Page 1

FA LL  /  WINTER 2013  /2014

T hi nk , Shop & Bu y

Local

go

Local FLATHEAD

guide to FLATHEAD BUSINESSES

— 1 —Owned FLATHEAD VALLEY Businesses A Guide to Suppor ting Locally


— 2 —


Shop Local Businesses! The Flathead Valley is unlike any other place in the world. By choosing to support locally owned businesses, you help to maintain our community’s diversity and distinctive flavor. This Go Local Flathead! shopping guide has been cooperatively produced by the businesses featured in this publication. The goals of this guide are to encourage education and awareness about the benefits of buying local, encouraging community support of locally owned businesses, and to increase support for local business owners in their stewardship of our community. One-of-a-kind businesses are an integral part of the distinctive character of the Flathead Valley. A growing body of economic research shows that in an increasingly homogenized world, entrepreneurs and skilled workers are more likely to invest and settle in communities that preserve their one-of- a-kind businesses and distinctive character. Here in the Flathead Valley – preserving our distinctive community character also helps to support and benefit our tourism businesses. Benefits of Buying Local: • It keeps dollars in our economy. Of every $1.00 spent at a local business $.45 is reinvested locally. For every $1.00 spent at a non-local business only 15 cents is reinvested locally. • It makes us unique. There’s no place like the Flathead! Homegrown businesses are part of what makes us special. • It creates local jobs. Local businesses are the best at creating higher-paying jobs for our neighbors. • It helps the environment. Buying locally saves transportation fuel. Plus you get products that you know are safe and well made, because our neighbors stand behind them. • It nurtures our community. Studies show that local businesses donate to community causes at more than twice the rate of chains. • It supports local farms and helps preserve the Flathead Landscape. In the 1950’s, we in Montana grew 70% of our food. Today, we grow only about 13% of the food we eat. The goal of this guide is to support local business owners in their stewardship of our community and in turn to encourage our community to support these businesses. This guide recognizes the value of all businesses in the community, but it is beyond the scope and scale of this publication to include businesses with national/international corporate structures. Best Wishes for Winter Fun in the Flathead, From Your Local Business Community Email us at golocal@golocalflathead.org or call us at 756-8993

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I n de x of Bus ine s s e s Bigfork Dine & Unwind

ShowThyme.........................................................9 EXPERIENCE

Persimmon Gallery.............................................12 Indulge

Bigfork Beauty Shop............................................8 Service

Partners West Realty...........................................11 Shop

Brett Thuma Gallery............................................9 Jug Tree..............................................................11 Kehoe’s Agate Shop..............................................8 Neal Brown’s Mojo Chocolates...........................11 The Barn..............................................................8

C o l u m b i a F a l l s / We s t G l a c i e r Dine & Unwind

Belton Chalet.....................................................20 EXPERIENCE

Swan Mountain Snowmobiling..........................15 Service

Freedom Bank....................................................18 Montana Photo Co............................................19 Western Building Center....................................17 Shop

Bad Rock Books.................................................16 Eagles Nest Antiques & Home Décor................16 Hungry Horse Liquor Store................................16 The Montana House..........................................19

K alispell Dine & Unwind

Bonelli’s Bistro...................................................37 Ceres Bakery......................................................30 Colter Coffee Roasting.......................................52 Hop’s Downtown Grill.......................................54 Rising Sun Bistro................................................38 The Knead Cafe.................................................49 Experience

Hockaday Museum of Art..................................35 Kalispell Downtown Association. inside back cover Museum at Central School.................................35 Noice Studio and Gallery...................................53 Paint Metal and Mud..................inside front cover The Conrad Mansion.........................................35 Tra Le Gael........................................................34 Grow

Potting Studio....................................................54 Kalispell Kreamery, Inc.......................................54 Terrapin Farm....................................................36

Indulge

Loco Tattoos.......................................................32 Shorty’s Barber Shop..........................................55

Stay

Aero Inn.............................................................25

L a ke s i d e / S o m e r s

Service

Able Body Collision Repair................................53 Absolute Refinement Barber & Beauty...............49 Airworks............................................................45 Alpine Interiors..................................................25 Barn Door Event Rentals....................................54 Best Rates Insurance, Inc....................................32 Calm Animal Care.............................................59 Centennial Timber Frames.................................50 Evergreen Compounding Pharmacy...................23 Kalispell Montessori Elementary School.............25 Lowitz Custom Shoppe......................................34 M and C Tire.....................................................28 McGarvey, Heberling, Sullivan & McGarvey, PC.....51 Montana Tile and Marble ..................................32 Paper Chase Copy Center..................................49 Parkside Federal Credit Union............................28 Pets-Plus.............................................................52 The Towne Printer..............................................40 Western Building Center....................................17 Shop

146 South Meridian...........................................37 Bikology.............................................................37 Bookworks.........................................................77 Brix Bottleshop..................................................34 Buckskin Clothier..............................................33 Camas Creek Yarn..............................................38 Coins & Carats..................................................50 Fawn Boutique...................................................49 First Choice Décor.............................................37 Flowers by Hansen.............................................52 Gold Rush Pawn................................................57 High Lonesome Gallery.....................................30 Humane Society Thrift Store..............................20 Imagination Station............................................75 J2 Office Products..............................................56 Jack & Jill’s Children’s Resale Boutique..............34 Kalispell Antiques Market..................................24 Mountain Valley Foods......................................39 Norm’s News......................................................31 Powder Horn Trading Co...................................51 Rocky Mountain Outfitter.................................37 Sassafras.............................................................33 Snappy Sport Senter...........................................46 Sportsman & Ski Haus.......................................23 The Bookshelf....................................................27 Think Local........................................................82 Western Outdoor...............................................31 Wheaton’s..........................................................28 Wheeler Jewelry.................................................53 Withey’s Health Foods.......................................29

A c kn ow l e dg e me n t s

Dine & Unwind

Somers Bay Café................................................63 Tamarack Brewing Company.............................44 Experience

Blacktail Mountain Ski Area...............................63 Shop

Lakeside Ski & Sports........................................65

Whitefish Dine & Unwind

Amazing Crepes.................................................79 Central Ave. Bakery & Deli................................76 Jersey Boys Pizzeria.............................................78 Experience

Heart of Whitefish.................... outside back cover North Valley Music School.................................73 Stumptown Art Studio.......................................73 The Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery..........77 Whitefish Pottery...............................................69 Indulge

33 Baker Day Spa...............................................78 Copperleaf Chocolat Company..........................71 Healing Spirits Therapeutic Massage..................76 Service

Bohemian Grange Hall.......................................72 The Abbie Shelter...............................................72 The Towne Printer..............................................40 Western Building Center....................................17 Shop

Bookworks.........................................................77 Copperleaf Consignment Clothing....................71 Crystal Winters..................................................79 Don K Subaru......................................................6 Ethos Paris Eco Boutique...................................73 Imagination Station............................................75 Mad Dog Art & Design.....................................71 Nelson’s Ace Hardware.......................................70 Sage & Cedar.....................................................75 Sprouts – A Children’s Boutique.........................71 Stumptown Marketplace....................................72 Third Street Market............................................69 Voyager Booksellers............................................71

F l at h e a d Va l l e y

Citizens for a Better Flathead.............................60 Flathead Electric Cooperative.............................41 Valley Recycling and The WasteNot Project.....42-43

A special Thank You to the volunteers who helped with this issue and without whom this publication couldn’t happen: Barbara Boorman, Kathy Britton, Susannah Casey, B.J. Carlson, Jeanne Carlson, Anne Feast Clark, Sharon DeMeester, Cindy Ercoline, Charlotte French, Cathy McDevitt, Barb Miller, Karen Morehouse, Barb Nelson, Linda Newgard, Don Schwennesen, Pauline Sjordal, Lynn Stanley, KC Voermans, Lynn Wallingford, and the staff of Citizens for a Better Flathead – Hilary Doran, Mayre Flowers, and Brooke Jeffrey. Cover Photo: John Ashley, Fine Art Photography.

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Inside this Issue Local Business Spotlight

Bigfor k 7

Swan Mountain Snowmobiling by Don Schwennesen

14

Evergreen Compounding Pharmacy by Mayre Flowers

22

Fawn Boutique by Hilary Doran

48

Somers Bay Café by Anne Feast Clark

62

Third Street Market by Anne Feast Clark

68

Kalispell 21

Imagination Station by Hilary Doran

74

Warm Ways to While Away the Hours.................................. 26

Big Sky, Big Lake, Bigfork.......... 10 by Charlotte French

Columbia Falls / West Glacier

13

by Barb Nelson

What The Locals Think

What You Don’t Know About Plastic May Surprise You............ 36

Bigfork

Neal Brown’s Mojo Chocolates.....................11 Partners West Realty.....................................11 ShowThyme!..................................................9 The Barn: Antiques Gifts Consignments........8

by Mayre Flowers

Mighty Multitasker: Mason Jar.... 58

Columbia Falls

Eagles Nest Antiques & Home Décor..........16 Montana House...........................................19

Kalispell

by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn

Lakeside/Somers 61

Alpine Interiors............................................25 Hockaday Museum of Art............................34 Mountain Valley Foods................................38 Think Local..................................................28 Western Outdoor.........................................30

Lakeside/Somers

Blacktail Mountain Ski Area.........................63

Whitefish

Jersey Boys Pizzeria.......................................78 Whitefish Pottery.........................................69 Sprouts.........................................................71 Stumptown Art Studio.................................73 The Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery....77 Western Building Center..............................75

— 5 —

Lakeside: Inspired by Volunteerism......................... 64 by Barb Miller

Working to Keep Flathead Lake Blue................................... 66 by Mayre Flowers

Whitefish 67 Flathead Valley Community Calendar.................................... 80


Go the extra 100,000 miles.

With 96% of Subaru vehicles sold in the last 12 years still on the road,* the 2014 Subaru Outback® lets you see the world and then some. *Based on Polk U.S. Vehicles In Operation registration information for MT2001-2013 as of January, 2013.

The

H VIP Experience! Sunbelt Version

Sunbelt Version

BUY A NEW SUBARU FROM DON “K” SUBARU AND BE A VIP CUSTOMER: FREE OIL CHANGES, TIRE ROTATIONS, AND COURTESY/LOANER CARS

• 2013 IIHS Top Safety Pick+1 • 30 mpg hwy3 • Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive • Built in a zero-landfill plant

LOCALLY OWNED AND COMMUNITY INVOLVED. $

00,000

• 2013 IIHS Top Safety Pick+1 • 32 mpg hwy4 • Built in a zero-landfill plant • Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive

000

$ JOHN SIMPSON SALES MGR.

JOSH GALE F&I

SUBARU

PER MONTH LEASE/ 00 MONTHS/XX,XXX MILES PER YEAR

$0,000 Down Payment $0 Security Deposit $0 First Month’s Lease Payment

$0,000 Total Due at Lease Signing

EDA

Stop in and meet our friendly, professional sales team: Justin Boylan, Rod Kuntz, Jon Grubb and Dirk Erekson.

EFA

6219 HWY. 93 SOUTH | WHITEFISH | 862-2571 | www.DonKsubaru.com Sunbelt Version

Just 10 Minutes North Of Reserve On Hwy. 93 Sunbelt Version

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Bigfork To Kalispell

Stage Ridge Rd.

35 Holt

Dr.

Commerce St.

N

Osborn Ave.

Electric Ave.

Grand Dr.

Bridge St.

35

To Polson

To Evergreen

35 To Kalispell

83

Hanging Rock Dr.

Holt Dr.

82

Flathead Lake

Chapman Hill Rd

Holt Dr. Holt Dr.

