Page 1

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO ISSUE

04.15

SEL ECTED W OR K S F ROM M.ARCH I PRO GRAM AT YAL E UN I V E R I ST Y 2013-2014 architecture

+professional +others


ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO ISSUE 04.15

web edition


CONTACT INFORMATION N

LILA JIANG CHEN

A

80 HOWE ST. #105 NEW HAVEN, CT 06511 UNITED STATES

T E

203-507-1232 LILA.JIANG@GMAIL.COM

PRINTED AT YALE UNIVERSITY PRINTING & PUBLISHING SERVICES IN NEW HAVEN, CT ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2014


01 dance machine 13 higher ground 25 building project 33 UPenn SoA

OTHERS

51 gehry-go-round 53 ipms origami 55 formal analysis 57 drawing 59 free speech kit

PROFESSIONAL

61 george friedman 63 raw design 65 CV

index

ARCHITECTURE


arc hitecture

01 dance machine 13 higher ground 25 building project 33 UPenn SoA


01

01

ARCHITECTURE


[ LOCATION ] PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANNIA, USA [ DURATION ] 4 MONTHS [ ACADEMIC ] YSOA // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN // MIMI HOANG [ YEAR ] U2, FALL 2014 [ INDIVIDUAL ]

TRADITIONAL PROGRAM

UPenn SoA

ARCH + LANDSCAPE

PLANNING

DESIGN + VISUAL

ARCH UNDERGRAD

The REFAB studios reflect a hands-on approach as they are designed as collaborative workshop spaces. The fabrication equipment is integrated to the assembly and instruction spaces to encourage the translation of ideas into reality. Conceptually the studios are clustered and organized around gathering spaces that are linked. To create a balanced distribution of studio spaces to ancillary common spaces, an organizational system was devised based on circulation patterns. The system is based on double height gathering spaces and simple rules of circulation that creates vertical connections through them.

UPPER YEARS

CORE STUDIOS

REFAB LABS

HIERARCHICAL BREAKDOWN

The traditional Beaux-Arts program is very hierarchical with a prescriptive program in which first-year students have little change to interact with upper-years, let alone another faculty. The new proposal seeks redistribute the student body into a non-hierarchical, interdisciplinary option studios based on topic of interest rather than by levels. These studios are focused on research and fabricationthe REFAB Labs. Each REFAB lab has a specific quota per faculty, and students apply into the studio they are interested in. Everyone enters the same CORE studios during the first year (in every discipline), but afterwards year-based distinction is eliminated.

1ST YEARS

NEW PROGRAM

Adjacency does not equal collaboration: The design of an interdisciplinary school of architecture for Upenn takes on this premise, not by housing different faculties in the same building, but by re-designing the program‘s curriculum and how people work together.

UPENN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

02


MOVEMENT-BASED UNIT

GROUP MODULE

UNIT MODULE

RELATIONSHIPS

9

8

GR EE N

7

CA M

PU

S

6

PRIV & PUBATE LIC

5

DA

DE

AD

STADIUM

4

3

2

O N TI EC RS IN TE IN

ZA

A

A

M

PL

ARCHITECTURE

NT

03

O

-1

FR

G

A RE

studio

gathering


Long range BUILDING CONTEXT

Close range

activity

Long range axis

New “grand” Campus Entry Plaza

Close range

monolith

Long range STUDY MODELS

UPENN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

04


CROSS SECTION AA EAST-WEST

FLOOR PLANS BB 6141

AA 6141

1416 1416 1416

ground

05

ARCHITECTURE

/ main entrance

1104

4011

1104

4011

6141

1st - core studios


TRANSVERSAL SECTION BB NORTH-SOUTH

4011

1416

6141

1416

1104

B - auditorium

2nd - classrooms

3rd - refab construction

4th - refab construction

5th - refab assembly

6th - refab assembly

7th - pro research

8th - admin

UPENN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

06


t: new campus entrance plaza b: second floor common space

07

ARCHITECTURE


composition of the

STORAGE - DISPLAY

SHADING

building envelope

The white, neutral storage walls are waiting to be energized with an everchanging landscape of works and ideas.

learning areas social areas

MATERIALITY & BUILDING ENVELOPE

MASSING MODELS

The main value in architecture school is the production of ideas that live on through the different means of production: boards, models, diagrams, drawings, etc.- most of which are lost when the physical materials are thrown away. The concept of the walls is therefore to provide a space where students can store their work as a way to share ideas and inspire. It is also an instrument of self-promotion and transparency within the school (scholarship awarding). With the REFAB labs in which students have to apply into the studio whose topic interests them, the walls also serve as an advertisement for the course. The white, neutral storage walls are waiting to be energized with an ever-changing landscape of works and ideas. The spacing and depth of the wall rings changes to perform different functions: visiblity and privacy control, shelving, tables, seating, hand-rail, etc. These are hung from steel cables to emphasize the horizontal bar-code reading. The glass becomes undulating like hung fabric on the double height common spaces. Coupled with the white fritted pattern whose density decreases as it reaches the ground, it reads as a dematerializing milky curtain.

