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October 2018

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The strength of ‘power writing’ at Adams Elementary

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Read about Nebraska schools, how to succed in dual-credit courses, and eveyrthing juniors and seniors need to know on

Beginning this year, third-grade teachers in Lincoln Public Schools are employing a powerful new method to help teach writing. It’s called “power writing,” and its effectiveness was on full display recently at Adams Elementary School.

Pages B7-12 SECTION A: A2 LPS is... A3 LPSDO Anniversary

Teacher Sarah Ideus devoted about half of her hour-long second period to power writing, which involved the following steps:

A4 Learning lunch FCS teacher honored A5 Naming a giraffe

• Ideus gave the students the first of three words they would write about - in this case, “teacher.” “I’m going to write it on the board so you can see how to spell it because I know spelling is important to you,” Ideus said. • The students were given one minute of “think time,” when they could brainstorm words they associate with “teacher.” “Hopefully you have lots of ideas in your mind,” Ideus said. • The students wrote for one minute, with the goal being to write as many words as possible. Said Ideus: “If we get the equal amount of time to think as we do to write, hopefully it will increase the number of words per minute, right?” • Finally, they counted the words and recorded the number in their booklet designated for power writing.

A6 TeamMates of the Month A8 Intramural sports A10 ConnectLPS A13 Huntington healthy living field trip A14 PBiS home matrix A15 Athletic trainers Custodian retires A17 Service learning fair TCA adds new path A18 Patriot Day SECTION B:

The students repeated these steps for the words “classmate” - which also was a vocabulary word that week - and “friend.” When they finished all three, they recorded the largest of their three numbers on a separate piece of paper, adding it to a graph so they can track their progress from day to day.

B1 Cougar Callouts

Lisa Oltman, the LPS K-6 English Language Arts Curriculum Specialist, said the purpose of power writing is to increase the fluency of students’ writing.

B7 College readiness

“Often we as writers get so caught up in writing correctly that we are generating ideas, revising and editing all at the same time. Sometimes this can look like writer’s block because it makes us slow to get words on paper,” Oltman said. “This can help students improve at getting their ideas down on paper quickly and then revising and editing afterwards.” Back in room 143 at Adams Elementary, it was only the third day of power writing but Ideus and her students could already see improvement. Ideus offered students high-fives as they excitedly announced their numbers. “I had 18 and now I got 23!” “I got 28!” “Me, too!”

B2 Wellness column Dangers of vaping B4 Learning lunch LNE auto shop IB Academy Mosaic book display B14 Rotary donation

One of the students commented how his graph looked like stair steps. “If yours isn’t looking like stair steps yet, let’s say yours is kind of flat, do you think I’m worried, though?” Ideus asked. “No,” the students replied. “That’s right,” she said. “This will get easier. This is something new - this is brand new. We just don’t want a staircase going down, down, down every day. Sometimes the words will be perfect for you. Sometimes these words are just going to strike things in your brain and you’re going to be able to write a lot. Some days these words up here on the board aren’t going to fit you very well. You might have trouble thinking, you might have trouble writing. You might have a bad day.”

B15 High school theater productions B16 Kids Corner B17 Menus B18 National Arts in Education Week


Lincoln Public Schools: In One Word One word that easily comes to mind when thinking about Lincoln Public Schools is GROWING! LPS has seen a staggering 10 percent increase - 3,858 more students - in our enrollment over the last five years. Not only are our student numbers swelling across the district at a record pace, but our students and staff are thriving with the love and support of an amazing community standing with us every step of the way. LPS is dedicated to educating the whole child - nurturing them to become safe, respectful and responsible world citizens. The growth of each student’s accomplishments from year to year continues to astound us. We also recognize our staff members and their willingness to continue to grow through local, state and national professional development and achievements - they are some of the top leaders in their fields. By investing in the best and the brightest educators we are providing our students with high quality opportunities and premium experiences. In October, LPS is … Growing! This past summer we posed a question to our community, our families, our staff and our students – describe Lincoln Public Schools in one, single word. Each month we will reveal a new word that describes LPS. For more, visit our website: lps.org/is https://lps.org/is


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Archive photos show the groundbreaking ceremony for the new LPSDO facility, the flag raising ceremony at its dedication, and salvage from the initial fire in 2011.

LPS District Office celebrates five-year homecoming

What a difference five years makes. Five years ago, Lincoln Public Schools Superintendent Steve Joel was saying, “Welcome home,” to all LPS District Office folks moving into a brand new LPS headquarters in the aftermath of a tragic 2011 fire. Five years ago this fall, the brand new center for public education in Lincoln re-opened for business. Five years ago, we celebrated the spirit of renewal and hope, an even stronger public school district and a milestone in the legacy of excellence at LPS. Tuesday morning everyone at District Office stepped outside and paused a moment to celebrate that memorable homecoming. “We do it right here at LPS – we took a tragedy and made it into a blessing,” said Lincoln Board of Education President Connie Duncan. “I cannot thank all of you enough – for all of your work for our most valuable asset, our children.” Rob McEntarffer, an assessment/evaluation specialist at LPS who represented all District Office employees with his remarks, stressed the importance of what is happening inside all our schools and classrooms on any given school day, “and that could not happen without our work.” Joel agreed and commended the Board of Education for the “difficult and wise decision” to return and build at 59th and O streets. “Five years ago we saw a tremendous spirit of recovery as we returned to this building …. A building where we work behind the scenes to make sure students benefit … a building where people commit and believe in our community’s children.”

"We do it right here at LPS – we took a tragedy and made it into a blessing. I cannot thank all of you enough – for all of your work for our most valuable asset, our children."

Flag raising ceremony from dedication of new LPSDO building. Archive photo 2013.

Archive photos from 2011 show the blaze that destroyed the original building, and the rubble that remians.


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LPS Learning Lunch: Beatles, Bee Gees and Beyonce What do the Baby Boomer, Generation X and Millennial generations have in common? Not much, it turns out. That was the overriding theme of the first LPS Learning Lunch of the 2018-19 season, held Aug. 21 in the boardroom at LPS District Office. The light-hearted but informative presentation, “Beatles, Bee Gees and Beyoncé: Communicating and Managing Generational Differences,” delved into the many differences among the Millennial, Generation X and Baby Boomer generations. Those born between 1946 and 1964 are typically considered Baby Boomers; for Gen X, 1965 to 1980; and for Millennials, 1981 to 2000. Representing their generations at the Learning Lunch were Baby Boomer Kay Byers, retired LPS supervisor of elementary personnel services; Gen-Xer Nicole Regan, LPS supervisor of secondary personnel services; and Minnellial Robbie Seybert, LPS director of employee relations and personnel. Of course there are always exceptions when you’re talking about such large segments of the population, but here’s what they had to say about their generations on a variety of topics:

CAREER GOALS Baby Boomers - “You build a stellar career - that was your identity as a Boomer.” Gen X - “Work hard so you can enjoy your life and have that work-life balance.” Millenials - “We don’t like to be boxed in. We don’t like to be told, ‘You can only do this.’” COMMUNICATION PREFERENCES Baby Boomers - “We prefer to face. I would much rather get up and out of my office and go to someone else’s office or meet with them personally.” Gen X - “We like email, voicemail, texting. Be direct, just tell us what we need to know. Quick and to the point.” Millennials - “We prefer messaging, texting. And be positive. Condescension and sarcasm sometime don’t go over well and can be seen as criticism for Millenials.”

WORK STYLE Baby Boomers - “Work very hard at one job. Often times we were the ones who arrived early and stayed later.” Gen X - “Give us a project and we’ll do it, just don’t give us too many parameters about how to do it. We’re committed to work but not necessarily the company.” Millenials - “We like to multitask. We’ve been doing that since we were young.” WORKPLACE STRENGTHS Baby Boomers - “Experience and knowledge are very important to Boomers.” Gen X - “We’re independent, adaptable. We’re willing to challenge the status quo - do what you do and ask for forgiveness later.” Millenials - “We’re risk-takers - we don’t have much to lose yet.”

4-H Information Night See animals such as rabbits and llamas

Southwest teacher honored for work with FCS student group

Find Out How Youth Ages 5–18 Can Join 4-H!

“Students like Brandon are what makes our chapter great. ... As an adviser, I love watching students blossom as a result of FCCLA.” A Lincoln Southwest High School teacher has been honored for her work with the school’s chapter of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) student organization. Family and consumer sciences teacher Tracy Way earned the 2018 Spirit of Advising Award, which honors one FCCLA chapter advisor from each state for their tireless work and dedication to their students. FCCLA helps students grow as leaders and address personal, family, work and societal issues through family and consumer sciences education. Way received the award this summer at the FCCLA National Leadership Conference in Atlanta. Last spring, Lincoln Southwest student Brandon Caha announced Way’s award at the state FCCLA convention.

Adults — Help Youth Grow By Volunteering!

Tues., Oct. 16• 6pm

Lancaster Extension Education Center 444 Cherrycreek Rd., Lincoln 4-H is America’s largest youth development organization — empowering nearly six million young people across the U.S. with the skills to lead for a lifetime. 4-H’ers are 4 times more likely to give back to their communities, 2 times more likely to make healthier choices and 2 times more likely to participate in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) activities! 1 Adult volunteers are vital to the ongoing growth and development of youth in 4-H. Research shows the structured learning, encouragement and adult mentoring youth receive through 4-H helps them achieve future life successes.1 1

“Students like Brandon are what makes our chapter great,” Way said. “He had high aspirations for his participation in FCCLA and all I did was help facilitate his ideas. As an adviser, I love watching students blossom as a result of FCCLA.”

Free hot dogs!

Read about the “4-H Study of Positive Youth Development” at http://4-h.org/about/research

http://lancaster.unl.edu/4h • 402-441-7180 The 4-H Youth Development program abides with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the USDA.


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Children’s Zoo asks LPS first-graders to name new giraffe Lincoln Public Schools first-grade students have been given a tall order: Name the 14-month-old female giraffe that was delivered to the Lincoln Children’s Zoo on Sept. 4. The giraffe is one of three that now call Lincoln home, with the other two arriving on separate days during the same week. This marks the first time the Lincoln Children’s Zoo has hosted giraffes. The public can meet them in May when the zoo’s expansion project is complete. In the meantime, one of the giraffes still needs a name. That’s where LPS gets involved. From Sept. 4 through Sept. 11, first-graders were able to take home a ballot and bring it back with their suggested name for the giraffe. Sometime during the first week of October, after zoo officials have gathered and reviewed all of the ballots from all of the schools, they will choose a winning name. LPS K-12 Science Curriculum Specialist James Blake said zoo officials contacted LPS with the idea and offered to supply all of the necessary materials - posters, ballots, ballot boxes. Besides it being an exciting experience, firstgrade students are currently learning about animals - including giraffes. “When you have 3,000 students at a grade level, you want to make sure it’s not only engaging, which we knew this would be, but that it be focused and have a curriculum connection,” Blake said. The soon-to-be-named giraffe comes to the Lincoln Children’s Zoo from Como Park Zoo in St. Paul, Minn. She’s expected to live more than 20 years and grow from 700 pounds to nearly 2,000, and from 10 feet tall to 18. Lincoln Children’s Zoo President/CEO John Chapo, speaking moments before the giraffe arrived on Sept. 4, said he’s thrilled that LPS first-grade students can play a major role in such a historic event - the zoo’s first giraffes. “Today, Lincoln, Nebraska is making history.”

Lincoln Center Kiwanis Club presents

The 61 st

Annual

Pancake Festival

with live entertainment provided by local performing artists!

Saturday, November 3

rd

7am-2pm | Auld Pavilion–Antelope Park Advance Tickets: $6 • $7 at the door KiwanisPancakeFeed.BrownPaperTickets.com

All proceeds support Kiwanis efforts to serve the needs of children.


