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LILY CAMPBELL EDITORIAL DESIGN MICHAEL ROBINSON

F.11


PROJECTS // PAGES NODE COVER CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN CATALOG GAGA FOR GAGA SPREADS ANTON CORBIJN POSTER WHITE PHOTOSHOOT RUVEN AFANADOR COVER WHAT COMES AFTER MONEY SPREADS NPR GIG POSTER SERIES + SHIRT

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

NODE MAGAZINE COVER

making connections

NOV 2011 RICHARD SERRA

MAN OF STEEL

BOWIE

A STYLE ICON REEXAMINED

INFIDELITY IS THE NEW MONOGAMY A LOOK AT SEXUAL MORES

THE STATE OF FASHION IN POST 9/11 AMERICA

MICHAEL ROBINSON

A DESIGNER BY DESIGN

COLD BUSTERS

WINTER FASHIONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS THE FILMS OF

ALEJANDRO JODOROWSKY

MAKING CONNECTIONS

the Transformation 10 QUICK SEASONAL SOUPS

NOVEMBER 2011

WHAT COMES AFTER MONEY?

10 WAYS TO GET PAST THE DOWNTURN

WHAT COMES AFTER MONEY? 10 WAYS TO GET PAST THE DOWNTURN

of

BOWIE

A STYLE ICON REEXAMINED

NOVEMBER 2011

INFIDELITY IS THE NEW MONOGAMY A LOOK AT SEXUAL MORES

THE STATE OF FASHION

making connections

What Comes After

MONEY?

10 Ways to Get Past

THE DOWNTURN

the

Transformation

of Uma

IN POST 9/11 AMERICA

RICHARD SERRA MAN OF STEEL

11.11

COLD BUSTERS

WINTER FASHIONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

MAKING CONNECTIONS

MICHAEL ROBINSON A DESIGNER BY DESIGN

What Comes After Money?

10 QUICK

10 Ways to Get Past The Downturn

SEASONAL SOUPS

Bowie - A Style Icon Reexamined

BOWIE

THE FILMS OF

INFIDELITY IS

THE TRANSFORMATION OF UMA

Infidelity is the New Monogamy - A Look at Sexual Mores

ALEJANDRO JODOROWSKY

Richard Serra - Man of Steel

A Style Icon Reexamined

THE NEW MONOGAMY

The State of Fashion in Post 9/11 America Cold Busters - Winter Fashions for All Occasions Michael Robinson - A Designer By Design

A Look at Sexual Mores

10 Quick Seasonal Soups

THE STATE OF

The Films of Alejandro Jodorowsky

FASHION

In Post 9/11 America R i chard Serra

MAN OF STEEL

MAKING CONNECTIONS

For All Occasions M i chael R o bi nso n

A DESIGNER

10 Quick Seasonal

SOUPS The Films of Alejandro

JODOROWSKY

the Transformation of Uma

11.11 WHAT COMES AFTER MONEY? 10 WAYS TO GET PAST THE DOWNTURN BOWIE

A STYLE ICON REEXAMINED

INFIDELITY IS THE NEW MONOGAMY A LOOK AT SEXUAL MORES

THE STATE OF FASHION IN POST 9/11 AMERICA

RICHARD SERRA MAN OF STEEL

COLD BUSTERS

WINTER FASHIONS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

MICHAEL ROBINSON A DESIGNER BY DESIGN 10 QUICK

SEASONAL SOUPS THE FILMS OF

ALEJANDRO JODOROWSKY

2

THE TRANSFORMATION OF UMA

COLD BUSTERS

WINTER FASHIONS

BY DESIGN

Uma


11.11 MAKING CONNECTIONS

What Comes After Money? 10 Ways to Get Past The Downturn Bowie - A Style Icon Reexamined Infidelity is the New Monogamy - A Look at Sexual Mores Richard Serra - Man of Steel The State of Fashion in Post 9/11 America Cold Busters - Winter Fashions for All Occasions Michael Robinson - A Designer By Design 10 Quick Seasonal Soups The Films of Alejandro Jodorowsky

THE TRANSFORMATION OF UMA 3


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

LILY CAMPBELL EDITORIAL DESIGN FALL 2011


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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

