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October 2019

LPS honors Patriot Day Students and staff across Lincoln Public Schools observed Patriot Day on Sept. 11 through a variety of activities and events, including lunch with first responders, flag-raising ceremonies and hallway parades featuring law enforcement and members of the military. Patriot Day is an annual observance to remember those who were injured or died during the terrorist attacks in the United States on Sept. 11, 2001, as well as to honor the first responders who rushed to help. For the second year in a row, Lux Middle School invited more than 30 first responders to have lunch with students, including members of the Lincoln Fire Department, Lincoln Police Department, American Red Cross, Army National Guard, Nebraska Emergency Management Agency, Lincoln/Lancaster County Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Army and U.S. Marines. Students were encouraged to ask questions such as: • How did you train for your job? • Tell us about a typical day. • What types of emergencies do you respond to? • How can we prepare for emergencies? • Where were you on 9/11? Evan, an eighth-grader at Lux, said it was “cool” to ask police officers about their experience and where they were on 9/11. “And they told me what it’s like to help people,” he added. Amelia, another eighth-grader, spent time with an emergency room nurse during lunch. “She felt terrible that she couldn’t be there on 9/11 to help,” Amelia said. “I would have felt that way, too.” Lux Principal Duane Dohmen said events such as this are important for a generation of students who were born long after the events of 9/11. “Adults remember where we were when the towers fell, but for our students, 9/11 is history,” he said. “In school and on the news, students are often reminded of the tragedy, but when we invite first responders to lunch on Patriot Day, we hope to put real-life faces to the heroism.”

THE DANGERS OF VAPING Learning more about the health and addiction risks associated with e-cigarettes, Juuls, and vaping:

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SECTION A: A2 Superintendent’s blog: Educating the Whole Child A3 TeamMates of the Month A4 MLK Youth Rally celebrates 25 years New schools join composting program A5 Veteran teacher A6 School social worker wins state award A7 Student Report A8 ConnectLPS A11 Facility advisory board findings A12 High School Theater schedule SECTION B: B1 Learning Lunch B4 Marching Band competitions B6 Librarian teaches life skills B7 Dangers of vaping B10 Wellness column B11 Menus B12 Mary Kay Roth retirement party Community News is a publication of Lincoln Public Schools. If you have any questions about this publication please contact Mindy Burbach, 436-1609; Lincoln Public Schools P.O. Box 82889 Lincoln, NE 68501-2889


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LPS believes in developing “whole” child

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ootball season has arrived and once again I am reminded, I really enjoy the game. In fact, I have always felt athletics offered kids incredible opportunities to experience what it was like to be on a team working toward a common goal – as a participant through my college years, a coach during my teaching years and now an active watcher and analyzer. The lessons learned are what young people can take with them everywhere they go as they begin to compete in the world: lessons of commitment, sacrifice and resilience mixed in with a little courage. As we launch a new school year, I am also reminded that it isn’t just sports that provide positive, extracurricular experiences for our students. Within our schools, we have highly successful performing arts, visual arts, debate and speech, various clubs and a plethora of organizations to suit just about every interest. I am always excited when I speak to students and they proudly tell me what their interests are outside of the classroom. Involvement in activities and extra-curriculars undoubtedly strengthens a student’s attendance as well as their work in the classroom. I believe we must consider it is the development of the “whole” child that matters most, especially in this age of testing and assessing student progress – an age when we use numbers that sometimes place poorly contrived labels on students who perhaps need positive reinforcement the most. We have to remember that the greater school experience can be a better predictor for student success than just an assessment score, something sometimes difficult to illuminate in the midst of a blizzard of data releases and school report cards. I am proud of all that we offer our students and grateful to all of our coaches and club sponsors who go above and beyond to teach students how to compete and perform on all sorts of stages. It is yet another reason why Lincoln Public Schools is such a unique and special school district. Read more posts from Joel’s blog at: http://wp.lps.org/sjoel.

Download our weekly podcast: Stories from Lincoln Public Schools. Find it on our website:

lps.org/podcast


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October TeamMates of the Month

Carly and Gabbie: Real Life. Real Relationship Carly knows the impact of a TeamMate. As a youth, she had one. To this day Carly believes that her mentor impacted her life trajectory, and she’s chosen to mentor for the same reasons. “It’s a tough world. It’s changed since I was in high school. Mentoring is about the next generation.” Both Carly and her mentee, Gabbie, a senior at Lincoln High School, are energetic, goal-focused, hard-working individuals. When they are not engaged in hotly competitive games of Sushi Go, they spend time considering and writing down their ambitions. Writing is how they debrief life. Gabbie admires her mentor of four years. “I don’t know how people carry their jobs, families, and relationships,” she says of Carly, who works two jobs and mothers two boys. “It’s been a good learning opportunity for me.” Carly believes her eyes have been opened to many things as a result of mentoring. “Like me, Gabbie is learning the challenge of balance. She continues to push to meet the demands of school, activities, jobs and relationships. We talk about it all the time.” “TeamMates has given me a safe place to open up,” Gabbie adds. “Carly always has advice for the big and small things. She’s always there for me.” “I’m so proud of how Gabbie is navigating life,” Carly says. “She is courageous and advocates for herself.” Gabbie is eager to finish her senior year and become a nurse. “A friendship with a young person is a great learning experience,” Carly says. “We’re both achieving and reviewing life. It’s refreshing to do it together.”

Every inch. I know every inch. Can walk at pitch black. Walk one way you hit water The other is a killer hill. Stand at the water Take 10 steps forward Then 3 to the left A tent. The flames fly 10 feet in the air Sit in the chair Big hoodie on Knees at chest Blanket wrapped around. 3:30 moon light Shines around us Glows on the water Keeps the bugs away.


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‘Walk Together’ celebrates 25th anniversary of MLK Youth Rally The annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Youth Rally and March will mark its 25th anniversary in January and organizers are going the extra mile to commemorate the event. On Aug. 28 - the 56th anniversary of the March on Washington they announced plans for a “Walk Together” campaign during the months leading up to the Jan. 20 event in downtown Lincoln. Organizers are reaching out to local community members, leaders, athletes and celebrities and asking them to donate a pair of shoes - new or worn, it doesn’t matter. Donors will include a card with a written message that describes their own journey they have walked. Eventually, the shoes and their stories will be displayed in glass cases, shared on social media and used as a way to continue their conversations throughout the community.

