Page 1

February 2019

LPS students, staff honor legacy of MLK On Jan. 21, the nation observed Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Students and staff from Lincoln Public Schools honored his legacy through a variety of activities and events. Scott Middle School Students, staff, family, friends and former colleagues gathered in the Scott gym on Jan. 17 to honor Lillie Myles, who retired last year after teaching social studies at Scott for 22 years and, prior to that, at Lincoln East High/ Middle School. Myles’ photo was added to Scott’s Martin Luther King Jr. Wall of Honor, located near the school’s main office. The wall pays tribute to community members who have followed the example set by King. “I cannot tell you how honored I am...I am here, in this place, that I gave a lot to. I am surrounded by my family. I am surrounded by my church family. I am surrounded by friends. I am surrounded by past colleagues,” said Myles, who organized this annual event for more than 20 years while teaching at Scott. Myles started the multicultural student club Cross Cultures while at East, then the Teens Influencing Equity (TIE) club at Scott. She also was active in multicultural issues on the school district level and throughout Lincoln. Scott students performed music and read original poetry about both King and Myles. Myles’ husband, Jessie Myles, read portions of King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. At the end of the program, Myles issued a challenge for the students. “I want you to examine your heart and to examine what’s taking place around you,” she said. “And be as brave as Martin Luther King and to step out and say, ‘I want equality for all.’ That is my challenge to you...You have work to do.” Martin Luther King Freedom Breakfast Retired Lincoln Police Department captain and current Lincoln Public Schools employee Genelle Moore served as the keynote speaker at the annual Martin Luther King Freedom Breakfast, held Jan. 18 at Embassy Suites in downtown Lincoln. She stood inside a ballroom filled with a crowd of more than 500 and issued a call to action. “Journey out of your comfort zone. Gather information. Research the issues, problems and injustices facing people,

communities and institutions. Continue to seek the truth and ask questions of those with differing perspectives and views. Educate yourselves and inform others about your issues, as well as the truths you have discovered.”

SECTION A: A2 LPS is... A5 TeamMates of the Month

Moore has spent a lifetime journeying out of her comfort zone. Before joining LPS in the Human Resource Department in 2017, she retired from the Lincoln Police Department as the captain in charge of education and personnel. In 1982, she was the first African-American woman officer hired by the department.

A6 Olympic broadcaster

At the breakfast, Moore spoke about a variety of topics, including the history of racial injustice in the criminal justice system and throughout society, as well as the legacy of King and his work.

A13 High schools advance in constitutional competition

“As you know, LPS is a melting pot — a rich, cultural tapestry of students and staff. Many immigrate to this country in search of equality and freedom. Their families are hard working, positive people striving for a better life,” Moore said. “No matter the race, ethnicity or orientation, Lincoln Public Schools recognizes and celebrates the diversity and talents of each and every student and employee...all means all.” LPS Superintendent Steve Joel also spoke at the breakfast. He recalled a quote from King: “We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope.”

Science Focus Program facility A8 ConnectLPS A11 WWI flag at Lincoln High

A14 Social worker focuses on safet Superintendent live show debuts LPS Podcast SECTION B: B1 Don Sherill art spotlight B2 Facility Advisory Committee meets B6 Learning Lunch Digital citizenship B8 Wellness column

“Personally,” Joel said, “I find infinite hope - I witness the legacy of Dr. King each and every day - in our Lincoln community and in the hallways of Lincoln Public Schools.” MLK Youth Rally and March The 24th annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Youth Rally and March took place Monday, Jan. 21, in downtown Lincoln with record crowds despite the frigid temperatures. The annual event was organized by a diverse group of area youth and held in conjunction with the national recognition of the birthday of King. All components were intended to celebrate his legacy and the mission of the event’s planning committee. Fifth-grade Belmont teacher Bobbie Ehrlich was presented with the Community Contributor Award, based on the rally’s misson: “…promotion of the life and dreams of the late Rev. Dr. King Jr. through positive youth action in the community.”

B11 Celebrating CLCs B12 Kids Corner B13 Menus B14 Therapy dog brings comfort


Lincoln Public Schools: In One Word A passion ignited, an idea sparked, a dream realized, a feat overcome, a goal accomplished… all of these are possible thanks to encouraging Lincoln Public Schools teachers and students who persevere. You will experience these things every day within our schools because LPS is… Inspiring. This is the time of year when eighth grade students start planning their path into high school, young scholars theorize their science fair projects, avid spellers prepare for competition, artists are creating their masterpieces for exhibit and winter student-athletes show their grit and determination as they wrap up their season. It’s also a time when students past and present think of ways to honor teachers who encouraged them to be their best. These are just some of the reasons that in February, our stories will reflect why LPS is… Inspiring. For more, visit our website: lps.org/is https://lps.org/is


Lincoln’s Most Popular Camps Each day campers go behindthe-scenes, learn from real zookeepers and meet some of their favorite animals. Zoo Camps are led by skilled instructors who will guide your child through interactive learning opportunities and educational activities.

3-4 year-olds + parents

4-5

year-olds

ZOO MEMBER: $99 NON-MEMBER: $129 WEEKLY JUNE 10 – JULY 12 8:30 – 10:00 A.M. | 1:30 - 3:00 P.M.

ZOO MEMBER: $119 NON-MEMBER: $139 WEEKLY MAY 28 – AUGUST 2 8:30 – NOON | 1:00 – 4:30 P.M.

MAKE IT A FULL-DAY CAMP! SIGN UP FOR A MORNING & AFTERNOON SESSION

6-7

year-olds

ZOO MEMBER: $119 NON-MEMBER: $139 WEEKLY MAY 28 – AUGUST 2 8:30 – NOON | 1:00 – 4:30 P.M.

MAKE IT A FULL-DAY CAMP! SIGN UP FOR A MORNING & AFTERNOON SESSION

8-10 year-olds 10-12 year-olds

ZOO MEMBER: $238 NON-MEMBER: $278 WEEKLY MAY 28 – AUGUST 2 8:30 A.M. – 4:30 P.M.

ZOO MEMBER: $238 NON-MEMBER: $278 WEEKLY MAY 28 – AUGUST 2 8:30 A.M. – 4:30 P.M.

NEW for 2019! Behind-the-scenes experiences with giraffes, tigers and more!

Space is limited! See camp descriptions & register at LincolnZoo.org.

crew Youth volunteer Go behind-the-scenes atprogram. Lincoln Children’s Zoo by participating in Zoo Crew!

Zoo Crew is one of the most successful and unique youth volunteer programs in Nebraska. Each year, students entering grades 7 through 12 gain important life and job skills at the Zoo!

New for 2019!

• Zoo Crew volunteers will work in the newly expanded Zoo. • Work with program animals within The Secret Jungle spider monkey experience. • Take part in giraffe guest experience and husbandry. • Work in guest experience stations located near the tiger and red panda habitats.

Register at LincolnZoo.org, call 402.475.6741 ext. 133. or stop by the Zoo.


Nebraska Teacher Recognition Day is Tuesday, March 5, 2019. It is time to say “Thank You” to a teacher who has made a difference.

The annual Thank You Teacher Contest gives students and former students an opportunity to tell teachers they are appreciated. Five teachers and the students who nominate them will be invited to breakfast at the Governor’s Mansion on Thursday, March 7. Send a written description of how your teacher made a difference in your life to: Thank You Teacher Lincoln Public Schools Communication Services Department 5905 O Street Lincoln, NE 68510 Or submit online at: http://lps.org/go/recognize Nominations must be received by 5 p.m., Friday, February 8, 2019.

NEBRASKA TEACHER RECOGNITION DAY Sponsored by: KFOR/KFRX, Lincoln Public Schools, Lincoln Education Association, and Foundation for Lincoln Public Schools

Name

Teacher’s Name

School

Grade

Student’s Home Address

Teacher’s School Teacher’s Home Address

City

State

The Teacher I am nominating teaches:

Zip

City

ACCESS TO EXCEP TIONAL

POSSIBILITIES At UNO, your potential is unlimited. We’ll support you as you study, explore, and research what means most to you. Find your program, join a club, live oncampus, volunteer in the community, and so much more. Access to exceptional possibilities starts here.

Majors and programs

200+

Registered clubs and student organizations

10

Zip

q Preschool - Grade 2 q Grades 3 - 5 q Middle School q High School q Retired GIFT BAGS TO THE WINNERS OF EACH CATEGORY.