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October TeamMates of the Month:

Tim and Abel: Six years and 18 inches of growth Abel first learned about TeamMates during third grade from Lincoln Public School’s Community News publication. He then marched into the McPhee Elementary School office and nominated himself for the program. Before the first meeting, however, Abel had doubts. “How would I relate to this big, scary man?” he wondered. His worries subsided after meeting his mentor, Tim, and they discovered common interests: playing the saxophone, the outdoors and a competitive spirit. “I’m so glad I got to know him,” Abel says. “He’s so understanding, and I know I can count on him.” Tim and Abel continued to steadily deepen their friendship. “We didn’t rush the relationship,” says Tim, “but allowed it to evolve naturally.” After several years of mentoring at McPhee, Tim followed Abel to Park Middle School, then on to Lincoln Southwest High School where he is now a sophomore. Growth has been a theme in their relationship. From the start, Tim realized Abel’s leadership and social competency, and over the years, he’s grown 18 inches in height and even more in self-assurance. “Abel has developed a quiet confidence that guides the direction he wants to go,” Tim says. At one point Abel was struggling with his studies. He credits Tim with helping him stay on top of his school work because Tim found clever ways to make learning enjoyable. During their meetings, the two frequently played catch, so Tim suggested that with each throw they take turns naming all the states in the nation. The contest was so successful that they moved on to capitals, then South American countries, and then around the world. Learning became fun, and the two realized a common sense of humor. Throughout their journey, there have been surprises. Both Tim and Abel were amazed to discover the strong bond each shares with their mothers and greatest role model. During the course of their relationship, each has encountered unexpected abilities in the other. Tim has been astounded at Abel’s success in theater, landing lead roles in

productions at the Lincoln Community Playhouse and the Haymarket Theatre. One of Tim’s favorite moments occurred when sixth-grade Abel starred in the play “Never Ending Story.” Abel has also been surprised by his mentor. “Even though Tim loves to win,” Abel says, “I noticed that when he had the advantage in a game, he would purposefully guide me in order to help me to do better.” Talk about a win-win! This year, Abel’s growth has taken another direction. He decided to take a break from theater to focus on academics and student council. Tim’s support has not wavered through these changes. His ability to stand by Abel stems from wisdom modeled by a mentor who helped Tim develop problem-solving skills and commitment to community service, both of which serve him as a mentor today. “I expect our relationship will morph more toward a peer friendship as Abel grows older,” Tim says, and Abel concurs. “We’ve come too far in our relationship to fall away. We’re always interested in the other,” Abel says. Six years of bonding makes an adult friendship inevitable and speaks to the power of mentoring.


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Intramurals kick

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Lincoln Public Schools offers three intramural fall sports for students in grades seven and eight: girls volleyball, soccer and cross country. LPS offers basketball and wrestling during the winter months and track and field in the spring. The following belief statements underscore the intent of intramural sports at the middle school level: • • • • •

To encourage student-athletes to conduct themselves in a manner which brings credit to themselves and their schools. To expand student-athletes’ awareness of various activities through inclusive exploration regardless of individual strengths or needs. To apply newly acquired skills through activities that require both individual and group participation/cooperation. To promote the development of self-discipline, self-esteem and self-worth. To enhance and shape the proper perspective of losing and winning.

For more information about middle school intramural offerings, visit lps.org, keyword: athletics.


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ConnectLPS

Here’s some of our favorite photos from LPS schools in September. Want more? Connect with your school’s social media at lps.org/connect.

Kloefkorn Elementary School Learning about Patriot Day

Prescott Elementary School

Lincoln Southeast High School

“An enormous thank you goes out to the volunteers at Union College. Today is “Project Impact,” and for the 12th year they showed up and spread mulch, weeded, and cleaned up in our outdoor classroom. We appreciate your help so very much! They were lead by Prescott parent Jake Lozier, who has been doggedly working in Prescott Park. Thank you, thank you!”

“Jumping for joy after winning the LSE Triangular today at Holmes Lake Golf Course. Celebrating Emma’s 5th place, Adalia’s 4th place, Katie’s 3rd place, Ansley’s 1st place and Natalee’s personal best! #BetterTogether

Schoo Middle School

Eighth-graders make pies in Family Consumer Science

Rousseau Elementary School

Adams Elementary School

Rousseau’s Purple Hands Pledge. “I will not use my hands or my words for hurting myself or others.”

“These Aviators are being recognized this week for working hard being respectful, responsible and safe!”


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Lincoln East High School

Irving Middle School

“7th grade Choir and Art students creating art inspired by music played by Sophia Potter. Thank you Sophia for playing beautiful music for our students!” “Biology students had the amazing opportunity to visit Platte River State Park, learning about ecology in a natural, undisturbed environment. Thank you to the Platte River NRD for providing these learning opportunities!”

Watch a video of the performance on Irving’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/IrvingMiddleSchool/

Lefler Middle School Fine dining Friday

The Career Academy

Dawes Middle School

“Our IT Networking Cyber Security seniors are hands-on practicing troubleshooting and repairing!” #FutureJobs #CollegeAndCareerReady

“We have grown so much!” #dawesgarden

Saratoga Elementary School

“In fifth grade science, students learned about weathering, erosion and deposition. They created small ‘sedimentary mountains.’ Then they observed the effects of rivers (water squirted out of eye-droppers), glaciers (ice cubes) and wind (blowing through a straw) on their mountains.”


CAREER FAIR

ELECTRICAL INDUSTRY

NOV

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&

3R D

FRIDAY 1 -4 PM | SATURDAY 10-2 PM AT IBEW LOCAL 265

S O UT H 1 4T H & O L D FA R M R O A D Come and see first hand the exciting careers in the electrical construction industry. With over 10 hands on stations, get a feel for what a career in the electrical construction industry is really about. Meet with contractors, electricians, and apprenticeship trainiers to get your questions about the industry answered.

VISIT US ONLINE AT

ELECTRICALCAREERFAIR.COM

Villarreal Nebraska Academy

An Official Academy of Villarreal C.F., Spain

Professionally directed soccer club focusing on developing highly skilled, intelligent soccer players for all levels of play.

How can I be a Mini-Submarine? Join the Winter Programs! Minis (PK/K) born 2015-2012 Submarines (1st-2nd) born 2012-2010 Wednesday or Friday Sessions: Times 5:15-6:00 All Training will be Indoors Winter 1: November & December Winter 2: January & February

Register at magellansoccer.com Looking for a Proven Soccer Program for your 6-10 year old? November—May 2018 Teams Groguet-TEAMs 2012 (U7s) -2009 (U10s) Training and Compe��on Events Wednesday Team Training 6:15-7:30 and/or Alternate Training Friday 5:15-6:30 VILLARREAL NEBRASKA At Nebraska Sports Center 333 Speedway Circe, Suite 4 Lincoln, Nebraska 68502 Email: info@magellansoccer.com Phone : 402-853-7100

2018-19 Teams 2011-2009 Birth Years—No Tryout Needed call for placement and Information

2008-2004 Birth Year Teams call to check for any openings.


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Huntington field trip encourages healthy living

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tudents from Huntington Elementary School took their annual field trip to Nebraska Wesleyan University on September 18th, where student-athletes led them through a variety of activities meant to encourage healthy living. The high temperatures cut short the trip, even with plenty of water breaks, time in the shade and a portion of the activities held indoors. The Eagles from Huntington still had plenty of fun with their Prairie Wolf neighbors, though. Wesleyan student-athletes led them through activities that involved basketball, football, baseball, softball, track, volleyball and cheerleading. Huntington and Wesleyan have partnered on the annual event for more than 10 years. It’s not only meant to emphasize healthy living habits, said Huntington Principal Rik Devney, but reinforces the community partnership between his school and nearby Wesleyan.


Every school in Lincoln Public Schools has building-wide expectations that are positively stated and intentionally taught. When we teach expectations, we focus on what to do instead of what not to do. We encourage you to consider similar expectations for your child outside of school. For example, what does it look like to be responsible during homework time? What does it sound like to be respectful when we are having a meal together? What does it look like to be safe when students are spending time with friends without much supervision? Here is an example of a matrix that could be used at home to identify and teach expectations that correspond to what is being taught and reinforced at school. Some examples have been included, but we encourage you to adapt it for your family’s needs.

Be Safe

Be Respectful

Be Responsible

Let the adults know where you will be

Meal time

Homework time

When friends visit

Morning routine

Brush your teeth

Ask for help when you’re stuck

Allow yourself enough time to get homework done

Thank the cook

Be on time to the table Use table manners

Chores

Use supplies appropriately

Bedtime

Brush your teeth

Ideas for older students: When out with friends, riding or driving, electronic devices Ideas for younger students: Playing outside, in a store or restaurant, at the library


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Athletic trainers critical to safety of student-athletes “You can really make a positive impact on kids through the training room. We’re teaching accountability, responsibility, teamwork.” Athletic trainers with Lincoln Public Schools are leading the way in a statewide effort to raise awareness about the vital role they play in keeping student-athletes safe. Initiated by the Nebraska State Athletic Trainers’ Association, the initiative is called the “Safety in Football Campaign,” but its message extends to all high school athletics. “It’s really just trying to spread the message that safety in all athletics starts with the trainers,” said Crystal Kjar, the head athletic trainer at Lincoln Southwest High School. “We’re there purely for the safety of the athlete.” The campaign kicked off Aug. 23 at the Lincoln East-Lincoln Pius X football game. The public address announcer recognized both school’s athletic trainers at midfield and shared information about the importance of their work. Each of the six LPS high schools employs two full-time athletic trainers. They serve more than 3,500 student-athletes annually - nearly onethird of all LPS high school students. Most of

what they do is behind the scenes work, much more than what the public typically sees when they attend sporting events - applying tape to student-athletes, handing out water, standing on the sideline in case someone is injured.

Because of that, according to Lincoln Southeast High School Head Athletic Trainer Cindy Benda, athletic trainers can play a critical role for many LPS students who may not have immediate access to healthcare.

According to a study conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the presence of athletic trainers in secondary schools lowers overall injury rates, improves diagnosis and the decision to return to competition, and reduces the risk for recurrent injuries.

“We are a great resource for these student-athletes who might not be able to go see a doctor right away,” said Benda, an athletic trainer for 18 years. “Eventually of course we can offer a referral but that really does help these parents and these kids who think, ‘I don’t have the resources,’ but they do. We’re licensed medical professionals.”

“It’s the iceberg effect. What they don’t see is what’s below the water,” said Kjar, who has been an athletic trainer for 18 years. “The injury eval- LPS athletic trainers obviously enjoy caring for uation, the rehab, concussion management the health of student-athletes. But there’s more really, the broad knowledge base that we have.” to the job than that, said Mac McQuistion, Lincoln East High School’s head athletic trainer for Athletic trainers must complete six to seven the past 28 years. years of college coursework, much of it the same material as students studying to be phy“You can really make a positive impact on kids sicians. The American Medical Association through the training room,” McQuistion said. recognizes athletic trainers as allied healthcare “We’re teaching accountability, responsibility, professionals. teamwork.”

North Star custodian ready for retirement after 44 years with LPS It’s shortly after 3 p.m. on Aug. 29 and students are streaming out of Lincoln North Star High School. As they end their school day, Dan Conn’s day is just beginning. Conn works the 3-11 p.m. shift as a custodian at North Star. He’s worked these hours since the school opened in 2003. Prior to that, he worked as a custodian at Brownell Elementary School for 29 years. That’s 44 years with Lincoln Public Schools - and now he’s ready for a new schedule. Conn retired on Aug. 31. His new schedule will include joining a health club, going to more of the auto races he loves to watch, maybe taking a vacation to Branson. “I’m really looking forward to it,” Conn said. “I have a lot I want to do.” Conn enjoyed the relative solitude of working mostly during the night, but walk down the North Star hallways with him during the day and you realize he’s made plenty of friends. “Hey, Dan!” “Dan! How’s it goin’?” “I will miss people I’ve worked with,” Conn said. “I’ve made some good friends.” Count Ryan Zabawa among them. Zabawa took over as North Star principal this year but met Conn during a previous stint at the school as an associate principal. “Dan has been a great member of our team at North Star. He is a team player, hard worker, extremely friendly and always helpful. He has had a truly impressive career. It won't be the same here without him.”

“Dan has been a great member of our team at North Star. ... It won't be the same here without him.” Richard Humann, the North Star building supervisor, said he’ll miss Conn’s positive attitude. “He is the kind of guy who is always upbeat. One of the things I enjoyed about Dan was if we were short-handed and I would ask him to do a little extra work, he would look up and say, ‘OK,’ with a huge smile on his face. “His smiles will surely be missed.”


NATIONAL FOSSIL DAY THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25 FROM 5:00–8:00PM

Regular museum admission | Members attend for free

A special paleontology themed night at Morrill Hall! Visitors can participate in activities that “dig” into the work of paleontology led by State Museum paleontologists. The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based upon any protected status. Please see go.unl.edu/nondiscrimination.


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Service learning fairs connect students with community For more than 30 years, students at Lincoln Public Schools have volunteered in the community as part of their senior-level government/civics course. The primary goal of this requirement is to help students thrive in a democratic society through connections with community organizations. Starting this year, making those connections is even easier. Recently, each of the six LPS high schools and The Career Academy hosted a service learning fair that brought in community organizations during the morning hours, allowing students to learn more about the groups and sign up for volunteer opportunities. Each of the schools hosted about 12 organizations. Lincoln East High School social studies teacher Michaela Schleicher said both the outside groups and students appreciated the event. “My students got a lot out of the fair. Many said they were really excited about the various agencies they visited with and were already setting up volunteer opportunities,” Schleicher said. “They appreciated having the ability to meet face-to-face with potential volunteer organizations.” LPS K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Specialist Jaci Kellison said the goal of the service learning fairs is twofold. “First, to educate students about the various service agencies in the Lincoln community and provide students an opportunity to schedule their service,” she said. “Second, to form a strong partnership between school and community. Conversations between students and agency representatives prior to any service will increase the likelihood that they both benefit from the experience.”

“My students got a lot out of the fair. Many said they were really excited about the various agencies they visited with and were already setting up volunteer opportunities.”