UPENN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

08


09

ARCHITECTURE MIDTERM MODEL THE CORE STUDIOS ARE THE TRUNK FROM WHICH THE UPPER REFAB LABS BRANCH OUT


THE CONTINUOUS LANGUAGE OF THE RINGS BLURS

THEY EXTEND TO CONCEIL THE STRUCTURE AND

THEY ALSO PERFORM MUTIPLE FUNCTIONS BY

THE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN FLOORS.

PROVIDE A UNIFIED LOOK.

VARYING DEPTH AND SPACING.

OFFICES

FACULTY

RESEARCH

REFAB LABS + FABRICATION STUDIOS

RESEARCH

CLASSROOMS

CORE STUDIOS

E-W SECTION

10


11

ARCHITECTURE


Its siting, lightness, and height becomes a new beacon of light on campus, standing out as an identifiable icon within the surrounding buildings.

UPENN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

12


02

13

ARCHITECTURE


EL

PIER 64

CHELSE A WATERSIDE PARK

W EST 2 3 R D ST R E E T

H U DSO N RI VER

W EST 2 2 N D ST R E E T

CLEMENT CL ARKE MOORE PARK W EST 2 1 ST ST R E E T

G ALLERY D I ST RICT

CH

E

A LSE

PIE

W EST 2 0 T H ST R E E T

W EST 1 9 T H ST R E E T

RS

F ULTO N HOUSES W EST 1 8 T H ST R E E T

W EST 1 7 T H ST R E E T

W EST 1 4 T H ST R E E T

ON

SITE

STR EET

PIE

4 R5

GA

HO

SELECTED FOR YEAR-END EXHIBITION

NS

RA

EV

TIO

J

WA

O

ST

ING

WE

TO T NS RE

RE

ST

1

ST

RE

H 2T

BE

T

ST

RE

ET

ET ET

ST

N HU

ET

H U DSO N R IVER PA R K

T OR

E AN

SH

The project started with an exercise studying and exploring an important architectural monument in the city. Based on that typology, distilled ideas relating to its usage, program, circulation, operation, and context, were applied to the design of the Dance Machine. The monument studied was Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum. The most salient aspect is indeed its continuous circulation, but more crucial than the ramp itself, how adjacent galleries connect to the main thoroughfare. Each one of these sub-galleries serve as a different repository of culture drawn from all over the world. The unrolled plan of the Guggenheim shows this space-thoroughfare relationship that parallels the High Line- the difference being that the spectacle of the city as a contemporary gallery of urban life scenes is what draws in the crowds onto the High Line.

W EST 1 3 T H ST R E E T

H A

7 R5

E IG H T

PIE

DS

[ LOCATION ] HIGH LINE, NEW YORK, USA [ DURATION ] 2 MONTHS [ ACADEMIC ] YSOA // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN // JOYCE HSIANG [ YEAR ] U1, FALL 2013 [ INDIVIDUAL ]

W EST 1 5 T H ST R E E T

M E AT PAC K IN G D IST R ICT HU

Dance Machine

W EST 1 6 T H ST R E E T

CHELSE A MARKET

RE

T ES

BA

ABINGD SQUARE

ET

NK

RE ST

ET RE

ET

Faced with the imminent high-rise development TH 11 surrounding the Meatpacking district section of W E ST the High Line due to dubious zoning exemptions, the design of this new multistory dance theatre seeks to preserve the vital connection between the High Line’s users and the city of New York. W ESTBETH ART IST HOUSING

It becomes clear that preserving the spatial openness and accessibility of the High Line is an important cause to consider in the design. Faced with the imminent high-rise development surrounding the Meatpacking district section of the High Line due to dubious zoning exemptions, the dance theatre seeks to preserve the vital connection between the High Line’s users and the city of New York. The porous, fluid form of the building provides an unimpeded enjoyment of the city’s urban spectacle. The bottom public-private portion of the building houses a flexible performance and events space that can open and directly engage the street. This is important as the space leasability increases, raising capital for the small theatre company. The top section of the building is dedicated to users affiliated to the company, either as resident dancers, or as members of the public taking dance classes.