200+

State

Themed housing and learning communities

15+

Signature Days of Service

EXPLORE YOUR POSSIBILITIES. VISIT CAMPUS TODAY. [ BE aM AV.C OM/ V ISI T ]

THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE BASED ON RACE, COLOR, ETHNICITY, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, PREGNANCY, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, GENDER IDENTITY, RELIGION, DISABILITY, AGE, GENETIC INFORMATION, VETERAN STATUS, MARITAL STATUS, AND/OR POLITICAL AFFILIATION IN ITS PROGRAMS, ACTIVITIES, OR EMPLOYMENT. 0443ADUGA0219


February 2019 | Community News | Section A

A5

February TeamMates of the Month

Felicia and Mikayla: ‘From Slow to Go’ Mikayla is a high school senior with plans. On track to graduate this spring, she is currently building a sports car to race at Eagle Raceway this summer. Next fall, she’s off to Army boot camp. In preparation for that, she wakes at 4:30 a.m. to hit the gym by 4:45. By 7 a.m., she is showered and ready for ROTC at Lincoln Northeast High School. But her path wasn’t always as clear. In third grade, Mikayla knew she needed support. When she saw a TeamMates poster in the hallway of her elementary school, she went to the office for information. Soon after, she was nominated to be a TeamMate. In sixth grade, Mikayla was matched with Felicia, who applied to become a TeamMates mentor because she knew that with a small investment of time each week, she could make a big impact. Over games of UNO, Guess Who and Connect 4, Mikayla slowly realized she could trust Felicia and began opening up about her life to her mentor, who consistently showed up weekly. “Mikayla reminded me of myself at that age,” Felicia says. It took some time for the relationship to form, but after trust was built, Mikayla began sharing the joys and struggles of her life. “Sometimes we talk seriously about personal issues, and other times we’re goofy and have fun,” says Mikayla. “Our conversations make our relationship special.” Felicia marvels at the growth she’s witnessed in Mikayla over their sixplus years in TeamMates. “She has become more confident in herself, she’s grown her personal voice, and worked to move toward her dreams.”

“I’ve learned the benefit and importance of sitting, listening and giving someone your undivided attention. Seeing the world from someone else’s perspective has helped me to grow.”

Felicia believes that being privy to Mikayla’s dreams and watching them become a reality is one of the greatest joys of being a mentor. “I’ve learned the benefit and importance of sitting, listening and giving someone your undivided attention,” she says. “Seeing the world from someone else’s perspective has helped me to grow.” “It took me a while to trust her,” Mikayla says, “but now I tell her everything. She listens and tells me it’s going to be okay.”

From slow to go, these TeamMates have traveled far in their relationship and plan to stay in contact. “I will always be open to our friendship,” Felicia says.

Only $25 deposit* required to sign-up. TM

TM

Registration opens

February 1 go.unl.edu /camp Camp day is 7:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. 130 per week per child.

$

Extended session options for $10/week/child.

*

Non-refundable deposit required for each child per session to reserve a spot.

Grades 2–8 Session 1

June 3–7

Session 2

June 10–14

Session 3

June 17–21

Session 4

June 24–28

no camp JULY 1–5 Session 5

July 8–12

Session 6

July 15–19

Session 7

July 22–26

Session 8

July 29–Aug. 2

Husker Kids is grades 2-6. Husker Adventures is grades 7–8.

A service of the Office of Student Affairs. Campus Recreation welcomes persons with all abilities. Please inquire about the availability of accommodations for special needs. The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based on any protected status. Please see go.unl.edu/nondiscrimination.

s t r o p S c e R s p i r T Field g n i m Swim s w o h S t n e l Ta s t f a r C


February 2019 | Community News | Section A

A6

Everett students learn valuable lessons from Olympic broadcaster This year’s theme for staff and students at Everett Elementary School is, “Be your best.” As part of this theme, they’re drawing on lessons learned from the “Pyramid of Success,” a philosophy for being your personal best originated by legendary basketball coach John Wooden. In December, Everett third-, fourth- and fifth-grade students had the opportunity to learn more about the “Pyramid of Success” from someone who has drawn on its lessons to become her personal best: Mary Carillo, a former professional tennis champion best known for her sports broadcasting career, including the past 14 Winter and Summer Olympic Games. She was recently inducted into the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Students at Everett connected with Carillo at her Naples, Florida, home thanks to web conferencing software. Students asked her a series of questions, all of them relating in some way to the “Pyramid” and the school’s theme for the year. Their questions (and her answers) included: • Are you ever nervous on TV? If so, what’s your process for focusing on the positive and not being as nervous? Carillo: “The only time I get really nervous is when I don’t feel like I’ve prepared very well, if I feel like I haven’t done enough homework to speak confidently in front of a camera, in front of millions of people. If you prepare and work hard, I think that really helps you to not be as nervous, no matter what you’re doing.” • Which character traits on the “Pyramid of Success” do you feel have helped you become a tennis champion and have a successful career in TV? Carillo: “To be resilient. To be able to reset if you fall down. Even if you fail, it’s not like you’re really failing, it’s more like you’re gathering information for the next time.” • Has anyone ever said something unkind to you and if so, how do you handle it so it doesn’t bother you? Carillo: “If I’m calling a tennis match and I give an opinion, there are a whole bunch of people who say that’s wrong. They write mean things about me. I just keep trying. I try not to take criticism personally. Sometimes I get my feelings hurt but I try to remember that if I try as hard as I can, it doesn’t really matter in the end what anyone thinks of me. If someone says something mean about me, that’s really saying more about them than me. They’re telling me that they’re unhappy. Always keep that in mind when anyone is unkind to you.” • Why is it important to you to be a great role model to us? What should we start doing today to be a great

role model for other people? Carillo: “All I ever wanted to teach my kids is to treat each other well, to have respect for themselves, to have respect for others. I work on those same things every single day. You start being a role model already at your age. Even if you don’t know it, there are probably other kids who are looking at you and thinking, ‘Yeah, I want to be like her.’” • What characteristics do you admire most in all the professional and Olympic athletes that you’ve met and that make them champions of character? Carillo: “They’ve worked so hard. They have such dedication. If they stumble and fail, they show resilience. But you don’t have to be an athlete to be that way. That’s my favorite characteristic in athletes and in anyone - in fifth-graders, too.” Everett Principal Mike Long spent part of the time during the web assembly walking from classroom to classroom observing students as they listened to Carillo. “The amount of student engagement and the focus right now for this assembly, I want to compliment the students,” Long said before they signed off with Carillo. “They’ve done such a great job.” More from Everett Principal Mike Long about how the school is incorporating the "Pyramid of Success" into its daily instruction: "The 'Pyramid of Success' embodies the belief that all students can achieve their own personal best. Specialists are using the story 'Inch and Miles' to focus on specific character traits each month. Classroom teachers also use the story to assist in teaching our students these essential character traits to help them to become respectful citizens who are able to handle daily responsibilities and rules. Our goal is to provide our students with the skills they need to make good decisions and be kind and helpful citizens. The 'Pyramid of Success' recognizes students who demonstrate positive character traits and are thriving to become their personal best. Students also have individual posters with the 15 blocks of the 'Pyramid of Success' to reference throughout the day."

New facility will keep Science Focus Program on the cutting edge The Lincoln Public Schools Science Focus Program will soon have a new home, still located inside the Lincoln Children’s Zoo but with additional classroom space and science labs that will allow the program - known as the Zoo School - to accommodate more students and expanded curriculum. Construction of the 15,000-square-foot facility continues to progress, with the hope that graduating seniors can spend time in the new space before the end of the school year. If that’s not possible, the facility will open for the 2019-20 school year. “This will be a new beginning for the program and it will enhance the experience for those students tremendously,” said LPS Operations Director Scott Wieskamp during a recent tour. “This facility will be a huge step forward in terms of our ability to deliver this science program to students,” said Kurt Glathar, principal of the Science Focus Program and the LPS Arts & Humanities Focus Program. The $3.2 million building will feature four classrooms and three 1,100-square-foot science labs. The program is currently housed in two portable classrooms and additional classrooms inside the zoo’s Camelot Commons area. There currently are roughly 100 students enrolled in the program; the new facility could accommodate an additional 50-75 students if necessary. The Science Focus Program will share parts of the building with the zoo, including a multi-purpose room and a lobby area. LPS is splitting the cost of those areas with the zoo. Glathar noted that the Science Focus Program was on the cutting edge nationally when it opened at the zoo in 1997. The innovative program garnered national media coverage. “With this new facility we will remain on the cutting edge,” he said.