1

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9 12 11

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15

1. no barre pump $710

4. little boe peep $820

8. icon stud flat $695

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2. nooka satin $695

5. cotton club wedge $720

9. lady claude $700

13. pink patent $725

3. pop pumps $750

6. cat woman t.strap $710

10. francaise pump $720

14. brest wedge $750

7. cotton club wedge $720

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23. studio peep $920

26. snake straps $975

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24. ribbon pump $875

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18. ribbon pump $875

22. studio peep $920

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19. black sand pump $925

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

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ra for

radical chic

dical ti

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m

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

2 1 4

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11. tootsie $1200

15. deva boot $975

19. eye $950

23. arille talon ankle $1000

12. python lace $880

16. paola ankle boot $1000

20. lillian III $825

24. court suede peep $950

13. jupiter python $695

17. pixiptou boot $1200

21. pamona pump $750

25. patent pumps $750

14. circus cut out boot $1080

18. multi booty $920

22. lillian IV $800

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

GAGA FOR GAGA MAGAZINE SPREADS Dance in Isreal |

June 2012 re mo kes e it ta mak that e to alize ciplin p of is rs re d e c to n their On , da to in r. s h e y a rm wit turn se d erfo ses ers The and anc clas ed p rain s, d und just sse ss-t ll-ro than e cla s to cro er , we ong niqu noth ic h tr a n s c to ’s a al te yro there wn to usu dG ow , s an sho their ty. N nce ilate at’s facili a da a, P e th their yog Gag e ris n th hin. then had it o g w n rm by O stre om d t fo a fr e n v r p e e h lo nce vem eve Bats e da ose mo ge d eli’s r th e th gua Isra o fo anc dy t lan ctor of enh go-t ir bo e men ea ove f the c dir becom o ti is s am s as ne , art y, h arin ware pan Nah ed a om s a C ce incre s of Dan t an term es. wan n in biliti the who give apa cue are its c may e” ons ti rs and c e u h uak eac instr “q T , s . s t” s ith tep “floa a cla an s t”. W Gag h as er th suc g ho In a ical rath ses ettin n phys ges is g phra o es ima und selv with than ro m s g rs e n e o ce e th e th sati id dan n in s to e g in a tion lve on s “im e la is d d re s n t a or ha e in mus mp ght pac ers re e no ri in s s anc mo ove ere’s mselve s, d ym . Th ition the ; bod pos them tion lend ta their round s l re e e s rp clas le a to fe inte p l a o a a g e u ivid , Ga with er p d d r th a e in o nd anc Inste ol a er d ng. ontr bett wro ra ve c e fo reati r he mak . to c afte that ry la ts ago u ing face ars cab r vo train 0 ye ade aily er 2 , v d o bro n e a d a th Gag any, now mp ted ay . It is ce Co crea its w jury n arin ing k us in eva Da a . o Nah s ri h se nm tate da Bats as bee dS face nite f the , it h eU en o 010 in th regim gust 2 ios stud Au e e c c an sin wd a fe into

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13

Dance in Isreal |

arn d le t an nec it, con Am ol to Ron ble ays nt to s m lle ” e s y, xce a en York’s bod an e hev ual w ga is individ Bats e t Ne “Ga a on f the sses a our er o Gag ut y er a cla rough abo emb g a m high r sa es G ter. “Th rme d h c n fo fi a n a te Ce and dy.” zio now ody ape e bo who er b r th ce C is/h dan on fo to h Peri ciati ent’ ess pre om acc p m a s e nd gain ‘in th in a ual sure are ts divid n plea in n. de ly atio lete , stu form mp lass g in ss. a co ng a c rbin llne a is uri bso t sti D a o Gag . n d t, nce g an men erie ovin ove its, exp tly m is m ur lim stan aga g yo into con of G ndin ing oint xpa tt p e e e t g u Th ise nd abo dy a t otherw e is r bo enc no rent you peri ight diffe ver e ex ea ou m isco r “Th hav red es y you c ill to to la w g p ng s. one nd tryin ecti ils a idea very onn ew deta it. “E ut c dn able the Am abo t an fort is h ays m g s a u g ,” a co .” f tho find . Ga in o re e c n are xplo dom erie you to e free exp that safe ent, ant feel vem port mo you h it st im which mo oug h in is lt t a It g nd, men ctin iron ss a nne env r co e cla ot a fo th n is n d in atio ys it tilize f inspir it sa is u o m ic A e , rc Mus ace sou d sp be a y an nt. can bod e able ith pon ne’s fort to o com com arrive w ry a ear d ess ss w nec y an warm a cla bod g e e a b th n aG limit ed to is a ing not o ne t Gaga end will is n c t If att a ngth re fa th he In stre ing ss. s. T ain cloth ctation e cla ay to g th y. f e o w da xp ing ood the no e ginn , a g r finish e be -up o at th t warm ents egin n to b stud elle to the way exc e t em a iv w th to g a gre allo ys. me and t will Amit sa ch ti a a e th t nt,” nce bes e e r ri m u e o ove exp do in m ing “We pen sure ye-o plea an e the ver isco d re

11

June 2012

Gaga Dancers, a class that lasts an hour and fifteen minutes, builds on the principles of Gaga People and applies them to the needs of professional dancers. “By drawing upon technical exercises from ballet and then pushing them to the extreme, the professional dancer is challenged to use the tools they possess fully,” says Amit. “This ensures that they can apply Gaga to their professional lives.” Either way, Gaga is something from which everyone can benefit. “People will realize how much their physical body is connected to their happiness,” Amit says. “Gaga gives a very comfortable, supportive way to find this connection that one can only understand through experience.” Gaga classes are now offered at Peridance Capezio Center, Steps on Broadway, and the Mark Morris Dance Center in New York, in Japan and throughout Israel. It will only be a matter of time and a few word-of-mouth testimonials before the Gaga craze spreads across the globe.“We do our best each time to give the students an eye-opening experience that will allow them to rediscover the pleasure in movement,” Amit says.

Perhaps most unique about Gaga as a movement form is its accessibility to everyone. For those with little or even no dance experience, the Gaga genre offers Gaga People. The hour-long class allows non-dancers the opportunity to experiment with interpreting the teacher’s instructions through their imagination and body. “Everyone can benefit from learning how to access their body fully,” Amit says.

12

16

“They will gain strength and knowledge to utilize their body, to connect their physical and spiritual being. It will help them to enjoy their body as part of their life.”

14


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Ga ga of Da Ga nc ga er up s, on Pe ac op pr te las of ch le e st n an ss en ha d ion ical su ap t la e al re pli st sts da xerc es ha ise n a ce th Eit tt sf em n ho r is he he ro ur rw yc ho m ch to a w all an ay ba th m en e n nd fi ,G lle giv ap uc ge ta fte ag ee ply es h d nd a is en ds th un av to Ga eir th m de u s e g en of p inu om s ry at rst ph ro co pu te o t e th et ys an fe s e h m sh ica he ss d ing to fo ion , bu th ing ir lb o rta ro ild f p ls a r od ro th ug ble so th y is om fe em l da h e , n s w y nc ex su sio th hic to co po er pp pe ep na nn h t s s. he s or rie l li ev es rin ec “B tiv nc ex ve er sf cip e w ted e.” tre y dr yo s.” u les lly to aw ne m ay ,” e, th ing c to sa an eir th fin ys e be ha d A n pp m th it. is ine efit. co “T “P ss nn his eo ,” ec tio Amit ple w n sa ill th ys re at ali .“ on ze e c Gag a an on ly