DANCE MACHINE

14

ST

RE

ET


section of guggenheim as central space SecƟon of Guggenheim as central space.

Unrolled guggenheim: relaƟonship between event space and thoroughfare. A series of “guggen” spaces, where even

Sec�on of Guggenheim as central space.

Unrolled guggenheim: rela�onship between event space and thoroughfare. A series of “guggen” spaces, where events happen, are a�ached to the main circula�o

SITE ZONING

BUILDING COMPONENTS

BASE

1.

Visual / Structural

BASE High Line Connec�on; high line connection; outdoors “guggen” space. outdoors “guggen” space.

empty lots adjacent to high line

High Line PRIMARY WALLS Envelopes program, PRIMARY STRUCTURE creates main volumetric massing. envelopes program, create main volumetric massing.

2.

maximum buildup under zoning exemption.

SECONDARY STRUCTURE

INTERIOR WALLS Complements support second structural system, system, separates internalseparates program. internal program.

3.

conserving public access and visual sightlines

PRIVATE dance company and Administra�on

7th Fl

affiliated programs Dance company, people

affiliated with the programs

Dance classrooms

interstitial space created 4th Fl

PUBLIC-PRIVATE Guggen-space public events, shows Public Plaza/Performance/ Event Space

6th Fl

“GUGGEN” SPACE5th Fl

“Guggen” Space

Public, people coming to events/shows

3rd,Fl by all the set of walls

housing public program.

High Line

Ground

15

ARCHITECTURE


guggenheim: relationship between event space and thoroughfare. nts happen, are aƩached to theunrolled main circulaƟon, just as peripheral programs are aƩached to the High Line.

a series of “guggen” spaces, where events

happen, are attached to the main circulation, just as peripheral programs are attached to the high line.

SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS

Back

CirculaƟon

Visual / Structural

Front

Lookout

High Line

LEVELS Front

Back

MASSING

7th Fl 6th Fl 5th Fl 4th Fl 3rd Fl

High Line

Ground

PROGRAM

DANCE MACHINE

16


11 9

FLOOR PLANS 10

11 2ND FLOOR

5TH FLOOR

14

10

11

11 3RD FLOOR

6TH FLOOR

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

flexible theatre stage backstage services lobby reception office coat room washrooms outdoors theatre

- high line

dance studio atrium space public lounge cafe dancer’s lounge offices/administration terrace

10 11

13

15 16

12

11

4TH FLOOR

8

7TH FLOOR

8 4

6

4

2

1

7

street entrance

GROUND FLOOR

17

ARCHITECTURE

street entrance

3 5


STUDY MODELS

DANCE MACHINE

18


l: north-south transverse section r: east-west cross section

19

ARCHITECTURE


sections depicting the warm tones of the materials lining the gathering spaces on the interior and exterior. neutral colors line the “work� spaces in the dance machine.

DANCE MACHINE

20


scale model

1/16” = 1’ - 0”

l: front view from washington street m: back view from the hudson river r: top view showing then high line connection

21

ARCHITECTURE


the two main grand circulation cores provide a profile consisting of steps where the public can sit and relax with a panoramic view of the city. one core faces downtown manhattan, while the other core looks out into the hudson river.

DANCE MACHINE

22


23

ARCHITECTURE


The porous, fluid form of the building provides an unimpeded enjoyment of the city’s urban spectacle.

DANCE MACHINE

24


03

25

ARCHITECTURE


SURFACE PLAY

UNDEGROUND MAKE

Higher Ground [ LOCATION ] HAMDEN, CONNECTICUT, USA [ DURATION ] 1 MONTH [ ACADEMIC ] YSOA // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN // JOYCE HSIANG [ YEAR ] U1, FALL 2013 [ INDIVIDUAL ] PUBLISHED IN RETROSPECTA 37

The project arises from the desire to maintain the character of the site by keeping the balance of building volume to outdoors green space unchanged. The design approach is therefore one that merges the new addition into the landscape, generating a playful outdoors space and an underground pocket for workshop classes. The location of the existing trees was used as attractor points in the generation of the undulating landscape, with some of the trees on their original location as reminders perforating through the surface. A series of parametric openings creates an ethereal space with natural light, and also provides direct entry points into the underground spaces through a gradually ramping surface. The set of ramps and openings form part of a circulation network that allow the users to seamlessly weave in and out of the landscape and in contact with the river and the topography.