Azcia Fleming, a senior at Lincoln High School, has been involved with the march since she was in fourth grade. She’s the planning committee’s student leader for this year’s event, scheduled for Jan. 20 in downtown Lincoln. “Our walk for the last 24 years has brought thousands of people of different walks of life together on the third Monday in January,” she said. “The planning committee has brought together youths with different walks - from Lincoln, Eagle, Norris, Raymond, public and private schools, youth of different genders, race, interests and level of racial understanding to the table.” Pete Ferguson, youth development team coordinator for Lincoln Public Schools, is the planning committee’s adult advisor. He said the goal of the “Walk Together” theme is to “gain insight and contributions of various walks throughout

history, honoring the current walks and the need for the community to unite in their walk to reaching the ‘mountaintop’ that Rev. King referenced in his ‘I Have a Dream’ speech.”

Event organizers are teaming with journalism students from Lincoln Southwest High School to spread the word. You also can find more information on the event’s website: mlkyouthrallymarch.teamapp.com.

LPS composting program feeds school gardens Lincoln Public Schools diverted more than 1.2 million pounds of organic material from the landfill last school year through its composting program. That number will likely grow this year as all 57 schools with standard cafeterias are now composting. Four schools started composting this year: Hartley Elementary School, Randolph Elementary School, Lincoln High School and Lincoln North Star High School. LPS started its composting program with a handful of schools five years ago.

“And that’s a low estimate,” she said. During a recent lunch period, it was clear that Randolph students had already gotten the hang of what to dump in the composting bin. One by one, with a little help from a teacher, students separated their garbage from their compost materials before they delivered their trays back to the kitchen.

“Composting to me is really just a tool to get to this idea of environmental stewardship and valuing our resources and our planet. Composting is a way to show LPS Sustainability Coordinator Brit- how our daily actions can have an tney Albin estimates that Randolph environmental impact,” she said. has already diverted more than 500 “These students are going to be the pounds of food and paper products leaders who take on these challengsince the first day of school. es in the future.”

Many students also see firsthand the results of their composting efforts. Some schools use compost created through the LPS program to fertilize their gardens.

“Having compost come back to the school and into the garden is a really great way for students to see that cycle,” Albin said. “We do really want them to see the whole process.”


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Schoo students learn about Patriot Day, Vets Day through teacher’s personal stories Staff and students in all corners of Lincoln Public Schools use Patriot Day and Veterans Day as opportunities to pause and learn more about those who have served and continue to serve our country. No one appreciates this opportunity more than Ryan Treat, who teaches math, social studies and science at Schoo Middle School. Before he began his teaching career, Treat was a police officer for the Blair and Lincoln police departments. On the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, he was a member of the Blair Police Department. He had just worked nearly 48 hours straight as part of a multi-county drug task force. When he finally got home, he crashed on his couch for some much-needed sleep. Soon his wife called from work and told him to turn on the TV. He watched the stunning events unfold in New York City until he eventually fell asleep again. “As I woke up again later that morning, I was almost

in tears at the nightmare I had just had. Then I turned the TV back on to realize it was real,” Treat said, later adding, “Police work changed that day, and my phone rang soon after, and it was back to work because of all the threats and elevated security needs. Needless to say, the world was different for everyone from that day on, but especially first responders.” He shares his 9/11 story with his

social studies class every year. “For a lot of students, this is just some event that happened and they don’t really understand it. I let them into my life and tell them what it was like. It’s a great opportunity to connect.” Treat also shares a special story with students on Veterans Day in November - the story of his dad. The Vietnam veteran visits his son’s class and talks with students about his

experience in the military. He brings a shadow box filled with medals and photos from his time in Vietnam. He answers student questions. Treat also has his students write thank-you letters to veterans they know or to the Veterans Administration. “Somebody inevitably writes one to my dad, too.”


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Erks named Nebraska school social worker of the year Carrie Erks from Lincoln Public Schools has been named the 2019 School Social Worker of the Year for Nebraska. Erks was presented the award during a surprise ceremony Aug. 27 at the LPS Bryan Community Focus Program building, just south of 48th and O streets. Erks thought she was there only for a professional development meeting - until a group of family, friends and colleagues streamed into the room, many of them clutching bouquets of flowers for the honoree. School Social Work Association of Nebraska President Emily Arkfeld presented the award. “There was no one else we could even consider,” said Arkfeld, a school social worker with Bellevue Public Schools. “I’m just doing what we all do every day, but thank you,” Erks said. LPS school social workers are licensed mental health practitioners who connect students and families to resources at school and in the community to help students overcome barriers to success. Colleagues raved about Erks in their nomination letters, which were read aloud at Tuesday’s event. Many of them talked about her work with implementing the Second Step curriculum to teach social-emotional learning to LPS students in grades kindergarten through seventh grade. Second Step recognizes that success in the classroom - and in life - depends on more than academics. Second Step teaches four main areas: • • • •

Skills for learning Empathy Emotion management Problem solving

Beyond Second Step, though, her colleagues wrote about Erks’ passion for being a school social worker. Gabby Danner, school social worker at Bryan Community Focus Program: “It is often said that character is who we are when no one is watching. Carrie is always a social worker. She is a beacon of hope both professionally and personally. Carrie emits warmth and genuine empathy for those she encounters. She strives to use her social work skills to make the lives of those she interacts with better.” Brenda Leggiadro, LPS counseling and school social work supervisor: “As a leader of the school social work team, Carrie provides a powerful voice for her colleagues and for the profession as she models collaboration with counselors, psychologists, and nurses to address student needs and help families thrive.” Tiffany Kavanaugh, LPS school social worker: “She brings wisdom, positivity, professionalism, kindness, grace and organization to all of her interactions with staff, as well as students.”

“As a leader of the school social work team, Carrie provides a powerful voice for her colleagues and for the profession as she models collaboration with counselors, psychologists, and nurses to address student needs and help families thrive.”


