Harbinger Portfolio

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WO RT H T H E R I S K ? The rise of the wildly popular app TikTok has taken the halls of East and teenagers everywhere by storm, but its growing influence has led to a national security investigation regarding its potential risks ­— but its users don’t seem to care.

PEEK INSIDE

0 5 | S PAC E I N FO G R A P H I C

1 O | T H E R A PY O P I N I O N

3 1 | H I D D E N G E M S O F KC


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SPECIAL SECTION PAGES 14-17

14 ADVANCED.

15 ENERGIZED.

16 HEALTHY.

17 EMPLOYED. SCAN TO READ MORE

FUT URE

From the increase of green energy to the changes in the job market, the future holds many unknowns. Read pages 14-17 to see what is expected in the upcoming years


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Awaits A DV E N T U R E

Seniors prepare for their gap year of traveling across the country, living out of a van


copy by | brynn winkler

14 S P E C I A L S E C T I O N | A & E

R E V I E IN K E S H A T I KTO K RIHANNA

WE FOUND LOVE

12

CARLY RAE JEPSON

CALL ME MAYBE

RO B I N T H I C K E

BLURRED LINES

14

HAPPY

BRUNO MARS

15

CHAINSMOKERS

CLOSER

JUSTIN BIEBER

DESPACITO

18

13

PHARRELL WILLIAMS

UPTOWN FUNK

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11

DRAKE

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GOD’S PLAN

LIL NAS X & BILLY RAY

OLD TOWN ROAD

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SCAN ME | PLAYLIST

Scan this QR code to listen to a playlist of the top songs of the deacde on Spotify *information courtesy of billboard

FRANK OCEAN BLONDE | 2016 After nearly four years of silence following his 2012 Grammy-Award winning album “Channel Orange,” Frank Ocean finally debuted ‘Blonde” in 2016. Ocean ingeniously incorporated psychedelic pop components, soulful influence and a hip hop beat into an unorthodox R&B album I can listen to on repeat. Romance is a main theme in the album, as many songs convey his complex emotions surrounding the topic. Versatile and introspective, “Blonde” is still one of the only albums that can keep me up at night wrapping my head around the lyrics, but also have me jamming in the car on the way home from school.

ATHLE I SUR E *photos courtesy of revolve My favori te t rend of t he decade, ath leisure, makes it socially acceptable for me to spor t l eggi ngs, sneakers an d a sweatsh ir t almost every day. Th an ks to at hl ei sure — or cas ual cl ot hi ng desig n ed to be suitable both for exercise an d everyday wear — I can al so h ead straight from sch ool to th e gym with out an out fi t change. “MOM ” J EA N S These st ra i g ht - l e g g e d, h i g h wa ste d j e a n s wi t h a re l axe d fit were n oto ri o us l y un co o l i n t h e e a rl y 2000s, a n d t h us du bbe d t h e “m o m” j e a n s. A m i d- 2000s s h i ft i n a t t i t ude made i t fa s h i o n a b l e fo r m o de l s a n d i n fl ue n ce rs to s p o r t the lo o k — a n d t h ey ’re st i l l a p op ul a r c h o i ce to day. EAR LY 2000’S PREPPY Fl as hback to th e early 2000s wh en th e h alls of Indi an Hills Middle Sch ool were a sea of Ralph Lauren Pol os an d V in eyard V in es T- Sh ir ts. Th is tren d of th e Ivy League in spired style was evident from th e men’s khaki s to women’s pearl studs. CROP TOPS Though th ey came back in style aroun d 201 3, crop tops — wh eth er in th e form of a T- sh ir t, sweater, jacket or tan k top — are still a popular ch oice for women an d teen s today. “DAD ” SNEAKERS These ch un ky, double- sole sn eakers came into th e scene recently. F rom Balen ciaga to F ila an d Nike, many joked th at th ese “ugly” sh oes must h ave come from th eir dad’s closet.

