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CELL CITIES

LILY CAMPBELL SENIOR THESIS 1 PAUL CARLOS FALL 2011 PUCD 4205 F CRN: 5339


CELL CITIES


PROJECT DESCRIPTION 2 RESEARCH 3 additional topics

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example analogy

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additional analogies

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cell diagram

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illustration inspiration

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cover inspiration

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cut out inspiration

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dimensional inspiration

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book size inspiration

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interactive inspiration

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additional inspiration

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MY BOOK 14 selected inspiration

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initial explorations

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CONTACT 17


CELL CITIES PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Children read books about people

translating organelles and proteins

using something familiar like a city,

everyday, but these are generally

into memorable characters, so when

kids will more easily understand how

about the human as a whole, not the

students are introduced to these

the cell functions. The books that

most basic parts of a human: their

concepts/processes at a higher level

follow will center around a crisis,

cells. I plan on creating a series of

of education, they may remember

special event, or specific part of the

books which will introduce elemen-

the book they once read, perhaps

city in order to go more indepth or

tary students to cellular biology &

even unconsciously, and already be

descirbe a specific process of the

genetics concepts before many edu-

familiar, comfortable, and interested

cell. For example, cell division would

cators would consider them ready.

in the material.

be explained in a book in which a city decides to break off into two cities,

The books will use analogies for complex concepts like DNA replica-

The first book will introduce the anal-

and therefore needs to double all of

tion, cell division, or cell mutation, by

ogy of a cell as a city (see page 3.) By

it’s buildings, departments, etc.

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ADDITIONAL TOPICS:

EXAMPLE ANALOGY:

MOLECULE TRANSPORT

One common analogy used in high

If you think about the postal service,

Cells must transport nutrients and

school to help students better un-

or a service like UPS, they practi-

other molecules in and out of their

derstand the functions of cellular

cally copy this process. They recieve

cytoplasm in order to survive and

organelles is a city. If you think of

some sort of material (protein) which

thrive.

the entire cell as a town or city, each

needs to be transported from it’s cur-

organelle can take on the function of

rent location to another either inside

DNA REPLICATION

buildings/departments in the com-

the city (cell) or outside the city (to

The most important goal of a cell is to

munity, while proteins act as the

another cell.) The post office will

survive & make more of themselves.

materials used in the poduction of

then place the material in a box, usu-

To do so they must replicate their

the city & everything in it.

ally with bubble wrap or peanuts for protection (fluid filled vesicle,) and

DNA. Let’s look at a single organelle to

place a label with the destination ad-

CELLULAR REPRODUCTION

better illustrate this cell as city

dress and return address (membrane

Cell replication can either occur via

concept. The Golgi Apparatus (some-

proteins.) This way the recipient

mitosis or meiosis. This splitting of

times refered to as the Golgi Bod-

can tell if the package was intended

one cell into two is quite an amazing

ies or the Golgi Complex) modiifies,

for them, and if they should open it

process.

sorts, and packages macromolecules

(much like the membrane, should it

for cell secretion. These macromol-

recieve a vesicle.)

PROTEIN SYNTHESIS

ecules (usually proteins) are deliv-

Proteins have diverse functions

ered via the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

inside the cells including being the

The Golgi then packages the proteins

building blocks for all organelles, so

inside a transport vesicle and marks

protein creation is crutial.

the vesicle with membrane proteins for recognition by the recipient of the

CELLULAR METABOLISM

vesicles contents. These processes

Animals consume food to get energy,

ensure the proteins will be delivered

plants process sunlight for energy,

safely, to the correct organelle, and

but these energy sources must be

opened only when intended.

converted into more useful forms of energy for use in the cell. CELLULAR SIGNALING Cells need to communicate with each other to synchronize their functions.

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CELL CITIES

CELL ORGANELLES CITY ANALOGIES CELL CELL MEMBRANE CELL WALL CYTOSKELETON CYTOPLASM ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM RIBOSOMES GOLGI APPARATUS/BODIES CHLOROPLASTS NUCLEAR MEMBRANE MITOCHONDRIA NUCLEUS

City City Limits City Wall Steel Girders or Physical City Structure Lawns and Parks Highways or Road System Farms/Factories Post Office or UPS Solar Energy Plants Police Department Energy Plants City Hall (or the mayor)

DNA

Original Blueprints or the city

RNA

Copies of Blueprints

NUCLEOLUS

Farm & Factory Construction

LYSOSOMES

Waste Disposal/ Recyclers

VACUOLES AND VESICLES

Packages, Warehouses, Water Towers, or Garbage Dumps

PROTOPLASM CHROMOSOMES PROTEINS

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Air or atmosphere Rolled up blueprints Raw Material


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CELL CITIES ILLUSTATIONS: I began looking at children’s books to understand what kind of illustrations kids relate to and appreciate. Included here are pieces with a graphic style that I personally relate to and could potentially translate into a book about cellular cities for kids.