High schools are already planning on hosting a second round of service learning fairs in January.

Career Academy adds criminal justice pathway The Career Academy (TCA) has added its 17th career pathway, criminal justice, and it’s already in high demand.

take the rest of their courses at their home high schools.

“It’s been a really strong start to a great pathway,” said TCA Director Dan Hohensee.

“Traditional policing, forensic criminology and some students are interested in going into law and probation. There also is one student who has expressed interest in financial crime investigations,” said Paavola, who worked in law enforcement and criminal justice education for more than

For the criminal justice pathway, courses Nearly 50 students are enrolled in the include Intro to Criminal Justice; Police pathway, which offers dual-credit courses and Society; Criminal Law; and Ethics in designed to prepare students for additional Criminal Justice. college coursework in criminal justice and potential careers that include law enforce- One of the pathway’s instructors, Chad ment, investigations, county court, correc- Paavola from SCC, said students have extions and homeland security. pressed interest in a variety of careers.

TCA is a joint venture between Lincoln Public Schools and Southeast Community College (SCC). Students take pathway courses at SCC for two hours a day and

10 years before recently joining SCC. “Being able to start this sort of coursework in high school allows the students to explore many more avenues - to find what interests them most at a younger age.”


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LPS students and staff observe Patriot Day

S

taff and students across Lincoln Public Schools observed Patriot Day on Sept.11 through a variety of special events and activities, including:

• Lux Middle School - As part of the “One Book, One Lux” tradition, the entire school is reading the novel, "Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story." In conjunction, Lux honored first responders on Sept. 11 by inviting them to sit and share lunch with students. Lux hosted 32 representatives from the Lincoln Fire Department, Lincoln Police Department, National Guard, Red Cross and Nebraska Emergency Management Association. • Culler Middle School - Students paused for a moment of silence during class at 8:46 a.m. in remembrance of Sept. 11, 2001. They also were encouraged to stop by the media center and leave a note about how they would give back to their community. • Kahoa Elementary School - Boy Scouts at Kahoa Elementary School presented their color guard on the school’s walking track and led the entire school in the Pledge of Allegiance. • Maxey Elementary School - Staff and students gathered around the track behind the school and connected roughly 700 paper links they had created to make a "Patriotic Chain of Kindness."


October 2018

Culler offers ‘Cougar Callouts’ to student leaders The sound of snapping fingers filled one of the sixthgrade hallways at Culler Middle School on a recent Friday morning. It was the sound of applause for students being honored with that week’s “Cougar Callouts.” Every Friday at the beginning of the first- and third-period sixth-grade language arts classes, the six teachers and their students flow into the hallway outside their classrooms and take a seat on the floor against the lockers. Each teacher talks briefly about one of their students and what they’ve done to deserve a callout that week. They present the student with a certificate and later in the day call their family to share the good news. “It recognizes students who go above and beyond, who are respectful and safe, who are leaders in the classroom,” said MacKenzie Armstrong, one of the teachers. On this particular Friday, one student was recognized for stepping up and being accountable for his words and actions. Another student was honored for being an “all-around great student.” And another was applauded for being a classroom leader when there was a substitute teacher. Teacher Josh Scheffert called out one of his students for multiple reasons. “I chose an individual for their outstanding focus and commitment to academics in the classroom. They’re also a person of character because they’re kind and show a lot of compassion to a lot of people,” Scheffert said. The Cougar Callouts align with Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports, or PBIS, which is a research-based framework for proactively teaching and supporting positive behaviors for students. Lincoln Public Schools is in year five of its implementation of PBIS. (See Page A14 for a pullout matrix of PBiS home expectations) Culler Associate Principal John Gloe said the callouts, now in their second year, have had a tremendous impact. “It builds community,” Gloe said. “It rewards kids for what they’ve done and they really love it.”

“It recognizes students who go above and beyond, who are respectful and safe, who are leaders in the classroom.”


October 2018 | Community News | Section B

B2

Kindness, thanks and giving By Michelle Welch, RD, LMNT LPS District Wellness Facilitator Parents see math, science and reading work. But social-emotional learning comes home less often in the backpack. Schools have been teaching character-based curriculum for decades. Those of you who grew up in Lincoln Public Schools may remember the pillars of character. But with changing times and the divided nature of the world, focus on kindness and caring has never been more important. You may start to hear the term “Second Step,” which is curriculum both in the classroom and supported by after-school programming and Community Learning Centers (CLCs) to support social-emotional wellness and positive relationships between students. During the second quarter of the school year, the district wellness focus will be in support of social-emotional health. The “Kindness, Thanks and Giving Challenge” will be held with pre-K-12 students in age-appropriate ways, along with involvement of our LPS staff. The challenge will tie in with the many activities that happen across LPS during this time of year, such as food and coat drives or days of service. Helping our students focus on being kind, being thankful and giving in meaningful ways are all great ways to help students learn critical skills for an emotional healthy life. Learning to think outside of themselves and recognize the impact of their thoughts and actions on others will help them build character, friendships and may have continued benefits for our community. If you would like to learn more about this challenge and about wellness resources within LPS, please visit our webpage at www.lps.org/wellness. You are also welcome to follow LPS Wellness on social media to see the great activities schools are completing. Finally, if you would like to learn more about Second Step or curriculum supporting character and social-emotional health, please contact Matt Avey, LPS character, PE and health curriculum specialist, or Carrie Erks, LPS Second Step coordinator.

JUULING: The New Wave of E-Cigarettes Keeping up with current substance use trends is very much a cat and mouse game between adults and youth. Just when we think we’ve heard about it all, a new device comes out on the market. The JUUL has been getting more attention in the news as a new vaping device. JUUL devices are flat and rectangular and resemble a USB flash drive. They are thinner than an iPhone and weigh even less. Users snap on a cartridge filled with liquid nicotine (nicotine extracted from tobacco) and inhale from the device. The nicotine in one cartridge (also referenced as pods), is approximately equivalent to a whole pack of cigarettes, or 200 puffs. Some e-cigarette critics are calling the JUUL the “iPhone of vaping”. One puff of the powerful liquid nicotine can produce a quick head rush that is appealing to some teens. Likewise, the sleek and portable design makes it easy to disguise the device in school or at home if parents or educators are unaware of the product. Because JUUL pods come in flavors, the odor can be mistaken for something else such as a light perfume or a scented lotion. A JUUL starter kit can be purchased online via the JUUL website for $49.99 and includes a re-chargeable Juul device, a USB charger, a warranty, and a four pack of the flavored JUUL pods. JUUL devices can also be purchased locally at retailers such as smoke and vape stores and KWIK Shops.

As with other vaping devices, there is the potential of youth utilizing the JUUL device for marijuana concentrates (liquid THC). There are several online videos that highlight how to refill the JUUL pods with a substance of your choosing. In this day in age it should not come as a surprise that how to make liquid THC (a concentrated form of marijuana) can also be found on the information superhighway of the internet. As with all concentrates, the potency of the marijuana is extremely higher than that of marijuana that is found in a joint or the bud that is smoked from a pipe. Most concentrates have anywhere from 60-80% THC, delivering extremely damaging effects to the developing adolescent brain. Whether experimenting with these devices for the rush of nicotine or the high of marijuana concentrates, parents and professionals who work with youth should be aware that this is an increasingly popular trend amongst teens. Engaging in conversations with our youth about JUULING and the risks associated with both nicotine and marijuana use should be part of our youth substance use prevention efforts. Below is a link to a document produced by the CDC on talking with youth about the use of e-cigarettes: https://e-cigarettes.surgeongeneral. gov/documents/SGR_ECig_ParentTipSheet_508.pdf

Lincoln Public Schools Elementary Principals Present

Saturday, November 3 • 8:00 - 9:30 a.m.

McPhee Elementary School • 820 Goodhue Boulevard Parents, unclutter your closets for a good cause. Bubba’s Closet will continue to accept used and new donations of winter coats, but is hoping for more donations of other winter wear: Warm jackets, sweaters, sweatshirts, hats and mittens/gloves. You can drop them off at any of the following Hanger’s Cleaners locations where they will be cleaned at no charge - between now and October 31st: 2525 Pine Lake Rd. • 2655 S. 70th • 1550 S. Coddington • 2101 G St. This is one of the many American Education Week activities planned in Lincoln Public Schools.


2018 Bryan Health Capital City Classic Sunday, October 21 • Nebraska State Capitol

1-Mile Kids Run 2:30 p.m.

5K Run/Walk & Lincoln’s Only 15K Run 3 p.m.

Learn more and register: bryanhealth.org/run

Thank you to our presenting partners: Art/FX, Sampson Construction and Union Bank & Trust

Helping Children & Teens with Life’s Challenges Dr. Matthew Wittry works with children, adolescents and their families. He provides evaluation, diagnosis and treatment including medication management and coordination of care with other therapies to help youth and families in areas such as: • Depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder • Anger management/defiant, oppositional behaviors • Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) • Autism spectrum and intellectual/ developmental concerns • Abuse and PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) • Eating disorders • Behavior and school problems • Pattern of mood swings • Significant life changes and relationship difficulties

To schedule an appointment Call: 402-483-8555 Online: bryanhealth.org/DrWittry Office location: 2221 S. 17th St., Suite 202

Bryan Heartland Psychiatry

Matthew Wittry, DO Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist


October 2018 | Community News | Section B

B4

LPS Learning Lunch: The stories and people behind the names of LPS schools The stories and historical figures behind Lincoln Public Schools were the focus of the latest LPS Learning Lunch, held Sept. 19 at district office. Ed Zimmer, historic preservation planner for the Lincoln Planning Department, offered the historical context of how LPS schools were named during his presentation, “What’s in a Name: Stories Behind our School Names.” The city’s first public schools, built in the late 1800s, were typically named for their locations - 11th and C School, 18th and Q School, 26th and O School. Eventually, Zimmer said, this “lazy” habit of naming schools was corrected. “Often it was the teachers who approached the board of education and said, ‘Can’t we have a name?” For example, 11th and C became Everett; 18th and Q turned into Bryant; and 26th and O was changed to Elliott. The current LPS schools are named for a variety of literary figures, politicians and educators. Some examples: • Three schools are named after former LPS superintendents: Ellis T. Hartley (elementary), Millard C. Lefler (middle school) and Phil Schoo (middle school). • Six schools are named after former Lincoln Board of Education members: Joanne Maxey (elementary); John Lux (middle school); Phoebe Elliott (elementary), who was the first female board member; Ruth Hill (elementary); Sally Wysong (elementary); and Ellis T. Hartley (elementary). • 25 LPS teachers and administrators - 15 women, 10 men. • One vice president, Charles Dawes (middle school), and two five-star generals, John J. Pershing (elementary) and H.H. “Hap” Arnold (elementary). Arnold was actually a five-star general in both the U.S. Army and Air Force. And, of course, one celestial body - North Star High School. LPS Learning Lunches are open to LPS staff and the Lincoln community. Learning Lunches are held in the boardroom at LPS District Office, 5905 O St. Doors open at 11:45 a.m., the program begins at noon, followed by questions-and-answers at 12:30 p.m. Please bring your own lunch – we’ll provide dessert.

“Often it was the teachers who approached the board of education and said, ‘Can’t we have a name?’ ” Tuesday, Oct. 9:

Tuesday, Feb. 26:

Informed Citizenship in Action: Student Vote”

Budget Development in LPS

Jaci Kellison, curriculum specialist for Social Studies, and students with a passion for Student Vote. Tuesday, Nov. 20:

Welcome Center: Opening doors into our community for families from around the world Laura Salem, supervisor, English Language Learner program. Tuesday, Dec. 11:

Recruitment and Retention of Talent in LPS Eric Weber, associate superintendent for Human Resources at LPS. Tuesday, Jan. 15:

VOICE at LPS: Readiness for Resumes, Rent and Recreation Tonya Jolley, coordinator of VOICE (Vocational Opportunity in Community Experience).

Liz Standish, associate superintendent for Business Affairs at LPS. Tuesday, March 19:

Twenty-five years of student-built houses Bob Freese, Lincoln Northeast High School teacher. Tuesday, April 16:

LPS Student Debate Mindy Murphy, curriculum specialist for English Language Arts for secondary education. Tuesday, May 14:

Aprenda mientras toma su almuerzo con los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella! (Learn while you have your lunch with The Star City Mariachi Ensemble) Lance Nielsen, curriculum specialist for Music at LPS.

Making world connections through diverse media Every student at Lincoln Public Schools should be able to see themselves reflected in the media choices provided to them through LPS Library Media Services.

Northeast HS open house will show off updates to auto and welding labs Lincoln Northeast High School will host an open house Oct. 18 to show off its newly renovated auto and welding/ machine tool labs. The open house is 4:30-6 p.m. and attendees can see firsthand the cutting-edge updates that were completed this summer. In the auto lab, the room was enlarged and two additional auto lifts were installed. In addition, new tools, cabinets and roll-around chests were purchased, as well as an additional tire changer and tire rack. In the welding lab, new booths were installed, along with a new ventilation system. New combination welders for some of the booths were purchased, as well.