HIGHER GROUND

26


scale model

L: view from river, 1/16” = 1’ - 0” R: view from site entrance, 1/8” = 1’ - 0”

TOPOGRAPHY

The Eli Whitney Museum serves as a handson learning center for children. Part of the approach is to allow children the freedom to witness and experiment directly with nature. Preserving its relationship to outdoors is essential to this direct contact. The project offers the users a two-fold grounds expansion: the top maintains a play-ground like topography in which kids can freely move about the site, while the bottom offers protected spaces to more structured workshops. Site navigation is presented as a gradual meandering within the surface topography, many alternative pathways encourage circulation. Weaving in and out of the site, the new expansion also seamlessly brings people closer to the water edge.

27

ARCHITECTURE


ees, original posi on

ees, reposi oned

LIGHT DIFFRACTION STUDY

HIGHER GROUND

28


SECTION aa

SECTION bb

SecƟon bb

SecƟon aa

SECTION cc SecƟon cc

SECTION dd SecƟon dd

UNDERGROUND PLAN

Storage

dd

Play Hill

Above Ground

Workshop/ExhibiƟon Above Ground

Storage

Play Hill

W/C

W/C

Cafe

cc

Plan of underground

29

ARCHITECTURE

bb

aa


scale model

1/8” = 1’ - 0”

sections through the site showing interior spaces and relationship to the landscape

HIGHER GROUND

30


“I’m imagining water running in under this thing and the whole surface being coated with a reflective thin sheet of water, and light bouncing off of that.” - Mark Tsurumaki

31

ARCHITECTURE


HIGHER GROUND

32


04

33

ARCHITECTURE


[ LOCATION ] NEW HAVEN, CONNETICUT, USA [ DURATION ] 2 MONTHS [ ACADEMIC ] YSOA // ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN // [ YEAR ] U1, SPRING 2014 [ TEAM D ] +ANTHONY GAGLIARDI, ANNE MA, MADELYNN RINGO, CYNTHIA HSU, CHARLES KANE, SEOKIM NIM, CAITLIN THISSEN

NUE P AVE HRO WINT

Building Project

SCRA NTON STREE T

bringing in the urban domain. exploiting the potential of narrow sites.

FLEXIBLE LIVING

BP PROJECT WINNING TEAM

office office

CONNECTICUT GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL - STUDENT AWARD owner owner

owner owner owner

This flexible microhouse prototype explores the potential of left-over, undersized lots in the city by transforming them into a landscape extension of the interior living space, benefitting the owners and improving the quality of the neighborhood. It also tests flexible living arrangements as a model for young professionals who can eventually turn office it into a multi-generational house. owner

tenant tenant

owner owner

owner owner owner

tenant tenant tenant

office

office owner owner owner

owner owner owner

The Jim Vlock First-Year Building Project is design-build studio at Yale University’s first year spring semester. The 2014 edition features the design of prototype house of 800 square foot at 179 Scranton Street in New Haven. The house is divided into a 500 sf homeowner unit, and a leasable 300 sf tenant unit. Our proposal emphasizes a flexible living arrangement on three floors strategically mediated by the circulation core. As an affordable house for young professionals, part of it can be leased fully tenant out, turned into an office, or eventually owner occupied by the owner. tenant tenant owner of the front porch as a place for social tenantinWith a strong tradition teraction, the house is set back on the site to create a courtyard, a owner owner welcoming spatial relief to the urban formula of building right up to the sidewalk. Gradually, this microhouse prototype seeks to re-invigorate the city by turning its left-over sliver lots into buildable sites while greening the neighborhood.

office owner owner office

office

tenant owner owner

tenant tenant

office tenant tenant

owner owner office

BUILDING PROJECT

office

34


DESIGN PROCESS

STUDY MODELS

35

ARCHITECTURE


1

2

3

That Looks like fun!

3 FLOORS 28 FEET

2

1

4

5

6

7

8

9

1

the house is set back on the site creating a courtyard. the house aligns to the row of backyards, subdividing the continuous

2 3

4

taller to accomodate

5

the new cube is

20’

x

3

floors.

23’

7

the maximum height-to-setback is

3rd

front, separated by a planted stoop mail.

setbacks, frontyard, and backyard.

6

the public domain threshold at the and containing a half-wall for the

to

accomodate for the uneven side

green belt and providing spatial relief to the lateral windows.

the original cube becomes thinner and

2:1.