The Science Focus Program, or Zoo School, is one example of the many choices that LPS offers students for them to succeed and achieve - 39 elementary schools, 12 middle schools, six comprehensive high schools and a variety of high school alternative programs. The Zoo School enrolls roughly 100 students from grades nine through 12, both from public and private schools. Students who attend LPS focus programs such as Zoo School remain students at their home schools, where they can participate in activities, athletics and social events. Students spend part of their mornings at their home school before attending Zoo School for the rest of the day.


Give to our

littles. Help a lot.

On Tuesday, February 12, Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, the Lincoln Community Foundation will host the first ever Lincoln Littles Giving Day. This one special day, inspired by Prosper Lincoln, gives people who care about kids (like you) the opportunity to help more children in need have a quality early childhood education. Go to LincolnLittles.org and give to our littles. It means a lot to the future of this great community.

LincolnLittles.org

. t r o p ss a P

E. R E H T T U O D L R O IT ’S A B IG W

OR IS IT?

Studying abroad is transformational. We believe so strongly in this that every Hastings College student has the opportunity to spend part of a semester abroad during their second year on campus. And, thanks to generous donors, we’ll cover the costs. Where will you go? It could be Paris, Rome or London — or Ireland or Peru. Your second year at Hastings? You’ll spend part of it abroad. (Seriously!) Studying abroad is just one part of the “new” Hastings College. We’ll also equip you with an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil — there’s no better way to incorporate technology and learning! And we’ll even cover the cost of textbooks, which will save you $4,000 — or more — over your four years at Hastings College.

Discover more about Hastings 2.0 by scheduling a visit.

hastings.edu/visit


February 2019 | Community News | Section A

A8

ConnectLPS

Here’s some of our favorite photos from LPS schools in September. Want more? Connect with your school’s social media at lps.org/connect.

Hartley Elementary School

“Third grade students have begun their embryology unit this week and are very responsibly turning their eggs three times a day. We will keep you posted on their arrival!”

Park Middle School

Morley Elementary School

First graders enjoying a book in the library

“The seventh grade C team won! Way to go team!”

Humann Elementary School

“Inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., here are some of our fifth graders’ dreams.”

Lincoln Northeast High School

“Jumping in on the Facebook 10 year challenge, here is the LNE commons under construction back in 2018 and the LNE commons now! The students who attended LNE in the 2007-2008 school year had to deal with a lot of construction going on throughout the building which brought a lot of noise, debris and construction workers to deal with. The 2008 yearbook is dedicated to all the construction that took place. One article, which was given the tag line ‘Life Under Construction,’ ends with: ‘Overall, construction has taken a lot out of each school day, but in the end when everything is said and done, it will be worth it.’ Thanks Rockets of 2008 for putting up with all that so we can have a great building to serve all Rockets of the future!”


February 2019 | Community News | Section A

A9

Holmes Elementary School

“A successful and fun nature night.”

Moore Middle School

Prescott Elementary School

“Sixth graders are receiving guidance and instruction through the YMCA support staff.”

“Our four graders in Andrea Meyer’s classroom celebrated great academic scores by having a pajama and popcorn party! Congratulations fourth grade.”

Elliott Elementary School

“Fun trip to the Leid Center for Elliott Family Literacy to see ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar.’ #elliotthope #elliottproud”

Arnold Elementary School

Lefler Middle School

Third-fifth grade assembly

“Congratulations to Chad Bergstrom who was recognized as the Fretwell Outstanding Educator by the Boy Scouts of America. Chad was nominated by his student, Lucas.”

Rousseau Elementary School

“Congratulations to weekly Reggie Buck Winners! We’re proud of you! Keep up the good work.”


Opening February 16, 2019

museum.unl.edu/fourthfloor

The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based upon any protected status. Please see go.unl.edu/nondiscrimination.

DO FROM DAY ONE. LEARN FROM INNOVATORS IN THEIR FIELD. WORK ON REAL PROJECTS AND MAKE A REAL IMPACT. COME AND SEE FOR YOURSELF. Schedule a visit or contact our recruitment coordinator, Whitney Jurgens: admissions.unl.edu/visit | wjurgens@unl.edu OUR MAJORS Advertising & Public Relations Broadcasting Journalism Sports Media & Communication

University of Nebraska does not discriminate based upon any protected status. Please see go.unl.edu/nondiscrimination © 2018 The Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska. All rights reserved. 1808.16


February 2019 | Community News | Section A

A11

Another historical gem shines light on Lincoln High’s World War I vets Just days before Veterans Day in November, Lincoln High School Media Technician Carter Hulinsky stumbled upon a historical gem: the service flag that was displayed above the school’s main entrance more than a century ago to honor its students who were serving in World War I. Hulinksy displayed the flag in the Lincoln High library on Veterans Day for students, staff and media to visit and learn more about the school’s rich history of veterans. That history lesson continues a month later, thanks to another unexpected discovery. About a week ago, a local woman called the school and relayed the following story: As she and her sister were cleaning out their father’s house, they discovered a roll of brittle newspapers from the early 1900s. When they unrolled the newspapers, they spotted an article from February 1918 about the origin of the Lincoln High service flag. The woman remembered media reports of the flag’s discovery in November and thought Lincoln High would be interested in the newspaper. She was right. “It's an astonishing find,” said Hulinsky, also the school’s archivist. “When you consider the newsprint was stored for over 100 years and never tossed into a waste bin. Then to have it found just after the news story of the service flag aired on television. The odds were not at all in our favor, but how fortunate we are that these two women were curious enough to unroll the newsprint and discover the article about the service flag.” The article read, in part: “Patriotism reigned supreme at the Lincoln high school Tuesday forenoon when the 1,600 students met in the auditorium to celebrate Lincoln’s birthday, and unfurl a service flag, containing 323 stars, each one representing a student who was at present or in the past a member of the Lincoln high, but who are now somewhere in America or somewhere in France, in defense of the flag. “The exercises opened with the singing of America, conducted by Chorister Ferguson, and participated in by nearly every student in a gathering that more than filled the auditorium.”

Now Hulinsky is working to ensure the page of the newspaper with the article is properly preserved for future generations of Links. He already has taken a high-resolution image of the article and is exploring options to either have it mounted and framed or stored in a flat file cabinet.

Wellness Recovery Action ® Plan (WRAP ) Youth Groups This voluntary support group helps you create a plan that is individualized for your needs, self-directed to achieve your goals and empowering. You’ll create a plan that includes: • A wellness toolbox • Daily maintenance plan • Triggers that can set you back and actions to avoid them • Early warning signs and action plan • What to do when things break down and action plan • Crisis plan • Post crisis plan Through this support group, you’ll learn new skills and how to use them in your recovery journey. If you have questions, please call 402-432-0158. Youth Group Information: For ages 14-18 When: Meets Tuesdays, 4-5 p.m. Where:

Bryan West Campus, Counseling Center, 2300 S. 16th St. - Enter through the Bryan Medical Center main entrance. - Take immediate left to reach connecting hallway to the Professional Office Building. - Groups meet on the third floor in the Counseling Center Group Rooms 310.

Cost:

Free

Registration:

No registration required


SUMMER CAMP

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!! www.CampSonshineMemories.org | 402.423.8746

camp

SONSHINE

Audition Workshop - Saturday, February 23rd, 2019 (FREE) 9am-12pm ages 8-15; 1pm-3pm ages 15+ Does auditioning give you anxiety? Are you more comfortable onstage, in front of hundreds of people, than alone in a room with two or three? Auditioning is a rollercoaster, regardless of how many times you’ve been onstage. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to use anxiety to your advantage, better understand your “type,” and feel comfortable in your own skin. Although the event is free, space for each session is limited.

DAY CAMP Camper Programs K - 6th Grade Leadership Training 7th - 9th Grade Located just minutes south of Lincoln! 13440 S. 25th St, Roca, NE 68430

Camp Sonshine

Open House

.m.

