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CONTEXT Lincoln is a currently a fifth year architecture student working towards a Bachelor of Architecture at The University of Texas at Austin. He will graduate in May 2016.

Before college, Lincoln lived abroad – in Azerbaijan, South America, and Southeast Asia – where he developed a passion for travel and exploring the identity of place.

In his time at UT Lincoln has cultivated an interest in teaching: working as a design assistant, research assistant, and senior preceptor at the university. He also served as UT Austin Chapter President of both the American Institute of Architecture Students and Tau Sigma Delta Honors Society.

Lincoln most recently finished a six month residency at Gray Organschi Architecture, a design/build office in New Haven, Connecticut. He has also worked for Matt Garcia Design and The National Building Museum, as well as participating independently in art festivals and competitions.

C O N TACT lincolndavidson.com lincolnd@utexas.edu 703.861.3366

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CONTENT ACADEMIC WORK austin rolling center | 5 artes + ciencias | 19 6200 north lamar boulevard | 29 core + interference | 35 design marfa | 41

PROFESSIONAL WORK pemberton place greenhouse | 51 starlight park comfort station | 55 woodland house screen | 61

INSTALLATIONS + RESEARCH wind sock | 69 computation + compression | 75 light instrument one | 79

CURRICULUM VITAE resume | 85

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ACADEMIC WORK austin rolling center | 5 artes + ciencias | 19 6200 north lamar boulevard | 29 core + interference | 35 design marfa | 41

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AUSTIN ROLLING CENTER Spring 2014 | Design Six: Sound Building Professor Judith Birdsong

The Austin Rolling Center is a proposal for a bowling alley/roller rink in downtown Austin. The building sits at 7th and Red River, connecting one of Austin’s busiest entertainment districts to the planned green belt along Waller Creek. The design consists of a 14 bay rigid frame structure that transitions from an inviting gable on the street side into an open shed on the creek side. The humble metal structure pays tribute to the decorated sheds that most bowling alleys and roller rinks are housed in, while making use of Austin’s extensive prefabricated metal construction industry. The project is clad in a perforated metal skin that integrates signage and a mural into the facade.

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PATH The entire structure is bisected by a 20 foot wide precast concrete pathway that connects the urban fabric of the city to the greenbelt along Waller Creek. It serves as both a grand entrance to the new park and as a second store front that charges The Rolling Center ’s spaces with pedestrian traffic and activity. The path itself is conceived of as a linear park, It provides spaces to sit, watch, eat, and play. The path slopes down 12 feet over its 300 foot run: from the height of the urban street to become a bridge across the creek. Along its length it provides bench seating, becomes bleachers, stairs, a railing, pops up as signage, provides a reception desk, elevator housing, and channels water out between the two buildings. A similar precast pathway makes up the building’s loading dock, which provides access to a courtyard along the buildings south side for Austin’s many food trucks.

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1 | Preforated Zink Fascia, Mounted on 1/2" Hat Channels 2 | Rigid Steel Portal Frame, Prefab Sections Welded on Site 3 | Aluminum Window System 4 | Precast 8" Hollow Core Concrete Pavers 5 | Standing Seam Metal Roof over 1" Corrugated Steel 6 | Double Layer Cold Rolled C-Section Structure 7 | 1" Corrugated Metal, Rigid Insulation, and Ceiling Finish 8 | 8" Concrete Slab over 2" Decking 9 | Metal Gaurd Rail w/ Tensioned Cables 10 | W 12 Secondary Structure, Bolted Connections 11 | Undulating Mesh Drop Cieling Conceals Systems

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ARTES + CIENCIAS Spring 2015 | Advanced Design - Studio Mexico Professor Benjamin Ibarra-Sevilla With Molly McNamara and Izabella Dennis Artes y Ciencias is an adaptive reuse and addition proposal for a historic university building in Oaxaca, Mexico. The university is rapidly expanding and finds itself in need of more classrooms and student housing. Our design also incorporates a museum, focused on the history of the university and archaeological richness of the site, and commercial retail spaces. These additional programs aim to catalyze interaction with the street and city beyond, further embedding the university in the community and culture of its place. The design carefully considers the sensitive historical context of the 1898 building, following guidelines established by UNESCO. The project is capped at four stories to preserve existing sight-lines, while stucco on the exterior façade blends into the immediate context. A new architectural language is introduced within the project’s interior courtyards. The building’s framed infill system is exposed, revealing the concrete and brick beneath. The addition is covered in a wood screen, which breaks away from the building to create pavilions and shaded outdoor space throughout the project. The interstitial spaces between the addition and original building generate a dialog between this contemporary language in wood and the historic university’s classical masonry.