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Student Report

Seniors begin college application process Sophia Merritt Lincoln Southeast High School As this school year begins, seniors are overwhelmed with the application process for college. With questions from family like, “Where are you going?” and “How much will it cost?,” it can be a lot to handle with very little time to make a decision. A lot of students are still working on retaking the ACT and handling last minute programs like National Honor Society, a nationwide organization for high school students, before they can even think about sending in applications. This can cause a lot of stress due to missing the early-bird deadlines that many colleges have. Along with the stress of deadlines, the application process can be expensive for many students, with application fees ranging from $45 to $90. All of this comes before students even know if they have been accepted into the school. Addison Cheek, a senior who has applied to out-of-state colleges, said that their application fees are much steeper than local colleges.

“It [was around] $70 to apply to Arizona State University,” Cheek said. “UNL was about $25 to $30, and Doane University was free for me to apply to.” Applying to colleges and the fees aren’t the only time-consuming things about this process. Seniors are also required to receive a transcript from their high school counselors, which can take multiple days and has certain requirements if you are under the age of 18. “If you’re under 18, you have to get parent permission to get [your transcript],” Cheek said. “You have to get a paper from your counselor and have your parents sign it, bring it back, and then it takes two days before you can pick up a physical copy.” While students like Cheek are still working on picking the perfect school for them, some students have already decided on which college works for them. Schuyler Riese, 12th grade, started working on college applications very early in her high school career.

“A lot of it was [about] soccer,” Riese said. “We would go to showcases throughout the season that a lot of colleges know about, but before you’re a junior they aren’t allowed to contact you directly.” Riese said that this process had a lot to do with communication. She would email colleges and try to get their attention to have them come watch her play during a game. While these colleges weren’t able to contact her directly, they could read the email and contact Riese’s coaches as a third party. While soccer played a huge roll in the decision that she made, she was also looking out for other things that would contribute to her college experience. “A home away from home is the biggest thing for me,” Riese said. “The atmosphere is a huge part.” While some are already looking and applying for college, others may have a hard time starting the process and feel like they are running out of time and missing opportunities. A way that students can get help during these times would be to go to the LSE Counsel-

or Center and talk to their assigned counselor to gain advice on what the first step to take is. Another way is to contact EducationQuest, which is a nonprofit organization that works to improve access to higher education in Nebraska. They will provide free college planning services and help students find scholarships and grants they meet the requirements for. This service is provided for high school and college students. While this seems like a start to a very long and excruciating process for high school students, with help from teachers and those in the counseling center, the process can be made a lot easier . Riese said that those who are stressed should take their time because if a college is truly the one, they will be patient with you as you finish off your year to gain all of the scores and recommendations you need. “Slow down. If a college really wants you they will be patient,” Riese said. “Trust your instinct and your gut, [because] most of the time that instinct is right.”


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ConnectLPS

Here’s some of our favorite photos from LPS schools in September. Want more? Connect with your school’s social media at lps.org/connect.

Wysong Elementary School

“Wysong Wolves created an American flag on our playground!”

Scott Middle School

“Mrs. Vrana’s 6th graders after completing their final lab! They practiced food safety and sanitation, measuring, following directions, time management and problem solving to make their coffee cakes. They look delicious!”

Saratoga Elementary School

“Ms. Rardon’s fourth grade class spent a day in 1892. Students dressed up and experienced school in a one-room schoolhouse. Students practiced reading, writing, ground corn, and even had a spelling bee. It was hot, but they still had a funfilled day!”

Brownell Elementary School

“Fourth grade students spent the day on the prairie! They looked at bugs, drew with nature, had a picnic and more!”


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Arnold Elementary School

“Math facts with Ms. Cheneye’s first grade class.”

Beattie Elementary School

“Mrs. Holsig’s class visited the garden.”

Moore Middle School

“Students were exploring our global community in World Language class by learning about traditional clothes from Guatemala.”

Lincoln Northeast High School

“The Lincoln Northeast High School Counseling Center took some of our students to UNK to check it out. Looks like they had a blast!”

Science Focus Program

Roper Elementary School

“Friday afternoon mineral identification.”

“The fourth graders made a tunnel down the hallways to cheer on their classmates who won the ‘Stellar Learner Award’ for the month!”


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Superintendent’s Facility Advisory Committee offers final recommendations to Lincoln Board of Education New schools, updates in current schools, space for early childhood, embedded focus programs, and more, were all among top facility recommendations officially presented to the superintendent and Lincoln Board of Education in August by the Superintendent’s Facility Advisory Committee (SFAC). The Board will now go to work to fully analyze these facility proposals, likely trimming the recommendations to $250-290 million – an amount which would fund a bond issue within the existing bond levy of 16.1 cents – and pass a resolution in November to float a bond issue in 2020. The Superintendent’s Facility Advisory Committee is a group of 100 Lincoln stakeholders who have been meeting for months now to analyze long-range facility and infrastructure needs to envision schools of the future and ensure that LPS wisely accommodates student growth into the next 7-10 years. The committee’s final recommendations – which will likely be significantly pared down by the Board for a potential 2020 bond issue – included: three new elementary schools (in southeast, northeast and northwest Lincoln); the exploration of building two new K-8 schools (in south/southwest and west/northwest Lincoln); two new high schools initially built at half capacity (built in southeast and northwest Lincoln); new athletic/activity facilities on proposed new high school campus(es); expansion of early childhood programs; renovations and infrastructure updates to current schools throughout the community, and more.

renovation (Indoor Air Quality) projects, designated as priorities in the LPS 10-Year Facilities and Infrastructure Plan. • LPS should – at a minimum – invest/ dedicate 10-20 percent of all future bond election proceeds toward infrastructure projects. • LPS should plan to fund the next bond issue within the existing bond levy (of 16.1 cents). Based on current analysis, the net bond proceeds could range from $250-290 million.

High School Athletics and Activities Complex • LPS should construct additional district athletics and activities facilities. • LPS should enhance/improve athletics facilities at each of the existing high schools to create equity and address needs (such as synthetic turf, if possible). • LPS should place new athletic and activity facilities on proposed new high school campus(es) to create efficiencies and realize cost savings.