May 11 // 2 - 6 p

camp

SOLARIS OVERNIGHT CAMP Residential Camp Programs 3rd - 12th Grade Located just minutes south of Firth, halfway between Lincoln and Beatrice! 2349 State Hwy. Spur 34B, Firth, NE 68358

Spring Break Camp: Annie KIDS Cost: $175 Camp Dates: March 11-15, 2019, 9am-4pm Performances: March 16, 2019; 10am and 12pm Spend your Spring Break learning a classic American musical: Annie KIDS! Music Theatre International’s fabulous adaptation for young people. This camp is best described as a concert version of Annie with movement and dance: all the hit song and dance numbers you love but pared down to its essentials. Set in the 1930s, Annie is determined to find the parents who abandoned her years ago on the doorstep of an orphanage run by the evil Miss Hannigan. Annie eventually outsmarts them all, finding a new loving home and family in billionaire, Oliver Warbucks, his personal secretary, Grace Farrell, and a lovable dog named Sandy.

SCHEDULE A TOUR TODAY! The mission of the Theatre Arts Academy at the Lincoln Community Playhouse is to provide production-based theatre education opportunities for children ages 8-15 to grow and develop as performers. Therefore, each child who signs up for the class will participate as a performer in the production.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM

get lost finding

your passion. Explore any of our 44 majors, 37 minors, and abundance of pre-professional tracks and you’ll find that no matter what path you choose, you can do you at Doane. Apply today at doane.edu/apply.

Scholarships are available and awarded to qualifying students. Scholarship applications are due 3 weeks prior to the applied camp. Applications can be found at www.lincolnplayhouse.com. For more information email education@lincolnplayhouse.com or call 402.473.5067.


February 2019 | Community News | Section A

A13

LPS teams qualify for nationals with constitutional knowledge Teams from Lincoln East and Lincoln Southeast high schools qualified for the national competition for the We the People program, which promotes civic responsibility and knowledge about the history and principles of U.S. constitutional democracy. East finished first at the We the People state-level competition, held Dec. 17 at the University of Nebraska College of Law, while Southeast finished second. Teams from Lincoln Southwest and Lincoln North Star high schools also competed. East and Southeast now advance to the national competition, held in April in Washington, D.C. East is coached by Kevin Rippe; Southeast by Dave Nebel. As part of the state competition, students participated in a simulated congressional hearing in which they testify before a panel of judges acting as members of Congress. Students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of constitutional principles and have opportunities to evaluate, take and defend positions on relevant historical and contemporary issues.

24TH ANNUAL

SCIENCE FAIR

Registration Deadline: February 8, 2019 (Registration is required for each participant)

Register Online at: www.lps.org — jump code PTBV or

Exhibitor’s Name: ______________________________________________________ (Please print first and last name)

Partner with: ___________________________________________________________ (Optional. Print first and last name)

Grade Level: __________ School: _________________________________________ Teacher’s Name: _______________________________________________________

Will be held on

February 28, 2019 at the Lancaster Event Center Pavillion 1 5:00 - 7:30 p.m. Open to all LPS 5th-8th graders All registrations due Feb. 8, 2019 For more information contact:

James Blake (402) 436-1802 Rochelle Settles (402) 436-1140 On-line Registration: www.lps.org • Jump Code PTBV or Mail registrations to: Rochelle Settles Fredstrom Elementary School 5700 NW 10th Street • Lincoln, NE 68521

Question to be answered: _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Sustainability Project:

❑ Yes ❑ No

T-Shirt Size (adult sizes):

❑ Small ❑ Medium ❑ Large ❑ X-Large

NOTE:

I agree to set up my exhibit between the hours of 4:15 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. on February 28, 2019. I will stay until 7:30 p.m. and dismantle my exhibit by 7:45 p.m. that evening.

Required: Student Signature: _________________________________________________ Parent or Guardian Signature: _______________________________________ Parent Email: ______________________________________________________ Teacher Signature: _________________________________________________

REGISTRATION FORMS ARE TO BE SENT TO: Rochelle Settles • Fredstrom Elementary School 5700 NW 10th Street • Lincoln, NE 68521


February 2019 | Community News | Section A

A14

New social worker position vital to LPS security When Allyson Headrick sees a troubled child, she sees a chance to make a difference. Headrick is the security social worker for Lincoln Public Schools, a new position created this school year as part of a partnership between LPS and the City of Lincoln. Her challenge: Each day, she works with students at risk of harming themselves or others, as well as with the families and schools of those students. Her job is about hope. “It’s still about prevention to me, especially because they’re kids,” she said. “If we can do something to intervene, even when they’re experiencing the highest level of crisis a student can experience, we can still make a difference, improve safety outcomes, attempt to prevent a more significant safety concern, as well as system involvement later in adulthood. It’s crisis intervention, yes, but it’s really prevention.” Headrick works as part of a team that includes LPS Security Director Joe Wright, LPS Security Coordinator Jon Sundermeier and Nate Hill, the threat assessment investigator for the Lin-

coln Police Department who is assigned specifically to LPS. Hill’s position also was created as part of the LPS-City partnership. Headrick provides the mental health component of threat assessment for this team. Threat assessment, first developed by the U.S. Secret Service, is a progressive, forward-thinking method of addressing safety and security — early. As opposed to dealing with a crisis at hand, threat assessment aims at preventing situations from happening. Mental health services are an integral part of this focus on prevention. Headrick gets to know the students she works with and often connects them to vital mental health services they never had access to in the past. “It’s a balance. We have to figure out how to hold kids accountable but also how to get kids the support they need to succeed in school and life. The majority of the kids that get referred to our team have had some challenging life experiences, so it’s about finding out their story - how did they get to this point. Recognizing... you’re a person and I value your dignity and worth,” Headrick said.

LPS debuts live interview show with Superintendent Joel Every two weeks, Lincoln Public Schools will air a live, 10-minute video interview with Superintendent Steve Joel — "Superintendent Spotlight" — hosted by LPS Communications Director Mary Kay Roth. The show begins at 10 a.m. on the second and fourth Friday of the month and will be available on the LPS Facebook page and website. Each show will feature current hot topics and what's coming up within our schools, along with a question from a student. We will be sharing this video with you, our trusted community partners. The first episode aired Jan. 11 and can be found at livestream.com/lpsorg.

Headrick’s past work experience made her the perfect fit for the security social worker position. Most recently, she worked as a social worker at Lefler Middle School and Holmes Elementary School. Prior to that, she worked at Lincoln Regional Center and with Lincoln Community Learning Centers. As part of her new LPS position, Headrick also assists with implementing additional mental health services in the school district, including more therapists in schools, and consults with schools on safety planning. Wright said the addition of Headrick to the LPS security team is vital to the school district’s ongoing efforts to promote and create a safe, secure learning environment for students and staff. “Lincoln Public Schools values safety and security and our partnership with the City of Lincoln has allowed us to continue to invest not only in initiatives and programs, but in people, as well,” Wright said. “There’s no better example of this than Allyson and her new position. Her mental health expertise is critical to our work.”

Check out our new weekly podcast: Stories from Lincoln Public Schools. Each episode gives you an inside look at the people, activities and programs that make Lincoln Public Schools the wonderful place it is. Find it on our website: lps.org/podcast


February 2019

Don Sherrill students are stars in traveling art exhibit Every year, elementary students within Lincoln Public Schools have the opportunity to create a banner that will be displayed throughout the community, a work of art not only meant to highlight students’ creativity but also to shine a light on what makes their school special. This year, for the first time, students at Don D. Sherrill Education Center are creating a banner. It’s titled “Coco and the Stars,” and it combines a painting of the school’s therapy dog — Coco — with a backdrop of stars — the school mascot. Coco was the perfect choice to be front and center on the banner, said Don Sherrill art teacher Katie Samson. “Coco is kind of the center of it all right now. She’s there to serve all the students, kind of like how our staff is there to serve all of the students, even if it’s someone from a different classroom, if you’re a specialist, if you’re a therapist — we’re always there to make sure everyone’s got what they need,” Samson said. “I think Coco encompasses that and the kids really agreed.” Don Sherrill is a program for elementary-age students who struggle to manage their behaviors at their home school and require more structure and support systems to succeed. There are similar programs for middle school students — Nuernberger Education Center — and high school students — Yankee Hill Education Center. Each education center’s ultimate goal is for students to return to their home school. Samson has been working with members of Don Sherrill’s student government group to create the “Coco and the Stars” banner. Students are chosen to participate in student government by earning positive ratings for their behavior over a sustained period of time. They’re considered leaders and are asked to assist their classmates in numerous ways. “It means I can help students succeed and get back to their home schools,” said Landen, one of the student government members who is working on the banner. Landen and his fellow student government classmates are great examples of the potentially powerful impact of Don Sherrill. “Often times when they arrive, they’re feeling a little defeated, feeling like they weren’t very successful in their home school environment,” said Don Sherrill psychotherapist Jaime Brooks. “I really notice that when you take a student when they first come here and you are able to watch them through their whole transition to when they graduate, they feel capable, they feel that they have some hope...and they know that they have a whole school of people standing behind them that is proud of them, that knows they can be successful. “It’s a good place for them to come back to find themselves again.” The Annual Lincoln Public Schools Traveling Banner Exhibit includes banners created by students from LPS elementary schools. The traveling exhibit starts in March at the Wells Fargo Center in downtown Lincoln, followed by stops at Energy Square, Morrill Hall, Gateway Mall, Lied Center for Performing Arts and Lincoln City Libraries.