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COURTYARD ONE | ADDITION 22


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COURTYARD TWO | ADAPTATION 28


6200 NORTH LAMAR BOULEVARD Spring 2013 | Design 4 Professor Charlton Lewis

Design for an apartment complex on North Lamar in Austin, Texas. The project explores a modular timber frame structure with curtain wall infill. The frames are assembled into 10’ x 10’ blocks, the blocks are then assembled and stacked as small communities. These clusters are then placed among the sites many existing trees, creating a meandering path way that links the major corridor of North Lamar Boulevard to the quiet neighborhood just beyond it. The buildings touch the ground lightly, minimizing impermeable cover in a suburban neighborhood where asphalt normally dominates.

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1/4” UNIT MODEL

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FIRST FLOOR/SITE PLAN 31


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CORE + INTERFERENCE Fall 2013 | Design 5 Professor Clay Shortall

CORE explores the potential for parametric systems to generate solutions to practical problems in architecture, specifically the relationship of a highrise’s footprint to its fire core. Our studio project was the design a highrise on a site that is heavily restricted by Austin’s Capital View Corridor (CVC). The CVC cut our site into 4 pieces, only one of which was unrestricted vertically. I produced a Grasshopper definition that analyzes a proposed building’s height, floor to floor, total square-footage, fire stair requirements, elevator requirements, and IBC restrictions to determine the most efficient floor plan and fire core for a triangular site. This process reduces the size of the buildings circulation space to 20% of total floor area, rather than the original 33% it would have to take up with a triangular floor plate. The data generated from this analysis was then used by the majority of the class in their design, as it allowed the practical concerns of the buildings core to adapt to any proposed massing or floor plate.

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70’ Fire Stair Seperation

45’ Fire Stair Seperation

3.22 Plate/Area Ratio 14’ Floor to Floor

3.33 Plate/Area Ratio 12’ Floor to Floor

4.12 Plate/Area Ratio 15’ Floor to Floor

4.21 Plate/Area Ratio 18’ Floor to Floor

4.33 Plate/Area Ratio 16’ Floor to Floor

4.58 Plate/Area Ratio 14’ Floor to Floor

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INTERFERENCE Following the exploration of CORE the final design project for this studio looked at how parametric processes can generate form: exploring phenomenal aspects of design like connection, view, and light. INTERFERENCE refers to a combination of patterns (view, proximity, light) to generate a wave function in which relationships are reinforced. This phase of the project explores the connections between programs in order to determine the desirability of space within each floor, as well as the shape of each floor and the massing of the building. Each floor plate is represented by a wave function that responds to the desirability of the space. As spaces gain access to natural light and views their amplitude increases. (3D printed above) This diagram was then used to quantify the qualities of spaces, allowing for a highly rational resolution of the final form. The diagram was incorporated into the earlier CORE grasshopper definition to create an entirely new form. Through this process the project explores the potential for parametric design to confront both objective and subjective aspects of architectural design. 37


INTERFERENCE and CORE are reconciled to create a building that responds to both subjective qualities (of view, light, and proximity) and the objective effi ciency of the highrise’s fire core.

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DESIGN MARFA Fall 2014 | Advanced Design: Interiors Professor Clay Odom

This Design Marfa competition entry served primarily as a catalyst to explore how spaces are programed, and how program leads to the generation of form. The process began with an extensive catalogue of the activities that make up living (cook, eat, sleep, play, study, etc.) The programs were then related to each other (cook - eat) and to specific site conditions (study - light). This data was fed through a grasshopper definition that explored ideal programmatic relationships and orientations, generating a series of diagrams that could be used to generate a residential unit. Each unit generated by this process is unique. It provides a particular solution to the specific programmatic needs of the residents and the unit’s location on the site. For the competition only one unit, a one bed/one bath, was developed, but the process would be the same for every other unit on the property. As the units are developed they begin to merge together, creating a perimeter on the block with a large shared courtyard in the center. The irregular shape in plan generates a variety of smaller spaces with different levels of privacy: patio’s shared by several units or spaces that belong to only one. The unit is rationalized with the needs of Marfa in mind, particularly the small town’s isolation. The units are constructed of adobe masonry and steel, which are both available locally. Adobe also maximizes the thermal mass of the building to make use of Marfa’s large diurnal temperature swing. The buildings steel elements allow the adobe to be restrained in it’s geometry, while the steel provides the complex forms generated by the parametric process.

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1 Bed/1 Bath UNIT FLOOR PLAN 42 2


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PROCESS The programs and subprograms are arranged as a data set. This data set is fed through a grasshopper definition that attempts to organize the programs in to an efficient arrangement based on programmatic affinity and site context and site context.. The diagram begins to explore sectional space; each program is assigned a diagrammatic section based on its specific needs, and these geometries begin to merge, creating form. The last step is the rationalization of form: surfaces are cleaned up and become material,. The unit become functional.

