First Citizens Bank in downtown Columbia Falls (1984-2004) and served as Chairman of the Board from 1991 to 2004. When he left First Citizens Bank he felt the time was right for the establishment of a new independent bank with local decision-making capabilities in Columbia Falls. He also came to realize that he was something of a “closet entrepreneur.” Like so many other entrepreneurs he had come to love and respect for their courage in stepping into the unknown to achieve their vision and dreams, he too met this calling and dove in with all he had. Yet only a few years into this venture, they along with the rest of the county, faced the tough challenges of the economic downturn. Today, Freedom Bank is vital and growing, and he is so glad he followed his entrepreneurial passion. He is also very proud that during the economic downturn Freedom

Bank stuck with every single person through thick and thin. This level of commitment is coming full circle today as the bank sees much of their growth coming from word-of-mouth referrals from loyal customers. Bennett says, “We aren’t everything to everybody, but we are always true. We are committed to the golden rule of doing unto others as you would have them do unto you.” “Being able to make decisions for his customers quickly and independently is one of the great strengths of being a locally owned bank,” Bennett says. “We have a commitment to take the time to listen and get to know our customers,” he adds. Someone coming in looking for help launching a new business may not be the most organized and it takes willingness to listen and understand his or her ideas and goals. “We may not always be able to give them the answer they want, but we work hard to find a way to work with them.” Bennett’s entrepreneurial talents are helping Freedom Bank plan for the future. Unlike banks that grow by adding branches, he sees Freedom Bank expanding into technology that will allow them to serve more customers with innovative remote technology features, all while avoiding the costs that adding new branches and personnel can bring. Technology is also helping the bank work smart and cut costs. Bennett is a co-founder and CEO for a start-up banking software company, e-Financial Solutions, Inc., which enables Freedom Bank and others to operate efficiently and paperless. A quote on the bank’s website says, “Freedom is not given, it’s earned.” Given this bank’s history, it can certainly be said that it has earned it’s name, and made Columbia Falls proud. – Mayre Flowers

— 18 —


Columbia Falls/West Glacier

19


20

Columbia Falls/West Glacier Go Local for Unique Montana-Made Crafts

Go Local to Manage Your Money

The Montana House

Park Side Credit Union

“Love the local Montana-made products and books on local flora and fauna. There are so many things to choose from and quality of the products is amazing.”

“Very friendly staff. Very helpful. Good location and great rates on loans. Nice, new clean facility.”

Carol Neuman Center, Texas

Elissa Owen Kalispell


21

Columbia Falls/West Glacier

The Historic

Belton Chalet Extraordinary Dining with Glacier Park Views

Go Local to Expand Your Mind Bad Rock Books

Belton Grill Dining Room & Tap Room Open December 12th - March 28

“Glad to have a used bookstore in town and with such a wide selection of topics. Great to be able to trade books and sell used books. Carol and staff are very friendly and helpful.”

Kathlyn Yeager Columbia Falls

Friday & Saturday Tap Room & Dining Room – 5-9 Saturday Live Music – 7-9 Sunday Brunch 10am - 2pm

Come-as-you-are Fine Dining featuring Montana grown foods, craft beers, fine wines & spirits

Winter Lodging

Cottages • Adobe House

A nationallyacclaimed, non-profit journal publishing the distinctive literature, art, and photography of mountain culture.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Weddings ~ Private Parties Business Functions

One of the most refreshing journals to hit the literary scene in years. – Doug Peacock, Author Whitefish Review’s next submission period is January 15 through March 15 for the summer issue. Winter issue #16 (The Geography of Hope) will be released Sat., Dec. 13 with an author reading by Cristina Eisenberg at Casey’s in Whitefish. Visit www.whitefishreview.org for information and submission guidelines

West Glacier

12575 Highway 2 East

(406) 888-5000

beltonchalet.com


Gateway to Glacier Trail:

Invest in our future community, safety and fam ilies

H

ard to believe that a dream conceived locally in the 1970’s can get new life in the 21st century. Of course I’m talking about the Gateway To Glacier Trail’s (GTG-T) separated pedestrian, bicycle path from Columbia Falls to West Glacier Not just a breath of life, but a giant leap forward so that almost 8 miles of new shared trail will be built starting next spring, 2015. I can’t wait to ride this new stretch from Coram to West Glacier without worrying about a distracted driver swerving and clipping my handlebars on my old mountain bike. I can understand being distracted though, driving or pedaling through one of the most scenic areas in our Big Sky Country.  We want to “live to ride” another day, though, feeling the crisp, clean air and hearing the birds sing as we coast by. Hundreds of people have helped make this a reality in the last 5 years and we’re about to see it finally take form next spring.  Many, many thanks to everyone for their faith and help donating time and money as they could manage.  That’s why I’m writing about this as an investment in our future community and a bit of a progress report so bear with me. A relatively small band of dedicated Middle Canyon volunteers led and inspired by rock star, Val Parsons of West Glacier, jump started GTG-T and through multiple fundraisers as small as selling ducks for the “Duck Derby” to the “Pints for Paths Brewfest” captured the enthusiasm of residents and visitors alike for this project. Then it seemed like every dollar was leveraged 10 fold through grants and matching gifts. Truly amazing. The investments came from West Glacier elementary school children baking cookies, parents baking pies that sold for as much as $200, soup night

where folks bring their best soup to share with others, Story Night at the Belton Chalet, local rising artist Colt Idol through Freedom Bank providing autographed collector giclee oil paintings for sale benefitting the Trail, Pedal and Paddle for Paths gathering over 100 people from 7 to 70 yrs riding together up the North Fork Rd and riding downriver with Glacier Raft Co. to Columbia Falls and then gather for pizza at Truby’s at Meadow Lake Resort. Every event raised a little money but a lot of awareness so that now the momentum is overwhelming. Leadership transferred to Sarah Dakin and Jami Belt of Columbia Falls for the next segment of trail. But last spring Sarah and Val Parsons became aware of the Federal Lands Access Program (FLAP) and applied for $634,692.23 grant.  WOW.  After winning a Flathead county grant for $848,000 two years ago, could we be fortunate enough to do it again?   This FLAP grant is for the next segment of the GTG-T from Columbia Falls to the entry of Badrock Canyon. Nearly 3 miles long, it would follow the south side of Hwy 2 past Big Sky Waterslide to the stoplight at Hwy

— 22 —

continues on page 82


23

C oC loulmubmi ba i aF aFlal ls l/ sW/eWs et s tG lGalcai ce ire r

23


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Columbia Falls/West Glacier

Hungry Horse Liquor Store

“specializing in locally distilled spirits” 8 9 7 0 H w y. 2 Hungry Horse, MT

387-5506 10 - 6 p m

O c t o b e r t h r u M ay

Experience the Best of Montana

Go Local, Go Fast, Go Deep and Go Outside Swan Mountain Snowmobiling

Guided Trips & Rentals 2 Hour, Half & Full Day

Bringing you more locations & trails than any other outfitter!

(406) 387-4405 www.glaciersnowmobile.com

“Absolutely wonderful family business!! We hadn’t even been on the sleds fifteen minutes when I was wishing that I had booked a longer tour. Can’t wait to go back!!”

Jennifer Felix Seattle


Kalispell Whitefish State Rd .

Commons Way Heritage W ay Meridian Rd

Sunnyview

Ln Kalispell Regional Conway Dr.Medical Center Claremont St.

Bl

vd

t. tah S

Evergreen Dr.

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t. 9th S St. 10th

St.

St. 12th St. 13th

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To Somers & Lakeside

La

ke

t.

8th S

11th St. 11th

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for

Big To

ve E 8th A

t.

8th S

35

t. 6th S t. 7th S

ve E 7th A

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ve W 6th A ve W 7th A ve W 8th A ve W 9th A ve W 10th A

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t.

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eW 1st Av ve W 2nd A ve W 3rd A

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ve E 5th A ve E 4th A

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ve E 3rd A ve E 2nd A eE 1st Av

r St. Cente . 1st St t. 2nd S t. 3rd S t. S 4th t. 5th S

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7th Ave W

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Evergreen

Kila R d

et

St.

Kila 2

Kila

Hill

18th St.

Rd St.

ns

St

Colorado St.

Main

Su

Reserve Dr.

Main

Meridian Rd

Burns Way

U Wyoming St.

2

La Salle Rd

e Dr.

idg Northr

To Columbia Falls

Trumble Creek Rd.