8

storey, the sides

the middle yard serves as a transition between the public and private, and

the front yard becomes a planted

to allow for a

garden that provides privacy, at the

are faceted to fit within the definition

allows ample space for activities such

same time it becomes a welcoming

of exposed face, which is taken as the

urban gesture expanding on the

average between the low point and

protected, lushly planted private

tradition of the front porch.

high point.

garden for the owner’s use only.

as gardening and playing.

9

the backyard is an enclosed and

BUILDING PROJECT

36


scale model

1/8” = 1’ - 0”

l: position of house in context m: view of private backyard scale model

1/2” = 1’ - 0”

r: view from first floor dining table

37

ARCHITECTURE


“I think the siting of this thing is really great. It looks right on the site and it’s different from the other buildings; its tininess is sort of monumental.” - Turner Brooks

BUILDING PROJECT

38


LANDSCAPE INTERATIONS

UP

UP

Depending on the owner’s level of involvement in the up keep of his/her land, landscape possibilities may vary. One can imagine it to be as simple as a flat landscape planted with tall, wild grasses to something more programed such as a planted vegetable garden, thriving because of its direct access to the southern sun.

39

ARCHITECTURE


scale model

1/8” = 1’ - 0”

t: front yard view from scranton street b: pop-out window on southeast corner

BUILDING PROJECT

40


INTERIOR SPACE

The faceted cube pushes the limits of residential convention by maximizing internal efficiency and compactness while allowing internal spatial constraints to find their release in the landscape. This allows the importance of landscape to come to the fore, lending a greener and lusher feel to the very dense housing stock of New Haven’s urban-scape. As proposed, the tenant occupies the 3rd floor, allowing the owner’s space on the first and second floor to spill out onto the land in the form of interior furnishings such as dining tables and pop-out window seats. These elements push and pull on the building’s envelope, establishing a unique dialogue between the interior and exterior. As a result, the site becomes an extension of the owner’s interior living room that can be visually enjoyed by neighboring sites.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION 3/ 4

41

“ = 1’ - 0”

ARCHITECTURE

UP

R

UP

ground floor

-owner


DN

DN

UP

UP

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

W

D

W

D

2nd floor loft -owner

DN

W

D

W

D

3rd floor -tenant

BUILDING PROJECT

42


scale model

1/2” = 1’ - 0”

t: front yard with extending table b: first floor living/dining room

43

ARCHITECTURE


scale model

1/2” = 1’ - 0”

t: third floor tenant apartment b: second floor bedroom loft

BUILDING PROJECT

44


MODULAR FURNITURE

C

F

A

A

C

E

B

E

1

2

2

15"

1

7'-10"

3

SLIDING PANEL

4

4

5

7'-10"

3

38"

7'-10"

16"

15"

6"

D

5

30"

BENCH

6

VAR.

16”

48”

18”

C 11"

LIVING ROOM

1

15"

B

48”

2

KING

KITCHEN

16”

3 7'-6"

TWIN

A

48”

FULL QUEEN

4"

4"

4"

6

BATHROOM

SLIDING PANEL

4 5

4"

6

48”

WORK DESK

E

D

BED

VAR.

48”

BEDROOM STORAGE

7'-10"

KING

FULL QUEEN

TWIN

38" 30"

7'-10"

16"

15"

6"

F

4"

4"

STORAGE

A

45

18”

KITCHEN

ARCHITECTURE

E

BED

C

BATHROOM


t: third floor tenant space ml: first floor looking up bl: second floor loft r: opening night

BUILDING PROJECT

46


47

ARCHITECTURE


BUILDING PROJECT

48


49

ARCHITECTURE


“...this house is slightly wacko, but I kind of like it. It has a little romantic viewing, it has a little character.” - Bob Stern

BUILDING PROJECT

50


oth ers

51 gehry-go-round 53 ipms origami 55 formal analysis 57 drawing 59 free speech kit


05

IT

IT

F

H KIT

FREE IT

CH K

EECH

KIT

S FREE IT

CH K

SPEE

EECH

SP FREE FREE

FREE

KIT IT

IT

IT IT

IT

FREE

CH K

IT

CH K

SPEE

YO

TY RK CI

IT

[ DURATION ] 1 WEEK [ COMPETITION ] INTRO TO URBAN DESIGN // A. PLATTUS [ YEAR ] U1, FALL 2013 [ TEAM ] + VITTORIO LOVATO, EUGENE TAN, SIN HSU & ANNE MA