Dance in Isreal |

Ga ga Pe cla rid an sses on ce ar Br en Ca oa Da pe ow d nc zio e C way an off ,a Ce d er e nd ed nt a m thro nter er th at u in ,S at gh m Ne e M te te ou ou ar ro w t Is k M ps th ft Yo cr ra im te r az k el. stim , in orris ea es ou It nd pr Ja o rb w nia pa ea ill af es an ds n on ls ew te ey be ac a wo ly b eall fo ro e op ch t re rd ow im ss th en t in th et e g he G ofing em m og lob ov ag ex to ive em a p e .“W er re en th dis ien ed es t,” co ce tu o Am ve th de rt it nt he at w sa s ill ys ple . as ur e

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re er dis ien an co d ce Am plac ver is yo ab es it. ur ou Ga yo “E te bo ve u ga dy xp m r fre yo is an an ab ne ight ed din d o o n is wil ut ge m g m l h ot o yo ttin co of o th st av co nn ur g er ea im thou m ec lim in wis f p g t o wh ing its diff o ht r e fi to th ich table rtan an er to e d , try nd en tt d yo yo ing ,” et en ne ha te u u sa ail v r w t xp fe iro ys s m ide el er nm you ov sa ie a em a en s. nc fe It t in re in en e. to t, a ex plo re .”

14

13

Going Gaga for Gaga Dance in Isreal |

June 2012

These days, dancers realize that it takes more

than just classes within their discipline to make a

strong, well-rounded performer. On top of their usual technique classes, dancers turn to yoga, Pilates and

Gyrotonics to cross-train and strengthen their facility.

Now there’s another movement form on the rise that’s shown to enhance the dancer from within. Gaga

dance, a movement language developed by Ohad

Naharin, artistic director of Israeli’s Batsheva Dance

Company, has become a go-to for those who want an increased awareness of their body and its capabilities. In a Gaga class instructions are given in terms of images rather than steps. Teachers may cue the

dancers with phrases such as “float”, “quake” and “imagine the ground is getting hot”. With more

emphasis on sensations than on physical positions, dancers must delve inside themselves to feel their body move in space in relation to other people

around them. There’s no right or wrong. Instead,

Gaga classes lend themselves to creative control and individual interpretation; facets that make for a better dancer with a broader vocabulary.

Naharin created Gaga over 20 years ago after he faced a serious injury. It is now the daily training

regimen of the Batsheva Dance Company, and, since August 2010, it has been making its way into a few dance studios in the United States.

“Gaga is an excellent tool to connect and learn

about your individual body,” says Ron Amit, a former

member of the Batsheva ensemble who now teaches Gaga classes at New York’s Peridance Capezio

Center. “Through Gaga one gains access to his/her

body and finds a higher pleasure in and appreciation for the body.”

By Laura Di Orio

Gaga is a completely individual and ‘in the moment’ experience. During a class, students are constantly

moving and absorbing information. The point of Gaga is movement, not stillness.

“The experience is about expanding your limits, trying to rediscover your body and getting into the details

and places you might not otherwise find,” says Amit. “Everyone will have a different experience. Gaga is about connecting to your movement, freedom of

thought and new ideas. It is most important that you

13

Dance in Isreal |

are in a comfortable environment in which you feel safe to explore.”

11

June 2012

Music is utilized in the class and, although it can be a

Gaga Dancers, a class that lasts an hour and fifteen

source of inspiration for connecting to one’s body and

minutes, builds on the principles of Gaga People and

space, Amit says it is not a necessary component.

applies them to the needs of professional dancers. “By drawing upon technical exercises from ballet and

If attending a Gaga class wear comfortable clothing

then pushing them to the extreme, the professional

that will not limit the body and arrive with no

dancer is challenged to use the tools they possess

expectations. There is no need to be warm at the

fully,” says Amit. “This ensures that they can apply

beginning of the class. In fact Gaga is an excellent

Gaga to their professional lives.”

warm-up, a good way to gain strength and a great way to begin or finish the day.

Either way, Gaga is something from which everyone

“We do our best each time to give the students

physical body is connected to their happiness,” Amit

an eye-opening experience that will allow them to

says. “Gaga gives a very comfortable, supportive way

rediscover the pleasure in movement,” Amit says.

to find this connection that one can only understand

can benefit. “People will realize how much their

through experience.” Perhaps most unique about Gaga as a movement form is its accessibility to everyone. For those with

Gaga classes are now offered at Peridance Capezio

little or even no dance experience, the Gaga genre

Center, Steps on Broadway, and the Mark Morris

offers Gaga People. The hour-long class allows

Dance Center in New York, in Japan and throughout

non-dancers the opportunity to experiment with

Israel. It will only be a matter of time and a few

interpreting the teacher’s instructions through their

word-of-mouth testimonials before the Gaga craze

imagination and body. “Everyone can benefit from

spreads across the globe.Music is utilized in the class

learning how to access their body fully,” Amit says.

and, although it can be a source of inspiration for

“They will gain strength and knowledge to utilize their

connecting to one’s body and space, Amit says it is

body, to connect their physical and spiritual being. It

not a necessary component.

will help them to enjoy their body as part of their life.”

12

14

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011 Dance in Isreal |

June 2012

by laura diorio


These days, dancers realize that it takes more “Gaga is an excellent tool to connect and learn

than just classes within their discipline to make

about your individual body,” says Ron Amit,

a strong, well-rounded performer. On top of

a former member of the Batsheva ensemble

their usual technique classes, dancers turn to

who now teaches Gaga classes at New York’s

yoga, Pilates and Gyrotonics to cross-train and

Peridance Capezio Center. “Through Gaga one

strengthen their facility. Now there’s another movement form on the rise that’s shown to enhance the dancer from within. Gaga dance,

gains access to his/her body and finds a higher pleasure in and appreciation for the body.”

a movement language developed by Ohad Gaga is a completely individual ‘in the moment’

Naharin, artistic director of Israeli’s Batsheva

experience. During a class, students are

Dance Company, has become a go-to for

constantly moving and absorbing information.

those who want an increased awareness of

The point of Gaga is movement, not stillness.

their body and its capabilities.