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SITE PLAN The geometry generated by the Grasshopper definition and the ensuing process creates a unique form for each unit in the complex. The rambling plans of the units each address the site in a particular way: they deal with access points, light, utilities, and view. This irregular massing breaks up the 16 unit apartment complex, helping it relate to the scale of the surrounding single family residential neighborhood, Units begin to merge together, sharing utilities or wet walls. Meanwhile the spaces between the units provide private outdoor space at a variety of scales and varying levels of privacy. The aggregation of the various units also forms a loose central courtyard, providing a space for community gathering or large events. This combination of extensive “owned� and community spaces begins to merge features of the single family home and the multi-family apartment complex into a single development, creating a hybrid housing type appropriate to Marfa.

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PROFESSIONAL WORK pemberton place green house | 51 starlight park comfort station | 55 woodland house screen | 61

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PEMBERTON PLACE GREENHOUSE Summer 2014 Matt Garcia Design For Matt Garcia, with Nicole Meizer

I led the design of a greenhouse and hot tub at Pemberton Place. The project consists of a board-formed concrete structure that is embedded into a south facing hillside creating a outdoor terrace for entertaining with a hot tub and a greenhouse below. The greenhouse features custom steel windows and louvers to regulate temperature and humidity. The project is currently under construction with completion expected in mid to late 2016.

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S TA R L I G H T PA R K C O M F O R T S TAT I O N Fall 2015 Gray Organschi Architecture For Alan Organschi and Lisa Gray, with David Sheerin Starlight was one of several projects re-awakening after the recession. There was little memory of the design’s status (the associate in charge had left the office), so I was tasked with an exhaustive redlining and evaluation of the project. From there I proceeded to update and expand the projects drawings from 50% Design Development to a 100% Bid Set - under the supervision of Senior Associate David Sheerin. These changes involved a completely new mechanical design, a nearly complete re-detailing, several updates for code compliance, and a reworking of structural drawings for constructibility. I coordinated these changes with the projects structural and mechanical engineers, and also helped manage the various New York State and City departments who had a stake in the project.

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WOODLAND HOUSE SCREEN Fall 2015 Gray Organschi Architecture For Alan Organschi and Lisa Gray By the time I arrived at Gray Organschi Architecture the clients had already moved into the Woodland House, only a few finishing touches were missing. A wood screen needed to be installed on the front facade, and the green roof needed to be installed and planted. I was tasked with the comprehensive design, fabrication, and installation of the wood screen. Only a vague outline of the screen had been designed - room had been left for it, but nothing else had been determined. I designed a mechanically fastened panelized bent wood system to screen the wall. I was also a member of the team that installed and seeded the green roof.

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PROCESS The wood screen was designed primarily through a back and forth process of drawing and full scale modeling. The desired configuration was drawn, then laid out temporarily using clamps, the actual geometry of the panel then influenced the drawings. This process was repeated until we were satisfied with the design. Once the typical panel was configured a partial mock up was fabricated and installed to test attachments and fit. Accurate as-built drawings were then produced to guide the fabrication of the entire system. Over 160 unique pieces were then cut and drilled for final assembly.

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INSTALLATIONS+RESEARCH wind sock | 69 computation + compression | 75 light instrument one | 79

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WIND SOCK Fall 2014 | Construction 5 Professor Judy Birdsong With Cameron Benson Wind Sock is a proposed installation in Sutton Hall at The University of Texas School of Architecture. The project aims to make students aware of the buildings unused (nailed shut) natural ventilation system by running a fabric structure through the building. The fabric gives air substance, alerting passerby of the presence of the buildings old systems. Students can manipulate the flexible fabric form as though it were a column of air. The installation connects to the existing window frames using a series of shims to generate compression. It touches the frames lightly, preventing damage to the buildings historic fabric.

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COMPUTATION + COMPRESSION Fall 2013 | Material Information Professor Danelle Briscoe With Alex Dallas and Zach Walters Support from Nichole Wiedemann and Escobedo Construction This project explores geometric form finding and the construction of compression only structures in dry stacked stone. Compression only vaults are defined by their stability and geometry, so we created a parametric process in Grasshopper that allows for the manipulation of inherently stable geometries to create unique form. The arch that the definition creates is divided using a hybrid grid, generating a minimally distorted system of interlocking masonry units that can be fabricated on a 3-axis CNC router. Properties of both an orthogonal grid (as is applied to a vault) and a radial grid (as is applied to a dome) are merged. The final form tapers at the apex for structural efficiency and load distribution, units at the peak of the arch would be only 2 inches thick while units at it’s base are 6 inches. In addition, the parametric system minimizes the warping of the faces between adjacent hexagonal components, creating a smooth continuous vault surface In order to evaluate this process, we fabricated a full scale portion of the arch in limestone and a 1” = 1’ model of the completed arch.