KIT

ECH

SPE FREE

H KIT IT

FREE IT

CH K

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

IT

CH K

SPEE

FREE

PEEC

S FREE

FREE

AWARD WINNER - EXHIBITED IN AIA NEW YORK

51

FREE

THE ULTIMATE

FREE SPEECH KIT

NEITW

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

H KIT

C

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

IT

CH K

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

FREE

H KIT

PEEC

CH K

PEE REE S

FREE

FREE IT

CH K

SPEE

IT

CH K

SPEE

FREE

CH K

SPEE

IT

CH K

SPEE

CH

SPEE

FREE

C

SPEE


EE FR

ECH ZONE CON SPE FI GU RA TI O

N

M RA AG DI

I have a dream

EE FR ECH KIT PICK SPE UP

POTENTIAL SITES in NEW YORK

1

Free Speech Sign

2

Free Speech Zone Indicator

Durable Straps ”

24

Bent Metal Ledge

Free Speech Toolkit

Railing Clasps

8

1

AR EA

The Manhattan grid not only controls the constant flow of people, but it also neglects spaces that encourage New Yorkers to pause. It is here that the ‘happening’ of free speech is most necessary, and most potent. The proposed design is a Free Speech Kit that members of the public can locate, set up, and drop off. The items within the Kit enable the New York street to be activated - both as a place of ‘happening’, and more specifically, as a space for free speech. The Symbolic Speech Apparatus and the Symbolic Debate Apparatus are two inflatables which declare the latter. The objects bring to mind the ladder and podium, two objects long associated with informal speech and debate. Additionally, the inflatable recalls an entire lineage of civic activism. One object denotes the location where free speech is occurring, while the other expresses the two-way nature of free speech, thereby encouraging spectators to participate. Being inflatables, their function is detached from their image, distilling their symbolic importance. Finally, the Kit’s Free Speech Circle helps mark the location of these episodic civic events, raising awareness of free speech through an associational motif. These symbolic circles hint at past occurrences on the streets of NYC, layering everyday spaces with meaning and memory.

FFREE

SPE

T C KI CH T S EE SP CH KI FFREE SPEE FREEE T KI T CH C KI CH KI SPEE SPEE EECH FREEE EE SP FR FREE H KIT T PEEC P CH KI REEE SP FR SPEE FREE KIT EECH S SP REEE FR

Subway Entrance Rail

12

24

Free Speech Kit

3

Air Pump

4

Symbolic Debate Aparatus

5

Symbolic Speech Aparatus

FREE SPEECH KIT

52


06 THE GO

OR LOWER Terr O L F ace 7th ~ One Day Only! ~ MAY 7th, 2014

[ DURATION ] 1 MONTH [ ARCHITECTURE ] VISUALIZATION 3 // J. EBERHART [ YEAR ] SPRING 2014 [ TEAM ] +VITTORIO LOVATO, KIANNA HOSSEINI, HUGO FENAUX & ANNE MA

The brief for this project asked for the design of a location-specific installation for a fabrication class. The location was the 7th floor terrace in the School of Architecture, where many sets of Gehry designed furniture sit. These designer furniture pieces had many issues and were rarely used, usually neglected during events (the famous 6-on7’s), becoming more of a hindrance to the social scene. Faced with the irony of the situation, the project takes on a humorous turn to give these furniture pieces a new life: turning them into amusement park rides.

53

OTHERS

Several iterations were explored with a combination of different furniture pieces, either providing a new dimension to their current functionality or changing them altogether. The final design is based on a two-piece Gehry rocking chair. Following through with the idea of an amusement ride, the terrace was reconfigured as a park ground, complete with ticket booth, posters, fair music, and happy people. Ride tickets were also sold a week prior to the May 7th inaugural date, with the proceeds going towards a grand raffle of Oreo cookies.


Must be taller than this line to ride!

AH!

OOF

ASSEMBLY

#$%@

PROBLEMS EGAH!

UH OH

SLIDEY

PUDDLEY

un-STACKY

Formula

TH E

TIPPY

GO

SOLUTIONS

THE GROUNDS

Entrance TICKETS

other proj

EXIT

RIDE

GEHRY-GO-ROUND

54


07

IPMS ORIGAMI [ DURATION ] 2 WEEKS [ ACADEMIC ] YSOA // VISUALIZATION 2 // S. BALD, K. BLOOMER [ YEAR ] U1, FALL 2013 [ TEAM ] + KIANNA HOSSEINI & ANNE MA