“I really notice that when you take a student when they first come here and you are able to watch them through their whole transition to when they graduate, they feel capable, they feel that they have some hope...and they know that they have a whole school of people standing behind them that is proud of them, that knows they can be successful.


February 2019 | Community News | Section B

B2

Superintendent’s Facility Advisory Committee holds first meeting More than 100 stakeholders from across the Lincoln community came together Jan. 15 — the initial stage of a tried-and-true practice at Lincoln Public Schools — to begin a seven-month process for analyzing longrange facility needs to envision schools of the future and ensure that LPS wisely accommodates student growth into the next seven to 10 years. “This is what separates Lincoln from other places,” LPS Superintendent Steve Joel told the new Superintendent’s Facility Advisory Committee. “People in this community not only care deeply about kids, they are also willing to roll up their sleeves and help us work.” The Lincoln Board of Education charged Joel with the establishment of the advisory committee — by February 2019 — to review the school district’s facility and infrastructure needs, options and priorities. “I’m delighted to begin this process,” Joel said. “We thank these compassionate citizens — in advance — knowing the many considerations they must ponder…They will be asking: How should we plan for the future of our city and our more than 42,000 students? They have the difficult task of identifying facility priorities that make the most sense for the Lincoln community and Lincoln schools.” The Facilities Advisory Committee will dig into these difficult questions, meet through the summer and offer recommendations for a thoughtful, community-based plan — by Sept. 1, 2019 — that lays the foundation for a potential bond issue in 2020. “We respect this tested process of community engagement, and will make any and all decisions following their advice and input.,” Joel stressed. “These will be difficult decisions, ensuring solid facilities for our students into the future – but also understanding there are considerably more needs than our limited resources will ever allow.” He continued: “They also have to address the high school question. How do we address high schools in an equitable and progressive manner? How many high schools should we build — and where? How large should they be? Last year we called together a community High School Task and their recommendations give us valuable parameters from which to begin, but critical questions loom.” Joel noted other considerations include the concept of personalizing education, thinking creatively and critically about curriculum delivery, thinking outside the box and personalizing the learning experience with options in career pathways and focus programs. Potential Sub-Committee Topics (this list could evolve): • New high school (number, size, program) – possibly two committees • High school athletics and activities • High school focus programs and alternatives • New elementary and middle schools • Infrastructure and finance • Early childhood and Community Learning Centers • Alternate Grade Level Configuration Information was presented Jan. 15 from the most recent updated LPS TenYear Facilities and Infrastructure Plan as well as the city’s growth patterns. For more about those presentations, to ask questions, to find a list of Committee members, meetings and resources, go to: https://home.lps.org/sfac/ The Committee is led by three co-leaders: Jennifer Brinkman, Lancaster County Commissioner: “I’m a proud graduate of Lincoln Northeast High School, my husband and I are raising two kids who attend Lincoln High School … I have spent a large part of my career involved in community processes …. with an interest in public policy and serving citizens …. Reaching out to parents …. and I have a track record as a community volunteer …What I hope I can bring to this process, I played a part in looking at and bringing people together for the West Haymarket and Pinnacle Bank Arena project.” Maribel Cruz, senior leadership consultant for Talent Plus: “As a director of leadership development and consulting, I spend a good portion of my day helping people think about leadership talent abilities … I am thrilled to be part of this process because I believe in the investment in Lincoln’s children, these are the future leaders of tomorrow … I believe in getting them all the resources they require to flourish …. I’m also very interested how Lincoln fits into the bigger business community. As the Silicon Prairie, lots of people are attracted to Lincoln, people who want to live and raise a family here … A strong school system is one of those major attractors. Finally, I see a rich mosaic of students coming here from many different backgrounds and I want to make sure all those voices are heard.” Nick Cusick, president of Bison, Inc.: “I am a business owner and employer, so of course I have an interest in a strong school district … But I am also involved in many community activities … I believe we are incredibly fortunate to have a strong education system in Lincoln, both parochial and public … I have had the opportunity to work on the past Superintendent’s Facility Advisory Committee, I was heavily involved in the development of The Career Academy and I have been involved in LPS focus programs. I recognize all kids are not alike, do not learn the same, and I am passionate about alternative learning options …. Among my roles, I am passionate about this committee of 100 and consensus building.”


1967-2019 Helping Boys and Girls Ages 3-8 Learn Fitness and Good Health

CELEBRATING

53 years!

Attention Little Green Boys and Girls 3 to 8 years old Practice only 1 day a week for 60 minutes Registration (No late registrations): Sunday, March 3 • Noon - 2 p.m. Riley Elementary School 5021 Orchard Street Uniform Pick Up: Sunday, April 14 • Noon - 2 p.m. Riley Elementary School 5021 Orchard Street First Practice: Tuesday, April 23 • 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Nebraska Wesleyan

Little Green’s: Field Events Only Tuesday, June 18 • 6:30 p.m. Little Green’s Classic: Running Events Only Tuesday, June 25 • 6:30 p.m. Contact Person: Jerry E. McGinn (402) 525-0939

A person never stands so tall as when he stoops to help a kid. REGISTRATION OPTIONS Print Registration Form off of our website, fill it out, and bring it to the registration • Pay $120 at registration time and you will be given 120 candy bars to sell. If you sell all the candy bars (at $1 each) you will earn all of the original $120 back. Checks for candy will be held for 2 weeks before cashing to allow time to sell the candy bars. • Paying a flat donation of $100. This fee includes the registration fee (no candy bars to sell). • No late registration!

For Additional Info, Check Us Out on the Web at: www.golittlegreen.com


is

convenient

Choose your week and class, even make it a full day of fun! 2019 Program Weeks • June 3-7 • June 10-14 • June 17-21 • June 24-28 • July 15-19

• Registration begins March 23 • STEAM* based classes • Hands-on classes in a variety of topics • Need-based scholarships available • 8th grade and above can also volunteer as Class Assistants • Half-day classes and full-day camps available Thank you for offering • Add-on Before Care and/or before care and lunch Lunch Care to make a whole care so children with day of fun *Science, technology, engineering, arts and math

Learn more about scholarships and registration at BrightLights.org

working parents can attend. I also appreciate that it was affordable to add this service on. – Bright Lights Parent

402.420.1115

Check Out the February Events at the University of Nebraska--Lincoln Glenn Korff School of Music! Double Reed Day Saturday, February 2 All Day, Westbrook

Concordia String Trio Monday, February 18 7:30 pm, Westbrook Recital Hall

Kevin Hanrahan, Tenor with Guest Artist Diana Blom, Piano Sunday, February 3 3:00 pm, Kimball Recital Hall

Honors Spring Strings Fri-Sat, February 22-23 All Day, Lied Commons

Guest Artist: Andy Harnsberger, Percussion Tuesday, February 5 7:30 pm, Kimball Recital Hall Graduate Auditions Fri-Sat, February 8-9 All Day, Westbrook N|150 Celebration Friday, February 15 7:30 pm, Lied Center

The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based upon any protected status. Please see go.unl.edu/nondiscrimination.

Undergraduate Audition Days Fri-Sat, February 22-23 All Day, Westbrook Opera -- The Tender Land Fri & Sun, February 22 & 24 7:30 pm (Fri) & 3:00 pm (Sun), Kimball Recital Hall University Singers and All-Collegiate Performance Tuesday, February 26 7:30 pm, Westminster Presbyterian

For current, up-to-date listings and more information about performances visit, music.unl.edu. Live webcasts will also be available on our website at the time of the performance.