To Whitefish

To Libby


26

Kalispell

Your Extended Office

Full and Self Service Copies Large Format Plans & Posters Invitations, Flyers, Brochures Stamps & Labels Graphic Design Business Cards Spiral Binding Laminating Scanning & more 406-752-4944 copies@pccopycenter.net 7 E Oregon St • Kalispell, MT

“FLATHEAD’S FIRST ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY BODY SHOP”

406-752-1125

Auto Body Paint & Repair • 24 Hour Towing • Windshield Repair & Replacement

2025 US Hwy 2 East • Kalispell, Montana • www.ablebodyshopkalispell.com


Kalispell

Elaine Snyder was inducted into Montanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Circle of American Masters by Montana Arts Council in January 2009 as a Buckskin Tailor. She designs & distinctively hand crafts vests & jackets for men and women and ladies dresses. Your tanned hides or hers. 540 Country Way South â&#x20AC;˘ Kalispell, Montana 59901 Studio Visits By Appointment Only 406-755-0767

27


28

Kalispell


29

Kalispell Go Local and Discover a Rich Past Kalispell Antiques Market

“Great variety of items – vintage and collectibles. I could spend hours in here.I just found the perfect vintage purse for an upcoming wedding.”

Nola McIntyre Rising Wolf Ranch, East Glacier

214 1st Ave West, Kalispell • 257-5808 wheatonscycle.com

KALISPELL

ANTIQUES MARKET 48 Main Street, Kalispell

Downstairs in Western Outdoor

10,000 Square Feet of Treasures to Browse

Open 7 Days a Week Winter: 10-5 Mon-Sat, 11-4 Sunday • Summer: 10-5 Mon-Sat, 11-4 Sunday 257-2800


Local Business Spotlight • Sassafras Gallery

An open door to the arts

O

pening the doors to Sassafras Gallery on Main Street Kalispell is much like its namesake, that lovely deciduous tree with such an aromatic fragrance. The gallery is bright, lively, and enchanting with just the right mix of unique and special arts, crafts, and antiques. Founder and artist Susan Miller describes Sassafras as, “an assortment of locally produced jewelry, photography, paintings, pottery, hand blown glass, turned wooden items, metal sculptures, fiber arts, hand knit children’s wear and so much more.” The original vision that Susan and several artists had in November 2002 was to open an artists’ cooperative. The gallery has evolved since then, and Susan is now the managing partner. The motto for the store is “A Cooperative Mix of Art, Crafts and Antiques.” Sassafras was born when a group of visionary artists found a willing partner in the building’s owner. Since then, over 100 artists have been a part of Sassafras. Currently there are 35 consigning artists, many of whom have been there since the gallery’s opening in 2002. Strolling the store aisles, you will find a wonderful assortment of newly produced art and crafts of all forms. They are beautifully displayed alongside antique furniture, lovingly restored pianos and a great variety of interesting collectibles. “Merchandising such diverse wares is both fun and challenging,” notes Susan. “I focus on mostly putting together compatible arrangements.” Business is good and locals and tourists alike seem to enjoy Northwest Montana art. Susan loves being downtown and hopes that further improvement in traffic and parking, along with a growing number of special events will continue to bring more people downtown. “One of our challenges remains the number of locals who walk in and ask when we opened. Marketing is never ending. That’s why we’ve launched a website (sassafrasartcoop.com) in addition to our Facebook presence,” states Susan.

After twelve years of doing Art and Craft shows full time in the Northwest, Susan decided she was ready to leap into the business ownership side of art. “I am fortunate in having natural instincts which seem to be a good balance between my creative side as an artist, and the more logical side of being a business person,” states Susan. Some of that was seemingly instilled at an early age as Susan was raised in the Flathead in a home where art was practiced and supported. From her early start with silversmithing in high school to stained glass in San Diego, art has been Susan’s vocation and avocation her entire life. “I feel lucky that I can make a living doing something I love so much.” When not managing the store or creating art Susan enjoys bike rides, swimming and doing yoga. This year marks the 12th year of the gallery and Susan hopes there will be many more as local artists and crafters find a year-round retail outlet at Sassafras. “This place is great for those unique and special art, crafts and antiques not found anywhere else in the Valley,” observes Susan. “We want to grow our artist and local market base.” Sassafras is open at 120 Main Street Kalispell Monday through Saturday between 10am and 5:30pm.

— 30 —

– Patrick Malone


31

Kalispell Go Local for Customized Stonework Montana Tile & Marble

“The staff here have been GREAT to work with. My house has unusual angles so tile flooring and a built-in desk top had to be cut to fit just right, which it did! They were on time, and so helpful in finding the stone, tiles, colors, and special accent tiles that matched just what I was looking for.” Mayre Flowers Kalispell

Sassafras

Jewelry• Painted Furniture

sassafrasgallery@yahoo.com • www.sassafrasartcoop.com

120 Main Street • Kalispell, Montana 59901 • 406-752-2433

Special • Creative • Delightful • Cards • Photos• Knit wear

Unique • Explore • Eclectic • Clever• Fun •Original

One of A Kind • Wide Selection


32

Kalispell

Flathead’s First Compounding Pharmacy

Evergreen Compounding Pharmacy George A. Yeats, Owner Philip Bertelsen, Pharm.D. Compounding Pharmacist

2141 Hwy 2 East, Suite 300 • Kalispell, MT Phone (406) 257-2083 • Fax (406) 755-3219

info@evergreencompoundingpharmacy.com evergreencompoundingpharmacy.com

Your Neighborhood Bakery Christmas Cookies In Historic Downtown Kalispell

Artisan Breads Fine Espresso Delectable Pastries

318 Main Street 406-755-8552

Monday-Friday 7am-6pm Saturday 8am-3pm Sweet Potato Sticky Buns, Croissants, Danish, Scones, Cinnamon Rolls, Sliced Bread, Challah, Burger Buns, Baguettes, Ciabatta, Focaccia and more!

Holiday Breads

Check us out on��� ������to find out what new treats we've been baking and look for specials!


33

Kalispell

Go Local and Discover Global Beverages Brix Bottleshop

WIN E

Fr iend ly, kno wl ed geab le staf f O v er 800 Unique W i nes Lar g e Var iety o f Im p or ts G ift B askets “I love this store. They have an extensive selection of beers and wines. Their staff provides excellent personal service and is very friendly and knowledgeable. And…I like to support local.”

CRAFT BEER

Lar g est Sel ectio n o f C r aft B eer in the Flath ead

Ron Scharfe Whitefish

Pro visions

Ar tisan C heeses, M eats B eer & W ine Accesso r ies

VIP

So u rcing fo r C o ll ecto r s Sp ecial O r d er s M o nthl y Tasting s

HOURS & ADDRESS

Mon-Sat 10am-7pm & Closed Sundays 101 East Center S. #102, Kalispell At the Historic Loading Dock 406-393-2202 www.brixbottleshop.com Get the Latest on Facebook

CLIMBING • BACKPACKING NORDIC AND BACKCOUNTRY SKIING

Now O pen!

Brix at the Market

Stumptown Marketplace 12 Spokane Ave. Whitefish, MT Mon-Sat, 11am-6pm


Montanans exhaust themselves exploring our outdoors, only to crash in front of the computer to browse faraway markets—and in so doing, miss some of the best opportunities for local exploration. It’s good that holiday shopping time is in the shoulder season, when it’s too cold for rafting, and before there’s enough snow for skiing! But don’t forgo that urge to let your curser do the walking: Specialty shops that are around every corner have a great online presence, some with Facebook pages bearing rave reviews that provide great gift ideas. Beckman’s Fine Furnishings, which as anybody would expect has fine leather couches and classic armoires, also has an array of eclectic gifts that are as carefully presented online as in the store; and, the Little Locals children’s store operates only online. Holiday explorers who search on foot find gift options in places they’d never think to look. But better yet, they can engage all their senses, tasting tequila tortilla brickle at Brix Bottle Shop, basking in colors so bright at Marshall Noice’s studio that they get a veritable dose of Vitamin D, and sniffing lavender lotion at Sage & Cedar. Gems of creativity are truly one of Flathead Valley’s natural resources. They can be found deep in small shops, galleries and cooperatives. And, while specialty shop owners may carefully choose merchandise for us from around the world, you need only ask and they will point out regional, Montana, and locally made items. Explorers of every type prize local knowledge and expertise, and those qualities are highlighted in stores and on websites like that of Rocky Mountain Outfitter, which is filled with photos of Don Scharfe and friends enjoying the top of the world, climbing and back country skiing. Scharfe is among those who sells the things he knows, uses or makes. But second only to such expertise is local merchants’ willingness to serve as holiday rescuers, obligingly ordering, wrapping, shipping or even delivering gifts. “Gifts” is too broad a subject to spark imagination, so think through these categories to get your list, and your shopping, underway:

Photo courtesy of Don Scharfe

suprising finds await

You don’t have to go to the top of Chief Mountain to find the perfect holiday gift. Ask Don Scharfe at Rocky Mountain Outfitter to guide you through their outdoor products.