Swan Highway

35 83

Bigfork To Polson

To Swan Lake


8

Bigfork

Custom Jewelry | Agates Montana Sapphires | Treasures Precious Stones | and Engagement 1020 Holt Dr. Bigfork, MT 59911 406.837.4467 | kehoes11@centurytel.net www.kehoesagateshop.com

Big fork Beauty Shop Amber Rae, Joella, Lindsey

THE

BARN Bigfork, Montana

Antiques Gifts Consignments

100 Hill Road, Bigfork | 406.837.2276 | www.thebarnantiques.biz

Go Local Where There’s Always Something You Must Have! The Barn Antiques, Gifts & Consignments

Hair Image Professionals Master Colorist Gel Nail Technician Manicures Pedicures Wedding Up-Dos Waxing

“The BEST Little Beauty Shop in Bigfork!” 406 837.4304 • Cell 270.8273 8270 Hwy 35, Bigfork, MT 59911

“I don’t think it’s possible to come in to this store and leave without something that you’ve fallen in love with. There is an incredible variety of special items, and these are the nicest folks.” – Carol Nelson, Bigfork


9

Bigfork Go Local for the Best of the Best ShowThyme!

“We come to Show Thyme because this is where you will find the best of the best gourmet food in the Flathead!” – Denise Lange and Friends (all of whom agree!), Bigfork

“Autumn at Avalanche Lake” by Brett Thuma

B r e t t t h u m a G a l l e ry

Giclee Prints Available • Brett Thuma Gallery • Downtown Bigfork (406) 837-4604 • brettthumagallery.com


U

nder Montana’s Big Sky and nestled on the east shore of the Flathead Lake, Bigfork Village is home to artists, nature lovers, hikers, musicians, and all who delight in the beauty of the setting and the special friendships that are made here. Our town’s Events Calendar starts off in February with the Bigfork Brewfest, where visitors enjoy food, music, and beer by Montana’s finest brewers. The popular Taste of Bigfork in April features wine, music and exceptional food, drawing food lovers to the village from all over the valley. The Spring Art Walk and Whitewater Festival in May bring both art lovers and kayaking enthusiasts to Bigfork. Hundreds of cheering onlookers line the streets each year for our town’s July Fourth Parade. It’s also a perfect time to stroll down Electric Avenue, enjoying a variety of interesting shops and fine restaurants. The month of August begins with the Festival of the Arts, a two-day celebration of art, crafts, food, and music, and closes out with the Crown of the Continent Guitar Festival, a series of workshops featuring renowned master guitarists. The Riverbend Concerts, performed every Sunday evening from June to September, present Montana’s own musicians in a hail and farewell to summer, and the famous Bigfork Summer Playhouse attracts theater-goers from all over the valley and beyond…but does Bigfork lock its doors and go home on Labor Day? NO! September marks the beginning of an exciting fall/winter season in Bigfork. The Rumble in the Bay brings a host of old-car enthusiasts who enjoy watching these magnificent relics of the past parade/putt by. Tamarack Time is a local favorite in October, when Bigfork residents bring their finest homemade goodies to Electric Avenue. For a $3.00 ticket, visitors can sample soups and stews, pickles and pies, and much more, while visiting with friends old and new up and down the avenue. And remember to buy a ticket for one of the Bigfork Community Players’ productions while you are there… these talented local actors tickle our funny bones and brighten our winter days.

November brings the Christmas Art Walk and strangers are surprised to see a multitude of elves in their scarves and pointed hats decorating the town for the holidays. Bigfork has been called the most decorated village in Montana; many of its citizens turn out for a full day of changing the streets and byways into visions of color and light, wreaths and candy canes. Most stores are open until eight during this festive season and activities include sleigh rides, a children’s holiday party with Santa, The Festival of the Trees in Bigfork’s celebrated Museum of Art and History, along with concerts, plays and a Christmas parade…something for everyone! Hiking and skiing venues are as close as Glacier Park and Bigfork’s Jewel Basin. Shorter hikes, spectacular in the fall, can be located along the Nature Trail that skirts the Swan River or in Harry Horn Park. Beautiful Flathead Lake, site of the Dragon Boat Races, provides unlimited recreational activities for anglers and boaters of all stripes. The Flathead Lakers, the Montana University Biological Station and the Bigfork Storm Water Committee (established by County Commissioners) work year-round to protect the clean water and natural environment of this lovely lake. Bigfork is a community of enthusiastic volunteers. The Community Foundation for a Better Bigfork is the guiding light, supporting every aspect of village improvements. The Food Pantry supplies and distributes four thousand pounds of food a month with the help of churches, other organizations and residents. Volunteer groups like the Bigfork Community Study Group for the Bigfork Green Box Site and the Bigfork Land Use Advisory Committee work with County organizations on behalf of our community. And all those elves that decorate the village for Christmas turn out in such happy numbers just for the privilege of being a part of this amazing Bigfork holiday season. So come visit us anytime of year…there’s always something exciting going on in our village under Montana’s Big Sky by the Big Lake… Bigfork is waiting for you! – Charlotte French

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11

Bigfork Neal Brown’s Mojo Chocolates

Go Local for a Chocolate Lovers Dream Come True!

Creating Truffles, Barks, and the occasional Cordial.

Neal Brown’s Mojo Chocolates

All made with premium chocolate from Belgium, France or Switzerland. Orders taken from November 1 to May 1.

406-837-5018

ojom11mojo@gmail.com www.mojochocolates.com

Go Local for Service Where Friendships Grow

“Neal Brown’s Mojo Cholates are the reason the sun comes up in the morning, the secret to a long and happy marriage, and the true path to Peace on Earth. Just try to pry them from my cold dead hands!”

Partners West Realty

– Kate Hunt, Kalispell

“I think the world of Rose and Don. They are so pleasant to work with. They were always in contact and sending me great leads till I found the right house.” – Ann Poteat, Bigfork

Rose and Don Schwennesen rose@partnerswestrealty.com don@partnerswestrealty.com

s Aenea

h Birc

e

Lak

tn

M otch ystack N r e Ha Crat

Call us for real estate (406) 837-2575

Cr

r ate

re e Bi Ea g g H les aw M Br ok k t en M n t Le n g M tn

Picn

t Moun

tn

M

Th

otch ic N

THE FLATHEAD IS A RARE JEWEL HELP KEEP IT THAT WAY

104 Jewel Basin Court, Bigfork, MT 59911 www.partnerswestrealty.com


12

Bigfork

Save your local economy...

three stores at a time.

the

3/50 project

ÂŽ

saving the brick and mortars our nation is built on

3

Think about which three independently owned stores you’d miss most if they were gone. Stop in and say hello. Pick up a little something that will make someone smile. Your contribution is what keeps those businesses around.

50

If just half the employed U.S. population spent $50 each month in independently owned stores, their purchases would generate $42,629,700,000 in revenue.* Imagine the positive impact if 3/4 of employed Americans did that.

68 1

For every $100 spent in independently owned stores, $68 of it returns to the community through taxes, payroll, and other expenditures. If you spend that in a national chain, only $43 stays here. Spend it online and nothing comes home. The number of people it takes to start a trend...you.

Pick 3. Spend 50. Save your local economy. For more information, visit the350project.net ŠCinda Baxter 2010; all rights reserved. Proudly supporting RetailSpeaks and independent retailers everywhere. *Employment statistics courtesy U.S. Department of Labor/Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2/6/2009.


Columbia Falls/West Glacier

d St

C St

B St

2nd St 3rd St

3rd Ave E

1st Ave E

1st St

2nd Ave E

A St

5th Ave E

roa Rail

6th Ave E

Columbia Falls/ West Glacier 4th Ave E

13

7th St

5th St 4th Ave E

1st Ave W

6th St

Nucleus

9th St

8th St 9th St 3rd Ave E

5th Ave W

2

2nd Ave W

To Kalispell & Whitefish

3rd Ave W

4th Ave W

5th St

2nd Ave E

4thSt

11th St

Bills Ln To Glacier National Park

2 Glacier National Park West Entrance West Glacier

2 Coram To Columbia Falls

2 To Essex, East Glacier & Browning

N


Local Business Spotlight • Swan Mountain Snowmobiling

Winter Fun in the Flathead

E

Courtesy of Swan Mountain Snowmobiling

ver wanted to try riding a snowmobile? Or, maybe you’re an experienced rider but don’t want to bring your “sleds” and all that equipment to Montana for your winter vacation. In either case, Swan Mountain Snowmobiling has the trip for you, with the latest machines and safety equipment, at competitive prices. Swan Mountain Snowmobiling has been operating in the Flathead Valley for the past four years and is the newest addition to the Swan Group of Companies, a family-operated group of businesses offering a delicious smorgasbord of year round outfitting and outdoor opportunities in Northwest Montana.

The mountains surrounding the Flathead Valley beckon with more than 200 miles of groomed snowmobile trails, mostly maintained through volunteer efforts of local snowmobile clubs. You can take a “Quickie” two-hour guided tour to the top of Desert Mountain bordering Glacier National Park, or along Crane Mountain near Bigfork, with fabulous views of Swan Lake and the Swan Range. Then there’s the Great Northern Ultimate Tour, an all-day guided trip that begins at Canyon Creek and stops at the summit of Whitefish Mountain Ski Area for a luncheon break, before continuing to Werner Peak in the Whitefish Range, with huge vistas of Glacier Park, the Flathead and Stillwater valleys all along the way. There are Sunrise and Sunset tours and even trips with a hot lunch warmed by a cooking device that uses the engine heat of your snowmobile! For those who are new to the

sport or a bit rusty, custom training clinics, geared to the needs of the riders in your group, are also available. Swan Mountain Snowmobiling operates under permits from the Flathead National Forest. They offer tours and rentals in the Canyon Creek and Desert Mountain areas on the Hungry Horse/Glacier View District at the north end of the valley as well as tours in the Crane Mountain area on the Swan River District at the south end, near Bigfork. “We have Flathead Valley’s only two hour snowmobile tour and are proud to offer trips in more riding areas throughout the valley than anyone else,” said Aubrie Loroña, general manager of Swan Mountain Snowmobiling. “This will be the fourth season,” she said. They began operations in February, 2011, after successfully bidding on the brand new USFS permit for guided snowmobile tours and rentals. In addition to guided tours, Swan Mountain Snowmobiling offers snowmobile rentals for experienced riders, as well as clothing rentals. Helmets are required and provided on all tours and rentals. Costs range from $85 per person for a “Quickie” 2 hour tour, to $225 per person for the Great Northern Ultimate Tour. The guide and his sled are an additional $105 for most tours (excluding gratuity), or $225 for the Ultimate (minimum of two riders required). For more information, Swan Mountain Snowmobiling has an outstanding website that details many trip options, explains age and other requirements for riders, and includes complete prices, links to maps of the areas and web cams at the top of the Big Mountain. A trip to the website is well worth the time (www.glaciersnowmobile.com). The Swan Group of Companies has been described as a “new generation outfitter.” It began in 2004 when owner, Pat Tabor, purchased Lion Creek Outfitters, providing family vacations, fishing and hunting trips into the Bob Marshall Wilderness. In 2006, he wrote the winning proposal to operate the horseback concession in Glacier National Park. Soon after, he established Swan Mountain Wilderness Guide School which offers a full array of training programs for prospective guides and outfitters. In 2010, Swan Mountain Llama Trekking was added to the mix. With the addition of Swan Mountain Snowmobiling, the Tabors and Loroñas feel privileged to make a career out of their passion and offer year round adventure to the Flathead Valley! – Don Schwennesen

— 14 —


Columbia Falls/West Glacier

15

EXPERIENCE THE BEST OF MONTANA

SNOW MOBIL E TOU RS & RE N TA L S

Operating in Three Unique Areas Throughout Glacier Country: CANYON CREEK DESERT MOUNTAIN & CRANE MOUNTAIN

Family Friendly Hotel Pick Up Available Professional & Friendly Guides 2 Hour, Half Day & Full Day Tours Half Day & Full Day Rentals “Quickie” 2 Hour Snowmobile Tour Offering the longest continuous guided tour— The Great Northern Ultimate Tour Sunrise/Sunset Snowmobile Tour Cook While You Ride Tour

Reserve Your Tour Today! (406) 387-4405 www.glaciersnowmobile.com SMS is an equal opportunity provider, operating under special use permit with the Flathead National Forest


16

Columbia Falls/West Glacier Go Local and Find Real Craftsmanship Eagles Nest Antiques & Home Décor

“This is a beautiful store with a nice mix of old and new items. It’s where to go to find a special gift. There is such variety and quality craftsmanship.” Hours: 10:00 – 5:00 Mon - Sat | 2400 Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT

– Jeanette Kasawski & Phyllis Saunders, Calgary

406-892-SHOP | www.eaglesnestmontana.com

Hungry Horse Liquor Store

“specializing in locally distilled spirits” 8 9 7 0 H w y. 2 H u n g r y H o rs e , M T

387-5506 10 - 6 p m

O c t o b e r t h r u M ay

You can’t buy happiness, but you can buy local, and that’s kind of the same thing.