“We know that it is critical for kids to find themselves reflected in books,” said Chris Haeffner, director of Library Media Services for LPS. “Not only can these books help them relate to things they are feeling and doing, it can open their minds to our global society and also take them to places a world away to learn about new cultures.” Over 26 years ago, a new rule from the Nebraska Department of Education required schools include current and unbiased information about different cultures in their libraries. LPS stepped up to the challenge by creating a Multicultural Committee to review materials and make recommendations to schools about appropriate content. They also began putting together a digital display called MOSAIC each year. This year, the display was showcased at LPS District Office Sept. 17-27. “Our media specialists are doing an amazing job opening the world to students through books,” added Haeffner. “With all the time they spend in the classroom working with students, they don’t always have the time required to research and review all the new multicultural titles that fit within Rule 16. The MOSAIC display serves to inform all of our librarians, teachers, and curriculum specialists about the rich multicultural resources we have available to us.” The committee consists of current and retired media specialists and volunteers. Each member reviews between 10 to 20 books each year, depending on the read-

ing levels. These reviewers have already begun selecting and reviewing titles for next school year. Each year the MOSAIC committee works on modernizing the display with more hands-on and interactive displays to help create more connections with the books. Over 190 titles were part of the digital displays this year, including: • Book trailers and highlights videos • Professionally written reviews • Teaching resources to compliment most titles • Full text e-books and audiobooks on demand Haeffner said, “It took a lot of hours for our staff to research the multimedia support for each title and then compiling them all together. Our hope is to get them to stop and look more deeply at the literature, giving them a richer experience and a deeper connection.”


Go Somewhere! FULL SEMESTER

block schedule New block scheduling means you’ll take just one or two classes at a time. This model allows you focus more intently on each class, and allows faculty to have more time to devote to every student in each class — and more fully invest in your success. The schedule also creates more time for job shadowing, research, internships, travel and other unique academic experiences. As part of this, our outstanding professors are reimagining new core classes for first-year students. The core will help you get off to a great start in college and set you up to excel in key areas.

iPad Pro + Apple Pencil When you arrive to campus we’ll set you up with an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil — and provide any support you may need to know how to best incorporate these technology tools into your studies. A bonus: They’re yours to keep when you graduate.

Study abroad experience During your second year at Hastings College, you’ll spend a two-week block studying away from campus — likely in Paris. We believe so strongly in the transformational experience of studying away from campus that we’ll cover the costs! We’re making this commitment thanks to individuals who love Hastings College and share this belief. No gimmicks or fake scholarships. Your second year at Hastings? You’ll have the opportunity to spend part of it abroad.

Period.

We know a lot of learning happens outside the classroom — and we’ve built a connected campus with supercharged WiFi (indoors and out) and Apple TVs in every classroom. Why the Pencil? Combined with apps we’ll provide and teach you to use, Apple Pencil lets you take notes, sketch and do all the things that drive learning.

 hastings.edu

NOT JUST A SUMMER CAMP

The more they move, the better their mood.

Check out our Year Round Program and Events at CampSonshineMemories.org

FAMILY CLIMB DAYS October 13 - 14 $25/Climber

Rethink Physical Education.

Are your kids getting enough?

NEW YEAR’S EVE OVERNIGHTER December 31 $30/Camper

Research shows that kids who are more physically active, are happier.

See more details online!

HealthyLincoln.org FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM

Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln


ACCESS TO EXCEP TIONAL

EXPERIENCES The right place to build your college memories.

Graduating?

Your time at UNO will be full of unforgettable experiences: sporting events, campus activities, and nationally-renowned guest lecturers. Plus, you’ll be surrounded be Mavericks just like you!

MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR OUR UPCOMING BE A MAV DAYS THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SATURDAY

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

OCTOBER 11 OCTOBER 20 DECEMBER 1

OCTOBER 19 NOVEMBER 17

Don’t wait, get your Go Po done early. Find volunteer needs at Volunteerlinc.org/GOPO

DECEMBER 7

REGISTER ONLINE [ BE aM AV.C OM/M AV D AY ]

dan@volunteerlinc.org | 402-435-2100 THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE BASED ON RACE, COLOR, ETHNICITY, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, PREGNANCY, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, GENDER IDENTITY, RELIGION, DISABILITY, AGE, GENETIC INFORMATION, VETERAN STATUS, MARITAL STATUS, AND/OR POLITICAL AFFILIATION IN ITS PROGRAMS, ACTIVITIES, OR EMPLOYMENT. 0191ADUGA1018

Check Out the October Events at the University of Nebraska--Lincoln Glenn Korff School of Music! Men’s Choral Festival Monday, October 1 All Day, Kimball Recital Hall

Cellobration Saturday, October 13 10:00 am - 4 pm, Kimball Recital Hall

Guest Artist: Jonathan Scales Fourchestra Recital Tuesday, October 2 7:30 pm, Kimball Recital Hall

Evenings of Choirs (Men’s and Women’s) with Chamber Singers Thursday, October 18 7:30 pm, Kimball Recital Hall

Wind Ensemble Wednesday, October 3 7:30 pm, Kimball Recital Hall

Guest Artist: Tanya Gabrielian, Piano Recital Monday, October 22 7:30 pm, Westbrook Recital Hall

Symphony Orchestra Sunday, October 7 3:00 pm, Kimball Recital Hall Symphonic Band Tuesday, October 9 7:30 pm, Kimball Recital Hall Jazz Ensembles Performance Wednesday, October 10 7:30 pm, Kimball Recital Hall University Singers & All-Collegiate Choir Thursday, October 11 7:30 pm, Newman Center Bass Day Saturday, October 13 10:00 am - 4 pm, Westbrook Recital Hall

The University of Nebraska does not discriminate based upon any protected status. Please see go.unl.edu/nondiscrimination.

Vocal Jazz Ensemble Tuesday, October 23 7:30 pm, Westbrook Recital Hall Karen Becker (Cello) & Hye-Won Hwang (Dance) Tuesday, October 23 7:30 pm, Sheldon Guest Artist: Bob Sheppard (Saxophone) with Faculty Jazz Ensemble Friday, October 26 7:30 pm, Westbrook Rectial Hall Saxophone Day Saturday, October 27 Time TBD, Westbrook Recital Hall Nebraska Trombone Ensemble Monday, October 29 7:00 pm, Westminster Presbyterian

For current, up-to-date listings and more information about performances visit, music.unl.edu. Live webcasts will also be available on our website at the time of the performance.


ARE YOU READY FOR

COLLEGE? It’s never too early to start getting ready for the college of your choice, and we’ve got information to help.

Five college conversations you should have with your family now By Joy Roos Courtesy of EducationQuest From ages 5 to 10, my mother made me take swimming lessons. I hated it and I fought against going, but she took me every summer. You might be thinking that my mother was an Olympic swimmer or at least a water aerobics enthusiast, but you’d be wrong. In fact, my mother is scared of the water, but she knew that she shouldn’t allow her fears to limit my development. I never became a good swimmer, but knowing the basics has allowed me to scuba dive in the Red Sea and float on an inflatable mattress down the Missouri River like a pro. Just like swimming for my mother, the college transition can be scary for the adults in our lives, yet they are an incredibly important part of the process. Read below for a list of conversations you should have with your family about college.

You need them along for the ride. Our families aren’t mind readers, so we need to tell them that we want them involved. They may assume that you get everything done at school and that they can’t offer much help; yet even if they haven’t been to college themselves, they have things you need. • Expertise: Our families have years of experience making difficult decisions. Ask them how they made those decisions and discuss how that wisdom can help you in making your college decisions. • Information: From the FAFSA to college applications, you will need information only your family can provide. Make a list of the information including: guardians’ full names, occupation, military status, level of education, estimated family income, etc. • Support: Sometimes our family doesn’t know how or that they can support us. Let them know by telling them, “I need someone to listen” or “I need your opinion about …”

Finding what fits. From deciding where we apply to where to attend, our families have certain expectations and you have yours. Be

sure to discuss your preferences about your college experience such as: • Distance from home • Majors/careers that interest you • Size of town/city you feel comfortable in

Money, money, money. Different expectations about who is paying for school and misunderstandings about college costs can cause tension. Don’t let it! • Award Letter: Review the award letters you receive with your family and compare financial aid packages. Call the Financial Aid offices at the college if you don’t understand something or were hoping for a bigger financial award. • Who pays for what: Talk about who is going to pay for tuition and living costs as well as who will accept the loans if you need them. • How many Loans you’ll accept: You don’t have to accept ALL of the loan money offered to you. Discuss with your parents how much you’ll need per semester and build a budget together.

Hopes and Fears. We and our families probably have concerns about our safety, health, and financial security as well as hopes for what a college degree/certificate will help us accomplish. Ask your family what their hopes and fears around your college experience are. This conversation can help build trust.

99 Problems. Our difficult decisions don’t end after we choose a college. Adapting to classes and campus life can have its challenges. It’s important that you and your family know that this will happen and talk about what you’ll do when it does. Be ready with a list of campus resources and agree together that even when things get tough, you won’t allow yourself to quit.


JUNIORS JUNIORS… A GUIDE FOR YOUR JOURNEY TO COLLEGE

FALL Ask your counselor what courses you still need to take to meet college admission requirements. Take dual-credit courses to earn college credit — if available at your school. Get involved in extracurricular activities to increase your chances for scholarships and college admission. Attend a Financial Aid Program to learn how to pay for college. Attend a College Fair or Educational Planning Program to meet with college representatives. Research colleges that interest you.

WINTER Prepare for the ACT. Ask your counselor about test-prep options including actstudent.org. Focus on your career interests by taking a career assessment at your school.

SPRING Attend a College Fair to talk to reps from your top college choices. Go on campus visits while college is in session to fully experience campus life. Narrow your top college choices. Take the ACT college entrance exam.

VISIT EducationQuest.org to: • Sign up for Countdown2College monthly email tips. • Create or update your Activities Resume.

Apply for a summer job, and create a budget to help you save for college.

SUMMER

• Find dates and locations of Financial Aid Programs, College Fairs, and Educational Planning Programs.

Retake the ACT and try to improve your score.

• Set up a ScholarshipQuest profile to find Nebraska-based scholarships.

Update your Activities Resume. Include awards, honors, volunteer work, and other activities.

• Use Reality Check to match your future career with your desired lifestyle.

Job shadow to explore potential careers.

EducationQuest.org 08/18

Courtesy of EducationQuest

Juniors: Get started on college planning By RJ Vega Courtesy of EducationQuest Juniors, college is right around the corner! Here are some steps to save yourself time (and stress!) so that you’ll hit the ground running at the start of your senior year.

The Time is Now

Many juniors say they’ll worry about college next year, as a senior. That is not a good mindset. Junior year should be spent planning and prepping because senior year is the year of action: applying for college admissions, scholarships, and financial aid through FAFSA.

Do well in school

You’ve heard it your whole life, “Do well in school! Do well in school!” This is also known as positioning yourself for success. Academics are important; the colleges (and some scholarships) will request a copy of your transcript, which has all of your grades (including that freshmen math class!). Try to have a solid cumulative G.P.A. and take challenging courses. Push yourself.

what colleges you can attend, and what kind of money (scholarship) they offer you. Take a serious approach to this test. I recommend seeking out test-prep resources or work with your school counselor to find additional resources at your high school.

Get Involved

Scholarships

Your schedule doesn’t need to be overwhelmingly packed with a million different things, but you need to get involved with some things. This is important. Whether you join a school club/organization, sports, the arts, part-time job, or volunteer/community service project, these different experiences will be a big benefit to you. Experiences will help you discover a program of study that interests you or provide you the essay content you need when you apply for scholarships.

Campus Visits

In the spring, when the weather is nicer, go on an official campus visit. Contact the college’s admissions office and set a date/time, and they will take you for a tour of the facilities, let you meet with faculty, as well as talk with admissions and financial aid representatives. This is a great way to get a true feel for the campus (you can only learn so much from the website). If you can, visit multiple colleges so that you can compare them and find the right fit for you.

ACT Test

The ACT test is an exam that many of you will take the spring of junior year. You can take the test again multiple times, through the winter of senior year. The test impacts

The majority of scholarship deadlines occur during senior year of high school; however, the best thing that juniors can do is begin to identify what scholarships are relevant to you (what are the current seniors applying to?). You can organize yourself however you like: master calendar, spreadsheet, sticky notes, etc., but the important thing is that you know what scholarships you’re targeting, their requirements, and their deadlines. • Scholarships will often ask for essay responses. Create an Activities Resume so that you can keep track of different involvement experiences you’re having in high school. Also, don’t be afraid to write practice essays or rough drafts. Many scholarships will even have their essay questions already posted on their websites, so you can begin crafting your responses! • Some scholarships may ask for letters of recommendations from teachers, counselors, coaches, employers (someone you know professionally, not your Aunt Bertha who thinks you’re so cute!). IMPORTANT: If you currently do not have any teachers or adults that you have connected well with, then NOW is the time to strengthen those connections. Sign up for an additional class with that teacher, volunteer as a student assistant, join a club; the important thing is that when you ask that adult for a recommendation, they know you well enough to write a great letter. Also, be sure you give them plenty of time to write that letter.