Early Childhood and Community Learning Centers • LPS should use all existing space to develop additional early childhood classrooms and add classrooms to existing elementary schools where physically possible. Consideration should be given to adding early childhood classrooms to each new facility when designing new elementary, middle and high schools. • LPS should, in the future and as quickly as financially possible, build a 10-classroom stand-alone early childhood facility for the early childhood preschool program with adequate property for expansion, and add more classrooms as the LPS student population continues to grow. • As LPS continues to grow and school enrollment shifts, LPS should continue to determine which schools will qualify for Community Learning Center programming – and look for outside partnerships and grant opportunities to support funding for CLCs.

High School Focus Programs and Alternatives • LPS should identify appropriate focus programs to be located in any new high school and determine facility requirements. • LPS should evaluate existing high schools and identify new focus programs to be located in each school, taking into account current facilities, current curriculum or extracurricular focus, private-public partnership opportunities. • LPS should engage community organizations and businesses to assist in developing new focus programs that align with business, industry and community needs.

New High Schools “You faithfully fulfilled your responsibilities,” • LPS should construct two high schools – Board President Lanny Boswell told committee each with an initial capacity of 1,000 stumembers. “We deeply appreciate your service to dents, but designed and constructed with Lincoln and Lincoln’s children.” core facilities sufficient to accommodate a 2,000-student population at full buildout. LPS Superintendent Steve Joel was also grateCore facilities include multipurpose/cafeteful: “One of the fantastic things about living in ria, kitchen, library/media, administrative/ Lincoln is the response we get from the comoffice and student common services/locker munity that cares deeply about kids … It makes area. Initially, gymnasium, other sports-reour work so much easier.” lated facilities and an auditorium/theater should be built to accommodate student The Committee was led by co-leaders Maribel capacity of 2,000. Cruz, senior leadership consultant for Talent • LPS should add new high school capacity in Plus, and Nick Cusick, president of Bison, Inc., the northwest and southeast quadrants of who presented the top facility recommendathe city. tions. • LPS should renovate specialized spaces in the existing high schools to match new high Finance and Infrastructure Subcommittee school facilities – as much as financially and • LPS should move forward with the Everett logistically possible. Elementary School and Park Middle School

New Elementary and Middle Schools, and Alternate Grade Level Configurations • Northeast and East Lincoln: LPS should build a new elementary school east of 84th street and north of O street. • Southeast Lincoln: LPS should build a new elementary school south of Rokeby Road and east of 56th street. • South and Southwest Lincoln: LPS should explore building a new, flexible-platform facility that would open as a K-8 facility serving both elementary and middle school students – south of Yankee Hill Road and west of 56th street. • West and Northwest Lincoln: LPS should explore building a new, small-format, flexible-platform facility that would open as a K-8 facility serving elementary and middle school students – north of Interstate-80 and west of Lincoln Airport. LPS should also build a new elementary school north of Superior Street and west of 40th Street. • Renovations of specialized classrooms in middle schools; LPS should complete renovations as recommended by LPS staff in the 10-year facility plan. For more about committee recommendations, go to: https://home.lps.org/sfac/


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OCTOBER HIGH SCHOOL THEATER PRODUCTIONS Lincoln Northeast High School presents

THE MOTHER OF US ALL Oct. 8-11 Purchase your tickets at the door.

Lincoln North Star High School presents

PETER AND THE STARCATCHERS Oct. 3-5 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students and children, $8 for adults. Purchase your tickets at the door or online at: http;//lnstheatre.seatyourself.biz.

Lincoln High School Theatre PlayLINKS presents

DRACULA: A COMIC THRILLER

STARRING SHIRLEY HOLMES AND JENNIE WATSON

Oct. 3 & 4 at 7:00 p.m., Oct. 5 at 2 p.m. Purchase your tickets by calling the Lincoln High School office at (402)436-1301, at the door, or from any cast member. Lincoln Southwest High School presents

AND THEN THEY CAME FOR ME

Mature language and subject matter – may not be suitable for young children Oct. 3 & 4 at 7:00 p.m., Oct. 6 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for students. For reservations and information call 402-436-1335.

Lincoln East High School presents

BYE BYE BIRDIE

Oct. 31, Nov. 1 & Nov. 3 at 7 p.m. Purchase your tickets at the door.

Southeast High School presents

SENSE & SENSIBILITY

Oct. 3 & 4 at 7:30 p.m., Oct. 6 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $8 for students and seniors and $10 for adults. Purchase your tickets at the door.


October 2019 Remaining Learning Lunches: Tuesday, Oct. 15: “ABCs of Teaching English to Immigrant/Refugee Students” Basics of English Language Learners: How do you teach students who cannot speak English? Presenters: Laura Salem, LPS English Language Learners program supervisor, and Kate Damgaard, LPS language curriculum specialist.

Tuesday, Nov. 19: “Meeting the Needs of All Students: Supporting our Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing” This session will provide an introduction to the supports, technology and services provided in our district for one of the fast-growing disability areas within LPS. Presenters: Alisha Bollinger, Special Education supervisor.

Tuesday, Dec. 17: “SROs: Understanding this Important Job” School Resource Officers wear many hats during their shift: mentor, teacher, investigator, guardian. Come hear how Lincoln Public Schools and the Lincoln Police Department have partnered to ensure our SROs successfully serve our students and staff. Presenters: Joe Wright, director of Security at LPS, and a representative from Lincoln Police Department.

Tuesday, Jan. 14: “Ensuring Students Have Adequate Learning Environments” Update on the 10-year LPS Facility and Infrastructure Plan. Presenter: Liz Standish, associate superintendent for Business Affairs

Tuesday, Feb. 18: “We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution”

September Learning Lunch: ‘How LPS Cares for our Students in the Online World’ Look around and it’s easy to see how Lincoln Public Schools works to keep students physically safe. There are crosswalks and bright yellow signs to help ensure the safety of students as they walk to and from school. There are secure entrances as you enter every school. There are numerous drills conducted throughout the year - fire, tornado, lockout, lockdown, to name only a few. But that’s not the only way LPS works to keep students safe.