Come join the fun for a great cause at the

12th ANNUAL BACKPACK WALK Saturday, April 27, 2019, 10:00 a.m. East High (70th & A Streets), Park in Seacrest Field’s West Parking Lot Since 2007 the BackPack Extra Mile Walk has been raising money to provide funding so more students can receive a weekend food backpack. The BackPack Walk is sponsored by the Food Bank of Lincoln and Lincoln Public Schools employees. The walk is open to LPS staff, parents, students, family, friends, service organizations, PTOs, PTAs, school clubs, student groups, business partners, CLC collaborators, churches, TeamMate mentors, and volunteers. Come join the fun for a great cause!

For more information, contact the team captain at your building or Shari Styskal at sstyskal@lps.org (402-436-1708).

www.lps.org | www.lincolnfoodbank.org


February 2019 | Community News | Section B

B6

VOICE program helps students with disabilities transition to work, life The mission of the Lincoln Public Schools Vocational Opportunity in Community Experience (VOICE) program is to prepare students with disabilities, primarily ages 18 to 21, to gain the skills and connections they need to facilitate a positive transition into adult living. It’s a mission that embodies a phrase you hear often at Lincoln Public Schools: All means all, meaning every student receives the attention and resources they need to thrive in the classroom and in life. “We live that every single day,” said VOICE Coordinator Tonya Jolley, speaking on behalf of the teachers, staff, families and community partners who make the program possible. Jolley spoke as part of the latest LPS Learning Lunch, “VOICE: Readiness for Resumes, Rent and Recreation,” held Jan. 15 at district office. The VOICE program, part of the LPS Special Education Department, started more than 25 years ago and currently serves about 110 students. The program’s goal is for students to learn about independence, career development, developing self and academics. They gain community-based work and life experience at 13 different sites throughout Lincoln, including Bryan Health Warehouse, Duncan Aviation, Food Bank of Lincoln, Hy-Vee and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. “This has been a very positive program,” said Lydia, a mother of a VOICE student, who spoke at the Learning Lunch. “I don’t know what I would have done after high school...he has grown so much in so many ways.” Lydia was joined at the Learning Lunch by her son, along with two other VOICE students and their mothers. Tonisha Jorgensen with Nebraska VR, a state agency, also spoke on Tuesday. The VOICE program works closely with Nebraska VR, which assists individuals with disabilities in setting and achieving their employment goals.

Remaining learning lunches:

“We help with a plan when they’re transitioning out of VOICE and looking for employment,” Jorgensen said.

Tuesday, Feb. 26: Budget Development in LPS

The three students at the Learning Lunch spoke about their goals after they complete the VOICE program. Trey wants to work full time and still live at home for five to 10 years. For Nick, he wants to get a job first, then “maybe move out.”

Tuesday, March 19: Twenty-five years of student-built houses

“I might get a job and see if any of my friends want to get a house together,” said Doriahn. Their future goals reflect the vision of the VOICE program, which Jolley read aloud: “All students with disabilities are prepared and empowered to thrive and participate fully in society.”

Liz Standish, associate superintendent for Business Affairs at LPS.

Bob Freese, Lincoln Northeast High School teacher.

Tuesday, April 16: LPS Student Debate Mindy Murphy, curriculum specialist for English Language Arts for secondary education.

Tuesday, May 14: Aprenda mientras toma su almuerzo con los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella! (Learn while you have your lunch with The Star City Mariachi Ensemble) Lance Nielsen, curriculum specialist for Music at LPS.

LPS steps up efforts to address digital citizenship Lincoln Public Schools has long placed an emphasis on teaching digital citizenship, which means the appropriate and responsible use of technology. This covers a wide range of topics - everything from cyberbullying to password security to online shopping. However, starting this school year, LPS has launched an initiative that takes a more deliberate and uniform approach to this important topic - one that seems to grow in importance along with the number of devices in our homes and schools. “This initiative specifically defines the elements we feel our students need to know to be safe and responsible citizens and provides resources for schools to reinforce the instruction that has already been woven into the different curriculum areas,” said LPS Director of Library Media Services Chris Haeffner. The Library Media Services Department spent months collaborating and planning with colleagues from a variety of areas — special education, computing services, student services and curriculum. The result, Haeffner said, is a detailed set of key concepts for students to learn at the elementary, middle school and high school levels.

want students to be aware that there are serious consequences for online bullying. Students need to know what to do if their accounts have been hacked and passwords compromised. We want our students to be good citizens.”

Each school’s librarian will work closely with teachers to consistently integrate short lessons about digital citizenship into their lesson plans. For example, at Lincoln Northeast High School, each Tuesday during third period there will be a ten-minute lesson in which every student learns the same material on digital citizenship.

Added Haeffner: “While our focus is digital citizenship, we really can't distinguish between our students’ digital and non-digital lives. They are one and the same.”

Northeast Librarian Jeanette Dorn said teachers presented the first lesson in mid-September and she’s already received positive feedback.

Lincoln East High School Librarian Jane Holt said schools don’t give students algebra books or bunsen burners and wish them luck - and it should be no different with the electronic devices they use.

“Digital citizenship has its value in having kids think before they do something impul“Why would we neglect teaching them how to properly hansive. We want them to be aware that things they do might hinder them from getting a job if an employer is checking out their Facebook or Instagram account,” Dorn said. “We dle the tools and landscapes that make up their digital lives?”


2019-2020

KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION

For children who are five years old by July 31, 2019

Starting January 1, 2019

Register Online Go to lps.org and look for the red button

If you can’t register online, register in person at your child’s elementary school on:

Wednesday, March 6, 2019, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or Thursday, March 7, 2019, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Families who wish to have their child attend an LPS school outside of their attendance area should complete the Special Attendance permit at lps.org/transfer.

Documents needed at registration Certified Birth Certificate | Current Immunization Record

Documents needed before first day of school

Health History Form | Proof of Dental Exam Card Physical Examination Requirements Form | Report of Vision Evaluation Form Medical Statement for Students Requiring Special Meals Form

on stage

this summer sing! dance! sing! dance! act! act! Opportunities for ALL AGES! Rising Stars Ages 3-8 June 17-21 • 9:30-11:00am • $100

June 24-28 • 9:30-11:00am • $100

Fairy Tale Forest

Candyland Adventures

Informal Performance: Friday, June 21st, 10:30am

Informal Performance: Friday, June 28th, 10:30am

Join Cinderella as she encounters the fairy tale characters who helped—or hindered—her journey home from the ball!

Join us for this SWEET story set in the town of Candyland!

STAGE Stars Ages 7-15 June 3-7 • Ages 7-15 9:30am-3:30pm • $200

June 17-21 • Ages 7-15 12:30-3:30pm • $150

June 24-28 • Ages 9-15 12:30-3:30pm • $150

M-F July 8-19 • Ages 7-15 9:30-3:30pm • $400

Total Theatre Experience

Broadway bound! Sing! Dance! Act!

Create & Relate!

Disney’s The Lion King, Jr.

Held at Kloefkorn Elementary Sing, dance, & act your way through this workshop featuring scenes from your favorite musicals!

Informal Performance: Friday, June 7th, 2pm

All classes held at 4325 Sumner Street unless otherwise noted

Set the stage with choreography, acting, singing, stage combat, stage makeup & more!

Informal Performance: Friday, June 21st, 3pm

Improv and script writing Theatre workshops and classes lead by Judy Hart!

Informal Performance: Friday, June 21st, 3pm

Take part in an unforgettable musical experience based on Disney’s The Lion King!

Performances: Thursday, July 18, 7pm Friday, July 19, 2 & 7 pm

TAFK.ORG

info@TAFK.org


February 2019 | Community News | Section B

B8

Tabling major issues: The power of meals or snacks By Michelle Welch, RD, LMNT LPS District Wellness Facilitator Higher graduation rates. Better grades for teens. Less mental health issues. Healthier weight status. Less alcohol, tobacco and drug use. These are just a few of the benefits found to come from kids frequently eating meals with their families.

healthier snacks into the routine, with more fruits or vegetables, since produce might be missed with meals on the run.

devices are not part of the dinnerware to minimize distraction for all diners.