55

OTHERS


FRAMEWORK

ITERATION 1

unit module

group module

unit module

ITERATION 2

unit module

group module

group module

unfolded unit

unfolded unit

ITERATION 3

unit module

group module

unfolded unit

IPMS ORIGAMI

56


08

Formal Analysis [ DURATION ] 1 WEEK EACH [ ACADEMIC ] YSOA // FORMAL ANALYSIS // PETER EISENMAN [ YEAR ] U1, FALL 2013

SAN SEBASTIANO

ALBERTI MANTUA, ITALY

Alberti’s San Sebastiano reflects a significant development in the context of humanist architecture, the prevalence of theory and ideas as a generative force behind design- the interplay between signifiers and signified elements. One of the most interesting aspects in this regard is the articulation of domes and vaults in different parts of the building. The big arches of the main roof vault rest on typical column capitals, but the columns or pilasters themselves are curiously missing beneath them. In essence, the absence of engaged columns that would have served as the signifier for the idea of supporting structure creates the effect of a floating roof. Paradoxically, the lack of signifiers represents a rare instance of architectural honesty, in which the structural wall that actually supports the arches is left unadorned from classical motifs. This also renders the reading of the walls and the roof as one continuous, massive volume. This monumentality contrasts the tectonics of the crypt, which was built at another time. Divided into a much smaller grid, the vaults within the circulation space rest upon square columns, honest to their structural function, but the vaults connecting to the perimeter wall rest on non-structural pilasters, which serves to signify the structural termination of all the vaults. The closely packed spacing of colonnades suggests a redundant structure- it is more likely that the series of vaults is employed to generate the feel of a maze-like crypt, therefore, becoming a signifier for an idea about a type of space.

57

OTHERS


The church of San Lorenzo is based on a plan with eight sides, and the even-numbered multiples of this figure can be easily resolved and traced in the ordering of architectural elements as it goes up, creating a more logical, expected progression of parts. As we move up the interior composition, we can see that there is always the repetition of 8 elements. The dome is also a metaphor of this resolved system in which the arches framing the windows go up and come back down into the next window, representing a closed system.

CHIESA DI SAN LORENZO CAPPELLA DELLA SACRA SINDONE

GUARINI TORINO, ITALY

In contrast, the Chapel of S. Sindone is based on a circular and triangular plan. The repercussions of merging an even-numbered polygon with an odd-numbered polygon starting from the plan can be traced throughout the composition of the subsequent elements. For example, from the triad of giant arches it follows a dodecagonal drum with windows and serlianas, which in turn is followed by a series of hexagonal dome layers. The implicit understanding is that the lines of forces from the different layers of element have to bisect each other. The climax of this phenomenon can be seen in the design of the dome, with each element being bisected by structure, and arranged in an system that can continue infinitely.

FORMAL ANALYSIS

58


09

Drawing I have always being interested in the artistic expression of powerful strokes, sensuous forms, grace, fluidity, and ephemera. I find beauty in the spontaneity of incipient sketches and how that apprises the viewer of the raw process of creation at work, a mixture of inspiration, intuition, and technique. The unfinished vagueness of sketches leaves room for interpretation, like memories do. It serves as a powerful tool to capture the wistful transience of life: the summer warmth of a trip to Baie Saint-Paul, the labyrinthine matrix of winding paths in Venice, the misty sunrise of a Sunday morning... ART MEDIUM

1. multiliner pens, brush nib marker 2. manga process: pencil sketch, inking (tachikawa+g pen, multiliners), colour (gouache + acrylics) 3. mixed media (acrylics, conte, ink) 4. watercolour

1

59

OTHERS


4

4

4

2

3

DRAWING

60


p rofessional

61 george friedman 63 raw design 65 CV


Lila Jiang Chen EDUCATION

SKILLS

Yale University

-Autodesk: REVIT, AutoCad, Maya, 3Ds Max, Ecotect+Vasari -Rhinoceros, T-Spline, Grasshopper, Sketchup, ZBrush -Vray, Maxwell, Keyshot -Adobe: Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, Premiere, Dreamweaver, and Flash -Model making and fabrication: 3D printing, powder printing, CNC milling, casting, resin models -Real Estate Pro-forma Analysis

New Haven, USA // Expected 2016 Master in Architecture

McGill University Montreal, Canada // 2006-2010 Bachelor in Science (Architecture) Minor in Construction Engineering and Management CGPA: 3.79/4.00 - with Distinction Dean’s List Faculty of Engineering (2009)

Oxford International School Panama City, Panama // 2003-2005 CGPA: 98.4%/100% - Class Valedictorian