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CELL CITIES

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COVERS: Included on the right are covers I found interesting beause of either illustration or hand done type. If possible, I will combine some simple illustations with hand done type to illustrate the action.

CUT OUTS: This page includes some interesting examples of how cut outs or die cuts can provide interacting within a book. Many of these examples like the cut outs which flip to reveal more information, and the spinning dial with the rivit may be useful when hiding/displaying information about the related organelle.

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CELL CITIES DIMENSIONAL BOOKS: Many of the books I found incorporated some sort of 3d element whether it be an attached element which can be played with or a textured area to illustrate material. This sort of addition may work in my books in order to differentiate between organelles and the cell or to create areas where children can physically move parts of the book. For example the golgi apparatus page could include proteins that the children could remove from the endoplasmic reticulum, move through the golgi, and into a vesicle on the other side. perhaps they could even add the membrane proteins.

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BOOK SIZE: When it comes to book sizes for

group of children it seems inconvi-

along with their finger when they

children, the bigger the better, in my

nent for one of the children to hold

read aloud, and interact with the

opinion. When children make their

the book while the others look on,

illustrations (especially if these are

own books, they want to use the big-

instead they tend to lay the book on

interective illustrations.)

gest paper, write a big as possible,

the ground and lay infront of it, so

Many times children’s books are

and stretch their illustrations across

everyone can be as close as pos-

read aloud by either a teacher or

the entire page. When reading in a

sible, help turn the pages, follow

parent, in which case, it’s incredibly useful to have an oversized book. The adult (or student even) is able to read while sharing the illustrations with the entire group.

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CELL CITIES INTERACTIVITY: Because I am currently hoping to include so many interactive features, it may make more sense for this project to manifest itself in the form of an ipad app or website. I am reluctant to propose such a project because of my own limitations. But if time allows, I would really like to translate cell cities into a more accessable media like the ipad or the internet.

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ADITIONAL INFLUENCES: The book to the right (an above) was a book I had when I was ten. The first few pages included a cartoon of the security guard at an art museum waking up and realizing that the museum had been broken into, and 10 painting replaced with frauds. You continue through the book doing a sort of spot the differences technique refereneing the paintings currently in the museum with those in a catalogue on the bottom half of the book. The book kept me entertained for hours trying to solve the mystery of who stole which painting. The book may actually be the reason I became fascinated with art and decided to come to parsons. My brother had the rug on the bottom right when we younger, and we used to play on top of it with trucks, barbies, polly pockets, and animal figurines. This sort of a large scale map could work for my interactive book. A cell or city map where kids can place in organelles and interact with the system as a whole.

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CELL CITIES

THE BOOK: After looking at all the previous influ-

could be bound beautifully like this

ences I found a few objects which

one, and I could see a bunch of nerdy

will provide me with a more precise

young teenagers carrying the book

direction. I would really like to use

around (excuse my use of the word

some form of cut and reveal. I love

nerd but I would have considered

the bright graphic illustrations in the

myself one at that age.)

book (above center.) The PR3 book (bottom right) caused me to reconsider my target group. This book could potentially be condensed into a book where every chapter covers an event in the cell, it

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PLAY TIME: On the bottom of the opposite page I began to play with how parts of the city could be introduced. This illustation, however, has not undergone any revisions and I don’t believe they are very useful in conveying the informa-

page I have begun to play around with

To the right, I began to play with the

how a cut and reveal may work to my

buildings as more simplifies icons,

advantage, by cutting out the shape

inspired by the PR3 book. But then I

of the organelle from the building it

began to think, why can’t the build-

will imply a connection between the

ings be actual characters, like char-

building and the organelle.

acters in many traditional childrens

tion nessesary. On the bottom of this

books. This will make the organelles more memorable and relatable

CELL CITY

chloroplasts act like factories in plants taking in energy from the sun and converting it into energy for the cell to use.

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CELL CITIES CITY PLANNING: I began looking at books concerning city planning, hoping to find a city that already imitates the structure of a cell. I found a few real cities like Paris in the 1500s and ancient Athens, as well as a few imaginary cities which may serve as a bridge between city and cell. In my research I happened upon a list of city ‘types’ including the commercial city, the industrial city, the transportation city, the recreational city, educational cities, mining communities, retirement communities, governmental centers, and combination cities. This classification could be an alternitive way to organize these cell city stories into seperate books, although not all of these city ‘types’ will work for a cell (i.e. retirement city)

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CELL CITIES

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CITY PLANNING: Many of the books regarding city

text and pages. This could also be

planning that I happened upon

an interesting addition to the book

included these city overviews which

which will add visual and interactive

I think are visually really interest-

interest. The book could have many

ing, even by themselves. I also came

different sized pages and somehow

across a book (on the right) that have

fold out to become a large cellular

different sized pages for pages with

city map.