LPS Government students have the opportunity to showcase their civic and Constitutional knowledge through the “We the People” program and competition. Presenter: Jaci Kellison, K-12 curriculum specialist, social studies

“We also put a lot of time and effort and thought into how we protect our students digitally. Those things are not always apparent. You can’t necessarily see digital protections when you look at a school, or even when you look in a classroom,” said Chris Pultz, an educational technology analyst for LPS.

Tuesday, March 17: “The Importance of Our Guest Teachers in LPS”

Pultz and two of his colleagues from the Computing Services Department, Tim Hahn and Jarred Rowe, shed light on the topic of digital protections for students at the latest Learning Lunch, “Digital Protections: How LPS Cares for our Students in the Online World,” held Sept. 17 in the boardroom at LPS District Office.

The job of being a substitute teacher can be challenging, yet rewarding. This session will provide information about being a substitute teacher in Lincoln Public Schools and the opportunities that are available for professional growth and development. Presenters: Vann Price, LPS Human Resources Department supervisor for secondary personnel, and Kren Shellhase, administrative assistant.

Tuesday, April 21: “Take Charge, Career Readiness and Financial Responsibility: Lessons in Career and Personal Finance” Lessons from the classroom in teaching young people responsibility in career and personal finance. Presenters: Julie Hippen, assistant curriculum specialist for career and technical education, along with teachers and students.

Tuesday, May 12: “Creating Music on a Blank Canvas” The final Learning Lunch of the school year will focus on the creative aspect of music. All six LPS high schools offer various music courses that empower and foster students to learn the creative process of music composition and improvisation. Some of our talented high school students will share their experiences, inspiration and performances of creating their own original music. Presenter: Lance Nielsen, LPS supervisor of Music. LPS Learning Lunches are open to LPS staff and the Lincoln community. Learning Lunches are held in the boardroom at LPS District Office, 5905 O St. Doors open at 11:45 a.m., the program begins at noon, followed by questions-and-answers at 12:30 p.m. Please bring your own lunch – we’ll provide dessert.

They talked about three key federal laws that have guided a number of district initiatives during the last decade: the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), which protects the privacy of student educational records; the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), which requires extra protections for the personal information of children under the age of 13; and the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA), which requires schools and libraries to have a web content filter in place. Here are some of those district initiatives: • LPS employs an information security officer, whose job is to plan, implement, maintain and monitor a formal framework of adequate data security controls. • LPS uses web filters that restrict what information students can access on their LPS-issued Chromebooks, both in school and at home. In other words, if a student is blocked from a website at school, they’re blocked from that website at home. • Students must agree to a Responsible Use Agreement (RUA) if they use an LPS-issued computing device. Teachers review the RUA with students, and students agree to the terms each time they sign into the Portal, the webpage where all of their apps and programs are located. • Teachers have the ability to gain access, monitor and guide student work through Google Drive. Pultz, Hahn and Rowe also touched upon broader technology issues that parents face with their children, such as social media and screen time. When it comes to social media, Pultz reminds parents that most social media apps - because of federal law - require users to be at least 13 years old to have an account. As for screen time, it’s become more about quality vs. quantity. “It’s less about time and more about what they’re doing with the device in front of them,” Rowe said. “Are they passively consuming or are they actively creating?” They recommend the website commonsensemedia.org as a resource for parents trying to navigate their children’s digital consumption. They also encourage parents to contact LPS through the website lps.org/connect/now with any questions specifically about the school district and technology. “The world that kids are growing up in right now is so much different than the world even people my age grew up in during the ‘80s and ‘90s,” Pultz said, “because the internet is a part of everything they do.”


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MARCHING BAND COMPETITIONS OCT. 5 - Capital City Marching Contest at Seacrest Field OCT. 12 - LINKS Marching Contest at Beachner Field OCT. 19 - LPS Marching Band Invitation at Seacrest OCT. 26 - NSBA Marching Contest at Seacrest Field NOV. 9 - All of the marching bands will be marching in the Veteran's Day Parade starting at L.incoln High School


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A connection made through books, laughter For four years, teacher Amy Jewell and her Life Skills students at Lincoln Southwest High School have made a weekly trip to the school’s library for 45 of the best minutes of their week. That’s when her students read a book with librarian Michelle Schnell. “They can’t wait to head to the library to read,” Jewell said. “Wednesday morning is definitely one of the highlights of our week.” Schnell feels the same way. “I get to laugh and smile a lot. I get to read great children's literature, which I love, and spend time with these amazing kids who love books and reading,” she said. “I get to build relationships with kids who I otherwise would not get to spend time with during the normal course of my days.” The Life Skills course is for students who are significantly below grade level due to their disability. At the middle school and high school levels, students focus mainly on life and job skills, as well as communication skills and functional academics. On a recent Wednesday,

Jewell read two books to the students: “Kitten’s First Full Moon,” by Kevin Henkes, and “The Hiccupotamus,” by Aaron Zenz. As she read the books aloud, two of the students were able to follow along and participate thanks to iPads equipped with an app, Proloquo2Go. Each week, Schnell tells Jewell in advance which books she’s going to read, allowing her to load key

words from the stories into the app. Pictures of the words appear as buttons on their iPad screens. They tap the corresponding button whenever Schnell reads one of the words. A third student communicated in similar fashion but used a Step-by-Step device, which also is preprogrammed with key words and one large button he pushed whenever one of the words was read. The

device then repeated the word aloud. “For various reasons, students may be unable to verbally communicate to someone what they need or what they think about something,” Jewell said. “Using a communication device like these provides students with an opportunity to share ideas with individuals who might not otherwise understand them.”

That’s the impressive technology behind this weekly activity. But it’s the heart behind this activity that is more impressive. As Schnell read “Kitten’s First Full Moon,” one of the students, Riley, kept cracking jokes and bringing up one of his favorite movies, “Toy Story 4.” Schnell laughed every time. “You make my life, Riley.”