“The experience is about expanding your limits,

In a Gaga class instructions are given in terms of images rather than steps. Teachers may cue the dancers with phrases such as “float”, “quake” and “imagine the ground is getting hot”. With more emphasis on sensations than on physical positions, dancers must delve inside themselves to feel their body move in space in relation to other people around them. There’s no right or wrong. Instead, Gaga

trying to rediscover your body and getting into the details and places you might not otherwise find,” says Amit. “Everyone will have a different experience. Gaga is about connecting to

your movement, freedom of thought and new ideas. It is most important that you are in a comfortable environment in which you feel safe to explore.”

classes lend themselves to creative control and individual interpretation; facets that make for a

Music is utilized in the class and, although it can be a source of inspiration for connecting

better dancer with a broader vocabulary.

to one’s body and space, Amit says it is not a necessary component.

Naharin created Gaga over 20 years ago after he faced a serious injury. It is now the

If attending a Gaga class wear comfortable

daily training regimen of the Batsheva Dance Company, and, since August 2010, it has been making its way into a few dance studios in the United States.

clothing that will not limit the body and arrive with no expectations. There is no need to be warm at the beginning of the class. In fact Gaga is an excellent warm-up, a good way to

gain strength and a great way to begin or finish the day. “We do our best each time to give the students

11


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011 Dance in Isreal |

June 2012

Perhaps most unique about Gaga as a movement form is its accessibility to everyone. For those with little or even no dance experience, the Gaga genre offers Gaga People. The hour-long class allows non-dancers the opportunity to experiment with interpreting the teacher’s instructions through their imagination and body. “Everyone can benefit from learning how to access their body fully,” Amit says. “They will gain strength and knowledge to utilize their body, to connect their physical and spiritual being. It will help them

12

to enjoy their body as part of their life.”


Gaga Dancers, a class that lasts an hour and fifteen minutes, builds on the principles of Gaga People and applies them to the needs of professional dancers. “By drawing upon technical exercises from ballet and then pushing them to the extreme, the professional dancer is challenged to use the tools they possess fully,” says Amit. “This ensures that they can apply Gaga to their professional lives.” Either way, Gaga is something from which everyone can benefit. “People will realize how much their physical body is connected to their happiness,” Amit says. “Gaga gives a very comfortable, supportive way to find this connection that one can only understand through experience.” Gaga classes are now offered at Peridance Capezio Center, Steps on Broadway, and the Mark Morris Dance Center in New York, in Japan and throughout Israel. It will only be a matter of time and a few word-of-mouth testimonials before the Gaga craze spreads across the globe.“We do our best each time to give the students an eye-opening experience that will allow them to rediscover the pleasure in movement,” Amit says.

14


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

ANTON CORBIJN IN CLASS POSTER A

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

RUVAN AFANADOR BOOK COVER

RUVEN AFANADOR

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RUVEN AFANADOR

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LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011

WHAT COMES AFTER MONEY? MAGAZINE SPREADS

32


Suppose you give m e a millio the instru n dollars ctions, “In with v e st th is profitab you well.” ly, and I’ll I’m a sha rp pay d re sser—wh out onto y not? So the street I a g n o d h a nd out sta to random cks of bil passersby ls : te n thousand In return dollars ea , each scri ch. bbles out thousand an IOU fo dollars, p r twenty a y a b le in five back to yo years. I co u and say, me “Look at generated these IOU a 20 perc s! I have e n t annual re investmen turn on yo t.” You are u r very plea enormou sed, and p s commis ay me an sion. Now I’ve got a big stack of IO these “ass ets” as co Us, so I u llateral to se money, w borrow ev hich I len en more d out to ev en more p eople, or

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sell them to others like myself who do the same. I also buy insurance to cover me in case the borrowers default—and I pay for it with those selfsame IOUs! Round and round it goes, each new loan becoming somebody’s asset against which to borrow yet more money. We all rake in huge commissions and bonuses, as the total face value of all the assets we’ve created from that initial million dollars is now fifty times that. Then one day, the first batch of IOUs comes due. But guess what? The person who scribbled his name on the IOU can’t pay me back right now. In fact, lots of the borrowers can’t. I try to hush up this embarrassing fact as long as possible, but pretty soon you get suspicious. You want your millionplus dollars back—in cash. I try to sell the IOUs and their derivatives that I hold, but everyone else is suspicious too, and no one buys them. The insurance company tries to cover my losses, but it can only do so by selling the IOUs I gave it.

33


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011 So finally, the government steps in and buys the IOUs, bailing out the insurance company and everyone else holding the IOUs and the derivatives stacked on them. Their total value is way more than a million dollars now. I and my fellow entrepreneurs retire with our lucre. Everyone else pays for it. This is the first level of what has happened in the financial industry over the past decade. It is a huge transfer of wealth to the financial elite, to be funded by US taxpayers, foreign corporations and governments, and ultimately the foreign workers who subsidize US debt indirectly via the lower purchasing power of their wages. However, to see the current crisis as merely the result of a big con is to miss its true significance. I think we all sense that we are nearing the end of an era. On the most superficial level, it is the era of unregulated casino-style financial manipulation that is ending. But the recent efforts of the political elites to fix the crisis at this level only reveal its deeper dimensions. In fact, the crisis goes all the way to the bottom. It arises from the very nature of money and property in the world today, and it will persist and continue to intensify until money itself is transformed. A process centuries in the making is in its final stages of unfoldment. Money as we know it today has crisis and collapse built into its basic design. That is because money seeks interest, bears interest, and indeed is born of interest. To see how this works, let’s go back to some finance basics. Money is created when somebody takes out a loan from a bank (or more recently, a disguised loan from some other kind of institution). A debt is a promise to pay money in the future in order to buy something today; in other words, borrowing money is a form of delayed trading. I receive something now (bought with the money I borrowed) and agree to give something in the future (a good or service which I will sell for the money to pay back the debt). A bank or any other lender will ordinarily only agree to lend you money if there is a reasonable expectation you will pay it back—in other words, if there is a reasonable expectation you will produce goods or services of equivalent value. This “reasonable expectation” can be guaranteed in the form of collateral, or it can be encoded in one’s