17

Columbia Falls/West Glacier

Western Building Centers Your Locally owned building supplier since 1946 Kalispell

le

Columbia Falls Ronan

Stevensvil

Evergreen

Polson

Libby Eureka

Whitefish

Culbertson

WBC Truss/Wall Kalispell — 755-6411 1745 3rd Ave East

Stevensville —777-1452 3956 US Hwy 93 N.

Evergreen — 755-9444 1019 East Idaho

Libby— 293-7755 30508 US Hwy 2

Whitefish — 862-2545 6130 Hwy 93 South

Ronan — 676-5726 36203 Round Butte Rd . W.

Columbia Falls — 892-3204 1550 9th St. West

Polson — 883-5284 905 1st St. East

Eureka — 297-2253 1574 Hwy 93 N.

WBC Truss/Wall — 892-2171 1863 - 13th St. W. CFalls

Culbertson — 787-5880 5929 Rd 1020

“Where the Contractor shops and so should you.” www.westernbuildingcenter.com


18

Columbia Falls/West Glacier


Columbia Falls/West Glacier Shop Local for the Finest Montana Made Crafts

19

Montana Photo Co.

The Montana House

New! Stage Coach & Outdoor Settings Portraits & Gift Certificates are Great Gift Ideas “We ducked into Montana House to wait out the rain and enjoyed looking at the displays. We love all the Montana products.” – Joanne & Mike McGarrah

Call for your Old Time Photo Shoot Available for Events and Location Shoots SHIRLEY REYNOLDS • 406-892-0178 Columbia Falls, MT 59912


20

Columbia Falls/West Glacier

The Historic

HUMANE SOCIETY THRIFT STORE

Extraordinary Dinning with Glacier Park Views

Clean a Closet and Help a Homeless Animal

Belton Chalet

Belton Grill Dining Room & Tap Room Open December 14th - March 30 Friday & Saturday Tap Room & Dining Room - 5-9 Saturday Live Music - 7-9 Sunday Brunch 10am - 2pm

Come-as-you-are Fine Dining featuring Montana grown foods, craft beers, fine wines & spirits

• Now accepting gently used, clean, resale quality items.

Winter Lodging

• Antiques, artwork, furniture, clothing, household items.

SPECIAL EVENTS

• All proceeds directly benefit animals

Cottages • Adobe House

Weddings ~ Private Parties Business Functions

• Tax-deductible

DONATE • SHOp • VOluNTEER

West Glacier

12575 Highway 2 East

(406) 888-5000

beltonchalet.com

2165 Hwy 2 East (next to JoAnn Fabric) Tuesday through Saturday 9:30 am – 5:00 pm


Kalispell Commons Way Heritage W ay Meridian Rd

Sunnyview

Ln Kalispell Regional Conway Dr.Medical Center Claremont St.

h St.

Cottonwood Dr.

ith

To Kalispell (heading east)

St.

St.

14th

N Airport Rd.

To Somers & Lakeside

ke

ve E 8th A

t. 9th S St. 10th

St. 12th St. 13th

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La

t.

8th S

11th S 11th

Sm

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t. 6th S t. S 7th

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Evergreen Dr.

eW 1st Av ve W 2nd A ve W 3rd A ve W 4th A ve W 5th A ve W 6th A

2

Evergreen

t. ing S Wyom . da St Neve t. rnia S Califo

7th Ave W

To Libby

vd

ve E 7th A

Uta Wyoming St.

Bl

Kila R d

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St.

Kila 2

Kila

Hill

18th St.

Rd St.

ns

St

Colorado St.

Main

Su

Reserve Dr.

Main

Meridian Rd

Burns Way

2

La Salle Rd

N

Whitefish State Rd .

r.

ge D orthrid

To Columbia Falls

Trumble Creek Rd.

To Whitefish

To Libby


Local Business Spotlight • Evergreen Compounding Pharmacy

Unique services Set Pharmacy Apart

Courtesy of Evergreen Pharmacy

Choosing to shop at the locally owned Evergreen with compounding techniques are now less common. Compounding Pharmacy will provide you top-quality, Compounding preparations are especially helpful for: “home-grown” expertise, the unique customized service • Patients requiring limited dosage strengths, such as a of a compounding pharmacy, as well as all the traditional very small dose for infants services you expect from a full service pharmacy. Chris • Patients requiring a different dosage form, such as Elizagaray, the current pharmacist, grew up in Evergreen turning a pill into a liquid or transdermal cream for and left to attend the University of Montana Pharmacy people who can’t swallow pills due to disability or due School. He graduated at the head of his class, before he to preference returned to Evergreen and the pharmacy to carry forward a • Patients requiring an allergen-free medication, such as long history of great service. one without gluten or colored dyes. • Patients who need drugs that have been discontinued by pharmaceutical manufacturers because of low profitability • Patients who are taking bioidentical hormone replacement therapy • Children who want flavored additives in liquid drugs, usually so that the medication has the appropriate dosage and tastes sweeter when possible • Veterinary medicine, usually for a change in dose or flavor

Greg Phillips established the Evergreen Pharmacy in the 70’s. Pharmacist George Yeats, who grew up in Whitefish, began working with Philips in 1995 and was able through his training to add compounding to the services they offered. Yeats later purchased the pharmacy in 2006. The Evergreen Pharmacy was one of the first pharmacies in the state to offer compounding services. As a professional compounding pharmacy, Elizagaray points out, “we can provide medicines tailored to the patient’s specific needs and prepared to the doctor’s exact specifications.” Compounding is done by a licensed pharmacist for medically necessary reasons, such as to change the form of the medication from a solid pill to a liquid, to avoid a nonessential ingredient that the patient is allergic to, or to obtain the exact dose needed. It may also be done for voluntary reasons, such as adding favorite flavors to a medication. Before mass production of medications became the norm, compounding was a routine activity among pharmacists. Community pharmacists who have experience

Elizagaray says one of the real pleasures of the work he does is being able to meet the unique needs of a child, the elderly, or others confronted with a pharmaceutical dilemma. He notes with satisfaction the numerous cards of appreciation they have received from individuals for whom his compounding skills have made a significant difference in their healing—ranging from the mom of two autistic children to a pet owner struggling with a way to get their pet to take a veterinarian prescribed medicine. It speaks volumes about the degree of customer satisfaction and the reputation that an independent pharmacy can continue to serve its customers for over 40 years. The highly educated, knowledgeable and dedicated staff of seven, now led by Chris Elizagaray, Pharm. D, are largely responsible for this continued success. The Evergreen Compounding Pharmacy is located on U.S. Highway 2 East within the new commercial cluster that includes the Goodwill store and Little Caesars, across from Army Navy in Evergreen. They also offer mail service for prescriptions within the valley and out of state. Shop at this locally owned pharmacy and receive the great service, selection, and competitive prices you deserve! – Mayre Flowers

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Kalispell

The name that’s meant

23

d a e h t a l F e h t n i Outdoors Since 1968

Locally & employee owned Kalispell • (406)755-6484 Hutton Ranch Plaza - Hwy. 93 N. Whitefish • (406)862-3111 Mountain Mall - Hwy. 93 S. sportsmanskihaus.com

Flathead’s most experienced Compounding Pharmacy

Evergreen Compounding Pharmacy George A. Yeats, owner Chris Elizagaray, Pharm. D. Compounding Pharmacist

2141 Hwy 2 East, Suite 300 • Kalispell, MT Phone (406) 257-2083 • Fax (406) 755-3219

evergreencompoundingpharmacy.com • evergreenrx@montanasky.com


24

Kalispell

kAlispell

Antiques MArket 48 Main Street Kalispell Downstairs In Western Outdoor

10,000 Square Feet of Treasures to Browse

Open 7 Days A Week Mon - Sat. 10-6 Sun. 11-4 257-2800


25

Kalispell

• Located near Kalispell City Airport • Indoor Pool, Sauna & Hot Tub • Group Rates • Senior Citizens Rates • AAA Rates • Continental Breakfast • Free High Speed Internet

1830 Highway 93 South, Kalispell, MT For Reservations USA & Canada 755-3798 1-800-843-6114 www.aeroinn.com

Go Local When You Want Impeccable Workmanship! Alpine Interiors

“Mark Mazur painted my house. He is a highly conscientious, thorough and completely trustworthy businessman. His workmanship is impeccable and his prices reasonable.” – Karen Leigh, Kalispell

Mark Mazur 

Wallcovering Installation and Removal

Custom Interior/Exterior Painting & Staining

Serving the Flathead since 1999

Over 25 years experience

EPA Lead Paint Certified

Timely, Trustworthy and Reliable

Fully Insured

406-756-2518 www.alpineinteriorsmt.com


Warm ways to while away the hours

E

fer classes and free advice. They also have examples of finished work on display, so they’re worth a visit even if you’re just looking (contact Camas Creek Yarn, Glacier Quilts, Stumptown Art Studio, or Powder Horn Trading Company for beading).

But not everyone has the ability or the desire to participate in those chilly activities. Somewhere around the middle of October, the rest of us get a sinking feeling—the kind of feeling you get when you’re headed into a long, dark tunnel. What in the world are we going to do for the next six (nine!) months? So we did a little research, talked to friends and strangers, and came up with a list for you. Pull on those flannel jammies, pour a cup of tea, and stoke the fire—you can have fun in the winter, even if you want to stay inside.

• Work out. Tired of your current fitness routine? Try something new. Local health clubs, gymnastics studios, and the community college offer courses in Tai Chi, Zumba, strength training, aerial skills, and a variety of other fitness methods. Or go bowling, walk around the mall, or dance to your favorite oldies.

iStock

Jackson Day

veryone knows that the Flathead Valley is a winter sports paradise. Many of us spend the winter cramming in as many activities as possible: downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, ice skating, ice fishing, snowmobiling, and more.

