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PART C.1: Gateway Project: Design Concept


Concept Development

‘Architecture should connect with local culture and remain convergent with the local community by constantly capturing the forces that shape the society’ (Moussavi). As Wyndham has an urge to enhance the connection between people and the land due to its fast population growth, our design for the western interchange gateway aims to represent architecturally the notion of cultural unity for the city of Wyndham. We believe that our design will promote a way towards cultural unity through the exploration of natural processes. Inspired by the transition, a biological object undergoes through a series of influences from natural process along the coastline, the idea of rock erosion explored in this project as it demonstrates both the surface transition and the morphology of the structural reaction. Parametric design is introduced in order to imitate this natural process through establishing a unique and form-drawing effect (Moussavi) that the ornament (culler pattern) is seamlessly connecting with the entire structural organization. In order to pres-

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ent this design in a true community context, our concept extends beyond a gateway design. To apply the erosion idea in real context, a technique of burning is introduced to further develop this biomimetic design. We believe that further development of incorporating the burning into the construction process will not only imitate the change in surface from an erosion process but will also add a sense of humanity to the digitalized product. This in turn will creates a sense of involvement and unity for the local community. The Burning Man Festival that crosses the world is an example of using fire and the notion of burning to connect people together and allow them to be involved together in the process. Through this, participants would experience the sense of unity as well as being able to create individual experiences. This process will create a new beginning for the city of Wyndham as it is a procedure that allows for a new identity of Wyndham to be revealed. (Summery from final presentationpanel 1)


CONCEPT: CULTURAL UNITY DIGITAL TECHNIQUE: BIOMIMICRY MAN-MADE TECHNIQUE: BURNING PROCESS AFTER BURNING EFFECTS: LINKING COMMUNITY TOGETHER- CULTURAL UNITY IS EXPRESSED

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Voronoi Pattern for self-support structure

Different voronoi patterns were explored by us in Part B to form the basic self-support structure. Voronoi definition was a way to portray the initial technique of biomimicry. Left: 2D voronoi pattern generated in a rectangular grid, then offset the boundary

ONOI PATTERN ONE VORONOI PATTERN TWO

VORONIO FSET

- 2D VORONIO - OFFSET - EXTRACT CONTROL POLYGON POINTS - CREAT CURVES

Midle: 2D voronoi pattern generated in a rectangular grid, offset the boundary, then extract control point on individual cells to soften rigid corners.

PATTERN 3: -COMBINE PATTERN ONE AND TWO - EACH UNIT IS CONNECTED

Right: A combination of the previous two patterns so that individual cells are connected and creating a framework for fabrication

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DESIGN CONCEPT /Voronoi Explorations


We then experimented with point attractor to change the density of the voronoi pattern and hence to make the structural form more interesting. Patterns to the left show how point attractor affects the voronoi cells. The closer the distance between a cell and the point attractor, the larger the cell becomes and hence, the overall pattern becomes less dense. Unfortunately, these effects can only be generated to a 2D rectangular grid by us. We did not successfully connect point attractor definition to the rest parts. Therefore, for the final model, we used the simplest voronoi pattern highlighted on the right page for the base structure of our final model.

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PART C.2: Form- finding


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FORM FINDING

1.

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3.

4.


Principles we used to define the final form:

1. Identify site boundary: The project can only be installed within the site boundary. 2. Identify traffic directions along highways: This is important for a highway design as we need to make sure that our project can be seen by people while not blocking driver’s view on road. 3. Always relating back to ‘urban experience’ in order to achieve cultural unity: How to maximize users’ experience with our project???This issue will be frequently addressed in our designing of the Gateway Project.

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The site is mainly surrounded by winding highways, and this led to our first form(1.)An uneven surface transformed from the shape of Princes Highway; Another analysis is the climate in Melbourne especially the wind directions. We sought to look at the wind rose map of Melbourne and generate similar forms to imply it (2.), (3.), (4.). However, those forms were somehow, not linked to our third principle of emphasizing on urban experience. They were similar to other highway installations which can hardly being experienced by the so-called users.


Prototypes testing on Self-Support Ability Though, the outcomes were not what we expected, we still wasted a bit time testing on its self-support ability.

of the perspective view of ‘wind rose’ form, voronoi cells extruding down to the ground to support the upper structure.