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CELL CITIES FOLDING INSPIRATION: The books I found, on the previous pages, caused me to look back for more inspiration. I love the red book below and think the spacial quality of it is really interesting. There may be a way to incorporate this kind of popup quality into my book. On the opposite page, a few circular forms I found interesting appear. The book in the center have a circular die-cut through the center with materials added across and through the circle. The folded book below has interesting color forms which may influence the final illustrations.

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CELL CITIES FOLDING & CORK: Folding the entire book out may be an interesting way to add interactivity for kids back in. Robert Hooke saw the first (and coined the term) cell around 1665 relating their appearance to that of a monk’s cell. Below is one of his original observational drawings of a cork cell through a microscope. Because the first cell was seen in a cork cell, I feel it would be make sense that some part of the book involve cork. Some uses of cork appear opposite.

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CELL CITIES PROTOTYPING PHASE 1: I began playing with illustration once I had written a rough draft for a piece of the cell division book. My illustator sketches were turning out too childish like the one below, so I decided to try making spreads a bit darker. Below right, are two variations of one of these spreads. Above is a possible overview of the city, the white is proposed ‘road ways’ through the city. The nucleus or town hall will be placed in the center with other buildings placed in empty quadrants of the circle. These may end up in the shape of a C as seen on the opposite page. Many of these quadrants will be left empty for use in the stories.

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& THE CITY WENT TO WORK, SLOWLY PUSHING THEIR CITY IN TWO


SAMPLE STORY: ... The people of the city worked

Building materials were quickly

As soon as the {centromere}

hard, and the city thrived.

delivered to construction sites, and

completed it’s replication, the people

the city doubled within a few days.

of {} city gathered to transport the

They produced more food than they

new building across town.

would ever be able to eat,

In the meantime, the town hall was

more power than they would ever be

carfully drawing copies of the entire

With the {centromere} on the

capible of consuming,

town’s specifications. {including the

opposite side of the city, citizens

more materials than they would ever

book of laws, blueprints to all the

unwrapped and ran to the center of

be able to use,

buildings in the city and city plans.}

town.

and more waste than they had room for in their {dome}.

Upon their arrival, they were greated by the rest of the town who had

In fear of lysis, the town assembled

gathered to witness the ceremonies.

at the town nucleus where the mayor demanded all government

The blueprints had been layed

buildings begin doubling their staff

across the hall’s lawn in pairs. The

and construction of new facilities.

town quickly wrapped one of every

Knowing how energy intensive

pair in the ribbons.

avoiding a break in the dome was going to be, he asked energy plants

A parade of people rushed in

to quickly take over the entire

following the ribbon bearers from

southern quarter of the city.

the opposite side of the city. They tied the remaining blueprints in the ribbons. The crowd grew silent. {TRANSLATION OF CELL SIGNAL:

& THE CITY WENT TO WORK, SLOWLY PUSHING THEIR CITY IN TWO

phone call to mayor?} And the city went to work, slowly pushing their city into two cities, stretching and reconfiguring the supports for the dome along the stretch. ..TOWN HALL SPLITS RECONFIGUREDS ON OPPOSITE SIDES AND RUNS ITS OWN TOWN THROUGH THE REMANDER OF THE DIVIDE

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CELL CITIES

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GOOGLE SKETCH UP: Because I have to illustrate a a cellular city, I decided it would benificial to begin drawing the physical city structure in google sketch up. Perhaps these models could eventually be turned into illustrations by bringing them into photoshop. Even if these only end up being reference for perspective drawing or as a map of the city to ensure consistancy throughout the book.

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CELL CITIES TO DO LIST: PROTOTYPING: WINTER 2011-2012 »» Draft of text for all books »» Storyboard for all books »» Finish SketchUp model »» Size exploration »» Binding exploration »» Type/format exploration »» Integration of cork/cutouts/folding PRODUCTION: SPRING 2012 »» Finalized text »» Illustrations for spreads »» Branding »» Cover design »» Packaging/extras? »» Box set TESTING: SUMMER 2012 »» Summer camp testing »» Game/Interactive integration REVISIONS: FALL 2012 »» Thesis II »» Feedback from summer 2012 testing

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email:

lily.k.campbell@gmail.com campl073@newschool.edu phone:

802.236.5724 mailing address:

Lily Campbell 439 W 51st Apt 1E New York, NY 10019

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{APPLAUSE}


Cell City 12.15.11