• Learn something new. Flathead Valley Community College offers a variety of classes, both credit and non-credit, on topics as diverse as digital photography, jewelry making, self-publishing, Montana history, computers and the internet. Visit their website for a complete list. FVCC is also offers courses through ed2go, an online educational site that offers an even wider variety of six-week courses, all entirely online (www.ed2go.com/fvccce). • Try a new skill. Learn to cook French bistro food, or Vietnamese pho. Or try woodturning or whittling or building a model car—visit a hobby shop for ideas and supplies. Quilt, knit, crochet, felt, bead, or sew. Many local craft shops, art studios and galleries of-

• Visit a museum. The Hockaday Museum of Art has a permanent collection of regional art, as well as rotating collections. The Museum at Central School offers an intriguing look at local history. In Whitefish, the Stumptown Historical Society Museum is located in the historic train depot. The Bigfork Museum of Art and History is right in the middle of downtown Bigfork with a variety of rotating exhibits as well as a permanent collection of historic objects and photographs. And a bonus—all our local museums offer a variety of handmade items for sale. • Watch a movie. Find a list of the top 100 films of all time, and watch them all. Or look for a specialized list of your favorite type of film: westerns, mob movies, family films, chick flicks, the funniest movies ever. Try websites like IMDB, the American Film Institute, Common Sense Media, or Rotten Tomatoes for a wide variety of lists as well as individual movie reviews. Commercial websites such as Amazon

— 26 —


and Netflix offer similar lists with the ability to watch them on your computer for a fee. DVDs can also be checked out through your local library. • Read a book. Join a book club, or start one. Visit your local library—if you haven’t been there in awhile, you might be surprised at what you find. Check out one of the independent local bookstores for staff picks (Bookworks, Bad Rock Books, or The Bookshelf ). Try a new genre—if you usually read biographies, try adventure or science. If your usual fare is mysteries, try horror, or one of the excellent new authors of young adult literature. And if the mention of graphic novels conjures up memories of The Archies or Superman, you’ll be amazed by Sandman or American Born Chinese. Get recommendations online for something new to read at Goodreads, Shelfari, or check the bestseller lists in newspapers and magazines.

• Learn to dance. A recent list of dance classes in our area turned up opportunities to learn swing dancing, clogging, square dancing, jitterbug, belly dancing, and more. Local bars host line dancing nights, no partner necessary. The community college and many local dance studios also offer classes for adults. • Trivia night. Is your brain filled with random bits of information? Put all those details to good use at a trivia contest. Flathead Lake Brewing Co. in Bigfork and Tamarack Brewery in Lakeside host weekly trivia nights. Call them for more information. • Volunteer. There are many ways you can help with local needs. Work with the elderly, deliver meals to the homebound, help someone learn to read, or serve dinner at a homeless shelter. Contact the United Way, the volunteer coordinator at Kalispell Regional Medical Center, or talk to a local church or elementary school. Someone needs your skills!

Dreamstime

Everyone is happy when summer finally arrives again, but any of these ideas will help winter go by in a flash. – Barb Nelson

• Join a musical group. Like to sing or play an instrument? Our area is host to many community musical groups, including The Crown of the Continent choir. Local churches also offer opportunities to sing or play. Or if you’re just learning, call the North Valley Music School, or visit the Kalispell Area Music Teachers’ Association’s “Find a Teacher” webpage. • Attend a cultural event. Whitefish is home to two theater companies, and the college drama department and all the local high schools have regular shows. Or try the Glacier Symphony and Chorale if music is your thing. And all those community musical groups mentioned in the previous item have concerts, too! The Daily InterLake’s weekly “This Week” insert (included with Thursday’s paper) has a calendar of events.

— 27 —


28

Kalispell

214 1st Ave West, Kalispell • 257-5808 wheatonscycle.com

Go Local for Irresistible Locally Made Gifts Think Local

“The charm of this store is irresistible! I came in looking for unique local crafts for a gift and I have fallen in love with so many of the items here. It will be hard to choose.” – Sue Lanharm, Boston


29

Kalispell Hours: Mon-Sat 9am to 6pm 1231 South Main Street Kalispell, MT 59901 406-755-5260 Gift Certificates Available

Organic Grocery Gluten Free Health & Beauty Supplies

Home Brew Supplies for Beer & Wine

Phone & Mail Orders Welcome!

Solid Gold Pet Foods Nutritional Supplements

Fresh Organic Produce Stop in, Withey’s is your local grocer, neighbor and your friend.


30

Kalispell Shop Local for the Best Western Wear in the West Western Outdoor

“I always find what I need and get great help when I need it. I mostly buy men’s western shirts as gifts. It smells like western stuff… that great leather boot smell.”

HIGHLONESOME GALLERY John Moffatt - Artist P.O. Box 166 Kila, MT 59920 (406) 755-3411

ppmoffatt@gmail.com

– Dulcy Zoellner

“The West That Was”

Your Neighborhood Bakery Christmas Cookies In Historic Downtown Kalispell

Artisan Breads Fine Espresso Delectable Pastries

318 Main Street 406-755-8552

Monday-Friday 7am-6pm Saturday 8am-3pm Sweet Potato Sticky Buns, Croissants, Danish, Scones, Cinnamon Rolls, Sliced Bread, Challah, Burger Buns, Baguettes, Ciabatta, Focaccia and more!

Holiday Breads

Check us out on��� ������to find out what new treats we've been baking and look for specials!


Kalispell

31


32

Kalispell

Auto • Flood • Home Call Today for your

Complimentary Policy Review

Serving Our Clients 24/7

Brenda K. Hanson


33

Kalispell

Sassafras

Jewelry• Painted Furniture

sassafrasgallery@yahoo.com

120 Main Street•Kalispell, Montana 59901•406-752-2433

Elaine Snyder was inducted into Montana’s Circle of American Masters by Montana Arts Council in January 2009 as a Buckskin Tailor. She designs & distinctively hand crafts vests & jackets for men and women and ladies dresses. Your tanned hides or hers. 540 Country Way South • Kalispell, Montana 59901 Studio Visits By Appointment Only 406-755-0767

Special • Creative • Delightful • Cards • Photos• Knit wear

Unique • Explore • Eclectic • Clever• Fun •Original

One of A Kind • Wide Selection


34

Kalispell Go Local for Art Classes The Hockaday Museum of Art

Jack & Jill ’s

“I am glad to have the opportunity to take art lessons at the Hockaday. I like different kinds of art—painting, drawing and abstract projects. We went upstairs to the main galleries to see Peter Moore’s work and then did a landscape inspired by it.”

Children’s Re-Sale Boutique Name Brand Clothes Maternity Baby Equipment Reuse • Renew • Refresh hours: mon-fri 10:00-5:00, sat. 11-4:30 328 S. Main St. • Kalispell • 755-1488

– Victoria Ullom

Tra Le Gael

Traditional & Contemporary Celtic Music

• Boat Tops, Covers & Interiors • Furniture, Residential & Commercial • Awnings, Residential & Commercial • Retractable Awnings and Power Screens

302 2nd St. West Kalispell, MT 59901 (406) 755-3200

lowitzcustomshoppe1@gmail.com • www.lowitzcustomshoppe.com

Contact Barbara Calm • tralegael.com 406.755.8212 • bcalm1@yahoo.com

BASKETS FOR ALL OCCASIONS Choose from items not found anywhere else in the valley for a unique and special gift.

Italian Snack Basket

In a rush? Just call us with the amount you’d like to spend and we will have it ready for you to pick up. Expanded Imported Wine Selections Fall Seasonal Beers Now in Stock check

for New Arrivals

406-393-2202

Seasonal Beer Bucket

At the Historic Loading Dock • 101 East Center St. Ste #102 • Fall Hours: Mon-Sat 10-7pm, Sun 12-4pm


Kalispell

35


Y

ou may have heard the mantra: Think Global, Act Local. Let’s look at plastic from this perspective. Here’s a short overview of some surprising trends in the future of plastics, and some steps you can take here in the Flathead to practice the 4 R’s: Reduce, Refuse, Reuse, Recycle. A global perspective on plastic can be both sobering and exciting. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), every bit of plastic that has ever been created still exists, including the small amount that has been incinerated and has become toxic particulate matter. Plastic, as we commonly know it today, is a material that the earth cannot digest. Thankfully, with the use of plastics growing substantially each year, there is some great new work being done on developing a whole new line of biomaterials (plant-based plastics—from plants such as corn, potatoes, sugarcane, mushrooms, and trees—as opposed to fossil fuel based plastics). The goal is to develop a new set of plastics from

biodegradable, nontoxic chemical building blocks, which can be composted into soil, safely and easily. The majority of plastic we use today, however, is not plant-based. (Note: Support businesses like these who serve you with products that can be locally Plant-based plastics recycled! currently available are not all compostable or even “green,” though this is where new research is headed.) Plastic is now everywhere, including places we don’t want it to be. According to researchers, microplastic particles comprise an ever-increasing percentage of pollution in the world’s oceans and freshwater lakes. In the ocean, some of these plastics—Polycarbonate, Polystyrene, and PETE—sink, while LDPE, HDPE, Polypropylene, and foamed plastics float on the ocean surface. Sunlight and wave action cause these floating plastics to fragment, breaking into increasingly smaller particles, but never completely disappearing—at least on any documented time scale. Plastic pollution is becoming a hazard for marine and other wildlife, and ultimately for us. Harmful chemicals leached by plastics are even present in the bloodstream and tissues of almost every one of us, including newborns. Ongoing studies are looking at what might be the long-term effects of even lowlevels of exposure to humans and wildlife. Fortunately for all of us there are some major and inspiring efforts underway to curb plastic pollution and develop more sustainable plastics. Just do an Internet search for TED Talks and plastic for a start to learn more. Meanwhile, there are some important steps you can take to “Act Locally” here in the Flathead. ➤ Start by learning how to tell plastics apart. Look for the small triangular chasing arrows with a number on the bottom of the container. Did you know that there are seven different kinds of plastic? Only plastics #1 and #2 are locally recyclable in the Flathead. Many plastics look identical—you will be surprised when you make it a habit to always check the number. If it is not a #1 or #2 plastic, or if it doesn’t have a number, place the item in the trash. It can’t be recycled here.

— 36 —

continued on page 65

Mayre Flowers

What you don’t know about plastic May Surprise You


37

Kalispell

146 South Meridian ` Home Decor & Gifts

New,

2nd Hand, & Montana Made Gifts 146 S Meridian Kalispell, MT

(406) 250-9362

Thursday 10-5 Friday 10-5 Saturday 10-2

ITALIAN • MEDITERRANEAN Breakfast • Lunch Espresso • Pastries Gluten Free !

Mon - Sat 8am - 3pm 38 1st Ave E. Kalispell • 406-257-8669

CLIMBING • BACKPACKING NORDIC AND BACKCOUNTRY SKIING

124 Main Street, Kalispell ● 406-250-8544 www..rstchoicedecor.com


38

Kalispell Go Local for Fresh Organic Food to Go Mountain Valley Foods

“I come to Mountain Valley because of the products especially a great protein powder that I can’t find any place else. I like the overall layout of the store and the wonderful customer service.” – Hellen Brien

Fresh & Local.

Your local farm-to-table community bistro ing ook B y w No olida s H tie Par

Pri v Din ate Ava ing ilab le

www.RisingSunBistro.com 406-755-7510 25 Second Ave. W., Kalispell As featured on the Food Network


ORGANIC FOODS | JUICE & COFFEE BAR | BODY CARE | QUALITY SUPPLEMENTS

Introducing!

fresh food grab & go! PACKAGED FOR CONVENIENCE | FRESH FOR FLAVOR | CREATED FOR HEALTH

25 Commons Way, Kalispell, Hwy 93, Next to Qdoba | 406.756.1422 www.mountainvalleyfoods.com | Open 7-7 Mon-Sat 10-4 Sun


The Towne PrinTer wHiteFiSH

p 406.862.5770 F 406.862.0876 237 Baker Avenue whitefish, mt 59937

KALiSpeLL

p 406.755.4993 F 406.755.4995 75 First Avenue w.n. Kalispell, mt 59901

The Towne Printer was established in 1963. We have grown from a small mom and pop operation to one of the largest quick printers in the state. We offer printing, copying, graphics, mailing and project management all under one roof. We pride ourselves on being one of the few printing companies that can produce everything ourselves. If you’re buying from us, we are making it.