SHOP ME | BRYNN’S PICKS Scan this QR code to be directed to the Revolve website to shop these looks

TAYLOR SWIFT REPUTATION | 2017 I love a good come back. So when my sister dragged me to my childhood favorite country singer-turned-pop-star’s newest stadium tour, I was impressed by Taylor Swift’s powerful performance and ability to own the narratives and rumors surrounding her personal life. Swift’s embrace of modern pop was fun and empowering rather than bland and predictable. From the sweet nostalgia of the slow “New Year’s Day” to the fierce anthem “Look What You Made Me Do,” Swift’s latest album was in my queue for weeks to come after that concert.

MOVIES OF THE DECADE 1 2 Y E A R S A S L AV E

Y EA R | 2 01 0

2 0 1 0 | I PA D 2 0 1 1 | R E B E C C A B L AC K 2 0 1 2 | W H I T N E Y H O U S T O N D E AT H | EBOLA

Y EA R | 2 01 4

2014

2 0 1 5 | C A I T LY N J E N N E R 2 0 1 6 | O LY M P I C S

| U N K N OW N

*photos & information courtesy of imdb

GET OUT

Y EA R | 2 01 5

BIRDMAN

2 0 1 3 | B O S T O N M A R AT H O N

2 01 7 | S O L A R EC L I PS E 2 01 8 | M EG H A N M A R K L E 2 01 9

SPOTLIGHT

Y EA R | 2 01 3

INCEPTION

WORDS OF THE DECADE

Y EA R | 2 01 7

MOONLIGHT

Y EA R | 2 01 6

*information courtesy of google analytics

BRYNN’S TOP

10

The arts and entertainment trends throughout the decade, from top Google searches to fashion fads

C LOT H E S O F T H E D EC A D E

S O U N D S O F T H E D EC A D E

A D EC A D E

GREEN BOOK

Y EA R | 2 01 8

BLACK PANTHER | 2018 Action-packed and geniously curated, “Black Panther” was the first Marvel experience to get me hooked on the rest of the Marvel Universe. Unlike other superhero films that are centered around a revolutionary technological revelation or a repetitive franchise storyline, “Black Panther” evokes a refreshing sense of wonder through the story of the mythical Wakanda and its leader T’Challa.


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20


32 | ALT-COPY

Mood GET IN THE

design by | lila tulp copy by | annabelle moore

THE EYES THE PERFECT BALANCE between maroon and glitter is this makeup season’s eye-catcher. From Kylie Cosmetics eyeshadow singles, Raspberry Sugar is a metallic rose bronze that will top off your fall look giving it that extra umph. photo courtesy of | kylie cosmetics

T H E D ECO R WHEN I THINK of fall, I imagine sitting in my window seat surrounded by my seasonal room decor. This antelope-patterned rug is a must have — its neutral colors set a wide variety of possibilities for other decor in the room, yet it also acts as a bold statement through its uniqueness and personality. Along with the funky rug, this white deer head that hangs next to my bathroom door and keeps my necklaces untangled is a two-forone: fun to look at and serves a purpose. photos by | taylor keal

T H E LO O K FEATURED ON REVOLVE’S Hot List, these two outfits were made for the fall season — when the temperature is 60 degrees and the leaves are turning warm and comforting colors — these outfits match that vision. Outfit 1: This tiger print skirt acts as the focal point of this outfit, paired perfectly with neutral colors and gold accents. This look is perfect for a Friendsgiving, dinner or fall day. Outfit 2: This classic denim button down is the epitome of fall style. Pair it with some stylish leather pants, this outfit is what you need this fall season. photos courtesy of | revolve

THE TEA OKAY, HERE’S THE tea. Teavana’s Imperial Spiced Chai Tea with cinnamon and papaya is assured to meet your fall morning needs. Teavana describes their tasty tea as “a richly flavored blend of chai spices and sweet tropical fruit. Ginger, cinnamon and star anise deliciously swirl alongside pineapple and papaya atop an oolong, rooibos and yerba maté base.” photos courtesy of | teavana

SCAN ME | BOARD Scan this QR code to get the links to all of Annabelle’s picks

T H E PAT T E R N WITHOUT A DOUBT, this season’s pattern is cheetah print. Cheetah print pillows, dresses, boots and screensavers — you name it. Throw tigers in there and you’ll be fierce. photos courtesy of | pinterest

THE NAILS NOW THAT NAIL colors of white, yellow and pink are making their slow departure, it’s the season for deeper, darker colors. What is the IT color of fall this year? Strong Coal-ition by OPI. photos courtesy of | OPI


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MOVING STARTS ON PAGE 13

IN REVIEW

OPINION

NEWS

FEATURE

NEWS


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CRAZE I N S P R I N G 2 0 1 7 , J U U L WAS A

B U T N OW. . .