Research also finds frequent family meals lead kids to have better social skills and intake of several nutrients, including fiber, calcium and iron. So how do you make this happen with the challenges of a hectic family schedule and challenging work hours?

Use sneaky tools to keep you out of the kitchen on work days. Use non-work days for prep or make meals that heat up for a quicker to-the-table opportunity so you don’t miss face time on busier or more tired days. Make healthier sides/ snacks easier by, for example, slicing up a couple oranges your family shares instead of having to peel oranges, or use the easy-peel cutie style fruit. In a pinch, drive-through sandwiches pair nicely with healthier sides and beverages from home, not to mention, skipping the drivethrough sides and drinks saves major cash.

Treat teens to one-on-one outings. I say this as a mom of two teen boys. After your teens turn driving age, taking them out for one-onone meals is critical to keeping conversation flowing. Your flow of information from carpool time dries up and you need to know what’s going on with them now more than ever. Make the time to have a special outing; be it a snack, meal or a walk around Holmes Lake. Teen life is tough, and they need you now more than ever — even if they don’t tell you. It doesn’t have to be for hours, but you’ll be surprised what you’ll learn if they feel you are a trusted, listening ear.

Build connection times into family structure. If you are rarely home at the same time for meals, you might find that family snacks work better than family meals. It’s more about the face time than which specific meal or snack you are eating. This might give you a chance to build

Skip the chore list. If kids think of meal time as chore assignment time or where they are being evaluated, family meals lose their luster. Make a mental commitment to build fun family conversation into the center of the conversation and minimize tough talk. Make sure that digital

Each parent would love to see the brightest future possible for your student(s). Investing time around the table (or even coffee table) can make a difference. Thanks for the efforts you make each day to support your child(ren). It matters.

Southeast Community College - Nebraska

What’s the cost difference between quarters and semesters? 4.5

Food tastes better when you eat it with your family.

Quarter Credits

=

3.0

Semester Credits

Nothing. It’s the Same.

Benefits of Family Meals for Kids R e s eaR ch s h ows:

Higher graduation rates Better grades in school Less alcohol, tobacco, and drug use Healthier weights Better nutrition Better social skills

2019-2020 Tuition & Fees 3.0 Sem. Credits @ $108 per hour = $324 (4.5 Qtr. Credits @ $72 per hour = $324)

HealthyLincoln.org

Nebraska resident rate.

Fall 2019 Semester Begins August 26, 2019

NAC

K

S

Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln

T

S

M AR

Made possible with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Quarter-to-Semester Conversion Information www.southeast.edu/Q2S New Residence Halls at Beatrice & Milford Campuses www.southeast.edu/livingoncampus

www.southeast.edu


Early Childhood Family Fair:

Explore • Play Learn • Connect Gateway Free to Mall Families! February 17 2:30-4:30 Come connect to community resources while your kids enjoy reading activities and fun games!

Sponsored by Lincoln Early Childhood Network on behalf of

HEY

STUDENTS! Do you have a question to ask Superintendent Dr. Steve Joel? Submit your questions at https://lps.org/go/asklps or use keyword “Ask LPS”

Play summer baseball with

Junior Saltdogs League • T-Ball (U6)

• Player Pitch (U10-U16)

• Machine Pitch (U8)

• Homer’s Heroes

Skill Development • Strategy • Teamwork • Friendship • Fun • Sportsmanship SEASON • No tryouts • Coaches contact players for practice 2-3 weeks before season starts • U6-U14 divisions will have varied season start dates ranging from early May to early June; U16 (high school) division will start in June • Majority of games played on week nights with some week-end games • The season for all divisions will be completed by July 31

DIVISIONS

(age as of April 30, 2019)

U6 U8 U10 U12 U14 U16

Registration Fee $75 $90 $100 $100 $110 $95

League Fundraiser: Each U6-U16 player must participate in the League’s annual fundraiser at the cost of $72 or can opt out at the cost of $65

2019 SEASON REGISTRATION DATES & LOCATIONS In-person Registration Only Sat, Jan. 26 Thu, Jan. 31 Sat, Feb. 9 Sat, Feb. 16

1-3 pm 6-8 pm 1-3 pm 1-3 pm

Auld Pavilion Rec Center, 1650 Memorial Dr. Belmont Rec Center, 1234 Judson St Auld Pavilion Rec Center, 1650 Memorial Dr. FUNdamental Athletics Academy, 8400 Cody Dr, Suite K (14th & Yankee Hill area)

Homer’s Heroes Division

(Ages 5-17 Coed) • Uses buddy system to assist players when needed • For children with physical or intellectual challenges • Shirts & awards sponsored by Lincoln Optimist club • Regardless of limitations

Online registration available January 9 - February 16 Late registration available February 17 - March 2 (online only and $25 late fee added)

www.jrsaltdogs.com


February 2019 | Community News | Section B

B11

Celebrating the power of Community Learning Centers When you think of afterschool programs for elementary students, you probably don’t think of lessons in basic engineering concepts. But that’s exactly what happens every Tuesday from 4:15 to 5 p.m. at the Lakeview Community Learning Center (CLC), located at Lakeview Elementary School in west Lincoln. Students from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Baja Society of Automotive Engineers, which consists of students who build off-road vehicles for national competitions, visit Lakeview CLC for a club dedicated to learning about engineering and how to build motorized toy cars. It’s one of hundreds of clubs offered at CLCs across the city. Nearly 30 elementary students participated in one of the engineering club’s recent hands-on meeting. Older students met in Lakeview’s gym and learned how to assemble motorized cars, while younger students gathered in the cafeteria and assembled basic parachutes to learn more about why the size of the parachute affects how quickly it falls to the ground. The club has been meeting at Lakeview for three years. One of the UNL students, junior Andrew Johnson, said he loves interacting with the elementary students. “It definitely gets me out of my comfort zone - as engineering majors this is not what we expected to be doing,” he said with a laugh. “But the kids are great. They really get into what we do and have fun.” Nola Derby-Bennett, director of Lincoln’s Community Learning Centers, said the engineering club is a perfect example of the power of CLCs. “We know that the best way to keep our students engaged after school is to give them opportunities to put their hands on the kinds of things that they're learning in the classroom,” Derby-Bennett said. “The hands-on learning clubs are always the first to fill up because the students know they're going to be active and engaged with a subject that they're really interested in or passionate about. It's so fun to see their faces light up when they get to put their passions into practice.” And in cases such as the engineering club at Lakeview, she added, there’s even more long-term benefit. “When our CLC students have the opportunity to spend time with UNL students, they begin to see themselves as college students. The possibility of attending college becomes a reality.” Lakeview is one of 26 CLCs, located at 19 elementary schools, six middle schools and one high school. They offer a variety of afterschool programming and resources through partnerships with 12 lead agencies and hundreds of community partners. The Lincoln Community Foundation, the City of Lincoln and Lincoln Public Schools share oversight of the CLCs. CLCs are the catalysts for developing successful youth, thriving families and strong neighborhoods. The CLC strategy facilitates and sustains intentional partnerships that address the diverse needs of youth, families and neighborhoods. They are the hub for connecting and promoting the efficient and effective use of our community’s wealth of resources.


K i d s CO R N E R


February 2019 | Community News | Section B

1/22/2019

B13

MealViewer Schools

FEBRUARY 2019

Breakfast / Belmont Elementary February Breakfast MONDAY

4

Mini Berry Pancakes Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice Apricot Cup

Mini Waf es

Breakfast Quesadilla Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

11

Breakfast Burrito Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

Maple

Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice Apricot Cup

Mini Chocolate Chip French Toast Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice Apricot Cup

Mini Berry Pancakes Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice 1/22/2019 Apricot Cup

TUESDAY

18

Egg & Cheese Sandwich Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

25

Breakfast Quesadilla Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

WEDNESDAY

5

12

6

Breakfast Bar Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Mixed Berry Cup

13

Pancake Sausage on a Stick Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Strawberry Cup

Breakfast Bar Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Mixed Berry Cup

Mini Turkey Sausage Breakfast Bites Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

20

Turkey Sausage, Egg, and Cheese Sliders Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Mixed Berry Cup

27

Pancake Chicken Sausage

4

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Bites Chef Salad Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

11

Chicken Nuggets Teriyaki Beef Nuggets Chef Salad Falafel Nuggets Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Warm Cinnamon Apple Slices Pineapple Tidbits Roll

Taco Crunch with Baked Scoops Chef Salad Cheese Ravioli in Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Roll