The Towne Printer way .... Quality, Pride & Service

localS printing for localS www.towneprinter.com


Puttin’ the Squeeze High Electric Bills! Flathead Electric is

on

Nothing says Local quite like

Energy Efficiency “Any energy we don’t use is energy we don’t have to go looking for on the open market.” That’s the message from your local electric utility, which offers a vast assortment of energy efficiency opportunities to its members. “Flathead Electric is unique in that it actually wants to sell less of the product it has to offer.” That’s according to spokeswoman Wendy OstromPrice, who explained that conserving energy saves the Co-op money, which ultimately beneets us all, as member-owners. FEC has a longstanding record of energy preservation, but decided to enhance its efficiency programs even further, with the launch of “Energy Fix,” and its many incentives. “You really can’t get more local than by utilizing FEC’s energy efficiency measures”, Ostrom-Price says. “We work with local insulators, window installers, appliance dealers, heating and cooling contractors, et al. Flathead Electric goes local all the way.” To learn more about FEC’s efficiency programs stop by the Co-op, call 751-1875, or visit www..atheadelectric.com and click on Energy Fix.)


It Takes a Community

At City Recycling Sites

At County Recycling Sites

There are seven different kinds of plastic and ONLY #1 and #2 are locally recyclable.

When you take time to recycle and to sort properly you are supporting 50-60 jobs in the • Valley Recycling, the County Green Bin Sites, and Flathead! curbside recyclers take all #1 and #2 plastics. • When non-recyclable materials are dumped in a recycling bin it all becomes trash. Then recycling • Pacific Steel and Recycling and the City of businesses lose money and can’t grow. Whitefish sites only take plastic that drinkable fluids come in. • If it isn’t #1 or #2 plastic or you can’t find a number, put it in the trash.

• Materials properly sorted for recycling are more valuable and help offset the costs to taxpayers of hauling these bins to local recycling centers from rural county recycling sites around the county.

This ad was sponsored by Valley Recycling, 257-2574 serving the Flathead’s recycling needs for over 20 years and by the WasteNot Project: Working to reduce waste and promote recycling in the Flathead since 1993. 756-8993. www.wastenotproject.org


to Make Recycling Work

At school

Schools across the Flathead have put in place recycling programs to help students learn hands-on about the value of recycling. How to properly sort is lesson #1. • For a printable guide to where to locally recycle over 60% of what gets currently thrown away, visit www.wastenotproject.org

At work

Businesses are realizing that they can recycle, save money, and please customers. • Adding a cardboard recycling collection bin at a business is often less expensive than adding additional bins for garbage. Call Evergreen Disposal, 257-1739, or North Valley Refuse, 862-4381.

At home curbside pick-up

Curbside Recycling at your home is available in most of the Flathead Valley for a small monthly fee. Contact one of the following businesses to get this service and learn more: • New World Recycling, 257-5899. • The Green Machine, 755-8112. • City of Whitefish/North Valley Refuse, 862-4381.

SORT

Be a good sort, recycle right

IT OUT


Testimonial: “We saved hundreds of dollars on our heating bills last winter and the cooling over the summer has been an unexpected bonus. We are very happy with the system.” —Ken Siderius

Bill and Diane Yarus

294 2nd Ave. WN Kalispell, MT 59901

Call the ThermoCouple for more information and/or a FREE estimate at 406-257-1341 Visit our website: www.airworksmt.com or find us on Facebook.


Kalispell

47


Local Business Spotlight • Fawn Boutique

Bringing City Style to Kalispell

Hilary Doran

A

ttention women and girls of the Flathead: you don’t need to travel to Spokane or Missoula to find sharp, trendy clothes. At Fawn Boutique, 219 Main Street in Kalispell, you will find the same fashions as you would in Nordstrom’s and other upscale clothing stores in larger metropolitan areas. Fawn Boutique brings the city to Kalispell. Lynde Price, owner, and Erica Robinson, manager, have created a fun and casual store at Fawn Boutique. It all started 5 years ago when Lynde decided to act on her love of fashion—and giving fashion advice—and create the kind of boutique that she herself liked to visit. Lynde’s family is here and she wanted to give Kalispell (and Main Street) a chance. Owning a specialty shop in downtown Kalispell is not easy, given the competition from the big box stores to the north, but it’s the personal touch, and the quality clothing lines, that makes Fawn unique and successful. The atmosphere is inviting, with polished wood floors, chairs for resting and checking out the latest fashion magazines, comfortable and spacious dressing rooms, and music playing in the background. The displays of clothes, accessories, handbags and jewelry are attractively arranged with plenty of space between them. No bumping into racks or squeezing between crowded displays here. There’s a lovely open feel in the boutique. The great customer service is immediately apparent, with a nice balance between being helpful and allowing you to browse on your own. There’s nothing else like it in Kalispell. But Fawn Boutique is more than just a pretty place with a nice atmosphere. It’s the selection of clothes that make this place special. Lynde personally chooses items in all age ranges and styles—from classic-but-trendy for women, to comfy and cute for teens and young women—all of superior quality and value. Fawn is THE place to go for jeans in Kalipsell. Lynde carries “Miss Me” jeans for the teens, and NYDJ (Not Your Daughter’s Jeans) for women, all with complimentary hemming service. You’ll find sweaters, tops, and dresses by French Connection and Velvet by Graham & Spencer, and more denim pieces by Hudson and 7 for All Mankind. Right now there’s a gorgeous selection of

sweaters and cool-weather tops. The handbags are Big Buddha bags and the jewelry is by local Flathead artists. There’s even a line of workout wear by Alo. Every season is new. In fact, new merchandise arrives every week, sometimes every day. So check back often. If you need some advice about putting together a special outfit, or just need to know if you should wear this pair of trousers with that top, Lynde and Erica are the women to see. They keep current on fashion trends, knows what the celebrities are wearing and go on buying trips to Las Vegas. Lynde also knows what works in the Flathead Valley. Fashion consultation is a huge part of the job and Lynde says it’s actually her favorite part of the job. She finds joy in helping people find the perfect item or outfit and enjoys the challenge when someone says, “dress me.” Towards the back of the shop, near the dressing rooms, sits The Beauty Bar. Here the aestheticians specialize in eyelash extensions, waxing, and facials using the Epicuren line of natural skin care products. The Beauty Bar is a nice complement to Fawn Boutique and provides an extra level of service and personal care not usually found in clothing stores. Stop by Fawn Boutique the next time you’re on Main Street. Say hi to Lynde and Erica, and check out the new fall and winter styles. – Hilary Doran

— 48 —


49

Kalispell Experience the Relaxing Gathering Place of Years Past…

We offer traditional “SIGNATURE SERVICES” in both the barbershop and salon. ONCE AGAIN... it’s our turn to enjoy LUXURY OF YEARS PAST! FULL SERVICE QUALITY: steam towels, straight shaves, etc. in our comfortable safe / healthy atmosphere. Free Coffee and WIFI!

17 2nd Street East Kalispell, MT 59901 406-752-SHAVE (7428) www.absoluterefinement.com

Paper Chase Copy Center

Taking your unmanagable and making it managable

Full & Self Service Copies • Spiral Binding High Volume Copies • Large Format B&W or Color Printing • On Site Typesetter Design/Layout Assistance • Invitations Flyers • Brochures • Business Cards .....and more 7 E Oregon St Kalispell, MT 59901 406.752.4944

Breakfast * Lunch * Desserts * Espresso Gluten Free * Vegan Options 21 5th Street East on 5th and Main Street, Kalispell Tuesday through Saturday 8am to 3pm

752-8436

For Take Out and Downtown Delivery


50

Kalispell

GOLD, SILVER, COINS and JEWELRY

Your Trusted Bullion Specialists For Over 22 Years

Monday to Friday, 10:00 to 5:30 237 Main Street, Kalispell, MT • 752-2646 coinscarats.net • coinscarats@bresnan.net

New brand. Same business.

1001 Trumble Creek Rd. Kalispell, Montana 59901 406.755.8114

www.centennialtimberframes.com


Kalispell

McGarvey, Heberling, Sullivan & McGarvey, PC Your Advocates for Health, Safety and a Clean Environment

Announcing our new location in the former Sons of Norway building — Now repurposed, remodeled, and solar powered! 345 First Ave. E. • Kalispell, MT 59901 • 406-752-5566

51


52

Kalispell Colter Coffee Roasting

Voted Best Flower Shop in the Flathead Valley

128 Main Street Kalispell, MT 59901

406-752-1313

Like us on

www.flowersbyhansen.com flowersbyhansen@centurytel.net

CELEBRATING 10 YEARS OF LOCALLY ROASTED COFFEE 424 S Main • 755-1319 • coltercoffee.com

Pet, Home-Care & Senior Help All pets, including Livestock Overnights Available

Services Offered Medications Pet Exercise Supply Delivery Pooper Scooper Exotic Pets Care

Connie & Dennis • Bonded & Insured 406-257-7155

petsplusdayton1@att.net

Polly & Connie

www.petsit.com/pets_plus


Kalispell

53

“Going to the Sun” Set with Golden Montana Sapphire & Diamonds 127 Main Street • Kalispell • (406) 755-5321

“FLATHEAD’S FIRST ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY BODY SHOP”

406-752-1125

Auto Body Paint & Repair • 24 Hour Towing • Windshield Repair & Replacement

2025 US Hwy 2 East • Kalispell, Montana • www.ablebodyshopkalispell.com


54

Kalispell All Natural Farm Fresh Dairy Products From Moo to You Pure, local, and made right here in the Flathead Valley.

Cream-on-Top

Montana’s Best Burgers

American Kobe Beef, Swan River Elk, Mission Mountain Buffalo, Spring Brook Ranch Yak 100 Craft Beers • Regional Wines Hop’s Downtown Grill • 121 Main Street Historic Downtown Kalispell • 406-755-7687 www.hopsmontana.com

Available in most area grocery stores

Milk Cream Greek Yogurt Eurpoean Butter

100 % antibiotic free No Artificial Hormones

Grade A- Pasteurized Products www.kalispellkreamery.com

406-756-MILK

Complete Rental Service Tents • Liners • Tables • Chairs Dance Floors • Dishware • Linens • Lighting

Everything For Your Event Bill Mann 406-253-1266 • Fax 406-752-1286

BarnDoorEventRentals.com


Kalispell

55

Celebrating Five Years!

Come help us celebrate with an Art Walk Party!

Friday, December 6th

OFFERING CUTS, COLORS, SKIN AND NAIL SERVICES! Design your favorite hair style and return to Shorty’s by December 20th, 2013 for the chance to win great prizes! Schedule online at www.shortysmt.com 406-260-4010 // 136 Main St. Kalispell, MT


56

Jack

1

2

3

4

5

J2: The Best People, Products, and Price.

9

w i t h

8

Business

7

YOUR

6

Grow

10 11 12

Kalispell

700 Sunset Blvd | J2op.com | 752-8520 | Your Smart Choice


Kalispell

57

GOLD1353RUSH PAWN COMPANY Hwy 2 East Kalispell, MT 599901 257-7296 • www.goldrushpawn.com • Friend Us on Face Book

Open 7 days a Week • 9-6 Monday - Saturday • 9-5 Sunday We Buy Gold Firearms - New & Vintage Prospecting Supplies Motorcycle Leathers Fine Jewelry Body Jewelry Gifts

Locally Owned •Serving the Flathead Valley for 33 years Voted Best Pawn Shop


Mighty Multitasker MASON JAR

Want to reduce the amount of stuff you have? Any minimalist can tell you how: multitaskers. These are household items and tools that can, with a little imagination, take the place of entire closetfuls of unitaskers—the Magic Bullet blenders, popcorn poppers, and other one-trick doo-dads. It’s a new way to measure the value of a thing: “How many ways can I use this? How many other things will I not have to buy?” Duct tape and clothespins are classic multitaskers. But the

YES! photo by Paul Dunn

mightiest multitasker may well be the Mason jar.