Spirit(s) of the season

“Test drive” locally made spirits, to borrow a phrase from a Facebook friend enthusing about a wine she tasted. Brewing company pages are filled with chatter about the local hops collections and speculation on the results; a gift of a growler plus refills immediately comes to mind. Meanwhile, liquor stores include Flathead vodka or cherry wines ready to go into gift baskets filled with chutneys and salsas, all products of local harvests.

Holiday hospitality Food is the centerpiece of any holiday gathering and it’s not cheating to call out for some O.P.C. (Other People’s Cooking) to serve as the main dish, dessert, or whole meal! Have a meal catered, or give a gift of a dinner for two. Some restaurants will deliver, so a gift certificate for that homebound friend can brighten a dreary January day. Of course, when you want to bring something to a hostess, chocolate or flowers (or both) are always happily received. Ask Neal Brown about his Mojo Chocolates or stop by Copperleaf Chocolat Company and tempt your eyes as well as your palate. If you check out delis and bakeries for holiday treats, you might pick up some Sweet Potato Sticky Buns at Ceres Bakery.

— 34 —


holiday explorers 35

Kalispell

Mining the past

Scents of place Be an olfactory adventurer, and let your nose lead you to the lavender or huckleberry scent of a Flathead summer, or to the vanilla of grandmother’s kitchen. At Sage & Cedar have an essence mixed with an oil or cream for your own signature concoction, or stop at Kettle Care Organics and find those delightful scents in products for health, happiness and beauty.

Montana gems Adventurers first came to Montana seeking gold and gems, but these days, there’s no gold pan required. Shoppers could easily holler “eureka!” when setting eyes on the rainbow array of Montana sapphires at Kehoe’s Agate Shop, or when catching sight of the sparkling Going to the Sun pendant at Wheeler Jewelry. And while there may still be hidden gold in our hills, it’s a whole lot easier to find at Coins & Carats!

Joyful toys

Who can’t recall the excitement of finding a bicycle under the tree? Those surprises are a specialty of our local bike shops, and so is the selection, care and repair. And while bikes aren’t just for kids, neither are the Bigfoot paper dolls at Crystal Winters, where just walking the aisles is an adventure. Or, judging from grandparents shopping at Imagination Station, the Erector sets, board games and porcelain tea services of yesteryear prompt both memories of the past and hopes for more in the future.

Holiday explorers can be time travelers if they take their gift search to antiques markets. And while the very old or original, such as the Salish basket at the Kalispell Antique Market, are always a treasure, so are the simple articles that our grandparents used. Materials with a past, repurposed as functional art, are some of the biggest draws for consigners. And why not make you, yourself, a sepia-toned treasure of yesteryear? Montana Photo Company can oblige by posing you and your family in a setting reminiscent of pioneer heritage.

Artfully yours Exploring art galleries is a visual trip, as well as an opportunity to talk with artists about their work. Marshall Noice will stand under wall-size paintings and point shoppers to his website for color ideas, then to his studio wall, where small original studies sell in a more typical holiday budget range. Most galleries work that way, displaying mountain vistas, regal elk sculptures, large pieces that put you in awe, then smaller versions and gift items. Good places to explore many types of art are at shops like Persimmon, or Paint, Metal and Mud, which showcase works of several, to dozens, of artists.

Sports for all seasons Exploring the outdoors in winter can require skis or snowshoes, hunting or ice fishing equipment, and selecting just the right gear as a gift would seem fraught with challenges. Not so, say owners of sports specialty stores: They’re experts who use their equipment, and their educated guesses will come close to the mark, requiring only minimal adjustment. They won’t mount your ski package, for instance, just wrap it up so you can put it under the tree, and provide a gift receipt so your sportsman can switch from downhill to cross-country skis, or even to another sport in a different season.

— 35 —


holiday explorers (continued from page 35) there’s a similar atmosphere at Camas Creek Yarn, where the array of fibers and projects, class listings and expertise can give you great ideas for warmly personal gifts of your own making.

All things bright and beautiful

Children of all ages enjoy creating masterpieces at Stumtown Art Studios. Check out their website (www.stumptownartstudio.org) for classes and events.

The gift of an experience What experiences have moved you, set you on a memorable path, introduced you to a hobby? If a gift has ever encouraged you to explore new worlds, consider gifting a ticket that opens a door. Books are still the ultimate gateway ticket, and so is theatre, particularly with Whitefish Theatre Company offering Harvey, The King and I, and the Hobbit. Or, how about music? Accept an invitation from North Valley Music School to explore musical interests. Creative possibilities in art are the hallmark of Stumptown Art Studios, where children and adults are invited to come for a few hours, a day, or a series of lessons; currently popular is “Canvas and Coffee, ” an opportunity to paint with a master artist. And, can you imagine making a gift of a real winter wonderland? Snowmobile Tours and Rentals has your ticket to the snowy beauty of our back country ,dressed in winter finery.

Venturing into clothing shops during the holidays for a sweater for Mom, shoppers always come home with something for themselves, as well. So, acknowledge in advance that you’re going to do that, and check out specialty clothing stores like Fawn Boutique for classic- but-trendy, or comfy–but-cute designs. You won’t forget Mom, and you know she’d really like you to get a massage, a haircut and manicure, as well, so you won’t be outshined by the Christmas ornaments. Ahh, those are things that you really can’t get done on the internet! – Anne Clark Illustrations by Julian Lafaye

From your hands and heart Perhaps you’re a hands-on adventurer, and just need a little help making a gift? Powder Horn Trading Company is a magpie’s delight of beads and jewelry making supplies, with classes in everything from simple assembly methods to metalsmithing. And,

Browse your local merchants for bright and shiny gifts, specialty services, and great ideas for holiday entertaining.

— 36 —


37

Kalispell

Cake with Extra Coffee

joanna griffin pottery

ITALIAN • MEDITERRANEAN Breakfast • Lunch Espresso • Pastries Gluten Free !

Now available @ ARTISANS 459 Electric Ave. Bigfork, MT. www.joannagriffinpottery.com 755-0845

Mon - Sat 8am - 3pm 38 1st Ave E. Kalispell • 406-257-8669

Go Local for a Safe and Comfortable Ride M & C Tire

STEVE

POSTOVIT

LOCALLY OWNED & SERVING YOUR TIRE NEEDS SINCE 1979!

TARA

POST IT OV

“We sincerely appreciate your business!”

Friendly Courteous Service With Attention To Detail. “Customer service is great. Staff are friendly and with great personalities. Great product line. Prices are competitive. Service is top notch.” Troy Denton Kalispell

1271 North Meridian • Kalispell • 752-9662 • www.mandctire.com


38

Kalispell

Roots Over 100 Years Deep! Strong Community Banks Build Strong Communities (406) 752-7123 41 3rd street west

Kalispell, Montana

valleybankmt.com


ORGANIC FOODS | JUICE & COFFEE BAR | BODY CARE | QUALITY SUPPLEMENTS

Introducing!

fresh food grab & go! PACKAGED FOR CONVENIENCE | FRESH FOR FLAVOR | CREATED FOR HEALTH

25 Commons Way, Kalispell, Hwy 93, Next to Qdoba | 406.756.1422 www.mountainvalleyfoods.com | Open 7-7 Mon-Sat 10-4 Sun


1001 Trumble Creek Rd. Kalispell, MT 59901

406.755.8114

CentennialTimberFrames.com

McGarvey, Heberling, Sullivan & Lacey, PC Your Advocates for Health, Safety and a Clean Environment

Located in downtown Kalispell in the repurposed, remodeled and solar powered Sons of Norway building

345 1st Ave. E. • Kalispell, MT 59901 • 406-752-5566 www.mcgarveylaw.com

Background photo by Trevon Baker. Inset photo courtesy of Flathead Beacon.


Monday - Friday 9-6 Saturday 10-2

Compounding and Specialty Services Prescription Medications Over-the-Counter Healthcare Immunizations

Small-town Customer Service Unique Selection of Gift Items Flathead and Montana Souvenirs Jewelry, Scarves and Clothing Greeting Cards, Gift Bags, Wrap

306 Stoner Loop in the Lakeside Town Center Phone 844-2103 Fax 844-2106 www.remedieslakeside.com


eat more from the earth and less from a box!

f a rmh o u se

serving fresh, locally sourced breakfast, lunch and coffee wednesday - sunday 8am - 2pm 306 Stoner Loop in Lakeside in the Lakeside Town Center 406.844.0610 farmhouselakeside.com


Testimonial: “We saved hundreds of dollars on our heating bills last winter and the cooling over the summer has been an unexpected bonus. We are very happy with the system.” —Ken Siderius

Bill and Diane Yarus

294 2nd Ave. WN Kalispell, MT 59901

Call the ThermoCouple for more information and/or a FREE estimate at 406-257-1341 Visit our website: www.airworksmt.com or find us on Facebook.