credit rating. Any time you use money, you are essentially guaranteeing, “I have performed a service or provided a good of equival ent valu e to the one I am buying.” If the money is borrowed money , you are sayi ng that you will provide an equ ivalent good or service in the future. Now enters interest. What motivates a bank to lend any one money in the first place? It is interest. Interest drives the crea tion of money today. Any time mo ney is created through deb t, a nee d to create even more money in the future is also created. The amount of money must grow over tim e, which means that the volu me of goods and services must grow ove r time as well. If the volume of money gro ws faster than the volume of goods and services, the result is infl ation. If it grows more slow ly— for example through a slowdow n in lending—the result is bankruptcies, recession, or deflation. The government can increase or decrease the supply of money in seve ral ways. First, it can create mo ney by borrowing it from the central bank, or in the United Sta tes, from the Federal Reserve. This mo ney ends up as bank deposit s, which in turn give banks more margin reserves on which to extend loans. You see, a bank’s capacity to crea te money is limited by margin reserve requirements. Typically, a bank must hold cash (or cen tral ban k deposits) equal to about 10 percent of its total custom er dep osit s. The other 90 percent it can loan out, thus creating new money . Thi s money ends up back in a bank as deposits, allowing another 81 per cen t of it (90 percent of 90 percent) to be lent out again. In this way , eac h dollar of initial deposits ends up as nine dollars of new money . Government spending of money borrow ed from the central bank acts a seed for new money creation. (Of cou rse, this depends on banks’ willingness to lend. Since 2008, banks hav e hoarded excess reserves, so that repeated injections of government mo ney have had little effect.) Another way to increase the money supply is to lower ma rgin reserve requirements. In pra ctice this is rarely done, at leas t dire ctly. However, in the recent pas t, various kinds of nonban k lend ing skirted the margin reserve requirement, through the alph abet soup of financial instruments tha t haunted the news and the pub lic imagination during the 200 8 financial crisis. The resu lt is tha t each dollar of original equity is leveraged not to nine times its original value, as in traditional ban king, but to seventy times or even more. This allows returns on inve stment far beyond the 5 per cen t or so available from traditional ban king, along with “compens atio n” packages beyond the dream s of avarice. Each new dollar that is crea ted comes with a new dollar of debt—more than a dollar of debt, because of interest . The deb t is eventually redeemed either with goods and services, or with more


, ctions us fun io r a es into v nity esourc r ought r l b a r e Huma u v borrowed money, which in turn can be redeemed I ha ent of nd nat c a s , s A n of ip e h nsh versio . In T relatio with yet more borrowed money … but eventually he con t : nd money h t f p l, o lm pita a s in de the rea ural ca it will be used to buy goods and services. The lt proces u c is h l, t apita ribe I desc tural c interest has to come from somewhere. Borrowing ital, na p a c oney. ntinue l o socia into m y to co more money to make the interest payments on an l m a o it stem t n p e eco ney sy ual ca h o t it r m ir ) p fo s d a existing loan merely postpones the day of reckoning by um n ially, base -and-h Essent tereste n r (i u t e a h n deferring the need to create new goods and services. for t e of thirty g and d mor mple, growin ore an or exa F m . day The whole system of interest-bearing money , d e le me; to viab onetiz d at ho remain e r st be m a u works fine as long as the volume of goods and services p , m e e om in re pr nship e the h als we e id relatio s t m u t exchanged for money keeps growing. The crisis we saw in s o npaid go mo pared once u re pre years a a A are s . s d li 2008 was in part because new money was created much ir nd we ket de two-th vice. A er mar r some e p s u s a r faster than goods and services were, and much faster than ome rants o as bec restau king, h has been historically sustainable. There are only two ways o o c growth , nction nomic ight? o fu R c . ade e it f out of such a situation: inflation and defaults. The rescue also m er for gine o e, has r jor en he rich a a t c m d r e packages that followed the crisis basically came down to an , chil n of Anoth burde ecades ad, of the hree d t d t attempt to prevent both. Superficially successful, actually they e s v s inste la e e expert w reli o y n a n’t over th p e r d e a we o only kicked the problem into the future. The mortgage-backed en. W er. We Even if childr . n ly us rich n t w n io o t r securities were bailed out and morphed into sovereign debt, and efficie struc for ou more the de , h y c caring a nd u w a it m oods more and more of society’s wealth concentrated in the hands of in this an do hborh ig icher” r e who c e. “ n iv e m t-knit ernat the creditors, as is inevitable when interest rates exceed o beco ke tigh ttle alt li li s want t le e r p . ctu ice st peo economic growth. ial stru id serv es mo of soc to a pa ies giv d il e a t m r o e fa There was a much deeper crisis at work as well, a crisis in ed s als onv ent wa extend been c s m a in h n a a t y r the creation of goods and services that underlie money to begin unit layed s ente Comm yone p t time r n e v ie c E n n with, and it was this crisis that gave birth to the real estate bubble Eve In a tion. rama. y func ry ipator ed in d t ic a t r everyone blamed for the 2008 crisis. To understand it, let’s get ip a es, eve t ic p free, , part ed Sta g it n n a seball s U a , ent clear on what constitutes a good or a service. In economics, and b in the d o n g a a instrum b s ing year nomy march these terms refer to something that is exchanged for money. If y-five he eco n T w . o s e s sevent ad it servic I babysit your children for free, economists don’t count it as a town h those small ay for p the e w Now es from service. It cannot be used to pay a financial debt: I cannot go ay. team. ay aris r d o o o t l, a g H cin ultur own. to the supermarket and say, “I watched my neighbor’s kids this e are fa cial, c has gr ore so risis w c m e o t into h n T morning, so please give me food.” But if I open a day care center conver lmost a o t is ous ft e ontinu pital le at ther and charge you money, I have created a service. Gross domestic ual ca near-c fact th it f ir o have p s — nia at we l, and product (GDP) rises and, according to economists, society has millen ute th it — natura t s s nd e ie r d u d beyo us so . Cent become wealthier. amage ve left d a money h e r , n a a e se rests creatio The same is true if I cut down a forest and sell the timber. into th Our fo money ashed o sell. t w ft d pacity n le a g ted a While it is still standing and inaccessible, it is not a good. It only ting c le a p nothin n e e d v il reju Our our so ut, the rated. becomes a good when I build a logging road, hire labor, cut it repair, shed o te satu fi s a s s w ie r r he ou image down, and transport it to a buyer. I convert a forest to timber, a our fis recycle tories, s o t d h n t a r ea hted. ongs commodity, and GDP goes up. Similarly, if I create a new song of the copyrig ry of s u d s n a a e r al t oted lready and share it for free, GDP does not go up and society is not cultur of is a been lo k s in a h h t , ons can considered wealthier, but if I copyright it and sell it, it becomes and ic se you r phra e v le c a good. Or I can find a traditional society that uses herbs and Any