3 Facts Ball traditionally sold jars east of the Mississippi River, and Kerr west of it. Even though Ball and Kerr act like competitors, they’re actually both part of the same corporation, Jarden.

5 Bonus Points Ball and Kerr jars are still made in the United States. Companies like Classico and Anna’s Honey sell their products in Mason jars to cut down on waste by giving us an easily reusable jar. No plastic chemical worries, microwave friendly, and naturally stainproof. The standardized jar design allows companies to manufacture special lids so your Mason jars do even more. A Portland company designed a French press coffee maker that uses a quart jar. Another company makes a child’s sippy cup top for half-pint hands.

The DIY movement and recession reignited sales in You can write on the glass and lid with a Sharpie pen. the 125-year-old Ball line. Last year’s sales were up Wipes off for next time. 20% and were the highest in history. — 58 —


1 Jar

12 Things

Baking ramekin Bake single-serving pot pies, casseroles, and blueberry crumbles in it.

Kalispell

Calm Animal Care Providing Quality Veterinary Services to the Flathead Valley Since 1984

Ice pack Freeze ice in it for injuries or portable coolers. Leave at least an inch of space at the top for expansion. Measuring cup Ball jars come with cups, ounces, and milliliters molded into the jar. No need to keep dry and liquid measurers. Drinking glass Perfectly matched, inexpensive, and easy to replace. Put a cloth cozy on it and it becomes a commuter cup for hot coffee. Shelf-space saver Glue the outer rings to the underside of a shelf, and you have organized storage for buttons and bobbins, screws and nails. Anything. Leakproof to-go container Pack a salad in a quart jar: dressing first, heavier things next, lettuce at the top. Shake it at lunch time. Mini-greenhouse Empty jars that held last year’s harvest can give you a head start on this year’s. Invert them over seeds or seedlings as individual cloches. Vacuum-sealed storage Pour your warm homemade yogurt into small jars. As they cool in the refrigerator, the air inside contracts, forming a vacuum seal that extends storage life. Miniprep blender The threads on mason jars fit directly onto most standard blender bases. Bulk food container Take it to the store to fill with bulk foods. Tip: half-gallon jars have a tare weight of 1.70 pounds. Soap dispenser, light fixture, alfalfa sprouter, sauerkraut fermenter, oil lamp. All depends on what you do to the inner lids. And, oh, yeah.You can use it for canning. n Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn wrote this article for “The Human Cost of Stuff,” the Fall 2013 issue of YES! Magazine, a national, nonprofit media project that fuses powerful ideas with practical actions. Tracy is creative director of YES!

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Medicine • Dentistry • Surgery Chiropractic • Acupuncture

Dr. Barbara Calm Dr. Karen Hartle Dr. Laura Thiel Calm Animal Care 425 Main St Box 14, Kila, MT 59920 406-755-8214 calmanimalcare.com


Brett Thuma

Stewardship Needed … Working to Keep the Flathead Special Forever requires of each of us a vision as grand as this valley we call home and a commitment to find solutions that respect the character of this place as our greatest economic asset. Each day decisions are being made that shape the Flathead’s future. For 21 years, with the support of many, we have worked for solutions that balance short-term needs of the present with a shared long-term vision for the future of this great place. Much is possible when we work together. If you’re not familiar with our work or just want to learn more, please give us a call at 756-8993 and visit our web site, www.flatheadcitizens.org.

— 60 —


Lakeside/Somers To Kalispell

th

ea

d

La

ke

For res Ro t Hill ad

To Bigfork School Addition Rd

Fla

To Kalispell

Somers

Adams St. Flathead Lake To Lakeside Stoner Loop

Lakeside

Ben Williams Ln

N

Blacktail Rd

Redfield Ln

To Polson


Local Business Spotlight • Somers Bay Café

Like Mom’s House restaurants are a family business. He also cooked for a while at Tall Pine Kitchen and for local entrepreneur Chris Levengood. He was working in food service at the hospital when a friend told him that Somers really needed a restaurant, and he should open one. He did, on April Fool’s Day, 1997.

Photos by Anne Feast Clark

Pulling up a chair in the Somers Bay Café is a lot like eating at your Mom’s house—if Mom were a homesteader, allowed you to select from a delectable array, and was thrilled to have the neighbors join you. In this café, customers have a way of drifting in to talk to owner Dennis Hatton about everything from sailing, hosting wine tastings or wellness runs, or to community efforts to house a restored steam engine. The colorful S2 switch engine is just down the street, but so is everything in this tiny, hilltop town that formerly was the industrial hub of the Flathead Valley. Only pilings and a few buildings survive from those turn-of-the-century years when Great Northern Railroad used the harbor for a rail tie plant, but Hatton pays homage to the past in his décor: A wooden statue of a steamboat captain welcomes customers at the door, and vintage photographs show the mill town when the tie plant sprawled across the harbor; outside, a deck mural by artist Penrod Corradine completes the picture. Against the background of mellow country classic music, “the stuff we all grew up on,” Hatton calls it, a neighbor boy picks up a “to-go” meal and bicyclists from the nearby Rails to Trails path discuss their route. The café is at the head of the Great Northern Historic Trail, and bicyclists are among those fueling up with omelets, French toast and pancakes before starting their day, or concluding their efforts with savory wraps from a full lunch menu. In a nook of the exposed brick walls that were new in 1905 when the structure was the State Bank of Somers, photographer Trevon Baker often enjoys breakfast. His studio is across the street, in the postage-stamp sized town bathed in light from the harbor. When Hatton joins him, they talk of sailing at the North Flathead Yacht Club on the nearby point. Baker’s photos are among those framed by the warm brick walls, which host an eclectic array of vintage items. “People like the funkiness” of the décor, says Hatton. He cooks and his sister Judith helps serve in the building that he restored. Their family had a supper club in Baker, so

“I said I was either going to make a fool of myself or fool everybody … and make it! So now, across from the board he installed to post joke comics that friends bring him, there’s a thank-you letter from the crew that filmed a re-creation of “Night of the Grizzlies” for PBS. Hatton catered that effort, to obvious acclaim. Here’s a hint why: When the waitress asks that everyday question, “Sourdough or house bread?” customers’ ears pick up. “Really? Made here?” It is. Hatton sets the sunflower nut bread to raise the night before, and bakes it in the morning to send a culinary welcome wafting down the street. He serves breakfast and lunch, and is open from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., but that didn’t t quite suit a local group of guys, he’s amused to relate. They were often at the door when he opened at 6:30 a.m. His solution: “I finally gave them a key, so they could come in and start the coffee for me. There’s not many places can do that.”

— 62 —

– Anne Feast Clark


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Lakeside/Somers Go Local Where the Staff is Truly Awesome! Blacktail Mountain Ski Area

“The staff is awesome and makes you feel welcomed and special. Open runs really make it fun on big snow days, and the different levels of terrain offer adventures for all levels of ability.” – Chris Edelen, Kalispell

Historic

Somers Bay Cafe Located in Beautiful Downtown Somers

Serving Breakfast & Lunch 7 Days a Week • 7:00 am to 2:00 pm

857-2660


Lakeside: Inspired by Volunteerism

Mayre Flowers

V

olunteer Park is an apt name for the newest County park located in Lakeside on Flathead Lake. It symbolizes the great spirit of volunteerism in the Lakeside community. The 1.5-acre parcel was purchased, and the park designed and built, by a local couple and then donated to Flathead’s Parks Department. Since its completion, it has been enjoyed by the whole community and many seasonal visitors and has hosted special events. But volunteerism and community-mindedness in Lakeside don’t stop there. The Lakeside Community Club has over 140 members from Lakeside and nearby locations. Their stated purpose is: “… to raise funds to help meet the charitable needs of our community.” The annual Lakeside Fair they organize in mid-July draws thousands of people and raises tens of thousands of dollars. The Club then donates the funds to organizations like the Animal Shelter, Lakeside’s Quick Response Unit (QRU), ALERT rescue, Somers Volunteer Fire Department and many others. Visit their website at www.lakeside-community-mt.com/. The QRU is also a great example. A longtime resident couple donated the land for a much-needed new QRU building. The $920,000 building is almost completed using community donations of funding, labor, and materials. And it has a community meeting room available for use. There are 17 volunteers who staff the QRU and respond quickly to fires, accidents and other emergencies. Visit their website at http://lakesideqru.org/. Volunteers from Lakeside are on call for the Somers Volunteer Fire Department, responding to fires and accidents within, and sometimes outside, the Somers Fire District. The West Shore Library in Lakeside is completely run by volunteers, with a very successful annual fundraiser including silent and live auctions of items donated by individuals, businesses, and organizations. The much used Food Bank in Lakeside was replaced with a new building on donated land and a local resident put up the money for the building. But volunteerism still does not stop there. Individuals and small groups in the community often volunteer for projects to help or improve the community. Concerned volunteers secured state and county funding for a walk/bike trail along Blacktail Road, which has no shoulders, forcing everyone to use this busy road. The County awarded $300,000 for the project, if the community could raise matching funds

of $30,000-$40,000. A group of volunteers then marketed and advertised the need, held a huge raffle of very worthy prizes donated by various businesses and organizations in the valley, and have raised over $30,000 to date. The trail is now scheduled to be built in the spring of 2014. The Lakeside Community Development Foundation is a 501(c) (3) with an all volunteer Board and receives and distributes funds for community projects such as the Blacktail Trail. Another local resident helped obtain a $5000 grant from Safe Routes to Schools to complete a planning study and make recommendations for safe walk/bike routes within a 2 mile radius of Lakeside Elementary School. The final report is available in the West Shore Library in Lakeside. Businesses and individual volunteers will be undertaking the implementation of these trails and paths in the future. Other examples of community volunteerism include those who volunteer to run for election to the Lakeside Community Council. The uncompensated Council was established in the 1995 Lakeside Neighborhood Plan, which was developed by a group of volunteers concerned about rapid development in the area. The Community Council meets the last Tuesday of every month in the new QRU building to make recommendations on development proposals and to discuss issues facing the community. All meetings are open to the public. A group of about a dozen volunteers served on a sub-committee under the Council for 3 years to develop an updated 2010 Neighborhood Plan which was adopted by the County Commissioners in late 2010. When you visit Lakeside and enjoy Volunteer Park, you now know how it got its name.

— 64 —

– Barb Miller


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65

L aL ka eksei sdi ed/eS/oS o m emre sr s

continued from page 18 ➤ Not all recycling businesses accept the same items.