Fabrication process was quite simple: Unrolling surface in rhino, printing out those surfaces and cutting them by hand. After all, the prototype could be self-support and stood freely. On the right side

Note: I was very concerned about this massive wall. I was as if the claw of the alien creatures in the movie ‘Knowing’...However, my group mates were very hap with it, so I had to compromise as a result.

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Rethinking ‘cultural unity’

After showing the previous forms to tutors, they doubted that we went a bit far away from our main focus on burning process. We were agree to their opinion as our interest was this erosion process of burning and its effects on the community and surrounding environments. Besides, the previous forms did not really show the link between our concept and their shapes. Hence, we threw away all the previous form-finding processes and restarted by referring back to simple forms developed in Part B. We realized that ‘cultural unity’ was a very blurring idea. How to integrate it with the Gateway project could be very challenging for us. Hence, we broke this concept down into a few narrow ideas in order to find a way to link this broad concept of cultural unity to our project.

Burning process can be a social event for the city of Wyndham -like the burning man events in Australia -burning is spiritually linked to Victorians due to frequent bush fires.

Cultural Unity involves who? -people -community -surrounding environment? How can people feel a sense of cultural unity? -through personal experiences -through social events

How to maximize personal experiences? -through seeing, touching, smelling etc.

That means, to create something that people can feel it, or interact with it.

Final Outcome 114

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FORM FINDING


Finding Final Form: wall-like structure

A gradual change from a loop to two stripes with openings at both ends

- CREATE BASE STRUCTURE - OFFSET SURFACE - MAP THE SURFACE (PANTTERN ONE) - LOFT - CHANGE PARAMETER FOR DISTANCE

1. 3.

- CREATE BASE STRUCTURE - OFFSET SURFACE - MAP THE SURFACE (PANTTERN ONE) - LOFT

2. 4.

1-4. Applying 2D voronoi pattern showed previously on the loop-like form. Changing input parameters - CREATE BASE STRUCTUREfor cell size, making sure the cells - OFFSET SURFACE are neither too small (for they will not connect - MAP THE SURFACE ((PANTTERN ONE) - LOFT with each other) nor too big (for they will - CHANGE PARAMETER FOR DISTANCE overlap with each other).

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5.

6.

5-7. Altering the shape of two stripes in Grasshopper to maximize the spatical quality inside and hence provide enough space for people to experience within.

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7.


9.

8-9. Final form, Perspective Views

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Prototypes testing on Self-Support Ability

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1.

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5.

6. 7.

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1-4. Unfortunately, We lost images which were taken before this prototype was burnt. It could not stand up due to the middle part was too curvy, so that the center of gravity was not on the prototype itself. 5-7. We intentionally created a wider base at the bottom for stability purpose. To make the prototype even more stable, bottom cells were filled completely with plaster whereas the upper cells were partially filled.


PART C.3: Construction Process


Model Fabrication& Construction

We finalized our final model a week before the in-class presentation. We were on a very tight schedule as we heard that the FabLab was kept crushing. So we decided instead of using grasshopper script to set files for fabrication(didn’t really got the time to learn), we manually unrolled each surface in Rhino and then sent the files to be laser cut.

1. Baked digital model ready to unroll

After anxiously awaited for a few days, we got the finished files from FabLab. The construction process was very timeefficient, as we only needed to fold each surface (made of mount board) to cell, and glue (UHU) them together.

2. Unrolled file ready for Laser Cut

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3. Conceptual model showing the construction process

5. Dried out model ready to be burnt

4. Filling plaster in

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Construction Process in Reality

BUT, how to construct our project in reality? Should the cardboard framework be constructed first, then pour concrete in and finally tilt it up as a whole? Or should it be constructed individually, and then stack each cell up? If we use the first method, would it be possible to tilt up a 750m X 5m X 1m wall which is filled with concrete? If we use the second method, the burning effect may strongly affected by the disconnected framework. After the presentation, we did a few research on materials and found a material called triple- wall corrugated cardboard, which could be used to construct our hexagongrid framework while resisting heavy loads. The material itself is very cheap and easy to fabricate and construct. Moreover, it is reasonably environmentally friendly as it is a source of fibre for recycling. It can be

compressed and baled for cost effective transport. We then searched for adhesives and found one called 3M™ VHB™ Doublesided Tapes. It is a highly performance product which can be used in building constructions such as skyscrapers. A shotcrete system is used to spray white concrete into the framework in order to form the main self-supporting structure. We felt that in terms of materials, there was a little difference between mount board used for physical model and triplewall corrugated cardboard. As they were essentially paper. However, it was the ability to support loads that varied. Obviously, triple- wall corrugated cardboard has better load bearing capacity than normal cardboard as it consists of three layers.