Containers of all sizes Hanging Baskets for Home or Business Colorful Garden Design, Planting and Upkeep Succulents and Cactus for Office, Home and Weddings

250-7236


Kalispell

51


Local Business Spotlight • Flowers by Hansen

Prepare to be amazed

T

he front half of Flowers by Hansen is a colorful, eclectic gift shop with an array of items for every occasion. But make no mistake: the heart of the business is the full-service floral shop that occupies the back half of the store. That area is dominated by an enormous work table where employees cut, trim, and arrange flowers. Flowers by Hansen handles weddings, funerals, business events, and any other occasion that requires flowers, from one client’s weekly long-stemmed rose for his wife, to another client’s need for something special as an apology.

and the sentiment it expresses are as important as the flowers. No one ever forgets receiving flowers.” Flowers by Hansen was started in 1946 by Carl Hansen. Debbie Snyder began working there in 1994 as a delivery driver. A native of Flathead valley, her knowledge of the area was invaluable. She gradually moved into customer service and then designing arrangements. She purchased the business in June of 2001. Snyder is especially proud of the unique items offered in the gift shop. Silk flowers spill from every sort of container: a silver candy dish, ribbed glass jars, a vase made of twigs, an enormous ginger jar. More flowers form colorful bases for candles or other items of home décor. But the selection isn’t limited to flowers. Items spotted on a recent visit included bowls of swirled blue glass in a variety of sizes, slender resin statues of saints and angels, a series of tiny, colorful glass roosters, mercury glass candle holders, and a pair of whimsical frogs sitting on a park bench. A variety of thoughtful gift books for all occasions are displayed, from celebratory books for new babies to spiritual works intended for times of loss and fun books for birthdays and other celebrations. The recent addition of a large selection of Baggallini handbags has been especially popular with shoppers. The Baggallini brand is sold worldwide, and is well known for fun, functional, and fashionable bags that last forever. A colorful display of the microfiber bags graces the front window, with more inside. Flowers by Hansen is located right in the middle of In fact, owner Debbie Snyder says that everyday floral downtown Kalispell at 128 Main Street, surrounded by needs are what make the work interesting for her and other local shops. Snyder has been active in the Kalispell her eight employees. She never knows when the phone Downtown Association for years. She is an enthusiastic rings if the person on the other end will be overjoyed participant in the downtown area’s First Friday events. at the birth of a new baby, worried about a friend in Stop by soon and see what they have to offer! the hospital, or desolated by the death of a loved one. – Barb Nelson “Flowers are all about emotion,” Snyder says. “The card

— 52 —


Kalispell

53

“Going to the Sun” Set with Golden Montana Sapphire & Diamonds

Go Local to Speed Up Your Day J2 Office Products

“As a Marketing and Office Coordinator at a busy architecture and engineering office I love that J2 can take an online order and deliver it the next day, for free. They offer a huge selection of products at unbeatable prices. And, the fact that J2 is a local family owned company active in the community gives me no reason to shop anywhere else!” Katie Halling Kalispell

Ink & Toner

Paper

Technology

Office Supplies

Furniture

Janitorial

700 Sunset Blvd | 752-8520 | www.J2op.com


54

Kalispell

Calm Animal Care

Go Local for Healthy Pets Calm Animal Care

Providing Quality Veterinary Services to the Flathead Valley Since 1984

“Great and unique service. They’re chiropractic and acupuncture procedures probably kept our dog alive and healthy another 2 years. Everyone is very caring. The treatment is very special.” Stephen Gumpert Ferndale

Medicine • Dentistry • Surgery Chiropractic • Acupuncture Mark Mazur

Dr. Barbara Calm Dr. Karen Hartle Dr. Laura Thiel Calm Animal Care 425 Main St Box 14, Kila, MT 59920 406-755-8214 calmanimalcare.com

Wallcovering Installation and Removal

Custom Interior/Exterior Painting & Staining

Serving the Flathead since 1999

Over 25 years experience

EPA Lead Paint Certified

Timely, Trustworthy and Reliable

Fully Insured

406-212-0501 www.alpineinteriorsmt.com


55

Kalispell

• Located near Kalispell City Airport • Indoor Pool, Sauna & Hot Tub • Group Rates • Senior Citizens Rates • AAA Rates • Continental Breakfast • Free High Speed Internet Baskets and more! Come delight in handmade, fair-trade gifts and décor from all over the world. Your purchase supports small businesses locally and across the seas, helping others help themselves! First Choice Décor 124 Main St. Kalispell 406-250-8544 www.firstchoicedecor.com

1830 Highway 93 South, Kalispell, MT For Reservations USA & Canada 755-3798 1-800-843-6114 www.aeroinn.com

GOLD, SILVER, COINS and JEWELRY

Your Trusted Bullion Specialists For Over 23 Years

Monday to Friday, 10:00 to 5:30 237 Main Street, Kalispell, MT • 752-2646 coinscarats.net • coinscarats@bresnan.net


Local Business Spotlight • Hop’s Downtown Grill

Serving up great food and drink

W

hen entering Hop’s Downtown Grill at 121 Main Street in Kalispell, expect to be drawn in by the scrumptious smells and inviting atmosphere. And then there’s the delight at the uniqueness of the food and depth of the beer and wine list. As Vonnie Day says, “we pride ourselves in having not only high quality food, but in offering unique specialty dishes and a broad selection.” Though I did not start with the beverage list, you have to be impressed to find upwards of 100 craft beers from around the world (featuring many excellent Montana and Northwest varieties) and nearly as many red, white and sparkling wines. What really made me hungry though, were the large number of appetizers, salads, specialty dinners, and of course their famous burgers. Here you can find American Kobe beef, Swan River Elk, Mission Mountain Buffalo, or for the really exotic, Wild Boar and Tibetan style Spring Brook Ranch Yak! Owners Vonnie and Doug Day were both raised in Montana (Vonnie in Kalispell and Doug in Billings), although it was experiences outside Montana that pushed them into careers in the fine dining industry. For Vonnie it was as an exchange student in Malaysia that sparked her interest. The mix of foods and cultures in Kuala Lumpur heightened her awareness of the varieties of foods, and ingredients and the sociability of dining. For Doug it was a passion that began in college while cooking for a summer work crew in Northern Idaho. His initial interest grew into a passion when a local librarian in a small timber town provided him with high quality cookbooks (the “Art of Cooking” by Julia Child being the most influential). In time, that passion became a profession as he earning a Culinary Arts degree from the very prestigious Johnson & Wales University, College of Culinary Arts in Providence, Rhode Island. Before launching his own enterprise, Doug served as a lead chef in some of the country’s best restaurants (and even in the Caribbean.) During the 18 years that they’ve owned the building Vonnie and Doug have experimented with three different fine dining concepts, Hop’s being the most recent, but they have always adhered to the same principles. As Doug says, “we focus on quality – from of our ingredients and

their preparation to our staff. We strive to exceed the high expectations of our customers. We have a preference for local, or at least Pacific Northwest ingredients produced by other family owned businesses in the specialty agriculture, beer, wine, cheese and meat sectors. We regularly source from at least 15 area specialty producers.” From their two previous restaurants (Café Max and Capers) to Hop’s, travel has always influenced how the Days think about food and the food industry. From sampling local ingredients to researching unique recipes, and learning from master chefs, they appreciate the wonderful opportunity regional differences can make. The emphasis of regional cuisine seems to be increasingly true for visitors who want good, local food at a reasonable price. They keep the menu fresh by adjusting it 6 to 8 times each year as unique, specialty items become available. Hop’s is not only a unique find in downtown Kalispell, but in the entire Pacific Northwest. Vonnie and Doug like to think of themselves as a “Mom and Pop Pub” where everyone is welcome for ordinary to special events. Open from 5pm to 9pm Monday -Thursday and 5pm to 10pm Friday and Saturday nights, Hop’s is the perfect place to take that special someone or simply enjoy a magnificent evening away from the stove and dishwasher. – Patrick Malone

— 56 —


Kalispell

Montana’s Best Burgers

57

American Kobe Beef, Swan River Elk, Mission Mountain Buffalo, Spring Brook Ranch Yak 100 Craft Beers • Regional Wines Furniture • Gifts Accents Shop Online: shop.kalispellfurniture.com

123 Main St, Kalispell MT 59901 406.756.8555 New Location: Stumptown Market 12 Spokane Ave., Whitefish www.Kalispellfurniture.com