shamanic techniques for healing, destroy their culture and make them dependent on pharmaceutical medicine which they must purchase, evict them from their land so they cannot be subsistence farmers and must buy food, clear the land and hire them on a banana plantation—and I have made the world richer.


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011 ery n. Our v spiritua e l capital ed sloga rk a m ities hav e il d b into mo a d a tra n a fi s n ney. Th it ip so , e sh , k n c a a o n d the clo e proble relati d sold b n a ser they m is, the s human u th m e o ir fr come to se resou s, e y r x a e tr g w n a a a c r n ti e rces are st exhaust o k n n o b t e n c e o ion, the been ta d m financia n e e s. p e T d h m e w l w r o o c e fe n r r fo s is e g r re is p e a ainful , contem we have for thin that we are intim poraneo an ecolo , money, ately inte us with gical cris tly: food fore on n re e e c the th re rl is l d in and a h earth in ked. We an for unti ealth cr to mone cannot ild care, er paid h v c is e is s t, y, c . n n o o e They a n r v ert muc much m the basi hum rtainm r h more ore of o s of life ing, ente onsume th c o lo u a it f c r se e th r, h lf m e e e alth into is threate shelt s beco Faced w money, ned. itself ha stiges of e e it if v h L b st . e th g la fo e exhau re commo y the cookin stion of nwealth e sell awa the non that it c day we health, th r u th m o o e o t: n n n item. To in etized sumes, fi evitable inds. athme nancial by cann e beque r own m capital h late ’90s ibalizing even ou our divin , e r m as tried u sh o it o n se o e wed tha lf. The d to delay ting in re and g t the pro ot-com up with culmina is biosphe t d a b u th u th c e bble of e ti ss v th g e e ro c in e w ro c y o p th ll the nomy co e of mon around especia uld not ey. Lots This is th frantica In the mplete, . o d c lo rl o n o st f ll g o w e y, e xcess m r keep searchin alm deferred ped” oney wa g for a p age. It is ho goods a e “develo s runnin lace wh eople w nd servic s and th p te in g ta a e S th r m e d e the prom es could inevitab Unite al re still re le crash be rede ise of re natur orld the e w h , e g th w m m in s, e e o p d. So, to Fed slash netary p lture erty. develo postpon olicy to ed inter in gift cu of prop e est rates allow old (rather th antially subject st e b th su se t and loo e e e d v y e th li a t b n o y ts a n r e to w sened is a a l h b g g lt e o in a r o e p e d p w ip se s l a r and serv id with rvices th ia of st new deb and soc ices). Th at arose able, e process ts e new fi were ph a vast, sy e’s insati tion is th a in z h li nancial o c a a n b y, m st f a y o e Glo r e m ti g n goods a fa o ic in c m sc in ts e a o -m le th f nd ip . d d r e eceptive fe Various t this st accounti assets, to too, both pundits grow. Ye s it to n m d g li e s on e P have ob onzi sch al n inst it served th eme wa existenti g up aga , and e in k n s n a ta n t u r o th to t pyramid e Berna so differ left nds is rd Mad ent from of mortg nothing other la stance. off the fina aged-ba is almost ctive resi w re e e h ff ic e th ncial ind se h f se o d th ts d e e e m k r c iv se becau — ustry’s o a y lv p ti e e g n v s e o in fo s m w a r f n m sustain d other ed a bub ly o of gro itself th instrum ble that, the supp because rough a ents, like Ma lt is that bt—has e su in d n re fl f u e u o n h doff ’s, c x e c T o e m f a si lu n o n e v g w n ould on , g o in m ti in c d o d u e n n d e e o d y. ly exponen even mo As such the pro corresp , it is a sy tially gro re than and the tstripped u o p is s m w e e It o in b d ple supp ol of ou g, casino e mises. al deca r times— ose. It is conomy at it pro for sever not only and that is a f rvices th o se la d m r n th n g le a e b e u r econo s nsustain Wall Str ic pro mic syst of good able pyr eet the class em, base a finite amid sc lated to ics. The re m o c d heme. T ly o n a p o m e s c m e it de o st is n li o a w he n it e d p alth into the eter like a bo deferre nal conv ply in ca money, nfire tha l can be a oversup e it is r p si u a t o n c t m n of sustaina ust burn rofi of all av crisis of ble as w higher a ailable fu w, high-p ell. It is Marxian nd high ng as ne el. Just a lo d s e a p fr re lo e e e e r, s heat, so s fire br to the e futu e dev eaks exis xhaustio into the does ou ets can b ting che n r econo nature, nd mark le of a c s ir mical b c ie m a r s n y u st d b io c r ic e u onds an indu v a lt k e u th r th e , r e li b fo b d p d o e e ro te n r ds of co ating fre cess. On ensa depress mmunit e energy ly a fool to comp g wages, in y, — ll w w fa o c , u h a ld think lled mo en the su rofits uction ney—in that a fi pply of falling p verprod re can b the fuel is fi deindust n, and o o urn eve ti n p it r e m ializatio . To exte e r higher h consu T n s. n ie a d r n to st th d u e metap financia using th e re ind lization hor, the e heat to in matu lism as w of the e recent create m money, f capita o n conomy o ti o a r r e a e it th fu n e fi e amounts r l. in th continu It n a a sa n n y g o s, o s m o “We wil ds and se oney.” A depend l use mo ccordin rvices, to ustries, know it re g to the redeem new ind amount se e se th c the prom f o o t c n r r d e e ly v a p la n te p o w d c su is o is st f e u a th of lw m e it. Obvio y ays less r modyn ssentiall than the amics, th usly, the cial, so which e f a e p o m r s a o c u principa lm tice of b nt expen new rea l and in orrowin ded to c infinite terest of g new m reate and w l, h a r a o oney to u t ld lt th u d c e e l, e b c a ts r o pay the n c tu annot la omy as na a whole st very lo Yet even has don ng, but abando e for ten that is of fuel (r ning this years no ememb fo w. ll y, we stil e r, I mean n l must fa of natu ot litera re or cu ce the d l energy lture tha epletion of the p sources, t c a n be tur roposals but any n e d fo in bond r to a com address amount ing the modity). to findin present M g more o st econom fuel. ic crisis