FAFSA next year

Beginning October 1 of senior year of high school, you can begin filing your FAFSA application for grants, loans, and work-study. Attend a financial aid program hosted by EducationQuest at your high school, or visit EducationQuest.org to begin preparing for the FAFSA.


SENIORS What I wish I knew before senior year By RJ Vega Courtesy of EducationQuest

Dear 12th grade me, This is your much older self. I’m writing you this letter because, yes, we have time machines in the future. Deal with it. I was thinking about high school and remembering all the good times (and the awkward times). That’s where I got the idea to write myself a letter, to help you get ready for your final year of high school. Here are some things I wish I knew before senior year… and I hope they will serve you well!

Don’t fill yourself with pressure. Don’t overthink. Get ready for an onslaught of questions like “So, what’s next?” and “What’s your plan for after high school?” It will feel overwhelming at times. Take a deep breath. You got this. You don’t need to have every single aspect of your life mapped out, but accept the fact that you are now in the driver’s seat of your life. Take control. Take ownership of this. Don’t worry, you’ll have options. You’ll never know the best option for you until you confront those options and make informed decisions. Relax. You can do this.

If there are any classes you’ve wanted to sign up for, a sport you’ve wanted to play, a club you’ve always wanted to join… this is the year to make that happen! Who knows what doors they’ll open up for you or the people you’ll get to know. I’m just saying… you’re stronger and capable of much more than you give yourself credit for. Push yourself.

Don’t fear the word “no.”

Have a real talk with yourself. Don’t just go along with what others think: parents, teachers, mentors, friends, etc. Press the ‘Stop’ button for a few moments and think about what you truly want to accomplish during this last year of high school. Is there an academic goal you can attain, like getting that cumulative GPA above a certain level for scholarships? Ahem, you (we) could’ve really used that one extra scholarship, a reminder every single time I auto-debit the student loan payment out of my bank account every month. Also, is

A GUIDE FOR YOUR JOURNEY TO COLLEGE

When it comes to your future plans, you hold the power. It is time for you to actively explore just what it is you truly want to be when you grow up. You don’t have to have it all figured out just yet, and that’s fine. You do, however, need to take a proactive approach to learn about all the different opportunities out there to help you find out what you want to be when you grow up. A fantastic (and fun) resource is Reality Check, which helps you think about how you want your lifestyle to be after you’ve finished your education (your future self!). Speaking of the future, you can use BigFuture from College Board to help you think about potential options. Inform yourself now, so that you can make informed decisions later.

High school still counts. Make it count.

SENIORS…

there a personal goal you want to accomplish, whether it be social, physical, or financial? Stay consistent with the gym, tuck some money away somewhere, learn how to tie a tie earlier. Good things come from those little actions. In order to take those actions, you need clarity. What do you truly want/need in the short-term?

There will be times when you hear “no,” even repeatedly. Good. You’ll get stronger from that. Remember, some people genuinely want to help you, but they can be busy or in a rough place at the moment and are unable to accommodate you. That’s okay, seek out someone else. Don’t be afraid to reach out to others: teachers, counselors, mentors, coaches, employers. Sometimes, you may need to seek out their help on more than one occasion. You know what a letter of recommendation is? You will soon! Nobody makes their way through the world entirely on their own. Also, don’t be afraid to say “yes” to somebody else. Yes to helping them, or supporting them, or gaining their good faith. You might just get a “yes” back from them. Sincerely, Future Me

FALL Take dual-credit courses to earn college credit — if available at your school. Visit your top college choices, if you haven’t already. Attend a College Fair or Educational Planning Program to meet with college representatives.

WINTER Watch for communication from the colleges you applied to via your online student portal, email, or mail. Watch for acceptance letters from the colleges you applied to.

Attend a Financial Aid Program to prepare for the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).

Be prepared for verification. The college(s) may request documents to verify your FAFSA information.

Apply to your top colleges. If your school is conducting an Apply2College event, you’ll get help during the school day.

Expect financial aid award notifications from the college(s) you listed on your FAFSA.

Create an FSA ID at fsaid.ed.gov (one for you and one for a parent). You’ll need them for the FAFSA.

SPRING

Complete the FAFSA at fafsa.gov on or after October 1 to apply for financial aid.

Compare financial aid award notifications to see which college offers the best award package.

Expect a Student Aid Report (SAR) indicating your FAFSA was processed.

Continue to apply for scholarships. Many have spring deadlines.

Retake the ACT and/or SAT. Colleges use your best score for admission and scholarship consideration.

Make your final college decision and notify the other schools.

VISIT EducationQuest.org to: • Sign up for Countdown2College monthly email tips. • Update your Activities Resume. • Find free FAFSA tools.

Submit your housing deposit before the deadline. Register for new-student orientation at your college. Apply for a summer job. Save as much as you can for college.

SUMMER

• Learn about Financial Aid Programs, College Fairs, and Educational Planning Programs.

Attend new-student orientation at your college.

• Find Nebraska-based scholarships via ScholarshipQuest.

Apply for student loans, if needed. Your college will tell you how to apply.

• Use Reality Check to match your future career with your desired lifestyle.

Set up a budget that will help you manage your money while you’re in college. Coordinate dorm purchases with your roommate.

EducationQuest.org

08/18

Courtesy of EducationQuest


COLLEGE FAIRS How to make the most of the college fair Mark your calendar to attend a College Fair College reps from across the state, region, and nation will be available to answer your questions and provide materials about their schools. If you cannot attend a College Fair, check out an Educational Planning Program (smaller College Fair) near you.

Spring College Fair

Keep on eye on EducationQuest.org, where dates for the spring college fair will be announced

By Jeannine Phelan Courtesy of EducationQuest Remember childhood treasure hunts? The really good ones had clues to follow, a map, and a big X when you found the treasure. Attending a college fair is a lot like that. The clues are all the questions you’ll ask college reps, the map is your design to maximize your time, and the prize is finding colleges that will be a good fit for you. Ready to start the adventure? Follow these tips to make the most of your college quest.

Create a game plan.

Before you attend the fair, get a barcode at NebraskaCollegeFairs.org. Print or save the barcode to your phone so college reps can scan your demographic information. This will save you from completing info cards for each college that interests you. Next, consider what you’re looking for in a college. Make sure it offers academic programs that match your interests and skills, is the right distance from home and is the right size for you. These are all things that you need to discover. Some students feel comfortable living far from home, and others thrive in or near their hometown. Some prefer a large urban setting and others like mid-sized or smaller towns.

Create a list of questions to ask.

College Fair Tips 1. Visit NebraskaCollegeFairs.org to register for a

barcode. Print the barcode, or save it to your smartphone, and take it to the fair so college reps can scan your demographic information.

2. Arrive early enough to visit all colleges that interest you.

3. Stop by the EducationQuest booth to get free col-

lege planning materials and for a bag to collect college view books.

4. Come prepared with questions for the college reps: • What are admission requirements and deadlines? • Does the school offer academic programs that meet my interests? • What is the cost of tuition and fees — and room and board? • How do I apply for college-based scholarships? • How many students attend the school? • What are the housing options?

5. Attend a financial aid program offered during the College Fair.

As you compile a list of questions to ask college reps, think about things that are hard to find answers to online. For example, ask about clubs and activities that interest you, if there are new buildings or programs that will be ready when you’re on campus, and if students tend to stay on campus most weekends or head home. It’s no fun to be far from home at a college where most kids spend weekends at home. Also, ask for the average ACT score so you’ll know how you stack up academically. Check out this list of questions to get your creative juices flowing. Ask your parents to attend the fair with you so everyone has a chance to ask questions.

Arrive early and create your plan of attack.

Most fairs last two hours so plan to arrive when the fair opens so you have time to visit all the colleges on your list. First, stop at the EducationQuest table for a bag and an event map so you can find the schools you want to visit. Next, notice which schools have long lines and plan to visit them later in the fair when the lines are shorter. If possible, start with a college on your list that does not have a line yet. Take notes so you can compare the schools after the event is over.

Talk to at least one college you haven’t considered yet.

If time allows, expand your search and talk to a few reps from colleges you have not considered yet. If you’re not sure where to start, look for a school counselor booth and ask for recommendations based on criteria such as major, location, and enrollment. Try to be open-minded – this is the time to explore all your options!

Unpack your college fair bag and take the next steps.

When you get home, review the college materials you collected and start grouping the schools by your interest level. This is a good way to narrow your college choices. Next, plan campus visits at your top colleges so you’ll get the true flavor of the school. Also, follow your top colleges on social media to see what current students are doing. This will help you know what to expect from the social climate. Finally, keep in contact with the college reps and ask about scholarships and special events for potential students. They will also keep you informed of deadlines for your admission, scholarship, and financial aid applications.

Easy steps to rock your campus visit By Wynter Davis Courtesy of EducationQuest Juniors, college planning is among us! The birds are chirping, and warm weather is soon to come. Why not start going on your campus visits now? For some of you, this is the first time you’re thinking about college, while others of you already decided who you want as a roommate your freshman year. Here are some tips that will help with your visits:campus_tour

Call ahead of time

It is best to call two weeks in advance of your visit. It helps the college tailor the tour toward your needs. For example, if you want to visit an individual department for your ideal major or view a certain residence hall on campus, they will try to make it happen. Plus, you can talk to representatives from admissions and financial aid to discuss applying and paying for college.

Go while school is in session

Scheduling your visit while school is in session will help you get a feel for the environment on campus. If you base your decision solely on the school’s website, you’re not getting the full experience. Every site takes pictures of the nicest part of campus, every student is smiling from ear to ear, and a positive image is depicted. Going in person will allow for you to interact with real students and get a true image of campus.

Campus visit questions

It is helpful to prepare yourself with questions ahead of time. Also, take lots of notes, it will be beneficial when you compare each school you’ve visited.

Student Ambassador

The college will have a tour guide show you around campus. Your guide will give you in-

formation on the college, fun facts about each building, and share different activities you can participate in on campus. Plus, it is the perfect time to ask your guide about their college experience. Also, take some time and tour places on your own. If there is a friend who goes to the school, set up a time to meet with them. Usually, their opinion is open and honest. It helps to get multiple perspectives.

Other resources

When on campus, browse around the student center and cafeteria. Take advantage of all aspects of the college. Submerge yourself in the environment and ask if you can see yourself there for the next four to five years. It is a huge commitment and investment you’re making for yourself. It is okay to ask numerous questions and make return visits to tour the campus. Now go forth, juniors, and rock your campus visits! If you want to share your campus visit stories, comment below!