Hop’s Downtown Grill • 121 Main Street Historic Downtown Kalispell • 406-755-7687 www.hopsmontana.com


(continued from page 10) Here’s what I asked for. 1. A family tree Each family’s story is unique, and learning that story is priceless. I know bits and pieces of my family history, but have always wanted to dive deeper into where my family has come from. These stories are not always beautiful—I know parts of my family’s history are not—but knowing how we fit into our own families, and how our families fit into our shared history, is an important part of being an informed, civic participant. 2. A donation A professor I had once said that the world can never have too much idealism. There’s no shortage of needs to be met in our world, and no shortage of inspired men and women working to meet them. And they desperately need our money. I have my many interests and organizations I’m hoping to contribute to this year. 
Instead of giving to me, I’ve asked others to donate to them. In fact, I’ve written about two of them for YES! this year: Men as Peacemakers, and The Harry Potter Alliance. 3. A take-away Rather than getting something, I’m asking people to take some stuff away. Come over and join in a Christmas take-away. Take something of mine, as a gift. Afterward, we’ll donate the rest. You can take it even further and offer a free home declutter and re-organization. Pick up some simple baskets and bins to fit the decor, spend an hour together going through the house, then provide some much need feng shui. Note: This is an especially valuable gift to parents of young children. 4. Stories Stories help us grow, learn empathy, and actually create change, if we’re willing to let them. The stories that we have in common—our popular culture—are the shared experiences of a diverse population. Through them we understand ourselves, and each other, better. Dig in, and you’ll find beautiful, strange, inspiring, responsible, equitable, gracious, and powerful gifts.

I’m asking for the graphic novel series Saga, a sci-fi story about starting a family committed to nonviolence in a time of war (the core of a story that also includes robots and ghosts, war and bounty hunters, and a galaxy in chaos). The book won this Hugo Award for Best Graphic Work and writer Brian K. Vaughan won an Eisner Award. The artist behind Saga, Fiona Staples, is also lauded for her work this year. Also on my list is the Soundsupp.ly drop. Soundsupply is an innovative music sales company that combines bits of music from ten artists sold in bulk for a flat rate. Soundsupply is a music selling system based on direct-toartists sales, where all profit is equally distributed. Good, responsible shopping. And the music is always great. 5. A break I’m a bit obsessive. I care about culture and politics and environmental activism—a lot. There’s one thing most folks like me have in common, regardless of our commitments: We never stop working. Or, when we stop working, our minds still swim in a sea of dedication/obsession marked by constant smart-phone use or random discussions of the day’s Twitter highlights. Activists rarely take a break. This year I’m hoping for the gift of clearing my mind and cutting the cords: To take a night or, if possible, a weekend to get away; to leave the smart phones at home and go out for dinner and a movie or a play or a long walk. If it weren’t so cold where I am, I’d pack up the family and go canoeing at the lake; go camping; go hiking; go somewhere it’s clear there will be no discussing work, no checking Twitter, no visiting the Huffington Post. I’ll probably give this one to myself. Christopher Zumski Finke wrote this article for YES! Magazine, a national, nonprofit media organization that fuses powerful ideas and practical actions. Christopher blogs about pop culture and is editor of The Stake. Follow him on Twitter at @christoperzf.

— 58 —

NPS

less stuff, more heart


59

Kalispell

W hitetail Bookkeeping • • • •

Services, LLC

QuickBooks Payroll Accounts Receivable and Payable Medicaid Billing

Michele Fisher

1019 6th Avenue West, Kalispell, MT 59901 406-756-0169 fishermich@hotmail.com

• Boat Tops, Covers & Interiors 302 2nd St. West • Furniture, Residential & Commercial • Awnings, Residential & Commercial Kalispell, MT 59901 • Retractable Awnings and Power Screens (406) 755-3200 lowitzcustomshoppe1@gmail.com • www.lowitzcustomshoppe.com

127 Main Street • Kalispell • (406) 755-5321

MEASURE, SAMPSEL, SULLIVAN & O’BRIEN, P.C. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Depot Park Square 24 First Avenue East, Suite C Kalispell, MT 59901 (406) 752-6373 www.measurelaw.com Family Law ★ Wills & Trusts ★ Contracts Estates & Probate ★ Personal Injury Civil & Criminal Cases ★ Real Estate

Serving The Flathead Since 1935

Breakfast * Lunch * Desserts * Espresso Gluten Free * Vegan Options 21 5th Street East on 5th and Main Street, Kalispell Tuesday through Saturday 8am to 3pm

752-8436

For Take Out and Downtown Delivery


60

Kalispell

WHEN YOU CHOOSE LOCAL & INDEPENDENT

For Your Holiday Season

We All Get A Little Something In Return

ShiftYourShopping.org

Pharmaceutical Waste in the Flathead Don’t Flush Unwanted Medicines The flushing of drugs adds to pollution in our waters because wastewater and septic systems are not designed to treat these chemicals.

Quick and Easy Drop Off Boxes You can safely dispose of unwanted medications in a secure, convenient mailboxstyle container. This is a free, anonymous, public service provided by local law enforcement agencies. They are the only agencies currently legally permitted to collect unwanted medicines. Kalispell: Flathead County Justice Center Drop Box • Accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Columbia Falls: Columbia Falls Police Station Drop Box • 8am – 6pm, Monday through Friday Whitefish: Whitefish Police Station Drop Box • 8am – 6pm, Monday through Friday Simply use the plastic bag provided to empty your pill vials or you may place the entire bottle into the box. No sharps or liquids please.


61

K a Kl iaslpi es lp le l l

Serving the Community for Over 30 Years! and Still Going Strong!!

MEDICAL ARTS PHARMACY Locally Owned & Operated • Free DeliverY • Drive-Thru or Walk-In • Conveniently Located • Accepting All Major Insurance Plans, Medicare & Workman’s Comp • The Fastest and Friendliest Service in Town • New Customers Always Welcome Hours of Business: Mon-Fri: 8:30am – 5:30pm • Saturday: 9:00am – 1:00pm

752-2492

209 Conway Drive • Kalispell

AmEx, MasterCard, Discover, VISA Fax: 752-2494

61


62

Kalispell

HowDo You

WantYour

prosperous strong beautiful

revitalized walkable green healthy safe

clean local friendly

collaborative

affordable

thriving

sustainable

welcoming

respectful

What We Do

a Secure policies that grow our local economy and protect the valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clean water, natural beauty, and friendly communities. a Publish the Go Local Guide bi-annually with the help of 200 local business partners. a Increase recycling and reduce waste going into the landfill through a 21-year partnership with the WasteNot Project. a Champion local energy conservation successes and encourage more by providing resources like the Re-Powering the Flathead for a New Economy report.

Flathead? Want to invest in YOUR future? Invest in OUR work to protect: a Your Job. Your Business.

Well-planned communities are economic magnets attracting good companies and good employees. Geotourists seek out special places like the Flathead and spend an estimated $110 million here annually as a result of their travels.

a Your Neighborhood. Your Community.

Change is coming and we are committed to making it positive. We work for fair, transparent, respectful, informed decision- making processes that ensure meaningful public participation in government.

a Your Commute.

We support planning that limits highway sprawl by directing growth towards our town centers with well-connected streets with sidewalks, bike lanes, and public transportation.

a Your Health. Good land use planning enables a more active lifestyle, and promotes overall walkability, recreational trails and parks, and public access to public lands. a Your Plate.

Our rich soils can meet many of our local food needs and provide jobs. Careful planning can provide incentives to direct growth away from the most productive lands.

a Your Air. Your Water. We have some of the cleanest water and air in the world here, but without daily advocacy to protect and defend these resources, they will be diminished.

Call us at 406.756.8993 or visit our website, www.flatheadcitizens.org


Lakeside/Somers To Kalispell

th

ea

d

La

ke

For res Ro t Hill ad

To Bigfork School Addition Rd

Fla

To Kalispell

Somers

Adams St. Flathead Lake To Lakeside Stoner Loop

Lakeside

Ben Williams Ln

N

Blacktail Rd

Redfield Ln

To Polson


64

Lakeside/Somers


65

65

L aLkaeks ei d s ied/ eS /oS m oemresr s

Historic

Somers Bay Cafe Located in Beautiful Downtown Somers

7212 Hwy 93 South | Lakeside, Montana Located behind the Spinnaker Bar. Look for the Ski Sports sign on the west side of highway 93.

Serving Breakfast & Lunch 7 Days a Week • 7:00 am to 2:00 pm

The best sporting goods option on Flathead Lake’s west shore.