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LIGHT INSTRUMENT ONE Spring 2013 | The Cohen New Works Festival With Alex Dallas and Michael Rahmatoulin

In our daily lives the qualities and impact of light can often go unappreciated. Light Instruments aims to draw in UT students and New Works Festival attendees, creating a moment of observance, as light is captured and presented to the viewer. The project consists of a modular system installed in the Payne Theater Lobby at The University of Texas Campus. The system is composed of a series of triangular light diffusion modules, that work together to create a continuous surface. Each element allows natural light though, creating a pattern of diffuse and colored light. I led the design and implementation of the installation, including producing drawings, writing the festival application, and the final laser cutting of the 1020 modules in the installation.

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RESUME PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE GRAY ORGANSCHI ARCHITECTURE/JIG DESIGN BUILD | NEW HAVEN, CT resident/associate | june - december 2015 Developed designs and construction documents for a wide range of projects: from the comprehensive design/build of a wood screen to the construction administration of Common Ground High School. Guided Starlight Comfort Station, a NYC parks project, though a set of highly scrutinized reviews, managing engineers and finalizing construction documentation for the project. Produced renderings and physical models for client presentations.

MATT GARCIA DESIGN | AUSTIN, TX intern architect | may 2013 - september 2014 Contributed to the schematic design and development of various residential projects. Led the design of the Pemberton Place Orchid Greenhouse. Produced construction documents, including the integration of a car elevator into a house. Worked closely with both clients and contractors to realize projects. Created illustrations, renderings, and models for the office's portfolio and presentations. Generated detailed digital models for design development, visualization, and digital fabrication.

ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN | AUSTIN, TX senior preceptor | january - may 2016 Worked alongside Professor Erika Bsumek to teach Building America, a history class that examines the country’s development through resource allocation and infrastructure. Directed the presentation segment of the class: working to improve students’ public speaking skills and narrative clarity in presentations.

design assistant | january - may 2015 Worked closely with Professor Charlton Lewis to teach Design Four, a studio focused on urban planning and housing in Austin. Developed lesson plans, guided students’ designs, provided technical advice and tutorials, and participated in desk crits and reviews.

research assistant | january - may 2014 Worked closely with Professor Benjamin Ibarra Sevilla to complete his research on the open air chapel of San Pedro y San Pablo Teposcolula in Oaxaca, Mexico. Contributed parametric analysis of the constructive and geometric features of the 16th century chapel using point-cloud data to determine the original design geometry developed by the architects 400 years ago.

THE NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM | WASHINGTON, D.C. investigating where we live intern | june - august 2012 Wrote and developed lesson plans for National Building Museum Summer Programs. Taught lessons on photography, drawing, painting, and urban studies to DC area high school students. Ultimately led students in the design and completion of a year long exhibition on the DC neighborhood of Anacostia.

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EDUCATION THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN bachelor of architecture | may 2016 | gpa 3.94

LEADERSHIP TAU SIGMA DELTA HONORS SOCIETY | president | july 2014 - july 2015 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE | dean’s ambassador | march 2014 - may 2016 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE | student mentor | july 2013 - may 2016 AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS | president | july 2013 - july 2014 AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS | aia liaison | july 2012 - july 2013

RECOGNITION C. WILLIAM BRUBAKER/PERKINS+WILL ENDOWED PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP | fall 2015 JANET C. AND WOLF E. JESSEN ENDOWED PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP | fall 2015 COUPLING DESIGN COMPETITION | first place | spring 2015 CHARLES M. NETTLES ENDOWED PRESIDENTIAL SCHOLARSHIP | fall 2014 SOUND BUILDING WITH DISTINCTION | spring 2014 COLLEGE SCHOLAR | spring 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 THE NEW WORKS FESTIVAL SELECTION | light instruments | spring 2013 THE NEW WORKS FESTIVAL SELECTION | perceiving campus | spring 2013

SKILLS PROFESSIONAL | construction documents, construction administration, consultant coordination, client presentations DIGITAL | rhino, grasshopper, flamingo, v-ray, revit, dynamo, auto cad, t-splines, vectorworks, sketchup, adobe cc, extendscipt cc, python, visual basic ANALOG | sketching, drafting, tone, pastel, model making FABRICATION | laser cutting, 3d printing, cnc, carpentry, masonry, concrete

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lincolndavidson.com | lincolnd@utexas.edu | 703.861.3366


Lincoln Davidson | Selected Works 2016  
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