CONTINUE IN OUR SPECIAL SECTION PAGES 13-17

In April 2017, Harbinger investigated a new type of electronic cigarette, the Juul, being found in the hands of a few students around the school. At this point in time, only 13 percent of East students could be found owning the device...


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stomach

Rae Metabolism Drops quickly gained popularity in usage among teens, but FDA-unregulated diet and weight-loss products negatively affect the teens they’re marketed towards


the harbinger. S H AW N E E M I S S I O N E A S T 7500 MISSION ROAD PRAIRIE VILLAGE, KS 66208

KANSAS CITY

JAN. 27, 2020 VOLUME LXII ISSUE 9

For the first time in 50 years, the Chiefs are going back to the Superbowl ­— and Kansas City is ready


DE SI GN L I L A T UL P

DES I GN LIL A T UL P

F E AT U R E S 17

16 F E AT U R E S

85% 88%

*Information courtesy of SafeGuard.com

41%

of teens between the ages of 13-17 have a social networking profile

of teens have had a negative experience on a social networking site

ADDICTED

of teens have been the target of or have seen someone be mean or cruel to another person on a social media site

Teenage addiction to social media can lead to depression, anxiety and other mental health related issues

BY CAROLYN P OPPER Section Editor

B

efore uploading a picture to her Instagram, freshman Brooke Seib opens her “editing folder” on her iPhone. In it, she taps FaceTune, an application used to edit and enhance physical image. After using the “whiten” effect on her teeth, and “brightness” effect on the background, Seib uploads the picture. “Sometimes I get a little carried away.” Seib said. “It ends up being forty minutes and I’m still staring at the same picture, deciding on last touches.” Social media is a growing addiction in high schoolers — one that’s causing depression and anxiety, according to psychologist Dr. Claire Barron. Teens internalize what they see on social media, according to Tamara Finlen, a clinical social worker at Behavioral Health Specialists. While social media can be a positive outlet for connecting with others, it is magnifying many students’ insecurities. According to Finlen, social media offers an artificial gratification. She says that receiving a number of likes on an Instagram post, or Snapchatting the “right” people can be deceivingly rewarding. She describes the feeling as a momentary “high” or a social ego boost, drawing the kids in even more. At East, students like freshman Stella McKinney value “likes” on an

Instagram post, and take them to heart. “If no one likes your post, then that tells you if you should delete the picture, or keep it up,” McKinney said. According to a new study on the U.S National Library of Medicine website, receiving “likes” on social media activates the same circuits in the teenage brain that are activated by eating chocolate or winning money. To sophomore Will Mohr, boys and girls don’t share the same behavior on Instagram. Some behavior, like posting too often or commenting on other pictures is less masculine — less acceptable for a boy using social media. According to Mohr, a boy has to be careful what he posts, if he doesn’t want to be made fun of. Junior Mallory Frank “follows” Alexis Ren, despite the insecurity Frank feels when looking at the famous model sporting bikinis and lingerie. “I wonder, ‘how does she look like that?’ and ‘What do I have to do to look like that?” Frank said. These are the subconscious thoughts that cause depression, according to Finlen. “Rationally, we know no one has a perfect life,” Finlen said. “But teens internalize that their lives are horrible because all they see [are] all these great things people are doing. With that comes depression.” Sophomore Lizzie Macadam resents the patterns she notices on social media. The way clothes must be perfect or too unnatural of a pose backfires, because it puts out a

false impression. Macadam believes her friends would be happier if they didn’t waste time on finding the picture that will receive the most likes. “I don’t like how people try to be someone they’re not,” MacAdam said.