October 2019 | Community News | Section B

B7

THE DANGERS OF VAPING

Youth Use of E-cigarettes What Parents Need to Know

Knowing that youth are using e-cigarettes means parents should understand the potential risks, recognize signs of use, know how to talk to youth, and have access to resources to help them quit if necessary. In December 2018, the Surgeon General released an advisory calling the surging rate of youth e-cigarette use across the U.S. an epidemic. Our community is no exception. In Lancaster County, 9-12th graders who used an e-cigarette at least once in the last 30 days rose from 23.8 percent to 27.4 percent between 2015 and 2019. First, it is important to understand what e-cigarettes are. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that heat a liquid (e-juice) into an aerosol that users inhale. They are also known as Juuls, vapes, vape pens, mods, and more. E-juice contains propylene glycol or glycerin, harmful chemicals, flavorings and dyes, with many also having nicotine. E-juice can also consist of other substances like THC and CBD from marijuana. You cannot tell what is in the mixture by look or smell. Often, youth mistakenly believe these products are “harmless water vapor”. Unfortunately, e-cigarette aerosol is anything but harmless. It contains heavy metal particles, which embed deeply in the lungs, nicotine - an addictive chemical, and volatile organic compounds - some of which can cause cancer. Other people may also be exposed to these chemicals and heavy metals if they breathe secondhand aerosol. Youth use of e-cigarettes containing nicotine can cause lasting harm to the developing brain, which occurs until the age of 25. The effects of nicotine on the adolescent brain include attention span and mood disorders, learning disruptions, and addiction. Other risks of e-cigarette use include asthma attacks, nicotine poisoning, and severe pulmonary illness. The CDC is currently investigating over 450 cases of severe pulmonary illness across the U.S., many of which have affected young people. Due to increased youth e-cigarette use, it is important to recognize signs that your child may be using one of these products. Currently, the most popular e-cigarette is Juul. Juul devices resemble USB flash drives. Signs of use may include, odd smells of fruit or candy, sudden changes in mood or concentration, unexplained irritability or anxiety, and disappearing money or secrecy. Additionally, parents may find Juul pods, e-juice

bottles, or other paraphernalia in the home, backpack, or clothing. Recognizing these items can help parents identify possible e-cigarette use. To prevent e-cigarette use, parents should begin by talking to their children. Engaging in open and honest discussions about the dangers of using e-cigarettes helps prevent risky behavior. For those with younger children, ask them if they have heard of e-cigarettes, Juul, vaping, and other related terms. By understanding what they have heard, misinformation can be corrected. Also, parents can educate children that these products are harmful and not allowed for children under 19 (legal age in Nebraska as of January 1, 2020). When talking to older children and teen, parents can deepen the conversation with questions about what they know or think about e-cigarettes and the risks of using them. Based on answers, parents can engage their child in a dialogue about risks, peer pressure, family expectations, and the law regarding purchasing and using these products. To help a child quit e-cigarettes, there are several free resources. First, the Mayo Clinic and Truth Initiative created a text-to-quit program for youth and young adults. For access, text

“DITCHJUUL” to 88709. This connects youth to an age appropriate program that helps them quit. Another text-based resource exists for parents to help their child quit. Parents can text “QUIT” to (202) 899-7550 and receive tips and guidance. Finally, for youth 16 and older, the Nebraska Tobacco Quitline is available. This free resource can be accessed in over 150 languages by calling 1-800-QUITNOW (784-8669). For Spanish speakers, call 1-800-DEJELO-YA (335-3596). Along with free text and phone-based programs, healthcare providers can also provide assistance to youth and

families in need of help to quit. No matter where you are on your journey towards understanding and preventing youth e-cigarette use, it is important to know the risks, take action, and protect our kids. For additional resources contact the Lincoln-Lancaster County Tobacco Control Program at (402) 441-8045 or visit us online at www. tobaccofreelancastercounty.org. Funding provided by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services/Tobacco Free Nebraska Program as a result of the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement.


October 2019 | Community News | Section B

B8

THE DANGERS OF VAPING Community Awareness Series Promoting Healthy Behaviors Our youth are our future’s greatest asset. Schools, parents, caregivers and communities all play a role in providing supportive pathways for our youth as they navigate childhood and adolescence. SCIP (School Community Intervention and Prevention) is partnering with Lincoln Public Schools, Bryan Independence Center and the Lancaster Prevention Leadership Team to put on a series of valuable presentations about how to support the health and well-being of our community’s youth. These events are open to parents, students, school professionals and community members.

Let’s Talk: Youth Vaping & Marijuana Use Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019 Lincoln Southeast High School 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Research shows that families and influential adults play the most important role in preventing youth substance use. As part of National Health Education Week, this presentation will provide education and awareness surrounding two growing youth substance use issues as a means to promote conversations and healthy decision making. Marijuana continues to be one of the most prevalent substances of abuse among our youth and teen vaping is increasing at alarming rates. Rebekah Willoughby, a Public Health Educator with the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department and Deputy Jeremy Schwarz, a Licensed Drug Recognition Expert with the Lancaster County Sherriff’s Office, will discuss: • The prevalence of youth vaping and marijuana use • The effects of these substances on the developing youth brain • Physical health effects of vaping and marijuana use • The role of marketing in vaping and various products that youth are using • Legal aspects • Signs of use • How to engage in conversations with youth about vaping and marijuana • Resources to further address prevention and early intervention of use. Please contact Abbe Edgecombe, SCIP Coordinator for Lincoln-Lancaster County for questions or additional information: (402) 327-6841 or aedgecombe@lmep.com


October 2019 | Community News | Section B

B9


October 2019 | Community News | Section B

B10

Helping your kids build the base to be successful Michelle Welch, RD, LMNT District Wellness Facilitator We want a great future for our kids. What might we do now to set them up for success? Healthy: Parenting is tough work, and no one is perfect. Do everything you can to keep your kids at their healthy best. Sleep, nutrition, physical activity, and stress management skill-building strategies all are parts of the formula, as well as hand washing and regular health check-ups. One wellness resource for ideas: www.lps.org/wellness. Safe: Most of us as parents instantly think about online safety as we struggle to keep up with this changing landscape that wasn’t a part of our childhood. Staying vigilant about online safety is critical, along with keeping electronics in public places in your home and having electronic bedtimes. That said, we also need to ensure that we teach and model basic safety, such as crossing the street at crosswalks and wearing helmets when biking. Engaged: We know that students and families who take part in activities typically are also more successful in the classroom. How is your child part of their school community? Their neighborhood activities? Rather through afterschool clubs, CLC activities, music, sports or community activities, having connection to others is key. Find your school’s website and activity opportunities at www.lps.org. Supported: Sometimes as busy adults, we forget how critical positive time with our kids is. Feeling as though someone has your back and is lifting you up can be all the difference. At home, even 20 minutes of face time with an adult can make a child feel more connected and heard. Family meal or snack time can help, as can family reading time. Challenged: We love our kids and from the time they crawl and walk, we are watching for talents. We want them to find their best skills and make the most of them. That said, sometimes the channeling of kids into specialized, extreme competition may lead to life imbalance and burnout. Cherish and support your child’s skill, but most of all, focus on raising a balanced, kind, young adult who can win/lose gracefully while making friends along the way. Thank you for working in collaboration with our LPS team to build the brightest future for your student.