-English and Spanish (highly proficient) -Cantonese and Mandarin (proficient) -Italian (intermediate), French (elementary)

Study Abroad Politecnico di Milano (Feb-Jun 2010)

EXHIBITIONS & PUBLICATIONS

Beijing Language and Culture University (Feb-Jun 2006)

AWARDS -Gluskin-Sheff Travelling Scholarship (2010) -Pekka H.M. Erkila Scholarship (2009) -Clifford C.F. Wong Scholarship (2009) -Favretto Scholarship (2008) -Panamanian National Scholarship (2005-2009) -Kross Magazine Drawing Content: Runner-up (2005) -Big Eye Solutions National Drawing Contest: First Place (2003 and 2005)

61

LANGUAGES

PROFESSIONAL

-Designing for Free Speech (2014) “The Ultimate Free Speech Kit.” Award winner and exhibited in AIA New York. Collaborators: Vittorio Lovato, Eugene Tan, Anne Ma and Cynthia Hsu. -Yale Retrospecta (2014) Projects selected for publication: “Higher Ground” and “Team D Building Project” -Canadian Architecture Student’s Association: National Portfolio (2010) Project selected for publication. -McGill Daily (2009) Project published as part of art show.


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

RAW Design

S-Trip

Toronto, ON // Feb - Aug2013 Formed part of several teams producing massing models, façade studies, and apartment+parking planning for highrise residential and mixed-used projects in the Greater Toronto Area. Worked extensively on the design development of Harmony Village, a 1.3 million SF mixed-used project in Barrie, Ontario.

Toronto, ON // Jun - Sept2011 Worked with the President and an interior designer to re-designed the headquarter’s 3-floors loft interior and the building’s exterior to increase brand-awareness. Managed design projects by planning, sourcing materials, coordinating labor, and any other aspects to succesfully implement the proposals under a tight budget and schedule.

George Friedman Architect Toronto, ON // Jun2011 - Jan2013 -Worked extensively on construction drawings for several projects in an office of 4 members, including coordination with clients and consultants. Participated in all stages of development- contributed to design, produced study models, worked on landscape plans, and acted as the firm’s sole visualization artist. -Projects include Sheridan College’s Welcome Centre in Brampton; retrofitting Toronto Star’s 3rd floor 50,000 SF premises for College Boreal, from schematic design to building completion in under 9 months with a 2 million budget; managed the design for a unique roof structure for Sheridan College Mississauga; and contributed to the schematic design of a church in Mississauga.

Sceno Plus Montreal, QC // Apr2011 Worked in a team of 3 to develop a proposal for a 12,000 capacity events complex in Abuja, Nigeria. Particiapated in design, produced models, drawings and renderings.

Atelier Big City Montreal, QC // Jan - Feb2010 Performed site survey, presentation drawings, and study models for the Champs-de-Mars competition in Montreal.

CV

62


10

George Friedman

DAVIS WELCOME CENTRE SHERIDAN COLLEGE - ONTARIO, CANADA project type: education, renovation project size:

18,000 sqft $2,750,000 date: sept2011 - feb2012 construction cost:

the project renovates the main entrance area at sheridan college’s davis campus. the new design includes a new canopy and landscape entrance, a welcome centre with its furniture, student services, counseling and administration offices, and student gathering areas.

63

PROFESSIONAL

[ FIRM ] TORONTO, ON, CANADA [ POSITION ] ARCHITECTURAL ASSISTANT [ DURATION ] JUN2011 - JAN2013


WELCOME CENTRE

STUDENT SPACES

ENTRANCE CANOPY & LANDSCAPE

GEORGE FRIEDMAN

64


11

R AW Design

[ FIRM ] TORONTO, ON, CANADA [ POSITION ] ARCHITECTURAL ASSISTANT [ DURATION ] FEB - AUG2013

PHASE III HARMONY VILLAGE BARRIE, ONTARIO, CANADA

PHASE II

project type: mixed-use lifestyle development project size:

1.3 million sqft

in partnership with diamond schmitt architects. this winning masterplan proporal is a sustainable, mixed-use urban community with a waterfront by lake simcoe. the project consists of aprox.

5 towers of 25 floors each, with an elevated landscape

podium that contains lifestyle amenities such as cooking and art classes, gym, retail stores, community centre, medical and professional services, etc. the project is going to be develope in

4 phases.

65

PROFESSIONAL

PHASE I

PHASE IV


TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

RAW DESIGN

66


lila jiang chen portfolio

2013-2014


Lila Jiang Chen // Yale 2013-14 Portfolio  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you