d e w ore f an hav re ver m ne a r o its, ving o d hich d a e p e , n o — s t d im m r ,a well w ye al is l s he un ore oil the go pl off bali ss t ered n to dela ding, f ling m n o il e r p d d s e lm i o is e e rea mer nl sid ati be her it nn bl d the nc consu le Whet expan which rring na es o o-ca se. U con lien not o r u t p fo e s op es. ed is s r t g - rc t a o a e t n , h in r t e h y : c t o a p h a u u d g sp new e , elv tifi rowt lo sou ial a r co ve n , an le c green nding mic g ears, w sis ms for ” I fi o o b i n s e e r o n b i a c y r a n fo e ee a h ft to t me our lr nc he er o? ita ch g c th d reignit e is le ices. I bly to te tura fina n t lth I mis nev in tect uil I d ion: d serv hat els agina n u d W a im i . s , n d s a B r d a u y l n o st e n all e ty goo song day, pe pr ds? hou ue rly f w ver , th d our ay. To in n n p a e a q r r n m o o l a s e a fi t e i ” t go i a o we we c po ng n o of at our w o? deed, sim lms of lu en for 2008 f a an d ned Wh ind n d bly; in a e a p y? s h id t o e o pay ev n v o e a t o m r pth ht er. ce y c , una tk Ic onse an ea? g rt into of oming t resp de mi long e fa the ile c ar eren ing conve se is c nmen tower r p a e a v e ll f h t o ld e o Ac and pho rst g w ch In t ha ckp ot dif l th goods The fi pt to u m a u o u of it. attem f real t re m t o k w St tif s n e a h id t s lu as ld? n a ges eau grow the m tal va ut, wa ic o o t il m n g i e a o h o b b u dt con te the re can beyon nless e of uy g und to s ost crisis, measu em. U t is far o ke is e a , m h s B d h t t e , lu r p s y u “ e vic li stim es to m mone he nd ser omic romis co uld is t es it p t econ oods a t it a g u t h B o w w . e servic o a w re n to d h hat is us mo r signed able. T “W deepe brings , is de inevit e h c g e a u h t k m t on pac elay nt and ed ou You see, the gathering 2009 only d differe t: max crisis presents ama’s a u b o r g O d fo in s e y a x — o a il h r a tre t c a me m s f ndous opportunity. De u e s e o d r t a t d u e e o flation, the ith se w doom ciety’s destruction of money becau astes w too is , is only a categorical t on so ill fail our w u o w e t d iv I e e evil . max nd o rec if the creation of mo reason nity a ney is a categorical goo ation; acity t u iz p a il m d c iv m n c ’s d. of hsta of co However, you can see nature to wit l basis e loss from the examples I logica ability city y mor o a ’ n c s p a e t s a e d e c hav e given that the creati th y’s hstan ur for on of money has in n bod to wit t on o huma re also a e ma ed ou ny ability h e x t ways impoverished us a w n t m o a ; t h n g u all. Conversely, T o io in t . c oth orld axed the destruction of mo conne have n oxic w uts; m t e c ney , w r ha d s t a the potential to e s a t cle s th road eple enrich us. It offers the more reflect in a d more e d ly le e h n op b t e po o rtu ia n nity to reclaim f v lly edit re o to stay parts of the lost com our cr we rea nd mo o n a o , D mo t . s nw m u y eal e th e o from the realm ulu th on maxed nt stim of money and proper ore of into m ty. ernme m nvert tain m s v e o t o u c s s y G o s e t ? w left long omic We actually see this ha ? Can goes a t econ ppening every ridges tepid urren y that c m e and b o h time there is an econo iod of t n r o g e c n p e f lo l mic recession. People , o y ie ia r r r d p t b o s t b s u a can e it, ps ind no longer pay for var ill at b perha re, spir re ious goods and servic ams w f natu alth a s, with es, e r o a w e e progr g n y o la and have to rely on frie re se mm e pil nds and neighbors ew mo collap the co lete th for a f omic es of comp n ins ig tead. Where there is o t e s c w e e v s n a e a no money to facilitate s h e t p h o o st grow hen t transactions, gift econo able t e ure. W b lt mi l es reemerge and new u il c gw and ears kinds of money are cre nothin cent y n e e r h f ate t d. Ordinarily, though, o , . 30s gone crisis le. people and institutions g the 19 omic al sca in n in b p o e c n lo figh e e a g t tooth and nail to k nt of t beg on a ersiste prevent that from ha oblem f wha ve r o a p h e l The p pp g t a eni s t a ng. The habitual first l st tere men e fina response to economic funda e of in ally th crisis is to make and o the he rat ion t t t s h lu n it o s is actu io keep olut nds w more money—to acc ctive ssive s elerate the conversio st effe t expa . r a 0 fi h 4 t e 9 Succe y h n of ne .T ce 1 anything you can int nd ith mo austed ent sin o money. On a system d exh pons a r man pace w a e n ic e a p , w n d r e s be clea n of level, the debt surge is generating pplie enormous hat ha ely, nu solutio been a state t rtunat d the e a fo it r, r tion, pressure to extend the commodifi e a m a h li w z t li e s a r a v a a cat b r w ion of the glo ss h ly, o vicescommonwealth. We can see iousne tions— tunate this happening nd ser consc r solu a Unfor e n s h a t d o m O go with the calls to drill ion. in hu for oil in Alaska, itized, of new scalat a shift ment mmod itary e p o il c lo com e m e mence deep-sea drillin v r s e s fo d le e d d b g, and so on. The n e ever nable time is here, though, logy-e tions n c o n n u h f for c the reverse process to te uman begin in earnest—to lace h remove things from the to rep realm of goods and ser vices, and return the m to the realm of gifts, reciprocity, self-suffic ien cy, and community sharin g.