857-2660 Go Local and Get Out on the Water Lakeside Ski & Sports

SNOWBOARDS

PADDLEBOARDS

SNOWSHOES

REP AIR & TUNE U PS

SKIS

Y UNT O C S CROS CLASSIC & SKATE

SKI RENTALS “Just visiting for the day. Drove up from Missoula to enjoy kayaking on Flathead Lake. This is really convenient with a great selection of watercraft and accessories. Much better than back home.”

Dave and Jim Lexington, KY

Phone: 406-844-2188 Mobile: 406-270-2927 www.lakesideskisports.com contactlssports@gmail.com


Whitefish

66

Western Building Centers Your Locally owned building supplier since 1946 Kalispell

le

Columbia Falls

Ronan

Stevensvil

Evergreen

Polson

Libby Eureka Whitefish

Culbertson

WBC Truss/Wall Kalispell — 755-6411 1745 3rd Ave East

Stevensville —777-1452 3956 US Hwy 93 N.

Evergreen — 755-9444 1019 East Idaho

Libby— 293-7755 30508 US Hwy 2

Whitefish — 862-2545 6130 Hwy 93 South

Ronan — 676-5726 36203 Round Butte Rd . W.

Columbia Falls — 892-3204 1550 9th St. West

Polson — 883-5284 905 1st St. East

Eureka — 297-2253 1574 Hwy 93 N.

WBC Truss/Wall — 892-2171 1863 - 13th St. W. CFalls

Culbertson — 787-5880 5929 Rd 1020

“Where the Contractor shops and so should you.” www.westernbuildingcenter.com


67

Lakeside/Somers

Whitefish To Whitefish Resort

Railway St

Miles Ave

1st St

1st St

Baker Ave

7th St

Columbia Ave

Kalispell Ave

5th St

Pine Ave

Park Ave

4thSt

Somers Ave

3rd St

Spokane Ave

Central Ave

Baker Ave

Lupfer Ave

E. 2nd St Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien Ave

To Eureka

Depot St

6th St 7th St

8th St 9th St Ri ve Av rsid e. e

W.13th St

10th St

N

W.15th St

To Kalispell


68

Whitefish

Purveyors of the Eclectic Since 1979 A Way Cool Place to Shop! Voted “Best Place for Unique Gifts” Montana T-shirts • Stocking Stuffers • Huckleberry Products Souvenirs • Great Cards • Gags • Gifts for All Ages 232 Central Ave. • Whitefish, MT • 406-862-6104 Open 7 Days a Week!


69

Whitefish

WTC

To enrich our communities through music appreciation, education and performance Offering lessons in banjo, cello, flute, bass guitar, guitar, harp, mandolin, piano, voice, violin and viola

Mark Baumbach

Andrea Brew

432 Spokane Avenue, Whitefish, MT (406) 862-8074 www.northvalleymusicschool.org

Judy Cockrell

Featuring Olde America Antiques Reproductions of Vintage Maps & Posters

305 Baker Avenue Whitefish, Montana 863-ARTS

thewalkingman@cyberport.net


Local Business Spotlight • Whitefish Pottery

Firing up some fun

I

n May 1994, the Flathead Valley pottery scene grew one person and one shop larger when Whitefish Pottery founder and potter Tom Gilfillan relocated from Wisconsin and started up a pottery studio and small retail shop on Twin Bridges Road. Today, Whitefish Pottery and Stillwater Gallery occupy a prominent location on Central Avenue in the heart of downtown Whitefish. Tom reports that “business has been steady and growing over these past twenty years. It was originally just me doing everything and now we enjoy the talented efforts of a half-dozen employees who handle orders, shipping, sales and are potters also.” To help guarantee a steady stream of up-and-coming young potters, Tom and his studio staff sponsor a twelve-month apprenticeship program. One person is selected annually from a national search. This year it is Jean from New Jersey who traveled to Whitefish for more than the free lodging, studio space and small stipend. Jean wants to learn more about the creative as well as business side of owning and managing a pottery studio. Tom’s love for pottery began long before he leveraged it into a career and business. He first became interested in working with clay in 1982, and later earned a college degree in Art Education and then a Master’s in Fine Arts. He spent years teaching at the middle-school level before working as a production potter in Ohio and eventually making the move to pursue a full-time career as a potter in the Flathead. Tom says “Whitefish celebrates and supports the arts. It is a haven of sorts, an important sector of our economy.” That support helps drive the ongoing success experienced by Whitefish Gallery. “When I arrived there were maybe half as many galleries and art shops as there are now,” notes Tom. He expresses optimism that the growing appreciation for the arts from locals and

visitors alike will continue to expand and contribute even more to the economy in the future. Tom stays inspired by new and creative designs. Although he is often busy with pottery production, it is the opportunity to throw his own ceramics that truly excites him. “Having so many other potters on-site and in the community stimulates the creative juices,” states Tom. Whitefish Pottery enjoys the benefits of a strong tourist economy and a well-educated local customer base. Part of that education has come from the regular “First Thursday Gallery Nights,” which Tom and Whitefish Pottery helped organize ten years ago. Tom reports that, “First Thursday has been one of many events that has helped grow a greater awareness and appreciation for local arts and culture. Another expression, and a way we extend our appreciation to our customers, is our annual Anniversary celebration held each May (May 15th in 2015) at our Twin Bridges Road Studio location,” notes Tom. This annual celebration is festive and fun for the whole family and includes food, drink, and tours that give a glimpse into the design and production of ceramics. Whitefish Pottery showcases the creativity of about twenty potters, in addition to their own creations, who regularly sell their wares at the Whitefish storefront. Whitefish Pottery and Stillwater Gallery offer a wide variety of styles and colors in the artistic and functional porcelain-based stoneware that are lead-free, and dishwasherand oven-safe. Whitefish Pottery welcomes both retail and wholesale orders, and gladly accept special orders too. In addition to pottery, shoppers will be pleased to find local photographs, paintings, note cards, tiles, jewelry and tasty huckleberry treats at their 240 Central Avenue storefront location. Store hours are 10am to 6pm Monday through Saturday and 11am to 5pm on Sundays.

— 70 —

– Patrick Malone


71

Whitefish Go Local to Eat Something Yummy Central Ave. Bakery & Deli

Celebrating 1995-2014 19 years Orders • Toll Free • Info

(866) 895 - 3699

“We’re from out-of-town and this looked very inviting. The service has been great. Everything smells scrumptious.”

Karen G. Houston, TX

BREAKFAST & LUNCH • Sandwiches, Soups, Salads, Baked Goods and more. • Bread and New York Style Bagels made fresh daily! • Gluten Free Options • Take & Bake Dinners

237 Central Avenue Whitefish, Montana

406-863-9788


Remedial Burns As often as not, his magic started with fire. By Gary Ferguson

Sergii

I

t was the late ‘90s, and I was living in the hinterlands again—this time it was canyon country, in the slickrock deserts of southern Utah. I’d headed down from Montana in the old Chevy van in early spring, hoping to tease out a story about a brilliant wilderness therapy school for at-risk-teens. A place where the field instructors and therapists had managed to come up with just the right mingle of big, wild beauty and careful listening, serving it up as much-needed nourishment to a bunch of dejected kids. When it came to treating drug addition alone, the school had a remarkable success rate—almost three times better than the typical 28-day lockdown program. It was while living in that desert that I met LaVoy Tolbert—a willowy, sixty-five year old former high school science teacher who’d taken on the role of the schools’ education director. LaVoy was a kind of wilderness wizard—calm, patient, and most of all, astonishingly observant. The sort of guy who sees the flick of a whitetail’s ear in a thick woods. Or more impressive still, a man who could spot a broken-hearted teen a hundred yards out, even when she was hiding behind a face that said foolproof tough kid. I remember standing wide-eyed in the Red Desert, watching him unleash in those teens a kind of zealous excitement—nudging them toward a realization that they could follow their own unique talents into a magnificent level of engagement with the world. Plain and simple, LaVoy Tolbert was magic. And as often as not, his magic started with fire. The make their morning and evening cooking fires, LaVoy taught the kids how to string a boot lace to a bowed piece of alder or aspen, which they then used to twirl a sagebrush spindle against a flat slab of wood, or fireboard. Essentially, the same bow-drill fire making technique used since prehistoric times. Still, impressive as that was, I wrote it off at first as little more than a cool trick, something to pull out to impress your friends. Like knowing how to juggle, or do a back flip, or reach around a kid’s head to pull a quarter out of his ear.