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College – Chadron 2,619 7,384 1,800 7,008 7,008 4,768 4,736 4,736 1,920 University ofdNebraska 20,954 fiitrec reffo s3,248 loohcs ese3,248 hT na samolp–idLincoln drawa sloohcs esehT 11,430,setac5,000 3,248 s’rolehcab9,242 reffo snoit1,016 utitsni ese11,430 hT 4-YEAR PRIVATE Purdue University Global – Omaha 339 17,580 **.seergN/A 660 Peru State College –sPeru 7,452 1,200 8,640 8,640 1,408 2,880 2,880 ye4,960 hT .seerge2,133 d etaicossa dn aN/A ,samolp2,880 id660 etaico sa reffo emoS .setacfiitrec s13,127 ’r1,761 etsam dra wa osla yn aM ed University–ofBellevue* Nebraska – Omaha 8,398 1,140 9,690 9,582 3,000 3,680 3,680 3,680 Bellevue University 7,812 9,699 3,969 ** -na** lp esoh4,774 t r3,969 of smargo4,392 rpN/A evah os4,392 la660 ged s’rolehcab dna .1,350 seerged et8,730 a928 r** otcod d10,208 n8,730 a University of Nebraska –.seKearney 4,843 10,208 4,392 Purdue University Global –erLincoln 208 7,512 17,580 N/A 4,960 2,133 660 University of Nebraska Medical Center – Omaha 835 (Programs and costs vary, contact the college for more information) .lo1,600 ohcs raey-ruof N/A a ot refs5,661 nart ot gn4,786 in Bryan College of Health Sciences – Lincoln 548 18,570 1,400 N/A 10,341 University of Nebraska – Lincoln 20,954 11,430 11,430 5,000 3,248 3,248 3,248 Purdue University Global – Omaha 339 9,242 17,580 1,016 ** N/A 4,960 2,133 N/A 660 660 Wayne State College – Wayne* 2,757 7,172 1,200 7,800 7,800 1,824 3,006 3,006 3,006 Clarkson College – Omaha 670 16,740 1,400 7,800 13,392 13,392 4,170 4,170 4,170 University of Nebraska 13,127 gro.tseu–QOmaha noitacudE 1,140 9,690 9,582 3,000 3,680 3,680 3,680 Kearney 4,843 8,398 7,512 928 10,208 10,208 4,774 4,392 4,392 4,392 2 4-YEAR PRIVATE College of Saint Mary – Omaha* 780 20,350 972 7,700 9,602 3,344 2,568 3,386 3,678 University of Nebraska Medical 835 9,242 (Programs11,430 and costs vary, contact the college for more information) – LincolnCenter – Omaha 20,954 1,016 11,430 5,000 3,248 3,248 3,248 Bellevue University – Bellevue* 7,812 1,350 8,730 8,730 ** 3,969 3,969 ** Concordia University – Seward* 1,684 32,280 9,699 1,000 8,470 8,470 6,530 2,210 2,210 1,535 Wayne State – Wayne* 2,757 8,398 7,172 1,200 7,800 7,800 1,824 3,006 3,006 3,006 University of College Nebraska – Omaha 13,127 1,140 9,690 9,582 3,000 3,680 3,680 3,680 College of Health Sciences – Lincoln 548 18,570 1,400 N/A 10,341 1,600 N/A 5,661 4,786 Creighton Bryan University – Omaha* 4,000 39,916 1,200 11,036 11,036 2,500 2,800 2,800 2,600 4-YEAR PRIVATE University of Nebraska Medical Center – Omaha 835 (Programs and costs vary, contact the college for more information) Clarkson– College 670 16,740 1,400 7,800 4,170 4,170 4,170 Doane University Crete* – Omaha 2,222 33,800 1,000 9,900 9,900 13,392 3,350 13,392 3,250 3,250 3,350 Bellevue University 7,812 1,350 8,730 8,730 ** 3,969 3,969 ** Wayne State College– –Bellevue* Wayne* 2,757 9,699 7,172 1,200 7,800 7,800 1,824 3,006 3,006 3,006 College–ofHastings Saint Mary – Omaha* 780 20,350 972 7,700 9,602 3,344 2,568 3,386 3,678 Hastings College 1,086 30,050 1,134 9,700 9,700 5,000 3,794 3,794 3,794 Bryan College of Health Sciences – Lincoln 548 18,570 1,400 N/A 10,341 1,600 N/A 5,661 4,786 4-YEAR PRIVATE Concordia University – Seward* 1,684 32,280 1,000 8,470 8,470 6,530 2,210 2,210 1,535 Midland University 1,214 32,598 1,020 8,600 ** ** 2,060 10,660 3,780 Clarkson College – Omaha 670 16,740 1,400 7,800 4,170 4,170 4,170 Bellevue University – Bellevue* 7,812 9,699 1,350 8,730 13,392 8,730 13,392 ** 3,969 3,969 ** University – Omaha* 4,000 39,916 1,200 11,036 11,036 2,500 2,800 2,800 2,600 Nebraska Creighton Christian College – Papillion 150 17,665 1,032 9,020 9,969 3,213 5,477 5,477 5,477 College of SaintofMary – Omaha* 780 972 7,700 9,602 3,344 2,568 3,386 3,678 Bryan College Health Sciences – Lincoln 548 20,350 18,570 1,400 N/A 10,341 1,600 N/A 5,661 4,786 Doane University – Crete* 2,222 33,800 1,000 9,900 9,900 3,350 3,250 3,250 3,350 Nebraska Methodist College – Omaha 881 18,048 1,444 9,586 11,522 4,212 4,922 6,230 6,230 Concordia University – Seward* 1,684 8,470 8,470 13,392 6,530 2,210 2,210 1,535 Clarkson College – Omaha 670 32,280 16,740 1,000 1,400 7,800 13,392 4,170 4,170 4,170 Hastings College – Hastings 1,086 30,050 1,134 9,700 9,700 5,000 3,794 3,794 3,794 Nebraska Wesleyan University – Lincoln* 1,779 34,202 1,000 9,622 9,622 3,000 3,500 3,500 3,500 Creighton 4,000 11,036 2,500 2,800 2,800 2,600 College of University Saint Mary––Omaha* Omaha* 780 39,916 20,350 1,200 972 7,700 11,036 9,602 3,344 2,568 3,386 3,678 MidlandCollege University 1,214 32,598 1,020 8,600 ** ** 2,060 3,780 Summit Christian – Gering 40 6,726 650 3,840 9,520 400 1,152 2,504 10,660 1,360 Doane University – Crete* 2,222 9,900 9,900 3,350 3,250 3,250 3,350 Concordia University – Seward* 1,684 33,800 32,280 1,000 8,470 8,470 6,530 2,210 2,210 1,535 Nebraska Christian College – Papillion 150 17,665 1,032 9,020 9,969 3,213 5,477 5,477 5,477 Union College – Lincoln 708 23,780 1,200 7,300 9,000 1,450 3,500 4,800 3,800 Hastings – Hastings 1,086 9,700 9,700 5,000 3,794 3,794 3,794 CreightonCollege University – Omaha* 4,000 30,050 39,916 1,134 1,200 11,036 11,036 2,500 2,800 2,800 2,600 Nebraska 881 18,048 1,444 9,586 11,522 4,212 4,922 6,230 6,230 York College – York Methodist College – Omaha 400 19,310 300 7,620 7,620 ** 2,750 2,750 2,750 Midland University– Crete* 1,214 8,600 ** ** 2,060 3,780 Doane University 2,222 32,598 33,800 1,020 1,000 9,900 9,900 3,350 3,250 10,660 3,250 3,350 Nebraska Wesleyan University – Lincoln* 1,779 34,202 1,000 9,622 9,622 3,000 3,500 3,500 3,500 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Nebraska Christian College – Papillion 150 17,665 9,020 9,969 3,213 5,477 5,477 5,477 Hastings College – Hastings 1,086 30,050 1,032 1,134 9,700 9,700 5,000 3,794 3,794 3,794 Summit Christian – Gering 40 6,726 650 3,840 9,520 400 1,152 2,504 1,360 Central Community College College – Columbus 4,263 3,000 1,500 6,528 7,000 2,700 1,500 1,900 1,900 Nebraska Methodist College – Omaha 881 18,048 9,586 11,522 4,212 4,922 6,230 6,230 Midland University 1,214 32,598 1,444 1,020 8,600 ** ** 2,060 10,660 3,780 Union College – Lincoln 708 23,780 1,200 7,300 9,000 1,450 3,500 4,800 3,800 Central Community College – Grand Island 4,319 3,000 1,500 N/A 7,000 2,700 N/A 1,900 1,900 Nebraska Wesleyan University – Lincoln* 1,779 34,202 1,032 1,000 9,622 9,622 3,000 3,500 3,500 3,500 Christian College – Papillion 150 17,665 9,020 9,969 3,213 5,477 5,477 5,477 York College – York– Hastings 400 19,310 300 7,620 7,620 ** 2,750 2,750 2,750 Central Community College 3,992 3,000 1,500 6,528 7,000 2,700 1,500 1,900 1,900 Summit College – Gering 40 18,048 6,726 650 3,840 9,520 400 1,152 6,230 2,504 6,230 1,360 NebraskaChristian Methodist College – Omaha 881 1,444 9,586 11,522 4,212 4,922 COMMUNITY Little Priest Tribal CollegeCOLLEGE – Winnebago 140 5,320 1,114 6,990 6,990 6,990 3,234 3,234 3,234 Union College – Lincoln 708 23,780 7,300 9,000 1,450 3,500 4,800 3,800 Nebraska Wesleyan University – Lincoln* 1,779 34,202 1,200 1,000 9,622 9,622 3,000 3,500 3,500 Central Community College – Columbus 4,263 3,000 1,500 6,528 7,000 2,700 1,500 1,900 1,900 Metropolitan Community College – Omaha* 11,403 3,105 1,350 N/A 6,255 2,850 N/A 2,250 2,250 York College – York 400 300 7,620 7,620 ** 2,750 2,750 2,750 Summit Christian College – Gering 40 19,310 6,726 650 3,840 9,520 400 1,152 2,504 1,360 Community – Grand Island 4,319 3,000 1,500 N/A 7,000 2,700 N/A 1,900 1,900 Mid-PlainsCentral Community CollegeCollege – McCook 1,445 3,210 1,600 6,400 6,400 2,000 2,130 2,130 2,130 COMMUNITY Union College –COLLEGE Lincoln 708 23,780 1,200 7,300 9,000 1,450 3,500 4,800 3,800 Community Hastings 3,992 3,000 1,500 6,528 7,000 2,700 1,500 1,900 1,900 682 3,210 Mid-PlainsCentral Community CollegeCollege – North– Platte 1,600 6,400 6,400 2,000 2,130 2,130 2,130 Central Community 4,263 3,000 1,500 6,528 7,000 2,700 1,500 1,900 1,900 York College – York College – Columbus 400 19,310 300 7,620 7,620 ** 2,750 2,750 2,750 Priest Tribal College – Winnebago 140 5,320 1,114 6,990 6,990 6,990 3,234 3,234 3,234 Nebraska Little College of Technical Agriculture – Curtis 342 5,200 1,010 7,922 6,820 2,240 3,676 3,676 1,838 Central Community College – Grand Island 4,319 3,000 1,500 N/A 7,000 2,700 N/A 1,900 1,900 COMMUNITY COLLEGE Metropolitan Community College – Omaha* 11,403 3,105 1,350 N/A 6,255 2,850 N/A 2,250 2,250 Nebraska Indian Community College – Macy 130 5,100 ** N/A 12,718 6,359 N/A 9,243 9,243 Central Community College – Columbus Hastings 3,992 1,500 6,528 7,000 2,700 1,500 1,900 1,900 4,263 3,000 College – McCook 1,445 3,210 1,600 6,400 6,400 2,000 2,130 2,130 2,130 NortheastMid-Plains CommunityCommunity College – Norfolk* 5,086 3,480 1,419 8,605 8,008 2,486 1,470 2,285 2,235 Little Priest Tribal College – Winnebago 140 5,320 1,114 6,990 6,990 6,990 3,234 Central Community College – Grand Island 4,319 3,000 1,500 N/A 7,000 2,700 N/A 3,234 1,900 3,234 1,900 College – North Platte 1,515 3,098 682 3,210 1,600 6,400 6,400 2,000 2,130 2,130 2,130 SoutheastMid-Plains CommunityCommunity College – Beatrice 2,200 7,600 7,600 3,800 3,400 3,400 3,400 Metropolitan Community College – Omaha* 11,403 1,350 N/A 6,255 2,850 N/A 2,250 2,250 Central Community College – Hastings 3,992 3,105 3,000 1,500 6,528 7,000 2,700 1,500 1,900 1,900 Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture – Curtis 342 5,200 1,010 7,922 6,820 2,240 3,676 3,676 1,838 Southeast Community College – Lincoln 8,210 3,098 2,200 N/A 7,600 3,800 N/A 3,400 3,400 Mid-Plains College – McCook 1,445 1,600 6,400 6,400 2,000 2,130 3,234 2,130 3,234 2,130 Little PriestCommunity Tribal College – Winnebago 140 3,210 5,320 1,114 6,990 6,990 6,990 3,234 Indian Community 130 5,100 ** N/A 12,718 6,359 N/A 9,243 9,243 SoutheastNebraska Community College – MilfordCollege – Macy 695 3,098 2,200 7,600 7,600 3,800 3,400 3,400 3,400 Mid-Plains Community College – North Platte 682 3,210 1,600 6,400 6,400 2,000 2,130 2,130 2,130 Metropolitan Community College – Omaha* 11,403 3,105 1,350 N/A 6,255 2,850 N/A 2,250 2,250 Northeast Community College – Norfolk* 5,086 3,480 1,419 8,605 8,008 2,486 1,470 2,285 2,235 Western Nebraska Community College – Scottsbluff* 2,635 3,525 1,500 6,766 6,766 2,563 3,402 3,402 3,402 Nebraska of Technical 342 5,200 1,010 7,922 6,820 2,240 3,676 3,676 1,838 Mid-PlainsCollege Community CollegeAgriculture – McCook – Curtis 1,445 3,210 1,600 6,400 6,400 2,000 2,130 2,130 2,130 Southeast Community College – Beatrice 1,515 3,098 2,200 7,600 7,600 3,800 3,400 3,400 3,400 PRIVATE CAREER Nebraska Community College – Macy 130 ** N/A 6,359 N/A 9,243 9,243 Mid-PlainsIndian Community College – North Platte 682 5,100 3,210 1,600 6,400 12,718 6,400 2,000 2,130 2,130 2,130 Southeast Community – Lincoln 8,210 3,098 2,200 N/A 7,600 3,800 N/A 3,400 3,400 Capitol School of Hairstyling andCollege Esthetics – Omaha 92 19,095 1,000 N/A 6,232 3,150 N/A 2,870 2,870 Northeast Community College Agriculture – Norfolk* – Curtis 5,086 1,419 8,605 8,008 2,486 1,470 2,285 2,235 Nebraska College of Technical 342 3,480 5,200 1,010 7,922 6,820 2,240 3,676 3,676 1,838 Southeast Community College – Milford 695 3,098 2,200 7,600 7,600 3,800 3,400 3,400 3,400 CHI Health School of Radiologic Technology – Omaha 16 6,300 700 N/A 6,000 2,500 N/A 6,000 2,500 Southeast Community CollegeCollege – Beatrice 1,515 2,200 7,600 7,600 3,800 3,400 3,400 3,400 Nebraska Indian Community – Macy 130 3,098 5,100 ** N/A 12,718 6,359 N/A 9,243 9,243 Nebraska Community College – Scottsbluff* 2,635 3,525 1,500 6,766 6,766 2,563 3,402 3,402 3,402 College ofWestern Hair Design – Lincoln 100 17,950 2,742 N/A 6,158 2,740 N/A 7,092 2,160 Southeast Community College – Norfolk* Lincoln 8,210 3,098 2,200 N/A 7,600 3,800 N/A 3,400 3,400 Northeast 5,086 3,480 1,419 8,605 8,008 2,486 1,470 2,285 2,235 PRIVATE CAREER Creative Center, College of Art & Design – Omaha 51 (Programs and costs vary, contact the college for more information) Southeast Community College – Milford 695 3,098 2,200 7,600 7,600 3,800 3,400 3,400 3,400 Beatrice 1,515 Capitol School of Hairstyling and Esthetics – Omaha 92 19,095 1,000 N/A 6,232 3,150 ** 4,585 N/A 4,585 2,870 2,870 Joseph’s College :: Cosmetology – Lincoln 130 18,900 1,500 ** 5,173 2,821 Western Community 2,635 1,500 6,766 6,766 2,563 3,402 SoutheastNebraska Community College –College Lincoln– Scottsbluff* 8,210 3,525 3,098 2,200 N/A 7,600 3,800 N/A 3,402 3,400 3,402 3,400 CHI Health School of Radiologic Technology – Omaha 16 6,300 700 N/A 6,000 2,500 N/A 6,000 2,500 La’James International College – Fremont 4 18,510 2,700 N/A ** ** N/A ** ** PRIVATE SoutheastCAREER Community College – Milford 695 3,098 2,200 7,600 7,600 3,800 3,400 3,400 3,400 College of Hair Design 100 17,950 2,742 N/A 6,158 2,740 N/A 7,092 2,160 Mary Lanning Healthcare School –ofLincoln Capitol School of Hairstyling and Esthetics – Omaha 92 19,095 1,000 N/A 6,232 3,150 N/A 2,870 2,870 Western Nebraska Community College – Scottsbluff* 2,635 3,525 1,500 6,766 6,766 2,563 3,402 3,402 3,402 RadiologicCreative Technology – Hastings 850 N/Acosts vary, 8,000 ** college for N/Amore8,500 Center, College of Art & Design – Omaha 20 6,200 51 (Programs and contact the information)** CHIInstitute HealthCAREER School of Radiologic Technology – Omaha 16 6,300 700 N/A** 6,000 2,500N/A N/A 6,000 2,500 PRIVATE Myotherapy Inc – ::Lincoln 40 16,800 ** N/A ** ** 4,585 ** 4,585 Joseph’s College Cosmetology – Lincoln 130 18,900 1,500 ** 5,173 2,821 ** College of Hair of Design – Lincoln 100 2,742 N/Athe college 6,158 2,740 N/A 7,092 2,160 Capitol School Hairstyling and Esthetics – Omaha 92 17,950 19,095 1,000 6,232 3,150 2,870 2,870 National American – Bellevue 130 (Programs and costs2,700 vary, contact for more information) La’James University International College – Fremont 4 18,510 N/A ** ** N/A ** ** Creative Center, College of Art &Technology Design – Omaha 51 (Programs and costs vary, contact the college for more information) CHIthe Health School of Radiologic – Omaha 16 6,300 700 N/A 6,000 2,500 N/A 6,000 2,500 Paul Mitchell School – Lincoln 71 21,000 2,500 N/A 1,050 300 N/A 564 399 Mary Lanning Healthcare School of Joseph’s College :: Cosmetology – Lincoln 130 18,900 ** 5,173 2,821 ** 4,585 College of Hair Design Lincoln 100 Radiologic Technology – Hastings 20 6,200 17,950 1,500 2,742 N/A 6,158 2,740 N/A 7,092 4,585 2,160 850 N/A 8,000 ** N/A 8,500 ** Regional West Medical Center School of RadiologicLa’James Technology – Scottsbluff 1,570 2,700 N/A 2,283 N/Amore 4,990 4,990 International Fremont– Omaha 11 2,702 N/A contact ** college** N/A ** ** Creative Center, College of &– Design 51 Myotherapy Institute IncCollege – Art Lincoln 404 18,510 (Programs and vary, the for information) 16,800 **costs 13,000 Universal College ofCollege Healing – Omaha 14 15,240 1,600 N/Acosts vary, 6,544 3,312 N/A 3,232 3,232 4,585 Mary Lanning Healthcare School Joseph’s :: Arts Cosmetology –ofLincoln 130 (Programs National American University – Bellevue 18,900 1,500 ** 2,821 ** 4,585 and contact5,173 the college for more information) Radiologic Technology – Hastings 20 6,200 850 N/A** 8,000 ** N/A ** Xenon Academy – Omaha* 113 17,300 2,209 2,700 N/A ** ** 8,500 ** La’James International – Fremont Paul Mitchell the SchoolCollege – Lincoln 714 18,510 N/A ** **N/A N/A ** ** 21,000 2,500 N/A 1,050 300 N/A 564 399 Myotherapy Institute Inc – Lincoln 40 16,800 ** N/A ** ** N/A ** ** Courtesy of EducationQuest Mary Lanning School of of Regional West Healthcare Medical Center School National American – Bellevue 130 (Programs and contact the college for more information) Technology – Hastings 20 Scottsbluff 11the6,200 850costsorvary, N/A 8,000 ** N/A ** *Radiologic Indicates main University campus. For additional locations, see college website College Profiles at2,283 EducationQuest.org. 2,702 1,570 N/A 13,000 N/A 8,500 4,990 4,990 ** information provided the college. PaulNo Mitchell the School –– Lincoln Myotherapy Institute Inc Lincoln Universal College of Healing Arts by – Omaha