1. Baked digital model ready to unroll

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2. Unrolled file ready for Laser Cut

4. Adhere cells by using 3M™ VHB™ Double-sided Tapes.

3. Triple- wall corrugated cardboard used as the material for framework.

5. Shot- crete system used for spraying white concrete into each cells.

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CONSTRUCTION PROCESS


Burning Process

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We started by burning the edges of each cell with blow torch, to see the effects made by fire.

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Final Model after Burning

After burning, the model still remained as a whole. As if showing how strong a community can become through time. This natural process ‘ruined’ the prefect edges created by machine, but was not it how the nature works? There is no much thing is perfect in this universe, and it is this imperfectness that makes us special. I believe, this undefined boundary between machinery and humanity created through burning process, is what our project so successful about.

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PART C.4: Final Model


Site Plan Accessibility The project is located along Princes Highway with its two stripes sliding pass each other to create entrances/ exits at both ends. By creating slow zones along Maltby Bypass (to the south-west side of the site) and Princes Highway (to the northeast side of the site), vehicles can be led to the site. Signs will be implemented along Princes Highway and Maltby Bypass at one kilometer intervals to indicate distances to the site. Parking lots are available at both entrances and exits as the site can only be accessed by walking. It functions as a backyard or secret garden of Wyndham where people can relax, chat and play footy (maybe not) etc.


Highway Ramp Highway Driving Direction Vegetation Project Outline


Rendering

Perspective View The height is of five meters, so that the inside can not be seen from the outside. A sense of mystery, attracting people to get off their cars and walk inside. Experiences will be maximized once people reach to the interior.

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FINAL MODEL


PART C.5 Algorithmic Sketches


1.

2.

6. 5.

PATTERN 3: -COMBINE PATTERN ONE AND TWO - EACH UNIT IS CONNECTED

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PATTERN TO DIFFERENT STRUCTURE

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3.

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- CREA - OFFS - MAP T - LOFT - CHAN 17.

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27.


PART C.6 Learning Objectives and Outcomes


As mentioned at the very beginning of Part A, I was just a beginner to Rhino...After four months of learning, I still can not say that I am the master of Rhino now, but what I can say is that, it is helping me to explore beyond my limits. What about Grasshopper? Well, I guess I am changing from an absolute blockhead to a beginner now. My attitude towards grasshopper is constantly changing as well! From ‘completely lost’ to ‘curious’, from ‘curious’ to ‘frustrated’, from ‘frustrated’ to ‘interested’...A progressive transformation was made during the semester, from simply copying grasshopper definitions from grasshopper.com, to changing input parameters and eventually thinking of other ways to generate similar outcomes. However, there is still a long way to go before creating my own grasshopper definitions. I have to say that I gained knowledge of digital design in both theory and practice during this subject. By doing the required readings in first few weeks, I gained an understanding of what parametric modelling would help designers to achieve. For example, the process from designing to fabrication and to construction was very coherent by the use of parametric modelling. However, I started to question if it is possible for architects to be fully relied on parametric modelling, when designing the Gateway Project. My group’s design process was strongly

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manipulated by Grasshopper, and hence our design schedule was strongly influenced. After seeing similar outcomes from other groups, my uncertainty of parametric modelling raised. Linking back to week two’s lecture notes on ‘false creativity’ , I guess this is one major issue relating to digital design. Different definitions result in similar outcomes. This was one reason that my group began to emphasize on a humanized process of burning in addition to the machinery outcome. I believed that it was this integration between man-made and digital design that made our project unique. My skill on other programs especially in Indesign has substantially improved as well. Previously, I was very reluctant to use programs to design my projects, as I thought it was very annoying that I needed to learn multiple programs at the same time in order to properly deliver my final projects. Whereas if I design everything by hand, I do not have to worry about them anymore...Now, I can not believe how simple- minded I was. Teaming up to do the project together was a very precious experience to me. As this is what will be like in architectural firms, working as a group in


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Journal final submission part c