Be kind to our local recycling firms by being a “good sort!” Remember to check who takes what. For example, only Valley Recycling currently takes all #1 and #2 plastics, while Pacific Steel and Recycling only accepts #1 and #2 plastic bottles with a neck that have been used as a food container; i.e., no shampoo or detergent bottles. ➤ Don’t trash what others have carefully sorted. When you place trash or items that can’t be locally recycled in the recycling container the whole bin of collected material often becomes trash. Local recycling firms can’t afford the labor costs to sort out trash or items they don’t recycle. ➤ Compostable plastic can’t be composted in the Flathead. No one in the Flathead has a facility that can compost compostable plastic; not even your backyard compost pile gets hot enough. Additionally, many of the current #7 compostable plastics are chemically not found in nature. Though they may break down eventually into small pieces, they can remain toxic. New research promises the development of truly compostable plastic in the near future. ➤ Reduce! Make it a habit to bring your own shopping bags, reusable cup and even takeout container. ➤ Refuse! If the item you are purchasing does not come in either a locally recyclable #1 or #2 plastic, choose paper over plastic. While paper take-out containers or cups can’t be recycled locally, because of food contamination, OA EB RDS DLare more environmentally friendly than plastics PADthey like Styrofoam. In the county landfill paper take-out containers break down eventually and contribute to methane gas production, which at the Flathead County landfill is collected to generate electricity. (Note that paper in general can be recycled as much as seven times before the fibers become too broken or short for recycling—so recycle paper not used for food service whenever possible and save expensive landfill space.) ➤ Reuse! A trip to the Internet will provide you lots of ideas for reusing plastic containers. The Good Food Store in Missoula now provides its diners the option of buying a returnable take-out container, so there is always one available when customers stop in for a meal. ➤ Recycle! Visit www.wastenotproject.org for a comprehensive list of what and where to recycle in the Flathead. – Mayre Flowers

7212 Hwy 93 South | Lakeside, Montana Located behind the Spinnaker Bar. Look for the Ski Sports sign on the west side of highway 93.

The best sporting goods option on Flathead Lake’s west shore.

SNOWBOARDS

SNOWSHOES

REP AIR & TUNE U PS

SKIS

Y UNT O C S CROS CLASSIC & SKATE

SKI RENTALS

Phone: 406-844-2188 Mobile: 406-270-2927 www.lakesideskisports.com contactlssports@gmail.com


Working to keep Flathead Lake Blue “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

T

he Flathead Lake Protection Association (FLPA) is a volunteer non-profit organization dedicated to preserving and enhancing water quality in the Flathead Basin. Since 1981 FLPA has been involved in water quality issues, advocating the need for pro-active public participation in all water quality issues, which affect Flathead Lake. FLPA is a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens, who provide critical leadership necessary to preserve the clean clear waters of Flathead Lake. “This is a group of people that has been very dedicated to a particular purpose, and singularly so,” says Bruce Young, a founding member of the group. “We have a  mission to protect water quality and to  educate, and we’ve stuck to that. It’s hard to find a group of people who will meet for 32 years for a single purpose.” The list of challenges they have taken on represent some of the most significant challenges to Flathead Lake’s water quality: helping to secure mitigation to in-stream flows from Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam; addressing impacts from poorly planned development including storm water or septic waste issues; and monitoring and clean-up of the toxic residue left behind by operations such as the Tie Plant in Somers. Ultimately adding new developments or harvesting and managing natural resources throughout the Flathead has the potential to harm local water quality if not done following best practices. “We have some very good common-sense regulations out there to protect water quality,” Young said. “They’re not perfect, but they’re a start. What we need to do now is make sure our politicians follow the rules and strengthen them to prevent the cumulative impacts that growth will have in the future. That’s where we come in when necessary to hold our decision makers accountable.” The FLPA has gone to District Court 6 times in 32 years against Flathead County Commissioner decisions that concerned major water issues and the county regulations protecting water. In each case, the FLPA prevailed and laws had to be followed that protect water in the basin. FLPA is active in numerous educational outreach efforts and regularly networks with other groups to expand this

outreach. A few years ago, FLPA worked with the Flathead Lake Biological Station and Artist Glen Prestegaard, to generate funds for lake water quality monitoring by promoting the Keep Flathead Lake Blue License Plate sales.

When you choose this license plate, a portion of your fee goes to the Yellow Bay Bio Station for monitoring of water quality in the Flathead Basin. Look for it next time you renew and show that you care about this public treasure.

Currently, the FLPA feels the most urgent and greatest dangers to the Flathead Basin are the lack of monitoring funds, the lack of a water district in Flathead County, invasive weeds, zebra mussels, and storm water drainage. To address the lack of monitoring funds, they are currently working hard to support a campaign to match $1,000,000 in donated money with the purpose of creating a permanent monitoring fund for the Flathead Lake Biological Station. They invite all who love the waters in the Flathead Basin to lend a hand to help preserve some of the greatest water on earth. To learn more and to make a donation visit: http:// www2.umt.edu/flbs/Community/Donations.aspx FLPA has demonstrated that citizen participation is a powerful tool when it comes to getting important things done. Let us all take proactive action to Keep Flathead Lake Blue. Visit http://protectflatheadlake.org/ to learn more about the work of Flathead Lake Protection Association and to get involved. Current FLPA Board Members are Howard and Francis Ruby, Bruce Young, Steve Rosso, Gregg Schoh and Bruce Barrett.

— 66 —

– Mayre Flowers


Whitefish To Whitefish Resort

Railway St

Miles Ave

1st St

1st St

Baker Ave

7th St

Columbia Ave

Kalispell Ave

5th St

Pine Ave

Park Ave

4thSt

Somers Ave

3rd St

Spokane Ave

Central Ave

Baker Ave

Lupfer Ave

E. 2nd St O’Brien Ave

To Eureka

Depot St

6th St 7th St

8th St 9th St Ri ve Av rsid e. e

W.13th St

10th St

N

W.15th St

To Kalispell


Local Business Spotlight • Third Street Market

More than a food store

Anne Feast Clark

C

ascades of flowers and baskets of colorful vegetables draw shoppers into Third Street Market in Whitefish, where the warmth and concern of owners Ric and Dawn Blair and their staff make it impossible to feel like a stranger, or to leave without learning something. Education starts on their website, featuring a reference library which includes information and articles on health conditions, therapies, recipes, women’s health, and much more. But for a simple and profound lesson on sugar, just prompt Ric: In two minutes, he’ll focus attention on a chart that shows …well, we won’t spoil his memorable presentation! Dawn will tell you the story of the market with the same quiet grace with which she greets newcomers and lifelong customers. The market structure, once a gas station and then “Mother’s Health Foods,” was owned by the couple’s best friends who sought Ric’s help from his extensive business background. The couple began to see that operating the store would be a good lifestyle choice for their family. That was in 1986, and now almost 30 years into their family project, they and their store glow with health. The store has tripled in size during those years that have included after-school visits from their children, and many opportunities to develop relationships with friends who became customers and customers who became friends. “It’s about caring, and making that wonderful connection with people,” says Dawn. ”We need those relationships in our lives.” The staff operates as a congenial extended family, with store manager Brian Cole easily slipping into the role of spokesperson. When asked about the most unusual thing the store has stocked, he does a mental romp through the inventory: grass-fed beef from Big Sandy, organic pork from Belgrade, as well as bison, elk and emu. Then there’s local produce from Purple Frog Gardens and Terrapin Farms, honey, huckleberries from a regular supplier, morel mushrooms, and Flathead cherries. If it’s grown or produced locally, it’s a good chance he’s got it, he says; that includes locally produced laundry soap. The store offers on-line coupons and specials, but bulk items such as spices, almond and peanut butter may be one of their best values, he says, because shoppers can buy small quantities, insuring freshness.

Back to the most unusual item in recent memory: duck eggs. A local supplier offered them to Cole, and all of a sudden he found himself with a lot of duck eggs and a large concern about moving them. But the response to a link about all the good qualities of duck eggs on the market’s Facebook page had the eggs almost flying out the door. ”It’s a point of amazement to me,” said Cole. “Next thing you know, they were all gone.” The market’s customers are often well read, on everything from GMOs to gluten, and sift through web pages and social media for quality foods and supplements. They find a like mind in Ric Blair. A stint in a book store fueled his love of research, and now his customers reap the benefits. He subscribes to health newsletters, hosts plenty of information about health conditions on his website, and brings nutrition experts into the store. When he directs people to food and supplement items that might work for them, he speaks with decades of experience. “More and more people are paying attention to what they put in their mouths and on their plates,” said Cole. And, judging by the market’s following among pet owners, it’s easy to add: what they feed their pets. “It’s fun to work around people who are into healthy living, healthy choices,” says Cole. “It’s a credit to Ric and Dawn that they have created an environment for it.” – Anne Feast Clark

— 68 —


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Whitefish

Go Local for Art that Inspires Whitefish Pottery and Stillwater Gallery

Celebrating 1995-2013 18 years Orders • Toll Free • Info

(866) 895 - 3699

“I am traveling the west by motor bike and they are going to package my purchase so I can carry it on my bike. That’s great service! The paintings and pottery in the window pulled me in.” – Ryan Jones, Australia

Choose Local & Independent This Holiday Season


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Whitefish

Nelson’s

Hardware

We’ve got you covered.

“Your downtown, hometown hardware store for over 65 years!”


Whitefish Go Local and Get “FAB” Customer Service Sprouts

“I am eight and my mom has been shopping here since I was born. She says they have FAB! customer service. I like Kelly, she owns the store.” – Teague McDonald of Whitefish with Kelly Marchetti

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Whitefish

When you see THIS Christmas Ornament in the windows of your favorite local stores, 1% of their holiday profits will be donated to

Available to rent for Meetings Family Reunions Rehearsal Dinners Small Weddings Classes Holiday Get Togethers 125 Blanchard Lake Rd. Whitefish, Montana 59937 406-862-4357 406-261-5967


Whitefish Go Local for Smiles That Say It All! Stumptown Art Studio

“We love it here.” “I like the pottery and the painting.” “This is my third year. This summer we did art in a yurt as part of this class—that was neat.” – Quotes from Liam Good, Anna Wikner, Issac Gibbs, and Avery Sorensen, Whitefish

Enriching the musical life of our community through education and performance 432 Spokane Avenue (P.O. Box 4446) Whitefish, Montana (406) 862-8074 www.northvalleymusicschool.org

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Local Business Spotlight • Imagination Station

toys that Open the Imagination Critters, as well as the ever-popular dinosaurs and stuffed animals. Imagination Station is the only place in the valley that carries hand-puppets that encourage imaginative play. Denise and Mary decided long ago that they wanted to provide toys that are handson and fun for both children and adults and foster family interaction. The Kalispell location also caters to teachers, providing them with resources such as calendars, workbooks, bulletin board essentials, and a host of other items for handson classroom activities. Children love to come to the store to play and check out the new toys. And children who grew up coming to the store now bring their own children. Denise says that one of the joys of having the store is seeing their customers so happy. And it’s not just children who enjoy the store. Many adults come in looking for games or puzzles for themselves or for gifts. The store truly has become a Birthday Store. Imagination Station sends out at least 350 birthday cards every month with a $5 gift card included, and gift wrapping is always free. Mary and Denise have heard many people say, “I should have started here.” When asked what is the best thing about owning a toy store Denise had a 4-part answer: 1) being partners with Mary and sharing the job with her, 2) having a staff that has become family through the years, 3) appreciating the continuity of customers and friends, and lastly, making people of all ages in the valley happy. It’s clearly been a recipe for success. Make a stop at Imagination Station soon. They are fully stocked for Christmas and Hanukkah. Mary, Denise, and the rest of the staff will greet you as a friend and help you find what you’re looking for. – Hilary Doran