Rationally, we know no one has a perfect life, but teens internalize that their lives are horrible because all they see is these great things people are doing. With that comes depression. TA M ARA F INLEN CLINICA L SOCIA L WOR KER Barron also believes people who change themselves physically for a post are giving a false impression to the world, reflective of self image issues and further leading into depression. However, sophomore Camille Talkington believes social media can be positive in moderation. When a sophomore Alex Carney died in a car crash earlier this year, a vigil was

organized and the word was spread through social media. In less than a day, hundreds of students and parents had received notice of the event. Finlen agrees that there are positives. Apps like GroupMe help students with homework, and social media can connect students with babysitting jobs. But some days sophomore Delaney Calvert falls asleep in class – or gets a 40 percent on a physical science test because Snapchat or Instagram claims her attention. Off the top of her head, Calvert can recite her Instagram statistics: 1,810 followers, following 1,282. Studying can often feel impossible when she has notifications rolling in every few seconds. She’ll take a 30-minute break every 15 minutes. In addition to its impact on mental health, social media can distract from school and sleep, Barron said. English teacher Melanie Miller keeps a purple storage box by her desk, scotch tape labeled with “phone hiatus.” The idea is to confiscate a phone if it’s visible in class, but when thirty kids have glued eyes to their iPhones, Miller decided the phone hiatus lost its authority. “Whatever a teacher does, it probably won’t be as interesting as what your friends have to say on Instagram,” Miller said. She believes media like Twitter and constantly Snapchatting are designed for addiction, and her teaching can’t compete with it. Teen addiction to social media is a

never-ending addictive loop affecting 50 percent of teens, according to Newportacademy.com. They keep coming back for more, whether their emotional response is good or bad. Barron sees teenagers unable to tear away from their bright, stimulating screens. She notices four kids at a restaurant, all separately glued to their devices, which she believes is anxiety provoking behavior, because kids are losing normal down time. “Kids are connecting to an artificial world that appears to be more important than the real world,” Barron said. Some students are making changes because they see the negativity social media is causing them. Junior Jana Banerjea deleted her Instagram account after feeling like her number of likes measured her value. To Banerjea, Instagram was stocked with gorgeous people posing at parties, on vacation — pictures she didn’t feel were genuine. “I think it’s toxic to feel like you always have to be like everybody else,” Banerjea said. After she deleted the social networking app, Banerjea feels she’s been able see what’s around her more. Without reaching for her phone constantly, she notices how attached people around her are to their phones. “Everything in moderation,” Finlen said. “We have a lot to live, it’s not just about social media.”


16 NEWS design by lila tulp

design by lila tulp

S

SECURITY 7 5 , 0 0 0, 0 0 0 R i d e r s

81% 51% 8.9 103

of E a st st u d e nts h a ve u s e d U b e r b efo re

o u t of t h e a b ove p e rc e nta g e d o n ot fe e l co mfo r ta b l e U b e r i n g a l o n e m i l l i o n d o l l a r f i n e wa s p a i d by U b e r i n Co l o ra d o a fte r s h o r tco m i n g s i n t h e i r d r i ve r vet t i n g p ro c es s U b e r d r i ve r s h a ve b e e n a cc u s e d of s ex u a l a s s a u lt a cc ros s t h e co u nt r y

* E a st st a t i st i c s fro m a p o l l o f 1 89 re s p o n s e s * N a t i o n a l sta t i st i c s co u r t e sy o f I nte r n a t i o n a l Business Times

UBER

by meg thoma enior Maggie Gray didn’t bat an eye when her friends suggested they order an Uber. She was used to always rating her Uber drivers 5 stars after many trips, whether that be transportation around the Kansas State University campus or a ride home from her Homecoming after party — it was a weekend ritual. After counting heads, they requested an Uber XL and checked the driver’s status. The girls made their way to the driveway to await the three minute arrival time, but the familiar circumstance became unsettling as the car arrived. The driver was approaching them. Gray says that her Uber driver did not explain, but rather demanded that they follow his instructions. Though they purposefully ordered a vehicle to seat six for the group of five, the only request that was made clear by the driver was that he wanted one female in the car with him, unaccompanied. There was no way Gray was getting in that car. “He gave us absolutely no reasoning for what he was saying,” Gray said. “He just kept on insisting that he take one at a time even though his car could very obviously fit all five of us.” With the prevalence of this service increasing in the East community and increasing assault allegations coming to light, questions are being raised about Uber’s preventative safety measures. In a Harbinger poll of 190 respondents, 81 percent have used the Uber app before and 21 percent utilize the service on a weekly to monthly basis. Currently, the company is responsible for running background checks on those applying to become drivers. However, these checks only include major traffic violations such as past DUIs, but nothing regarding mental health or medical history according to the safety regulations on Uber’s website. In order to become eligible to drive, an applicant must first submit a selfie along with their driver’s license, which are then manually compared by a specialized team according to Brett Farmer, Uber’s Global Safety and Risk Quality and Compliance Leader. If they do not match, the applicant is unable to drive. Once Uber determines the match, drivers are subject to agree to the company’s community guidelines when they sign up to work for the service. “Facial recognition is something that we believe is one of the most direct entry points into making sure that a driver is who they say they are,” Farmer said. According to a CNN article published in