October 2019 | Community News | Section B

9/20/2019

OCTOBER 2019

/ Beattie Elementary OctoberBreakfast Breakfast MONDAY

TUESDAY Breakfast Beef Sausage Sandwich Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

Mini Confetti Pancake Bites Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Apple Juice Mixed Berry Cup

Cocoa Puffs Filled Pastry Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Apple Juice Mixed Berry Cup

No Elementary School

Mini Confetti Pancake Bites Frosted Flakes Cereal Chocolate Chip Oatmeal Bar Yogurt Apple Juice Mixed Berry Cup

7

14

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Egg & Cheese on English Muf�n Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

Rolled Egg, Potato & Turkey Sausage Taco Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

Breakfast Beef Sausage Sandwich Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

Egg & Cheese on English Muf�n Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal Super Stik Hard Boiled Egg Grape Juice Applesauce Cup

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9/20/2019

WEDNESDAY Cinnamon Bun Stick Froot Loops Cereal Mini Chocolate Chip Loaf Yogurt Orange Juice Apricot Cup

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Breakfast Bar Froot Loops Cereal Mini Chocolate Chip Loaf Yogurt Orange Juice Apricot Cup

Apple Stick Froot Loops Cereal Mini Chocolate Chip Loaf Yogurt Orange Juice Apricot Cup

Cinnamon Bun Stick Froot Loops Cereal Mini Chocolate Chip Loaf Yogurt Orange Juice Strawberry Cup

Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Breakfast Bar Froot Loops Cereal Mini Chocolate Chip Loaf Yogurt Orange Juice Strawberry Cup

2

9

16

23

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THURSDAY Pancake Sausage on a Stick Cocoa Flakes Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

Breakfast Pizza Cocoa Flakes Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Strawberry Cup

10

Pancake Sausage on a Stick Cocoa Flakes Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Apricot Cup Peach Cup

Breakfast Pizza Cocoa Flakes Cereal Mini Breakfast Bar Hard Boiled Egg Fruit Blend Juice Apricot Cup Peach Cup

24

FRIDAY Chocolate Crescent Apple Jacks Cereal Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Apple Cherry Juice Raisins

Mini Cinnis Apple Jacks Cereal Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Apple Cherry Juice Raisins

4

11

18

No School

Chocolate Crescent Apple Jacks Cereal Super Star Donut Hole Yogurt Apple Cherry Juice Raisins

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MealViewer Schools

MONDAY

OCTOBER 2019 TUESDAY

Muchos Nachos Country Beef Sandwich Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Roll

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Pizza Bites

7

w/Marinara Sauce

Chef Salad Veggie Burger Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

Chicken Nuggets Breaded Pork Sandwich Chef Salad Chik'n Nuggets Meatless Chef Salad Baked Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Roll

No Elementary School

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Pizza Bites

14

21

28

w/Marinara Sauce

Soft Shell Taco Chef Salad Cheese Ravioli Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Honeydew & Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Roll

Taco Chalupa Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Chef Salad Bean & Cheese Chalupa Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Cantaloupe Cubes Diced Peaches Roll

Muchos Nachos Country Beef Sandwich Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Sweet Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Roll

Soft Shell Taco Chef Salad Cheese Ravioli Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Orange Wedges Diced Peaches Roll

WEDNESDAY

1

8

15

22

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Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Chef Salad Stuffed Crust Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Nectarine Peach Applesauce Roll

Lemon Chicken on Brown Rice Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza Chef Salad Black Bean & Rice Bowl Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Plum and Grapes Applesauce Roll

Mac & Cheese Mexi Pizza Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Stuffed Wrap Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll Brownie Treat

Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Chef Salad Stuffed Crust Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Fresh Pear Applesauce Roll

Lemon Chicken on Brown Rice Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza Chef Salad Black Bean & Rice Bowl Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Banana Applesauce Roll

THURSDAY

2

9

16

23

30

https://schools.mealviewer.com/school/BeattleElementary/print?month=9&year=2019&blockId=1157 Chef Salad Personal Hamburger Pizza Veggie Burger Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

9/20/2019

Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad Chik'n Veggie Wrap Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Cantaloupe Cubes Diced Pears Roll Fat Free Strawberry Milk

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Hot Dog on Bun Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Cheese Sticks Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Cantaloupe Cubes Diced Pears Garlic Bread

TUESDAY

7

w/Marinara Sauce

Sloppy Joe on Bun Chef Salad Veggie Burger Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Chef Salad Chik'n Veggie Wrap Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Diced Pears Roll Fat Free Strawberry Milk

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Hot Dog on Bun Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Cheese Sticks Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Sweet Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Pears Garlic Bread Sugar Cookie

14

Soft Shell Taco Sub Sandwich Chef Salad Cheese Ravioli Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Honeydew & Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Garlic Breadstick Roll

Taco Chalupa Cherry Chicken on Brown Rice Honey Sriracha Boneless Wings Chef Salad Bean & Cheese Chalupa Meatless Chef Salad Golden Corn Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Cantaloupe Cubes Diced Peaches Jalapeno Cornbread Roll

1

8

15

WEDNESDAY Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Lasagna Chef Salad Stuffed Crust Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Nectarine Peach Applesauce Garlic Breadstick Roll

Lemon Chicken on Brown Rice Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza Nebraska Bun Chef Salad Black Bean & Rice Bowl Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Plum and Grapes Applesauce Roll

Mac & Cheese Mexi Pizza Hot Turkey Ham & Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Stuffed Wrap Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Grapes Applesauce Roll

