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Digital Design - Module 02 Semester 1, 2018 Lilie Paxton-White (911118) Junhan Foong + Studio 13


Week Three

Reading: Kolerevic B. 2003. Architecture in the Digital Age

Kolerevic described three fundamental type of fabrication techniques in the reading. Outline the three techniques and discuss the potential of Computer Numeric Controlled fabrication with parametric modelling.

The three different forms of fabrication techniques discussed in the reading are subtractive, additive and formative. These are all examples of 3D modelling; formative involves shaping heat-softened materials into a mold; additive is the building up of a shape in layers, for example 3D printing; and subtractive involves remov-ing parts of a whole through shaving down and surface, for example Computer Numeric Controlled fabrica-tion. This technology has the potential to create shapes that are incredibly accurate, as well as being easily modified to create many different iterations at the same price, leading to mass customization rather than mass production.

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Week Three

Surface Creation

The process of scripting the surfaces in Rhino through Grasshopper was very involved, but also rewarding and useful. I found the way that it is adjustable throughout the design process makes production of iterations and different designs very easy and streamlined. When designing my surfaces, I wanted to created two very dramatic, curving structures, so I looked to the sails of boats and structures like the Sydney opera house. However, it was difficult to ensure that the two surfaces didn’t intersect. I finally constructed four plausible iterations, with the final two being contenders. I like these two the best as they create a dramatic sloping ceiling from both the inside and the outside, and if they were to be converted into pavilions they would force the viewer to look upwards towards the sliver of sky at the peak, while also providing ample shade. Far right: the process of programming the surface in grasshopper. Top right: iteration 1. Top left: iteration 1. Bottom right: iteration 3. Bottom left: fourth and final iteration.

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Week Four Panels & Waffle

I wanted to create panelized surfaces that threw interesting shadows and had variation in them, so I created three different truncated pyramid shapes, with variations in the size of their opening. I used the ones with the larger holes across the centre of each surface, with a gradation towards smaller ones at the top and bottom. This provides dappled light into the interior of the structure.

My waffle structure was difficult to design; there were a few superfluous structures which I had to cull, and when i first plugged it into the Grasshopper code, the layers didn’t link correctly, so the structure in the Z plane was not planar. Once I had deleted a few structures and changed the shape of my surfaces slightly it seems to work better, and it was relatively easy to construct.

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Week Four

Laser Cutting

I had some difficulty when unrolling these surfaces; even though I used the command MeshtoNURB and the shapes were planar before I meshed them, when I tried to unroll the individual shapes, the edges overlapped, meaning they were not developable. As a result, I was forced to triangulate each shape manually, then mesh them again. The result was much more satisfactory, as it could then be unrolled and printed without any difficulty. However, they still have to be constructed individually, rather than in their rows of five, which will be much more time consuming.

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Week Five

While designing my Boolean form, I looked at the different shapes available in Lunchbox and liked the look of the platonic octahedron, as it was an interesting, but not overly complex shape, which I thought would provide interesting facets and faces, and increase the organic, crystalline appearance of the model. I also decided to use iteration 3, as it is quite a sim-ple cuboid shape, which serves to emphasize the intricate geometries of the Boolean shapes. Far left: processes in grasshopper. Top left: Iteration 1, diamond. Top right: iteration 2, diamond, but different orientation within the overall form. Bottom left: Iteration 3, cuboid form, and the structure I got modelled. Bottom right: Iteration 4, pyramid.

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Week Five

Isometric

For my final 3D print, I wanted to use a Boolean form that had interest and variation, as well as a noticeable order and simple pattern. Initially I was very interested with creating a complicated overall structure, such as the irregular kite or diamond shapes seen in iterations 1 and 2 on the page previously. While these shapes looked interesting on their own, once the Boolean geometries were introduced, all sense of order was lost, and the models became organic lumps of rock; interesting, but not something that looks like it had a design process behind it. I eventually decided to use a simple cuboid structure, which allows the Boolean form to be celebrated. My model has some interesting spatial qualities, because despite looking quite bulky and geometric, there perforations throughout the centre that allow in to be looked through from top to bottom, as well as through both sides. This creates intricacies and a sense of lightness in an otherwise quite blocky form. Additionally, three of the six faces (not shown here) of the cube are almost flat, with only small openings through which you can see the interior structure of the shape. This is juxtaposed with th dynamic cut away sections of the other sides, which further emphases the balance between simple and complex, order and disorder, that I wanted to convey in my model.

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BLACK = Page Size/Trim Line

Week Six Task 01

Surface iterations

1.2

1.3

1.4

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

Surface grids

1.1

Panelised surfaces

Task 01 Matrix While creating iterations of the two surfaces through Grasshopper, I wanted to create a dramatic over-all shape. As seen above, I quickly moved towards the idea of having the two surfaces sweeping upwards to a central point. Eventually I decided I wanted to create a greater internal space for the waffle structure, so I chose to have them facing each other, rather than in the same direction. As a result, all my final iterations of the panelized surfaces are all based on 1.4.

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Week Six Task 02

Surface iterations 1.2

1.3

1.4

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

Surface grids

1.1

Panelised surfaces

Task 02 Matrix My first iterations were using a simple spherical shape in a very distorted matrix. I used attractor points on two of the four grids in the system, and used high attractor settings, so the shapes themselves became quite distorted. These are the same settings for 1.1, 1.2 and 1.4. 1.3 however is different - the attraction to the point is far less, and only one grid is being attract-ed. As a result, this forms a much more ordered system, which compliments the disorder of the shape I used - a truncated diamond. I chose to model a one-eighth section of 3.3 as i found this to be a good balance between order and disorder.

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Week Six

Final Isometric Views

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Appendix

Process

This is the process I used when creating the pattern of truncated pyramids in my panelized surfaces. I created three sepa-rate iterations with variations in the size of their opening, and then spliced them together to create the surfaces seen above. (I did the same process for each surface). I think the outcome is quite seamless and creates a bit of interest in an otherwise quite simple cuboid pattern.

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Appendix Process

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Appendix

Process

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Digital Design Moudle 2  

A journal documenting the design process behind two different construction techniques.

Digital Design Moudle 2  

A journal documenting the design process behind two different construction techniques.

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