LILY CAMPBELL//EDITORIAL DESIGN//MICHAEL ROBINSON//FALL2011 nyway in appen a h to g se their is goin ll: This people lo s a , se Note we p olla le will rrency c gs. Peop e of a cu buy thin to r the wak o emerge. o e too p ies will re m it o n c u e b m r l com tect jobs o and rea do to pro h other thing we y n n into a o , help eac e onversi eantim e from c In the m rc u so re mitigate social apse and tural or ll a o n c e e nt, m th so hasten velopme ill both from de w e v y e sa n ou o u y o m group forest y tive play ity. Any a r r e e v p o se o to s it lf, or , any c you stop eal himse r ach to h any road te u o make he y , anyone wn food ; o sh is li h b k a e o th est ouse, co or add to r own h ou create y h build he s to lt it a e im yw er off-l thes; an ou rend y g own clo ten in r o th any l help sh omain; hine, wil c a public d M g rin d-devou the worl

Individually and collectively, anything we do to resist or postpone the collapse will only make it worse. Let us stop resisting the revolution in human beingness. If we want to survive the multiple crises unfolding today, let us not seek to survive them. That is the mindset of separation; that is resistance, a clinging to a dying past. Instead, let us shift our perspective toward reunion, and think in terms of what we can give. What can we each contribute to a more beautiful world? That is our only responsibility and our only security. More concretely, let us engage in conscious, purposeful money destruction in place of the unconscious destruction of money that happens in a collapsing economy. If you still have money to invest, invest it in enterprises that explicitly seek to build community,

the Mac hine’s li fespan. not dep Think o end on protect nature, and preserve the cultural f it this money way: if pleasure fo r some p you alre s, then th ady do o r ti on of life e collap transitio ’s necess se of m n for yo o it n ie e s and y u. The sa will pose Any netw me app much le ork or c li ss e s o to the so f a harsh ommun vehicle cial leve ity or so cial for the c l. cial inst finan t onversio e it v u i enrich li tion tha n of life gat tha fe after t is not a into mo r ne sign money. ney will ood ero o e of z g sustain There e a a mor ect t is and x n a is p e t x h to v t ey d e E ay, in th practice t— ing mon lth. eory an , alterna tmen convert ave wea s d ti h n in e v e o c v u re m credit a asingly oney syst m in ay yo ly nd dem in com ems, ba not your onal ld aw ng urrage, sed on m tenti er or t was so n on all that n r th h i thi t a u t n u y e t d tu o not dr is good, al re ot u Wh . An wha . n y iv tr y e u e e m e th m r , i n e o a fundam a nd beau conversi o n la , entally d you tiful into on of to m o rec oney eco ople ifferent money. r pe orld n als e sense of w a m h h c t d or u e T e m h o e ese enac an iden th self, from cycl , you of th f or for t ti e t ty t s a r , e w u a f h v fu that mo at domin o ndamen d of sel ps o to in re for m ates tod tally dif ation e instea your g ste z i e r n l a fe i i is y. o re t k f le N k nt ss for yo possible o more yu ong do ma by ta u. On a will it b revoluti ew s n to it; an ing you n r e r o p ce a r n tr e o r e u w f o so l e e can en in our id nal leve redu ng yth kill you l, the de act is a entity. T will payi ew s s; an , t l r re n o e a u p h v e i e o e y o st lu r h d y iscrete a tion in o Adam S an m t ate not with nd sepa mith ha ur sense sell; dm cono or a e f e d f r o d s t l a o r r r f te f u e i d n a se o s self of D realizin its course lf, w l ur ag tea disc g our ow escartes and is b The h yo row e ins c . g v a i n a n e n d b g e o in t d c i e n o , separate ming ob totality a u w sit buy ness, fro of all life solete. W ney rt yo tran , the is m each . Interest e are f mo coming ew a eties i o n the sepa c ges, o r n th o o b s o e elies this r and fr rate self ini the a the gift f o m ens h m u e o o k n g a v th io t a d s i u e n th t , for it se e expen other. M aw the hing thro d rimi c se of so eks grow s n any in th p a a u e g mething lt gs in in th of e West a e of interc externa ritua eartstrin echo susta re now re th onnecte l, someth e spi gift, coming h h e t r d befo h u n d t , in e to agree o l ss, wheth g n perspec l f a a n o c , o with the s tive. Th er from gy ? its e time h principle a Buddh t tug colo eed med of the g as come of e us. I istic or a s we h onsu n l c l ift, whic o s a to i p n live it. It ecologic u Sh ty h embo al is time to It is bec nigh sity. dies the beau oming a enter th felt und nero th’s e r g a e b r e e u rstandin ndantly spirit ou of dimensi g of non obvious der ons) is a separati that less lso less fo main e r o fo n brought . r you (in r me. T us to a st all its he ideolo ate of p gy of pe for air. T o v rpetual e r ty hat ideo so destit gain ha logy, an ute that s collapsi d the civ we are g ng toda il a iz sping ation bu y. ilt upon it, is wh at is

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