— 74 —

Photos by Hilary Doran

P

ull into Imagination Station and open the door to a magical place. The store is aptly named; it will engage your imagination. The shelves are packed with wonderful toys, games, puzzles, stuffed animals, paints, books, models…. Well, you get the idea. 18 years ago Denise Magstadt was doing child care and Mary Witbrod was the administrator of Whitefish Montessori. Both women have degrees in childhood education and were looking for good quality educational toys. And they were tired of wrapping presents in the back of their cars, as many stores then did not provide gift wrapping. With their children entering elementary school, and with more time to pursue other interests, they decided to take the plunge together and open a store. Denise always knew she wanted to open a toy store in Whitefish, one with quality toys that maybe trick kids into learning; a store that could be a ‘Birthday’ store with items for $10 or less. In 1995, Imagination Station opened for business on Central Avenue in Whitefish. That first Whitefish store was small, just 400 square feet, but they soon expanded to 900, then 2,000 square feet. And in October 2001 they opened a second store at 132 Main Street in Kalispell. Imagination Station is currently the ONLY toy store in the Flathead Valley. Mary and Denise envisioned a store that catered to locals first. They listen to their customers and neighbors and respond to their needs and desires as best they can. While some of the merchandise changes yearly, many of us will recognize the ever-present classic toys we loved as kids. You’ll find Jack-in-the Box, Slinky, Lincoln Logs, blocks, and bike bells. You’ll also find the hottest toys that kids want right now, like Rainbow Loom and Calico


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Whitefish Go Local and Get the Price You Like Western Building Center

“We drive up from Many Lakes to shop at the Columbia Falls Western Building Center. They always have the product we need at the price we like! They have the friendly service we like.” – Pat and Cyndie Forrest, Whitefish

timeless beauty . . .

available exclusively at . . . Jackie, 1953

214 Central Ave. Whitefish, Mt 59937

www.sageandcedar.com (406) 862-9411


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Whitefish

BREAKFAST & LUNCH • Sandwiches, Soups, Salads, Baked Goods and more. • Bread and New York Style Bagels made fresh daily! • Gluten Free Options • Take & Bake Dinners

237 Central Avenue Whitefish, Montana

406-863-9788

406.862.6447

33 Baker Avenue Whitefish, MT 59937

We offer: • Therapeutic/Deep Tissue Massage

Let Us Rejuvenate You!

• Swedish/Classic Massage • Pregnancy Massage • Geothermal Hot Stone Massage • Body Wraps

You can also schedule your next massage by visiting

Gina Landon, Massage Therapist

www.HealingSpiritsofWhitefish.com


77

Whitefish

Andrea Brew

Shop Local for the Artistic Talent That Wows!

Mark Baumbach

The Walking Man Frame Shop & Gallery

Judy Cockrell

Featuring Olde America Antiques Reproductions of Vintage Maps & Posters

“We loved working with Walking Man Gallery! Their framing skills enhanced the artist’s work and our enjoyment of our paintings. Many guests in our home have expressed similar comments.”

305 Baker Avenue Whitefish, Montana 863-ARTS

– Marylou Patterson, Whitefish

www.thewalkingmanframeshop.com thewalkingman@cyberport.net

• Special Orders • Stationery • New Gift Wrap Area • Cards • Large Children’s Section • Knowledgeable Staff 244 Spokane Avenue • Whitefish • (406) 862-4980 38 1st Ave East • Kalispell • (406) 755-4980


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Whitefish Go Local for Phenomenal Pizza! Jersey Boys Pizzeria

Whitefish, MT • elev. 3028’ Dine in /Carry out /Delivery Pizza, Cheesesteaks, Calzones, Subs, Salads, Beer, Wine and More! 550 East 1st St.

(406) 862-2212 www.jerseyboyspizzeria.net

“We are committed to shopping locally and really like that when we do so here, it feels like we are all friends. They know us by name and the pizza is phenomenal!” – Amy & Craig Moore, Whitefish


Whitefish

79

Purveyors of the Eclectic Since 1979 A Way Cool Place to Shop! Voted “Best Place for Unique Gifts” Montana T-shirts • Hats • Jackets • Huckleberry Products Souvenirs • Great Cards • Gags • Gifts for All Ages 232 Central Ave. • Whitefish, MT • 406-862-6104 Open 7 Days a Week!


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Fl athead Fall/Winter Community Events Bigfork

November 22-24 The Nutcracker Ballet, Bigfork Performing Arts, 2-8 pm 22 Festival of Trees Gala, 525 Electric Ave, 6-8 pm 23 Bigfork Elves Decorate Bigfork for the Holidays & Tree Lighting Ceremony, Bigfork Inn, 8 am 23 Bigfork Art Walk, Downtown Bigfork, 3-7 pm 28 Turkey Trot, Hike, Swan River Nature Trail, 10 am Nov 27– Holiday Members Show, Bigfork Museum, Jan 11 525 Electric Ave, 11-5 pm December 7, 14, 21 Christmas in Bigfork, Carriage Rides and Santa, Electric Avenue, 2-5 pm 7 Annual Magical Holiday Parade, Electric Avenue, 6 pm 7 A Touch Of Christmas Concert, Bigfork Theater, 7:30 pm 13-15 A Christmas Story, Bigfork Center for the Performing Arts, Call for details, 837-4885 14 Bigfork Children’s Holiday Party, Mosiac Restaurant, 2-3:30 pm January 1 18 February 22 March 14 17 April 4-6 19 25-27

26 27 May 17 17-18

The Annual Polar Bear Plunge, The Raven, 2 pm Un-Decorate Bigfork, Meet at the Bigfork Inn, 8 am

24-25

39th Annual Bigfork Whitewater Festival, Kayak Races, Wild Mile on the Swan River, All Day

Columbia Falls/ West Glacier December 6

Kalispell November 22-24 Artists and Craftsmen of the Flathead Christmas Show, 10-5 pm 23, 24 Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Celestial Music – Heavenly Voices, Call for details, 257-3241 25, 26 Christmas at the Conrad Mansion, 7-9 pm 29 City of North Parade, Downtown, 6 pm 30 Christmas Tour, Conrad Mansion,11 am, 1 & 3 pm December Christmas Tour, Conrad Mansion, 11am, 1 & 3 pm 6 6 Art Walk & Stroll, Downtown, 5 pm 6-7

12 14, 15 19 20

Annual Bigfork Brewfest, in front of Brookies Cookies, 3-7 pm

January 18, 19

Rotary Chili Feed, Garden Bar, 5 pm St. Patrick’s Day in Bigfork, Episcopal Church, afternoon

February 13

47th Annual Creston Auction & Country Fair, Creston, All day Easter Egg Hunt, Bigfork Elementary School, Noon Cowabunga Variety Show, Bigfork Center for the Performing Arts – Thomson Theatre, Call for details, 837-4885 Clean YOUR ‘Fork, Meet at Flathead Bank, 8-12 pm Taste of Bigfork, Downtown, 2-5 pm

Night of Light Parade, Downtown, 6:30 pm

20 21-23 22, 23 27

27

Flathead Cherry Blossom Festival, Yellow Bay Club March House, 10-4 pm 13 Northern Rockies Paddlefest, Wayfarers State Park, Call for Details, 752-2446 — 80 —

MRP Arena Cross, Majestic Valley Areana, 6 pm

Santa’s at the Conrad Mansion, Call for details Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Messiah, Call for details, 257-3241 Valley Voices Holiday Choir Event, Conrad Mansion Christmas Tour, Conrad Mansion, 12 pm

Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Carnival of the Animals – A Fun Family Concert! Call for details, 257-3241 Bob Marshall Wilderness Speaker Series, Bob Keane, FVCC, Arts and Technology, Rm. 139 Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Soloist Spotlight, The Alpine Ballroom, 7 pm Montana Pond Hockey Classic, Foys Lake Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Winter’s New World, Call for details, 257-3241 Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Cascade String Quartet–Chamber Concert, Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 7:30 pm LIVE on Stage Show, FHS, 7:30-9:30 pm Bob Marshall Wilderness Speaker Series, Panel Discussion, FVCC, Arts and Technology, Rm. 139


13, 15, 16 Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Soloist Spotlight, Call For Details, 257-3241 29 LIVE on Stage Show, FHS, 7:30-9:30 pm April 10 25 May 10, 11

Bob Marshall Wilderness Speaker Series, Jonathan Klein, FVCC, Arts and Technology, Rm. 139 Glacier Symphony and Chorale, Jazz Night With the Maestro! The Alpine Ballroom, 7 pm Glacier Symphony and Chorale, The Ecstatic Sea, FHS, Call for details, 257-3241

December 7 West Shore Holiday Fest, Lakeside Elementary School Gym

Whitefish November 20 Wild Women Wednesday, Stumptown Art Studio, 6:30-8:30 pm December 5-8, 13-15 Oliver, Whitefish Theatre Co., Call for times, 862-5371 10 Culture and Art History Club, Stumptown Art Studio, 10-12 pm 13 Christmas Stroll in Downtown Whitefish, 5:30-9 pm 21, 22 Yuletide Affair X, Whitefish Performing Arts Center, 7 pm 28 Whitefish Gallery Nights Art Walk, Downtown, 6-9 pm

8 9 15 27-28 March 1, 2, 7-9 April 3-6, 11-13

December-March

February 22

Winter Walks with the Montana Wilderness Assoc., Call for details, 755-6304 NW Montana Wedding & Events Expo, Flathead County Fairgrounds, 10-5 pm

January-February

Lakeside/Somers

February 7

Valley Wide Events

Whitefish Winter Carnival LIV Gala Dinner, Whitefish Lake Golf Club Restaurant, 6:30 pm Winter Carnival Grand Parade, Downtown, 3 pm Rotary Pancake Breakfast, Winter Carnival, Moose Lodge, 8 am-1 pm Whitefish Gallery Nights Art Walk, Central Avenue, 6-9 pm The Lion, Witch, and The Wardrobe, Whitefish Theatre Co., Call for details, 862-5371 The Lion, Witch, and The Wardrobe, Whitefish Theatre Co., Call for details, 862-5371 Other Desert Cities, Whitefish Theatre Co., Call for details, 862-5371

John White Speaker Series, Bringing life to history and history to our lives, Every other Sunday, Call for details, 756-8381

January-May 4th Thursday’s Movie Nights, Great short inspiring films and lively discussion, Call for details, 756-8993 November-April Hike with the Swan View Rangers, Saturdays. Call for details, 755-1379, swanrangers@swanview.org

Ongoing Events Kalispell

Bigfork

Chefs Table, fine dining, FVCC, Each Friday, 6-8 pm, Call for reservations, 756-3862 Irish Music Jam, Every Thursday Evening, Split Rock Cafe/KM Building, 6:30-8:30 pm First Friday, Downtown, First Friday of every month all year long. Starts at 10 am Swan River Nature Trail Hike, Every Tuesday, Meet at Showthyme Restaurant, 10-12 pm

Lakeside/Somers Story Hour at the West Shore Community Library, Every Monday, from 10:30-11:30 am

Tamarack Trivia night, Every Tuesday at 7pm

Whitefish

Whitefish Book Discussion Club, Last Wednesday of every month, Whitefish Community Library, Spokane & 1st St., 6 pm

For More Event Information: Kalispell www.kalispellchamber.com www.discoverkalispell.com Bigfork www.bigfork.org/bigfork-montana-event- calender.php Columbia Falls www.columbiafallschamber.com Lakeside/Somers www.lakesidesomers.org Whitefish www.whitefishareachamber.chambermaster. com/events

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• WHITEFISH • B U Y I N D E P E N D E N T. BUY LOCAL.

Heart of Whitefish reminds you to buy from the local and independently-owned businesses of WHITEFISH. Your family, friends and neighbors will thank you!

When you buy from local, independently-owned shops, three times more of your money stays in the area, helping to grow our local economy! Did you know that for every dollar you spend at a local and independently-owned business, about 45¢ stays local? In contrast, only 15¢ of each dollar recirculates in the community when you buy from a corporate chain. Buy local. Buy independent. Brought to you by Heart of Whitefish.

Fall/Winter 2013 Go Local Flathead Valley  
Fall/Winter 2013 Go Local Flathead Valley  
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