I was wrong. In time I came to see the bow drill as something more akin to how many indigenous people had described it, as “mother giving fire.” Time and again I saw kids so wracked with ADD they could barely focus through a knock-knock joke, suddenly able to spend a couple of hours working to get their very first ember and then blow it into flame. What’s more, once they had the technique down, getting an ember in just fifteen or twenty seconds, most proved more than willing to hunker down for another hour or two and teach it to someone else. There was something in this making of fire that captivated them. I suppose at some level it offered them a small measure of control—the ability to claim warmth and food and light from a world where, on first glance, they seemed to have no power at all. But it was more than that. In the wake of that curious accomplishment, the kids went on to show and uncanny willingness to open up to the wide world that surrounded them out there. u After fire lessons, LaVoy gathered everyone into a circle in the sand, and like some kind of backcountry

— 72 —


u Mother giving fire, those Native people called the bow-drill. How long was it after we first got that gift, all

those thousands of years ago, that we were off and running, suddenly eager to try our hand at being gods? Turning ourselves into earth-bound versions of ancient fire deities like Vulcan and Logi—capable of using fire for astonishingly creative purposes, but also, wielding it with mindboggling destruction. But while gods have the benefit of eternity, and thus an endless amount of time to correct their mistakes, we have no such longevity. No such memory. Far too often, our misguided gestures drop bitter fruits into the lives of those not yet born. For modern people like us, so accustomed to the power of fire, maybe it would be useful if we could simply pause long enough to recall the miracle of it all. Like those kids in the desert, kneeling down and whirling those spindles and then thrilling to that first ember. An inquisitiveness that can lead to a generous brand of persona power. Something our children ask us for all the time, but which, way too often, we seem heartbreakingly unable to deliver. Brent Danley

Socrates, K ato lspeculate i s p eabout ll 7 3 began encouraging the kids what might be going on to make that glowing ember possible in the first place. They started out ruminating on the nature of combustion. In little time they came to see how carbon and hydrogen molecules were combining with oxygen, each element gaining or losing electrons, in the end releasing as byproducts carbon dioxide and water. From that point, their brains running fast, they went on to figure out that this same basic process was happening in every cell of their bodies, with the same byproducts—carbon dioxide and water—coming out of their noses and mouths. At the end of the lesson they stood up and walked off into that desert, smiling over the notion that their own bodies were made up of a trillion tiny fires. Me too. In fact I came back to Montana with fire very much on my mind. I savored the black scars from lightning strikes that ran up the trunks of towering Douglasfir trees. I felt the sun on my skin, thinking it like some great campfire hanging in the sky. Even at night I saw it. When the dark skies were riddled with stars. Funny thing is, though, I also started seeing how there were too many fires in the world, too many acts of combustions: sprawling curtains of haze from cars and trucks in Los Angels and Salt Lake City and Atlanta. Belching smokestacks at cement plants in Texas, and still more at the old, ailing coal-fired electric plants in Ohio and New Jersey—exhaling their carbon-laden breath, and in the process bending the climate of the entire planet. Too many bombs detonating. Too many smoking gun barrels. Near my home at the edge of Yellowstone, ponds were drying up, taking with them blotched tiger salamanders and boreal chorus frogs. Streams were disappearing, too, at least in summer, making life impossible for spawning cutthroat trout. Meanwhile the alpine ridges of the nearby Beartooth Mountains were warming subjecting whitebark pine groves—a critical food source for grizzlies—to near total destruction by pine bark beetles, an insect suddenly able to thrive in the changing climate.

u Gary Ferguson is the author of 22 books on nature, science and history. His latest book is The Carry Home: Lessons from the American Wilderness, by Counterpoint Press. Formerly an interpretive naturalist for the U.S. Forest Service, he is a member of the National Geographic Lecture Series and has given keynote presentations and workshops across the nation. His nature and science-based essays can be heard on National Public Radio affiliates throughout the country. To learn more about Gary’s work visit his website at http://wildwords.net This essay was originally published in Whitefish Review, a locally produced literary journal of photographs, art and writing. Whitefish Review celebrates the individual and the exchange of ideas in our mountain culture. For more information, to subscribe or order copies visit www.whitefishreview.org.

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Go Local for Tasty Treats and a Great Read Copperleaf Chocolat Company

Whitefish, MT • elev. 3028’ Dine in /Carry out /Delivery Pizza, Cheesesteaks, Calzones, Subs, Salads, Beer, Wine and More! 550 East 1st St.

(406) 862-2212 www.jerseyboyspizzeria.net

“Smells are great. Very fun and diverse. What’s not to love about fine chocolates and good books.”

Kathleen Benz Portland OR


Whitefish

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N SHIRT CO New Owners • Same Location with a New Look! Come check out our expanded inventory of great shirts!

Wholesale screenprinting and embroidery for your business, organization or club. We can now make custom, one of a kind shirts for individuals or small groups. If you have a party or special occasion, we can make a shirt for any event!

215 Central Ave • Downtown Whitefish • Next to Sappari • 406-862-3175


Local Business W hSpotlight i t e f i s•hSage & Cedar

Create Your Signature Scent

I

n November 2014, Sage & Cedar will celebrate twenty years of providing high quality, unique gifts and fragrances in downtown Whitefish. Owner Nicole James has been mixing custom fragrances and providing skin care and makeup for her loyal clients for two decades now.

Nicole started the store with a partner in 1994 after brainstorming for a business that would allow them to have fun, be successful, and still have time for their children. The partner has since moved on to other ventures, but Nicole still loves her work at Sage & Cedar. She carries more than 30 base products such as shower gels, body lotions, and massage oils that can be customized with a wide variety of scents. The base products are made to her specifications, and are ready to use or to be personalized for clients with their own favorite aromas. Once the client has a product she is happy with, it can be packaged in five different sizes, ranging from 2 ounces to 32 ounces. Currently, about 140 fragrances, as both essential oils and high grade fragrance oils, are available to shoppers to create their own signature scent. Choices range from the traditional, like Vanilla, Sandalwood, and Tuberose, to the exotic, such as Egyptian Musk, Nag Champa, and

Maui Ginger, and blends like Coconut Lime Verbena and Strawberries & Champagne. The combinations are endless. Over the years, Nicole and her staff have developed several custom blends of their own that are always available in a number of different products. “Rain” is a soft, feminine scent, popular with those who prefer a subtle fragrance. “Montana Morning” is a fresh, outdoorsy choice that appeals to both men and women. Another enduring favorite is “Lemongrass Sage,” a citrus-herb blend. In addition to their customizable products, Sage & Cedar carries several top lines of bath and beauty products, such as The Thyme, 100% Pure, Little Moon Essentials, and KamaSutra. The Myrtle Leaf, made here in Montana, is a line of facial cleansers, serums, toners, and body butters that is popular with shoppers. The store also displays a wide variety of gift items, from loungewear to jewelry to scarves and other accessories. Shoppers have been particularly happy with the P.J. Salvage line, a brand carried by Nordstrom’s and other top department stores. Their cozy pajamas in soft cotton and flannel are an affordable indulgence, comfortable, luxurious, and easycare. Nicole has recently branched out to offer men’s loungewear as well. And candle lovers will be entranced by the wide variety of candles, in a myriad of different colors, sizes, and scents. Sage & Cedar is popular with both locals and tourists. Nicole finds that her unique blend of customers— locals, tourists, and mail order—provides a nice balance that keeps things interesting for her and her employees. Her location at 214 Central Avenue in the middle of downtown Whitefish makes it a great destination on a holiday shopping trip. Stop in to create your own favorite skin care items, or find a unique gift for that hard-toplease person on your gift list. – Barb Nelson

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W hWi th ei tf iesfhi s h

pure.natural.organic

214 Central Ave. Whitefish, MT 59937 www.sageandcedar.com (888) 863-9411

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Go Local to Make Home Repairs Nelson’s ACE Hardware

Crystals & Fossils! Jewelry ™ Petrified Wood Furniture ™ MT Sapphires ™ Dinosaur Teeth Central and 3rd Street, Whitefish

(406) 890-3790

www.whitefishrockshop.com

“As an artist I can ask any question and feel empowered to work on my own home. They explain everything for the average shopper. Staff offers great suggestions.” April Dawn Whitefish


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Nelson’s

Hardware

We’ve got you covered.

“Your downtown, hometown hardware store for over 66 years!”