April 2018, five drivers from different states have claimed that they do not receive any kind of sexual harassment or assault training. The article also states that Uber guidelines specifically state that no sexual contact is permitted when using its platform. Yet, the release of 103 driver-to-rider assault accusations nationwide, along with other local and questionable encounters, has brought light to the fact that these rules are not being closely followed. More prevalent policies that are overlooked frequently by drivers include transporting passengers under 18-years-old without an adult in the vehicle and no child under 13-years-old being able to ride at all. In a Harbinger poll of 337 respondents, 62 percent claim that they were unaware of the 18 and over policy. 74 percent of users say that they are under 18. However, this rule is not well publicized, according to East parent Kris Tucker, who is not only uncomfortable with her 16-year-old daughters riding alone in an Uber, but was also unaware that the rule existed in the first place. Farmer stated that Uber has been working to update its security measures and has been making noticeable strides in doing so every couple of months. Recent updates that have been made in the app to improve safety include emergency assist buttons that are made accessible to riders that notify authorities during the trip as well as the recent addition of the ride sharing feature. Ride sharing allows the rider to alert a family member or friend with a “ping” so they have access to the rider’s location.

I have always trusted Uber and use it often, but my experience made it apparent that some people can seem okay on paper, but are crazy in person.

hallie higgason senior Senior Hallie Higgason wishes that she would have known about this feature during her trip in an Uber with three friends at the University of Arizona. Her driver not only aggressively spoke of sensitive topics such as the Kavanaugh trials, race and religion, but when they arrived at their destination, he would not stop to let them out — Higgason claims she had to jump out of the moving car to remove herself from the situation.

RIDING WITH A RISK As the prevalence of students using Uber increases, the security comes into question

NEWS

17

“Not only was I in an uncomfortable situation, but also in another state, so I would have felt much safer with my mom knowing my exact location,” Higgason said. “I have always trusted Uber and use it often, but my experience made it apparent that some people can seem okay on paper, but are crazy in person” Externally, Uber is providing 24-hour support where inbound calls are sent to a support center in the San Francisco headquarters. Farmer also explained that driver profiles are reviewed consistently, and they update policies to make sure that drivers are safely following the community guidelines. Some of these rules include the driver respecting all passengers present in the vehicle and assuring they have personal space. AP and IB Psychology teacher and Uber driver Brett Kramer has never experienced any major issues with the company or their policies, and he believes that Uber is doing all that they’re able to on the forefront of the accusations. This is because the background checks implemented by Uber have no control over whether or not drivers choose to act out after being verified to drive. “It’s one thing to know if someone’s never had a DUI, has a driver’s license, an income to have insurance and a car that’s safe, but none of those factors are going to predict whether or not someone will carry out a behavior like [assault],” Kramer said. Kramer believes that a possible solution could be implementing stricter security, though it may create an inconvenience for most drivers who would not be able to equip their vehicle with the proper audio or video recording devices. However, he feels that it could create transparency in every allegation made. Kramer also understands the way that people’s words can be misconstrued in one ride, considering he has to take that into consideration every day as a teacher in his classroom. “Who’s to say that tonight I don’t go out and say ‘good evening, how are you’ and [my passenger] take[s] that as some weird advance and it’s not being recorded?” Kramer said. “All of a sudden maybe I would wish that I had [proof].” Farmer says that he is unable to comment on specifics of the successes of the new implementations, but that a transparency report will be published later in the year. This will give insight to the effectiveness of the safety adjustments that have been put in place.