Regional West Medical Center–School of National American University Bellevue Xenon Academy – Omaha*

71 40 14 130 113

21,000 16,800 15,240

2,500 ** 1,600

N/A N/A

1,050 ** 6,544

300 ** 3,312

N/A N/A

564 ** 3,232

399 ** 3,232

(Programs 2,209 and costs vary, for more information) 17,300 N/A contact the **college ** N/A **

**


COLLEGE PREP

Keys to success in dual-credit courses By Jason Combs Courtesy of EducationQuest Shhh… don’t tell anyone, but there is a way that you can take one class but get credit for two. Sounds too good to be true, right? It’s actually very common for students to take a class in high school and get college credit while doing so. But every year students miss out on college credit for a variety of reasons, let’s see if I can help you avoid those pitfalls.

are not that different from your norm. Concurrent Enrollment is typically when a student is enrolled in high school and college and will take classes at both. I have run into them every so often in night classes at local community colleges. These students need to remember that they will have a high school transcript but also a college transcript, maybe multiple college transcripts. In Nebraska, both of the latter two will follow the transfer credit guidelines set by the schools. You can check out Transfer Nebraska for more details.

there is likely more study time associated with these classes. Most people recommend that you only take a couple each semester. Too many and you could find the homework overwhelming and each class could suffer. Remember that your grades in these classes will be reflected on your transcripts when you apply for scholarships and admissions. If your G.P.A. drops because of these classes it could affect your ability to pay for the school of your dreams, and that would be a Shakespearean-level tragedy.

Dual credit courses are often harder than regular classes. If you ever feel like you are getting left behind or are having a hard time grasping a concept then ask for help right away. If you don’t do well in the class you’ll miss out on the college credit and waste the hours you invest. One of the advantages of dual-credit classes is that you have smaller classes so you can get some extra help. For example, last year a friend took AP Psychology at her high school. She didn’t have to take Psych101 at her college this fall. Her class last year had 22 people in it, a single session of Psych101 has almost three times that at her college. Take advantage of this in every way you can.

even in my AP classes. I know, you hate me now. The mistake I made was not investing in study habits that I could lean on in college and it made first semester very difficult. Whether you are like me and never study or are one of those that has to invest a lot of time to get the grades you deserve, spend some time developing good study habits.

Know what type of dualSharpen your study skills. credit class you are taking. Don’t delay asking for help. I didn’t have to study much in high school, not Just because the course you are taking qualifies as dual credit doesn’t mean you’ll get credit. Some classes require you to take an exam at the end of the course to get the subsequent college credit. Others require you to complete paperwork at the beginning or end of the term to get credit. It’s important for you to know if any of this has been done for you. Talk to your teacher or advisor and let them know you want to get college credit for the class.

There are a few differences between the course types that you should be aware of. Advanced Placement (AP) classes are high school classes that are taught based on a curriculum similar to the college class. At the end of the term you take an exam and your score can pass you out of classes in college. But not all schools accept all AP, as was the case for me. Keep in mind that these are “pass-on” credits, in many schools this means you still have a specified number of credits necessary for graduation. Dual-enrollment classes are taught at your high school, and

Don’t overload your schedule. In the last tip I mentioned the more in-depth coursework and the need to stay on top of the assignments, well you also need to realize that

Avoid going too far. I’ve seen students get trapped into taking dual-enrollment classes that were for higher level college credit. It sounds good, but ultimately it hurt them. One found himself without the necessary foundation for the next level, mostly because of the time gap between one course and the next. Another found out that the course didn’t transfer in and she wasted the time. A general rule of thumb, don’t seek anything more than a second-year class, especially if it is a subject you plan to major in at college.

ACT/SATACT/SAT RESOURCESstudy Information

EducationQuest.org

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College Board

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Kaplan

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Khan Academy

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Number 2

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Test Prep Review

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The Princeton Review

princetonreview.com

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Sylvan Learning Center

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$125-$1,800

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Tui�on & Fees at SCC

Scholarship to pay for two years at SCC

Learn to Dream now paying tuition, fees up to 90 credit hours

Tui�on (2018-19): $67.50 (in-state) Fees (2018-19): $2.00 $69.50 X 90 cr. hrs.:

Southeast

Community College

$6,255

Apply2College Day

Programs of Study More than 50 Career/Technical

East: 10/12 North Star: 10/31 Southeast: 10/10 & 11 Lincoln High: 10/3 - 5 Southwest: 10/4 Northeast: 10/3 & 10/4 The goal of APPLY2COLLEGE Day is for seniors to complete an application for admission to college.

Academic Transfer Associate Degrees Diploma Cer�ficate

nts.

rd recipie iever Awa

am Ach arn to Dre

Le

Partners

Acklie Charitable Founda�on Lincoln Public Schools Nelnet Southeast Community College

Learn to

Dream

Union Bank & Trust

Award

recipie nt.

Does your senior need help applying to college? If so, encourage them to sign up and attend our Apply2College days! Counselors and representatives of many colleges will be available to help students complete online applications during the school day at our high schools: College Application Checklist: https://www.educationquest. org/pdfs/Apply2College/College_Application_Checklist.pdf Also Financial Aid Nights Open to Everyone! LSE - October 1, 2018, 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm Central Time LNE - Oct. 3, 6-7pm LHS - Oct. 9 6:30-7:30 Learn how to pay for college and earn a chance to win a $500 scholarship. Juniors and seniors who attend an EducationQuest Financial Aid Program before December 1 will be eligible to win one of six $500 scholarships. Parents/guardians may attend for their student. If you are selected as a winner, $500 will be added to your NEST 529 College Savings Plan. If you do not have a NEST 529 Plan, you will need to open one to receive the award.

ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

• Students must be enrolled in a Lincoln public or private school at the beginning of his or her senior year and remain in the district un�l gradua�on. • Qualifying students who graduate from a LPS or private high school in Lincoln a�er Jan. 1, 2018, can take advantage of the 90 quarter credit hours. • Students must be eligible for free or reduced-price meals. • Students must complete the 90 quarter credit hours within 48 months of first enrolling at SCC. • Students must maintain a minimum cumula�ve 2.0 grade-point average while enrolled at SCC.

www.southeast.edu/learntodreamscholars

And join us for these special interest visit events: Dia de Visita en Español Saturday, Sep. 22 Discover Doane: Homecoming Saturday, Oct. 6 Music Day Wednesday, Oct. 10

where it really does

pay to visit.

Future Teacher Day Tuesday, Oct. 30 Tiger Sleepovers Sunday, Nov. 4 - Monday, Nov. 5 or Sunday Nov. 11 - Monday, Nov. 12

Visit Doane during your senior year of high school, enroll, and receive our $4,000 visit grant.

Theatre Day Monday, Nov. 19

That’s $1,000 per year for four years— just for making a personal campus visit!