2

9

16

THURSDAY Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Beef Teriyaki in Gravy over Potatoes Chef Salad Chik'n Veggie Wrap Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Cantaloupe Cubes Diced Pears Roll Fat Free Strawberry Milk

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Hot Dog on Bun Personal Hawaiian Pizza Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Cheese Sticks Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Cantaloupe Cubes Diced Pears Garlic Bread

No School

https://schools.mealviewer.com/school/BeattleElementary/print?month=9&year=2019&blockId=1157 Popcorn Chicken Cheeseburger on Bun Chef Salad Garlic French Bread Pizza with Marinara Sauce Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Strawberry Cup Pineapple Tidbits Croissant

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Pizza Bites w/Marinara Sauce

Personal Hamburger Pizza Sloppy Joe on Bun Chef Salad Veggie Burger Meatless Chef Salad Crinkle Fries Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Biscuit

10

24

4

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll Chocolate Chip Cookie

Breaded Chicken Sandwich Personal 3 Meat Pizza Chef Salad Chik'n Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

11

18

No School

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll Chocolate Chip Cookie

25

31 1/1

OCTOBER 2019

Muchos Nachos Country Beef Sandwich Philly Chicken Sub Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Watermelon Cubes Diced Peaches Jalapeno Cornbread Roll

Chicken Nuggets Breaded Pork Sandwich Pizza Flavored Breadsticks with Marinara Sauce Chef Salad Chik'n Nuggets Meatless Chef Salad Baked Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Wedges Pineapple Tidbits Roll

3

MealViewer Schools

MONDAY

Chicken Fingers Turkey Sausage & Cheese Pizza Bites

FRIDAY

17

No School

/ East High Lunch OctoberLunch Secondary

3

17

No School

OctoberLunch Elementary Lunch / Beattie Elementary

B11

MealViewer Schools

21

28

Muchos Nachos Country Beef Sandwich Philly Chicken Sub Chef Salad Black Bean Salsa Burger Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Sweet Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Peaches Jalapeno Cornbread Roll

Soft Shell Taco Sub Sandwich Chef Salad Cheese Ravioli Meatless Chef Salad Refried Beans Shredded Lettuce & Tomato Orange Wedges Diced Peaches Garlic Breadstick Roll

22

29

Tangerine Chicken on Brown Rice Lasagna Chef Salad Stuffed Crust Cheese Pizza Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Fresh Pear Applesauce Garlic Breadstick Roll

Lemon Chicken on Brown Rice Stuffed Crust Pepperoni Pizza Nebraska Bun Chef Salad Black Bean & Rice Bowl Meatless Chef Salad Sweet Peas Romaine Lettuce Salad Banana Applesauce Roll

23

30

Creamed Turkey on Whipped Potatoes Salisbury Steak Beef Teriyaki in Gravy over Potatoes Meat Loaf Chef Salad Chik'n Veggie Wrap Meatless Chef Salad Whipped Potatoes with Gravy Romaine Lettuce Salad Apple Diced Pears Roll Fat Free Strawberry Milk

Spaghetti and Meat Sauce Hot Dog on Bun Personal Hawaiian Pizza Chef Salad Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce and Cheese Sticks Meatless Chef Salad Baby Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Sweet Blueberries with Whipped Topping Diced Pears Garlic Bread Sugar Cookie

3

10

17

24

31

FRIDAY Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Fish & Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Tomato Soup Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

Breaded Chicken Sandwich Personal 3 Meat Pizza Chef Salad Cheese Omelet on English Muf�n Chik'n Sandwich Meatless Chef Salad Green Beans Romaine Lettuce Salad Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

No School

Corn Puppies Grilled Cheese Sandwich Fish & Cheese Sandwich Chef Salad Bean Burrito Meatless Chef Salad Savory Carrots Romaine Lettuce Salad Tomato Soup Mixed Fruit Assorted Fruit Roll

4

11

18

25

1/1


October 2019 | Community News | Section B

B12

Thank you, Mary Kay Roth

M

ary Kay Roth stood before a crowd of friends and family on Sept. 19 at the Science Focus Program at the Lincoln Children’s Zoo, all of them there to celebrate her retirement after more than 20 years of passionate service to Lincoln Public Schools. But in typical Roth form, she deflected the attention. Instead, she spoke about the cause that became her life’s work. “Public education is alive and well and thriving in Lincoln, Nebraska, and it has been my privilege to be part of the Lincoln Public Schools story and part of the Lincoln Public Schools community,” Roth said. Others, however, spoke about the privilege of working alongside Roth. “What Mary Kay brings is heart and soul to her work,” said John Neal, associate superintendent for governmental relations and general administration. “And sometimes people think heart and soul means effort – and Mary Kay’s always had effort, there’s not a question about effort – but she also brought heart. Loving, caring, respect - really important tenants. She left that in each of those projects. Each one of those projects had loving, caring, respectful outcomes. I applaud you for that.” Lincoln Board of Education President Lanny Boswell said Roth’s contributions to LPS and the Lincoln community will be felt for years to come. “The outpouring of support we have gained from our community is from the thoughtful planning and efforts from Mary Kay,” Boswell said. “It’s evident in the messages we hear on social media and in the news - those projects where she planted the seed and cultivated the relationships are blooming and we are reaping the rewards. The real winners here are the 42,000 students and the 8,000 staff members who feel the support and are lifted up by our community...Thank you - from all of us - for your perseverance, your devotion and your spirit. We wish you all the best as you begin the next chapter.” LPS Superintendent Steve Joel has worked closely with Roth since arriving in Lincoln 10 years ago. He said Thursday’s celebration event spoke volumes about her impact. “When we dedicate a life and a career to something, it’s really measured by who’s there when the journey comes to an end,” Joel said. “And as I look around this room, I realize - and I know Mary Kay does, too - that this has been a journey that has paid tremendous dividends for all of us in this room, 42, 000 students and a very grateful community. And for that, we thank you, Mary Kay.” Roth’s final day with LPS was Sept. 30. After that, she plans on spending more time with friends and family, including her two granddaughters; more time walking in nature; more time championing the many causes she holds dear to heart; and more time chasing that ever-elusive perfect sunrise.

Profile for Lincoln Public Schools

October 2019 Community News