by rose kanaley

T

hen 12-year-old Stu Stram watched in awe as his dad was lifted up by 46 of the players on the Kansas City Chiefs football team, eagerly carrying him out onto the football field in praise. They’d done it. Led by Stu’s father, Hank Stram, the Chiefs won the 1969 Super Bowl. Fifty years later, the Chiefs will return to the Super Bowl on Feb. 2 for the first time since then. Quarterback Patrick Mahomes’ “magic” throughout the season and the team’s ambition to make it all the way has done more than just excite Chiefs fans to hopefully see the $5,000 rings on each player’s hand. Their chance to bring home the shimmering gold trophy engraved with Superbowl LIV has brought the entire city together. Then Briarwood-Elementary-schooler, Stu remembers running up to kiss his dad after each touchdown. Fifty years later, he’s never forgotten the image of the team storming the field, and he knows the same enthusiasm will carry through the new generation of fans. “This team is providing memories for a whole new generation of football fans in Kansas City,” Stu said. “To me, that is the coolest thing that the team and the Super Bowl provides to this community.” At the last game, junior Major Park watched as older fans jumped and shouted as if they were young again in excitement. Amid the 10 minutes straight of red and gold confetti spraying the stadium, Major saw every fan taking the win in different way — screaming, high-fiving, hugging, crying. Park watched the players rush to the center of the field, hugging and yelling in disbelief. But his favorite part had to be seeing Tyreek Hill and his son jumping around, playing in the sea of confetti that covered the field. Park realized the atmosphere inside Arrowhead was a reflection of how the entire city felt. Diego Galicia, an East alum who works with video for the Chiefs, saw the overwhelming support of the team through his season spent sideline filming — he’s glad he has a job he’s connected to, with the team he’s been listening to, reading stats of and drafting in his fantasy football teams since his dad took him to a game when he was eight. Using his Black Magic Pocket Cinema 4K camera, he takes videos to help fans watch and experience those games in the same way he gets to. Getting to watch and work around the players, Galicia now knows the team beyond what you see from watching the game on TV or in the stands. Galacia never saw Kansas City as a popular city before, but he thinks a new light has changed the country’s perception.

This team is providing memories for a whole new generation of football fans in Kansas City. To me, that is the coolest thing that the team and the Super Bowl provides to this community.

stu stram | son of hank stram “Kansas City is a big city for sure, but it’s like a small town, too,” Galicia said. “So it’s kind of cool how our non-major city, compared to like Chicago, New York, L.A. or anything, has so much spotlight on it.” Growing up, junior Meredith McGannon’s dad, Pat McGannon, promised that if the Chiefs ever made it to the Super Bowl, he’d take their whole family. He kept kis promise. Before the Chiefs became the top-seed team they are now, Meredith loved it when her dad came home from games and, although they’d lost, hear her dad tell her stories of the crazy drunk fans screaming next to him and the friends he’d gone to the game with since high school. She also loved when he came home with Chiefs jerseys for everyone in her family, branded “McGannon” across the back. “It’s just such a good atmosphere that’s fun to be in,” Meredith said. “Like, when the Chiefs score a touchdown,

when you’re just high fiving all these random people around you, it describes Kansas City as a community.” To Meredith, the Chiefs aren’t just an NFL team, they’re part of what brings their family together — what gives her older siblings a reason to fly home and her dad the permission to book a 30-person party bus, carting family and friends to Arrowhead. Like Pat McGannon, East social studies teacher Klein has been going to the Chiefs games with his best friend since kindergarten. Always texting play-by-play updates of their thoughts on the game when they can’t attend or watch the games together, over the years they’ve celebrated just as energetically when the team was led by Todd Haley and Matt Cassel, as when Patrick Mahomes was first signed, according to Klein. “When the chiefs took the 18-point lead in the fourth quarter and there was a long pass to Sammy Watkins, it just kind of dawned on me that, holy moly, this is actually happening,” Klein said. “And all of the sudden it was happening and I didn’t realize the extent to which I subconsciously didn’t believe it would ever happen during my lifetime.” It’s affected more than just the lifelong fans. With an entire city feeling the impact of their success, people like English teacher Amy Andersen are joining the fan base for the first time.