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Go Local to Brighten Your Corner Rocks & Things

“Velvet’s place includes a book and gift shop filled with meaningful inner growth tools, a room for yoga, meditation and other spritiual traditions. This space is a sanctuary.” Rebecca Norton Whitefish


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Whitefish

Gateway to Glacier Trail (continued from page 22) 206 where it crosses and continues on the north side to the House of Mystery. With the unanimous support of the Flathead County Commission, the mayor of Columbia Falls, Glacier National Park Superintendent, Flathead National Forest Supervisor and the Montana Department of Transportation (MDOT), this grant has unofficially won support.   The final segment will be Badrock Canyon. The MDOT is responsible for building this separated shared trail through Badrock Canyon and across the South Fork River Bridge beginning in 2017.   This is your chance to join us in this last phase of fundraising. Don’t miss this opportunity to “Invest in Our Future Community” as we announce another series of opportunities such as the Harvest Dinner at Columbia Falls Montana Coffee Traders. Join us. And celebrate with us for another wonderful round of events to make this dream come true. – Alan Ruby


Whitefish

• Special Orders • Stationery • New Gift Wrap Area • Cards • Large Children’s Section • Knowledgeable Staff 244 Spokane Avenue • Whitefish • (406) 862-4980

Open 10am to 6pm Monday - Saturday • 11am to 3pm Sunday

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flathead Fall/winter Community Events Bigfork November 21 Festival of Trees Gala, Bigfork Museum, 6:00pm 22 Decorate Bigfork 27 Turkey Trot, Swan River Nature Trail, 10:00am 28-30 The Nutcracker Ballet, Bigfork Center for the Performing Arts, 2:00 & 8:00pm on Friday and Saturday, 4:00pm on Sunday

23-24 Bigfork Whitewater Festival Kayak Races, Wild Mile on the Swan River, All Day

Columbia Falls/West Glacier December 5 Night of Light Parade, Nucleus Avenue, 6:30pm February 8 Winter Ecology Tour, West Glacier Post Office, 9:30am

December 6,13,20 Christmas in Bigfork with Santa, Electric Avenue, 3:00pm – 5:00pm 6 Annual Magical Holiday Parade, Electric Avenue, 6:00pm 6 “A Touch of Christmas Concert”, Bigfork Theater 7:30pm 10 Caroling at Lakeview Care Center, Lakeview Care Center, 5:00pm 12 Handel’s Messiah, Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Bethany Lutheran Church, 7:30pm-9:30pm 13 Santa’s Workshop, Electric Avenue, 10:00am – 4:00pm 20 Holiday Cookie Contest, Electric Avenue 12:00pm – 3:00pm

Kalispell November 23 Voices in Autumn, Glacier Chorale, Glacier High School, 3:00 – 5:00pm 28-29 Christmas Tours, Conrad Mansion, Friday & Saturday 11:00am., 1:00pm, and 3:00pm 28 Christmas Parade and Tree Lighting, Downtown Kalispell 29 Shopping Extravaganza, Kalispell Fairgrounds

December 5 Annual Art Walk & Holiday Stroll, Downtown Kalispell, 5:00 – 9:00pm 5-26 Christmas Tours, Conrad Mansion, Friday & Saturday, 11:00am, 1:00pm, and 3:00pm January 6 Annual Christmas Sale, Central School Museum, 1 Polar Bear Plunge, Raven Brew Pub in Woods Bay, 10:00am – 3:00pm 2:00pm 6 A Chocolat Affaire, Downtown Kalispell, 5:00-8:00pm 23 Un-Decorate Bigfork, Meet at the Bigfork Inn, 8:00am 6-27 Christmas Tea and Tour, Conrad Mansion, Saturdays 11:00am., 1:00pm, and 3:00pm February 5 Art Walk & Stroll, Downtown Kalispell 28 Annual Bigfork Brewfest, in front of Brookies Cookies 11 Children’s Christmas, Conrad Mansion, Meet Santa 3:00pm-7:00pm 14 Handel’s Messiah, Glacier Symphony and Chorale at March Flathead High Performance Hall, 3:00pm-5:00pm Christmas Choir, Conrad Mansion, Christmas music 1 Lower Krause Basin Tour, Foothills Drive and 18 performed by Valley Voices “Evensong” Choir Strawberry Lake Road, 9:30am 31 First Night Flathead, Downtown Kalispell 4 Easter Egg Hunt April 4-5 Creston Auction & Country Fair, Creston All Day 4 Easter Egg Hunt, Bigfork Elementary School 12:00 noon, come early 25 Clean YOUR ‘Fork, Meet at Flathead Bank 8:00am – 12:00 noon 26 Taste of Bigfork, Downtown Bigfork, 2:00pm – 5:00pm M ay 16 Cherry Blossom Festival 16-17 Northern Rockies Paddlefest, Wayfarers State Park

January 22 Glacier Institute Hosts, Lecture, Conrad Mansion February 6 A Choclate Affair, Downtown Kalispell 19 Glacier Institute Hosts, Lecture, Conrad Mansion 20-22 Montana Pond Hockey Classic, Foys Lake March 14 Into Paradise, Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Flathead High Performance Hall, 3:00pm – 5:00pm 19 Glacier Institute Hosts, Lecture, Conrad Mansion

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flathead fall/winter Community Events April 11,12 24-25 25

Orchids in Spring, Glacier Symphony and Chorale Death by Chocolate Murder Mystery, Conrad Mansion Ladies Luncheon, Central School Museum, Call for more information, 406-756-8381

M ay 15 Conrad Mansion Tours Begin

Lakeside/Somers December 6 West Shore Holiday Fest, Lakeside School Gymnasium

Whitefish

14-15 Radium Girls, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 15 Into Paradise, Glacier Symphony and Chorale at Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 7:30pm – 9:30pm April 8-11, Venus In Fur, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 16-18 Venus In Fur, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 24 Moria Smiley & Voco, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm May 9-10 15 27-30

Talk of The Town: Under the Big Sky, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm Annual Anniversary Celebration, Whitefish Pottery Studio, 355 Twin Bridges Road Exit Laughing, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm

Ongoing Events

November 22 Voices in Autumn, Glacier Chorale, Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 7:30 – 9:30pm December 2 Christmas Stroll, Downtown Whitefish, 5:30pm – 9:00pm 4 Whitefish Gallery Nights, Downtown Whitefish, 6:00pm – 9:00pm 5-7 The King & I, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 12-14 The King & I, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 13 Handel’s Messiah, Glacier Symphony and Chorale at Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 7:30pm-9:30pm 19-21 The King & I, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 20-21 Yuletide Affair, Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 7:00pm January 24 The Mark of Zorro, Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 7:30pm – 9:30pm 24 Lil’ Smokies, (Bluegrass Ensemble), Whitfish Theater Co., 8:00pm 31 Letters to Sala, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm February 1 Letters to Sala, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 5 Whitefish Gallery Nights, Downtown Whitefish, 6:00pm – 9:00pm 7 Winter Carnival –Grand Parade, Downtown Whitefish, 6:00pm – 9:00pm 20-22, The Hobbit, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 27, 28 The Hobbit, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm March 1 The Hobbit, Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm 7 Okaidja & Shokoto (African Music Ensemble), Whitefish Theater Co., 7:30pm

Bigfork Preschool Storytime, Wednesdays during school year, ImagineIF Library, 10-11 am Swan Rangers Club, Every Saturday,Meet at Echo Lake Cafe, 8:30am Breakfast, 9:30am Departure, starts Nov. Columbia Falls/West Glacier Books & Babies, Thursdays, ImagineIF Library, 11 - 11:30 am Kalispell First Fridays Downtown, 5-7pm Free Quilt Class, Central School Museum, every other Wednesday in 2015, 1:00pm - 4:00pm Historic Film Club, Central School Museum, last Tuesday of each month in 2015, Starts at 6:30pm Books & Babies, Thursdays, ImagineIF Library, 11 - 11:30 am Lakeside/Somers Book Sale, Saturdays, West Shore Community Library, 10:00am – 4:00pm Story Hour, Mondays, West Shore Community Library, 10:30 – 11:30am Whitefish Gallery Nights, First Thursdays, Downtown, Book Discussion Club, Last Wednesday, Whitefish Community Library, 6:00pm First Friday, ages 7-12, Stumptown Art Studio, 6:30 – 8:30pm

For More Event Information Kalispell: www.kalispellchamber.com www.discoverkalispell.com Bigfork: www.bigfork.org/bigfork-montana-event-calender Columbia Falls: www.columbiafallschamber.com Lakeside/Somers: www.lakesidesomers.org Whitefish: http://business.whitefishchamber.org/events

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• WHITEFISH • B U Y I N D E P E N D E N T. BUY LOCAL.

Heart of Whitefish reminds you to buy from the local and independently-owned businesses of WHITEFISH. Your family, friends and neighbors will thank you!

When you buy from local, independently-owned shops, three times more of your money stays in the area, helping to grow our local economy! Did you know that for every dollar you spend at a local and independently-owned business, about 45¢ stays local? In contrast, only 15¢ of each dollar recirculates in the community when you buy from a corporate chain. Buy local. Buy independent. Brought to you by Heart of Whitefish.

Fall/Winter 2014 Go Local Flathead Valley  
Fall/Winter 2014 Go Local Flathead Valley  
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