STEM Day Thursday, Dec. 6

Visit doane.edu/visit or call 402.826.6767 to schedule a personal visit or sign-up for a Visit Day event. Can’t make it to campus? Check us out online at doane.edu/virtual-tour.


October 2018 | Community News | Section B

B14

Rotary donation to help fund Everett playground project Lincoln’s Downtown Rotary Club has donated $50,000 to Everett Elementary School to help with the revitalization of its playground at 11th and C streets. Jim Griesen, president of the Rotary 14 Foundation, presented the donation to Everett Principal Mike Long during a ceremony at the playground on Aug. 24 after the school day. Lincoln Board of Education Member Barb Baier - whose District 3 includes the Everett neighborhood - also was on hand, along with current Downtown Rotary President Randy Bretz and former presidents Mark Stephens and Jennifer Brinkman. “We’re thrilled to have Rotary 14 work with our students, our faculty and our staff,” Long said. “Our school serves many refugee and immigrant families and the involvement of Rotary shows them that people in Lincoln care for them. I can’t begin to tell you how excited our students are for the new playground.” “It’s with particular pleasure that we present this gift to Everett Elementary,” Griesen said. “We’re excited to see the changes taking place on the playground and look forward to a formal dedication ceremony later this year.”


OCTOBER HIGH SCHOOL THEATRE PRODUCTIONS East High School Fine Arts Department presents

MEREDITH WILSON'S THE MUSIC MAN Oct.25 - 27 7:00 p.m. East High School Auditorium Tickets $7.00 Purchase your tickets at the door

Lincoln High School Theatre PlayLINKS presents

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT Oct. 4 & 5 at 7:00 p.m. Oct. 6 at 2pm Sorenson Theater - Lincoln High School 2229 J Street Tickets $5.00 Purchase your tickets by calling the Lincoln High School office at (402)436-1301, at the door, or from any cast member

North Star Theatre presents

THE BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER

Oct. 4-6 7:00 p.m. North Star High School Auditorium Tickets $7.00 for adults, $5.00 for children Purchase your tickets at the door or http://lnstheatre.seatyourself.biz

Northeast High School Theatre presents

THE BOARDING HOUSE REACH by Donald Payton

Oct. 9-12 7:30 p.m. Northeast High School Auditorium Tickets are $5 for adults, $2 for elementary age students, and free for LNE staff and guests. Purchase your tickets at the door, doors open at 7pm.

Southeast High School Theatre presents

SHE KILLS MONSTERS

Oct. 12-13 at 7:30 p.m. and Oct. 14 at 2:00 p.m. Tickets TBA Purchase your tickets at the door


K I D S CO R N E R


OCTOBER 2018

Breakfast / Beattie Elementary

BREAKFAST MONDAY Mini Chocolate Chip French Toast Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice Applesauce Cup

Mini Berry Pancakes Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice Applesauce Cup

Students Do Not Report

TUESDAY

1

8

15

WEDNESDAY

2

Egg & Cheese Sandwich Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Diced Pear Cup Mixed Fruit Cup

Students Do Not Report

3

Pancake Sausage on a Stick Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Banana

9

Breakfast Quesadilla Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Diced Pear Cup Mixed Fruit Cup

THURSDAY

16

Mini Turkey Sausage Breakfast Bites Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

Apple

Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Diced Pear Cup Mixed Fruit Cup

Mini Chocolate Chip French Toast Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice Applesauce Cup

Mini Berry Pancakes Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Orange Juice Applesauce Cup

22

29

9/10/2018

Egg & Cheese Sandwich Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Diced Pear Cup Mixed Fruit Cup

Breakfast Quesadilla Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Diced Pear Cup Mixed Fruit Cup

23

24

Pancake Sausage on a Stick Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Banana

30

Turkey Sausage, Egg, and Cheese Sliders Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Bites Chef Salad Meatless Chef Salad Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

Students Do Not Report

8

15

Muchos Nachos Cheeseburger on Bun Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Roll

Soft Shell Beef Taco Chef Salad Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Plum and Grapes Diced Peaches Roll

Students Do Not Report

WEDNESDAY

2

9

16

Chicken Teriyaki on Brown Rice Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Cantaloupe Cubes Applesauce Roll

Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Hamburger Pizza Chef Salad Hummus with Cheese Stick and Savory Pizza Crackers Meatless Chef Salad Broccoli with Cheese Sauce Romaine Lettuce Salad Watermelon Cubes Applesauce Roll Chocolate Chip Cookie

Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Breaded Pork Sandwich Chef Salad Crustless Soybutter and Jelly Sandwich

3

10

17

with Cheese Stick

22

Muchos Nachos Cheeseburger on Bun Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Roll

29

26

Mini Bagels Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Assorted Juice Assorted Fruit

THURSDAY

Cheese Stick Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll

Popcorn Chicken Turkey Hot Dog on Bun Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Bites Meatless Chef Salad Baked Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Croissant

19

Chocolate Filled Crescent Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Assorted Juice Assorted Fruit

OCTOBER 2018

TUESDAY

1

25

12

Students Do Not Report

MealViewer Schools

ELEMENTARY LUNCH Popcorn Chicken Turkey Hot Dog on Bun Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Bites Meatless Chef Salad Baked Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Croissant

18

5

Mini Bagels Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Assorted Juice Assorted Fruit

31

Breakfast Bar Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Banana

Lunch / Beattie Elementary MONDAY

11

Cheese Omelet Pocket Bread Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

17

Fruit Filled Frudel

4

Turkey Sausage, Egg, and Cheese Sliders Cocoa Puffs Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

10

Breakfast Bar Trix Cereal Mini Loaf Yogurt Apple Juice Banana

FRIDAY

23

Chicken Teriyaki on Brown Rice Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Fresh Pear Applesauce Roll

30

24

Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad Cheesy Green Chili Quesadilla Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Diced Pears Roll

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Mexi Pizza Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Shredded Mozzarella Cheese Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Diced Pears Fresh Baked Garlic Bread

Pepperoni Pizza BBQ Chicken Thigh Chef Salad Vegetarian Chik'n Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Romaine Lettuce Salad Watermelon Cubes Diced Pears Cinnamon Roll

Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad Cheesy Green Chili Quesadilla Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Kiwi and Grapes Diced Pears Roll

FRIDAY

4

11

18

25

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll Brownie Bites

Students Do Not Report

Creamy Mac & Cheese Personal 3 Meat Pizza Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll Brownie Bites

5

12

19

26

31

Chicken Fingers Soft Shell Beef Taco Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Chef Salad Hamburger Pizza Bites Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Chef Salad https://schools.mealviewer.com/school/BeattleElementary/print?month=9&year=2018&blockId=1157 Marinara Sauce Chef Salad Crustless Soybutter and Jelly Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Meatless Chef Salad with Cheese Stick Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Refried Beans Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Plum and Grapes Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Diced Peaches Fresh Pear Pineapple Tidbits Roll Applesauce Biscuit Roll Candy Cookie

9/10/2018

1/1

MealViewer Schools

OCTOBER 2018

Lunch / Northeast High / Northeast High

SECONDARY LUNCH MONDAY Popcorn Chicken Turkey Hot Dog on Bun Cheeseburger Paradise on Croissant Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Bites Meatless Chef Salad Baked Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Croissant

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Bites BBQ Beef Sandwich Chef Salad Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Orange Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

Students Do Not Report

1

8

15

TUESDAY Muchos Nachos Cheeseburger on Bun Baja Chicken, Cheese & Rice Burrito Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Roll

Soft Shell Beef Taco Sub Sandwich Chef Salad Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Plum and Grapes Diced Peaches Roll

Students Do Not Report

2

9

16

WEDNESDAY Chicken Teriyaki on Brown Rice Lasagna Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Cantaloupe Cubes Applesauce Garlic Breadstick Roll

Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Hamburger Pizza Nebraska Bun Chef Salad Hummus with Cheese Stick and Savory Pizza Crackers Cheese Stick Meatless Chef Salad Broccoli with Cheese Sauce Romaine Lettuce Salad Watermelon Cubes Applesauce Roll

Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Breaded Pork Sandwich Fish Melt Sandwich Chef Salad Crustless Soybutter and Jelly Sandwich

3

10

17

with Cheese Stick

Cheese Stick Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll Garlic Breadstick

THURSDAY Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad French Bread Garlic Pizza Cheesy Green Chili Quesadilla Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Diced Pears Roll

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Mexi Pizza Shredded Chicken Carnitas on a Flour Tortilla Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Shredded Mozzarella Cheese Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Cantaloupe Cubes Diced Pears Fresh Baked Garlic Bread

Pepperoni Pizza BBQ Chicken Thigh Chili Chef Salad Vegetarian Chik'n Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Romaine Lettuce Salad Watermelon Cubes Diced Pears Cinnamon Roll

4

11

18

FRIDAY Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Sloppy Joe on Bun Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

French Toast Sticks with Sausage Links Breaded Chicken Sandwich Chicken Enchilada Chef Salad French Toast Sticks with Cheese Sticks Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

Creamy Mac & Cheese Personal 3 Meat Pizza Hot & Spicy Chicken Sandwich Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

5

12

19

https://schools.mealviewer.com/school/BeattleElementary/print?month=9&year=2018&blockId=1157

Popcorn Chicken Turkey Hot Dog on Bun Cheeseburger Paradise on Croissant Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Bites Meatless Chef Salad Baked Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Croissant

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Mini Pizza Bites BBQ Beef Sandwich Chef Salad Veggie Teriyaki Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

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Muchos Nachos Cheeseburger on Bun Baja Chicken, Cheese & Rice Burrito Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Roll

Soft Shell Beef Taco Sub Sandwich Chef Salad Cheese Stuffed Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Plum and Grapes Diced Peaches Roll

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Chicken Teriyaki on Brown Rice Lasagna Chef Salad Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Fresh Pear Applesauce Garlic Breadstick Roll

Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Hamburger Pizza Nebraska Bun Chef Salad Hummus with Cheese Stick and Savory Pizza Crackers Cheese Stick Meatless Chef Salad Broccoli with Cheese Sauce Romaine Lettuce Salad Fresh Pear Applesauce Roll

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Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad French Bread Garlic Pizza Cheesy Green Chili Quesadilla Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Kiwi and Grapes Diced Pears Roll

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Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Sloppy Joe on Bun Chef Salad Grilled Mozzarella Cheese Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

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October 2018 | Community News | Section B

B18

National Arts in Education Week: Art is woven into everything we do

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ept. 9-15 was National Arts in Education Week and the students at the Lincoln Public Schools Arts and Humanities Focus Program were able to kick off the week at the International Quilt Study Center and Museum on Sept. 7 as part of the First Friday visual art series throughout Lincoln. The students’ pieces on display were inspired by an October 2017 visit to the museum — and especially by a Halloween pop-up exhibit titled “The Haunting of Quilt House.” “The display was very much like traditional quilts just turned on their head a little bit. That is what drew us to the quilt museum at the time,” said Emily Dvorak, math teacher at Arts and Humanities. Students took inspiration from what they saw and created individual paper collage quilt blocks focused around Halloween themes. “We had a theme that was nature and on my quilt I focused on human nature, kind of to the extreme with violence and gore and things like that,” commented senior Jordan Raemakers. “I wanted my quilt to look like a criminologist’s diary. That is what I was going for.” The staff at the quilt museum were so excited by the students’ work that they asked them to create two more quilts. Arts and Humanities students created three quilts in all through various workshops with teachers – two using paper collages and one using fabric and applique techniques. Dvorak added, “Projects like this are fun because there is so much symmetry in quilts and geometric designs, and then the variations on those, too. It’s fun to be able to integrate those into our classrooms, too, connecting to what we’ve done elsewhere.” The second paper collage quilt was created in February. During the First Friday reception, junior Elijah Haschke reflected on his block: “The theme was love and affection and for mine I have my character I usually use, which is the ghost guy. I knew we were going to put our pieces up, so I might as well show one of my favorite characters I draw and put it in.” For the third and final quilt students were taught fabric applique techniques. “We had an assignment to make one out of fabric this time and it was towards the end of year so we had to turn it in on the last day of school,” explained senior Ariana Dahlenburg. “We had no idea what was going to happen with it, we just glued all the pieces together and sent it off and hoped for the best. And now here they are all together and it’s really cool to see for the first time.” Dvorak said that engagement is an important piece of weaving arts into education and is something that everyone can relate to. “Something that I believe in as a math teacher is you educate the whole person. What’s amazing about Arts and Humanities is we are interdisciplinary and we are able to connect students on a lot of different levels. I’m not teaching them just about math, I’m teaching them about a lot of different things.” Ramakers said that art has taught him why education is so important. “I didn’t have much interest in school before I came here, but we talk a lot about current events and real things that are happening and so that actually makes me want to learn.” For Dahlenburg, she says that people often overlook art, but it’s built into every single thing and people don’t even realize it. “I think it is quite important because it’s in pretty much everything we do in all career fields and it’s an important part of expression. It’s also quite valuable to humanity as a whole because it’s everywhere. It’s in the music we have, the bags and shirts people wear and the way people express themselves.”

October 2018 Community News  
October 2018 Community News