F I R S T T I M E AT T H E S U P E R B OW L S I N C E

THE CHIEFS ARE G O I N G I N TO T H E S U P E R B OW L A S A

19701 P L AY I N G AGA I N S T VS B E AT T H E T I TA N S I N P L AYO F F GA M E

24-35

P O I NT FAVO RI T E

FIRST IN THE AFC WEST DIVISION

PAT R I C K MAHOMES: 2019-20 SEASON 26 4,681 PA S S I N G T H R O W N POINTS YA R D S 2018 NFL MVP IN H I S S ECO N D Y EA R

T R AV I S K E LC E : 2019-20 SEASON 5 1,229 TO U C H R EC . D OW N S YA R D S 7TH YEAR ON THE CHIEFS TEAM

T I C K E T S TO G O TO THE S U P E R B OW L ARE PRICED ON AV E R AG E F O R TYREEK HILL 2019-20 SEASON 66 RECEPTIONS 7 RECEIVING TOUCHDOWNS 7TH YEAR ON THE CHIEFS TEAM

$ 5 ,0 5 0 T H E GA M E WILL BE P L AY E D I N MIAMI, FL.

SPORTS FEATURE | 09 design by | lila tulp photos courtesy of | diego galicia

T H E T EA M T H AT LAMAR HUNT FO U N D E D H AS J U ST WO N L A M A R H U N T ’S T RO P H Y I N T H E STA D I U M T H AT WAS L A M A R H U N T ’S D R EA M K A N SAS CITY CHIEFS | 01 / 2 2 / 2 0

T H E W I N AGA I N S T T H E T I TA N S WA S T H E L A RG E ST C O M B AC K I N FRANCHISE H I S T O RY * I N F O R M AT I O N A N D S TAT S C O U RT E S Y O F E S P N . C O M & T H E ESPN APP

50 YEARS IN

FEB. 2

AT 7 P . M . T H E C H I E F S W I L L TA K E O N THE 49ERS

Andersen had only ever considered herself a social football game watcher, always chatting with friends or eating the AllAmerican snacks they’d have during each game — everything from hot tamales to Velveeta cheese dip — instead of paying attention to the game. But after receiving a red Chiefs jacket for Christmas, Andersen knew she’d feel guilty if she wore it without really watching the game and decided it was time she tried to pay attention. To her surprise, Andersen was sucked in. “The games themselves have been awesome, full of twists and turns,” Andersen said. “Mahomes’s big pass in the last game was epic. But also, just as a lifetime Kansas Citian, it’s so fun to have something to rally together and celebrate, and I feel the Chiefs fever.” The “Chiefs fever” is everywhere, according to Andersen, from the loudest stadium in the world holding 76,416 screaming fans in red and white to the lifesize bobblehead Patrick Mahomes in HyVee. Even on a 15-hour bus ride to Winter Park, CO, everyone on the annual Village Presbyterian ski trip was decked in Chiefs red. With the AFC championship held in the middle of their day on the slopes, sophomore Spencer Newton and his friends, along with the rest of the Chiefs fans in Winter Park, left the mountain three hours early without hesitation to head over to a small bar on the mountain to watch the game — the waiters hadn’t seen the bar that packed before, Newton said. But it wasn’t just watching the game with his friends instead of skiing. They all wore their Chiefs jerseys while they skied, and the mountain of strangers became a community. Hearing a “Go Chiefs!” on the chair lift or meeting strangers from Kansas City in the same #15 jersey, Newton found it to be a completely new experience. And this was all happening 675 miles away from Arrowhead. “It’s definitely a different experience, because at the games you know everyone there is going to be a Chiefs fan and the energy is awesome,” Newton said. “But being in Colorado and being able to watch the Chiefs and end up around so many Chiefs fans, it’s also a great experience. It’s definitely like a community, where everyone’s just friends with everyone just because they like the chiefs.”

The Chiefs have brought the whole city together as they make their way to the Superbowl for the first time in 50 years on Feb. 2


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