18

No School

Muchos Nachos Cheeseburger on Bun Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Orange Wedges Diced Peaches Roll

14

Chocolate Filled Crescent Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Assorted Juice Raisins Assorted Fruit

21

Mini Bagels Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Assorted Juice Raisins Assorted Fruit

25

Soft Shell Beef Taco Chef Salad Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Roll

MealViewer

Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Schools Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

5

12

WEDNESDAY

Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Hamburger Pizza Chef Salad Hummus with Cheese Stick and Savory Pizza Crackers Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll Chocolate Chip Cookie

Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Breaded Pork Sandwich Chef Salad Crustless Soybutter and Jelly Sandwich

6

13

with Cheese Stick

Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll

19

Chicken Teriyaki on Brown Rice Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Blueberries with Whipped Topping Applesauce Roll

THURSDAY

20

26

Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Hamburger Pizza Chef Salad Hummus with Cheese Stick and Savory Pizza Crackers Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Fresh Pear Applesauce Roll Chocolate Cookie

27

https://schools.mealviewer.com/school/BelmontElementary/print?month=1&year=2019&blockId=1157

1/22/2019

FRIDAY

7

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Mexi Pizza Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Shredded Mozzarella Cheese Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Diced Pears Fresh Baked Garlic Bread

Pepperoni Pizza BBQ Chicken Thigh Chef Salad Vegetarian Chik'n Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Diced Pears Cinnamon Roll Red Velvet Cookie

Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad Cheesy Green Chili Quesadilla Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Strawberry Cup Diced Pears Roll Fat Free Strawberry Milk

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Mexi Pizza Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Shredded Mozzarella Cheese Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Diced Pears Fresh Baked Garlic Bread

14

21

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Bites BBQ Beef Sandwich Chef Salad Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

Chicken Nuggets Teriyaki Beef Nuggets Chef Salad Omelet Falafel Nuggets Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Warm Cinnamon Apple Slices Pineapple Tidbits Roll English Muf�n

4

11

TUESDAY

Soft Shell Beef Taco Sub Sandwich Chef Salad Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Roll

Taco Crunch with Baked Scoops Buffalo Chicken Tenders Chef Salad Cheese Ravioli in Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Jalapeno Cornbread Garlic Breadstick Roll

Popcorn Chicken Turkey Hot Dog on Bun Cheeseburger Paradise on Croissant Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Bites Meatless Chef Salad Baked Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Croissant

Muchos Nachos Cheeseburger on Bun Baja Chicken, Cheese & Rice Burrito Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Orange Wedges Diced Peaches Roll

25

Soft Shell Beef Taco Sub Sandwich Chef Salad Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Roll

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll Frosted Chocolate Cake

15

22

1/1

5

12

WEDNESDAY

Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Hamburger Pizza Nebraska Bun Chef Salad Hummus with Cheese Stick and Savory Pizza Crackers Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll

Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Breaded Pork Sandwich Fish Melt Sandwich Chef Salad Crustless Soybutter and Jelly Sandwich

6

13

with Cheese Stick

Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll Garlic Breadstick

THURSDAY

19

Chicken Teriyaki on Brown Rice Lasagna Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Blueberries with Whipped Topping Applesauce Garlic Breadstick Roll

20

FRIDAY Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Sloppy Joe on Bun Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Mexi Pizza Shredded Chicken Carnitas on a Flour Tortilla Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Shredded Mozzarella Cheese Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Diced Pears Fresh Baked Garlic Bread

Pepperoni Pizza BBQ Chicken Thigh Chili Chef Salad Vegetarian Chik'n Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Diced Pears Cinnamon Roll Red Velvet Cookie

Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad French Bread Garlic Pizza Cheesy Green Chili Quesadilla Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Strawberry Cup Diced Pears Roll Fat Free Strawberry Milk

7

14

21

Offered once a month

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Bites BBQ Beef Sandwich Chef Salad Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

Creamy Mac & Cheese Personal 3 Meat Pizza Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

28

https://schools.mealviewer.com/school/BelmontElementary/print?month=1&year=2019&blockId=1157

18

8

French Toast Sticks with Sausage Links Breaded Chicken Sandwich Chef Salad French Toast Sticks with Cheese Sticks Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

FEBRUARY 2019

February Secondary Lunch

1

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll Frosted Chocolate Cake

MealViewer Schools

Lunch / East High MONDAY

22

28

Offered once a month

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Bites Chef Salad Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

15

FEBRUARY 2019

TUESDAY

Soft Shell Beef Taco Chef Salad Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Roll

8

Mini Cinnis Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Assorted Juice Raisins Assorted Fruit

Sandwich

Lunch / Belmont Elementary February Elementary Lunch MONDAY

7

Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

Fruit Filled Frudel

1

Mini Bagels Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Assorted Juice Assorted Fruit

Sandwich

Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Mixed Berry Cup

26

FRIDAY

Pancake Chicken Sausage

Apple

19

THURSDAY

26

Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Hamburger Pizza Nebraska Bun Chef Salad Hummus with Cheese Stick and Savory Pizza Crackers Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll

27

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Mexi Pizza Shredded Chicken Carnitas on a Flour Tortilla Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Shredded Mozzarella Cheese Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Diced Pears Fresh Baked Garlic Bread

28

French Toast Sticks with Sausage Links Breaded Chicken Sandwich Chicken Enchilada Chef Salad French Toast Sticks with Cheese Sticks Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

Creamy Mac & Cheese Personal 3 Meat Pizza Hot & Spicy Chicken Sandwich Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Sloppy Joe on Bun Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

1

8

15

22

1/1


February 2019 | Community News | Section B

B14

THERAPY DOGS BRING JOY, UNCONDITIONAL LOVE TO SCHOOLS

S

hug is one of two therapy dogs at Randolph Elementary School. Shug is actually short for Sugar Bear — which makes sense, because the threeyear old English Cream Golden Retriever is very sweet.

“When I see Shug, he makes my day because he’s a good dog,” said Dre, a third-grader at the school near 37th and D streets. “A lot of dogs are good, but Shug is really good.” Shug is one of 29 therapy dogs roaming the hallways and classrooms of Lincoln Public Schools, trading their affection and attention for belly rubs and a good scratch behind the ears. Former Mickle Middle School Principal Dick Spearman started the LPS therapy dog program about 20 years ago with his dog Riley. Shug is the fourth therapy dog that counselor Susie Mahoney has brought to Randolph during her 18 years at the school. Since then, Randolph has gained a reputation as a school that loves therapy dogs, hosting as many as four at a time. Shug is currently joined by Jake, who is computer teacher Bryan Ebeler’s seven-year-old Bullmastiff/Black Lab mix. As a counselor, Mahoney is keenly aware of the benefits of school therapy dogs. The primary benefit, she said, is what she observes on a daily basis: helping students regulate their emotions. “When students have high emotions, that’s usually anger and sadness and frustration. Often times they don’t want to listen to adults or listen to logic that adults are trying to use with them. But there isn’t anyone in the school who’s not going to listen to Shug or to Jake. Shug has a way of snuggling up to people and knowing when kids need that unconditional love,” said Mahoney, adding that it’s not uncommon for teachers to borrow Shug to help with one of their students if she’s busy. John Neal, LPS assistant superintendent for governmental relations and general administration, oversees the school district’s dog therapy program. He cited numerous benefits of therapy dogs: improved school attendance and behavior, reduced student anxiety and a warmer school environment - all of which leads to higher academic achievement. The LPS goal is to someday have every school reap the benefits of a therapy dog. “Pet therapy dogs come to school every day filled with unconditional love to share with students,” Neal said. “Whether they spend the day listening to a young reader's first attempt at reading aloud, sitting by a desk at the feet of a nervous new student who just transferred into the school mid-semester, or receiving hugs in the hallway from students, pet therapy dogs are there for the kids every day.” Mahoney point outs that therapy dogs must go through extensive training through the American Kennel Club before they enter schools, with recertification required biannually. “It’s hard work, not every position or person can do it. But because of the benefit it provides it’s worth the work.” Dre agrees. His face lights up when he enters a room and sees his buddy Shug. “He’s just nice. He’s like a person, kind of. He just greets you. Sometimes he greets you and rubs up against you and gives you kisses,” he said. “I like giving him attention. Because the more attention you give the better bond you have. So if you’re ever sad he’ll give you more attention. “It makes me feel happier.”

Profile for Lincoln Public Schools

February 2019 Community News  

February 2019 Community News