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FRONT COVER

t h e c i n e m at i c e s c a p e

L i L a B a G h Z O U Z / D O U G J a c K s O n thesis stUDiO 2009-10


the cinematic escape thesis statement thesis maniFestO

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With minimal opportunities to break away from the mundane environment, the individual’s surroundings appear to be patterns – repetitive and persistent to what is normal. if architecture can evade its programmatic norms, refuges for escaping this reality and focusing past the obstructive foreground can be created where they are needed the most. By glorifying the success of cinema and its ability to temporarily remove us from what is actuality, architecture can be used to emulate the cinematic escape.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Thesis Statement

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Escapism in Cinema t

he location of the cinema is usually lit up, flashing and absorbing all the attention it can get. it is successful in that everyone knows what it is and what it is premiering for the week. it is exceptionally successful, however, for those that step into the proximity with intention to enter. these are the people who are looking for a mere hour and a half of entertainment, a projection of past reality, and all in all - an escape. escape, in this case, is used to describe a temporary evasion of reality and immersion into another. inside the theater, focus is no longer on the self and the individual’s place in the world, but on a large-scale projection that everyone else in the theater is viewing simultaneously. the streaming pictures are eloquent and are capable of

telling a story on their own (we must not forget the silent film), yet they are accompanied by audio effects and this entices and diverts another one of our senses. in the theater, the lights are dim and eventually turned completely off for the feature presentation. the ritual is to arrive early and find optimal seating before seats are limited. the lights are initially dimmed until they fade to off and the audience becomes ready for the presentation to begin. since there are no lights, the projection is the only source of illumination and visual focus is set and unlikely to be interrupted during the course of the movie. Form here on, the viewer is separated from his/

her reality. throughout the course of the movie, interruptions may occur, and the viewer will snap out of his or her escape only for a moment (if your date were to lean over and whisper, or during a bathroom break). While watching a movie, the viewer’s emotions begin to be controlled by what is playing on the screen. the director, the script, and the acting all form a powerful ally in drawing sympathy from the audience. a good movie will have you laughing at situations you aren’t involved in, feeling sadness for problems that aren’t yours, and angry at a fictional villain. the manipulation of viewers’ emotions is a prominent feature of the cinematic escape.


Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Thesis Manifesto

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Realms Between Reality & A Society in Escapism Need of Escape T

he movie-going ritual begins with the awareness of the theater location and what the theater is showing. A curious glance at the cinema marquee can excite or draw interest. If something makes you say, “I would love to go to that movie!”, then you already have plans to escape. Commercials, mass advertising, and word of mouth are another start to the awareness of an upcoming movie. Cinema, however, has a place and time if you are interested in catching a certain show at a theater location. The approach to the location of the cinema is one of the last steps that the intended viewer has in his or her realm of reality. This is to say, they are about to step into a ritualistic sanctuary where program, circulation, and layout become customary and are indefinitely familiar to the regular movie-goer. The box office, the ticket check, the concession stand, and convenient bathrooms are all customary in the layout of the movie theater. This paradigm of placement and events acts as a sort of filter which weeds out references to the relative chaos happening outside the cinema walls. The paradigm is also preparing the audience to have the proper movie-going mindset. Let this be the familiar and comfortable realm of the experience before the phenomenon of the movie itself.

T

he human is not a machine. We instead have many needs to satisfy – a majority of them being emotional (success, happiness, fulfillment, etc…). It is therefore unfortunate that most of our schedules are tedious and full of burdening responsibilities that we cannot ignore. For the student, it is the class schedule and studying as well as the part-time job. For a professional, it is the career with the 40 hour work week where there can be very little day-to-day variation. Boredom is a common byproduct of following a monotonous schedule. It doesn’t just occur when there isn’t enough to do, but also when “doing” becomes so mechanical that you no longer feel excitement or passion for the work you are doing. A disinterest and a lack of passion is what numerous are dealing with at the work place.

Social encounters can also be a source of stress and uneasiness. We look onto our family and friends for support in our emotional well-being, but when problems occur in these relationships, they can lead to dire needs of escape. Take, for instance, the unhappy spouse. The more drastic consequences of an unhappy marriage can involve having an affair or getting a divorce. Nature is another break from the chaos of life and it is especially sought after by those who are most deprived of it – the city dwellers. It is unfortunate that nature has become so out of reach for them due to the hindrances of getting out of the city. These include traffic, urban sprawl and the time it takes to get travel through both. City parks would be a reasonable substitute if they didn’t have the inevitable backdrop of the cityscape and city noise.

Some work environments provide their employees with the break room - where people are allowed to ‘unwind’ for a moment. These break rooms, however, tend to fall short when it comes to a real satisfying escape. They are merely attachments to the workplace and don’t attempt to provide a different mindset for the employee.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Thesis Manifesto

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Immersion into a Temporary Reality W

hen we escape a certain place or situation, we end up in another. in the case of the cinematic escape, the viewer steps out of their reality and ends up in a place and time that has no footholds in the present. Only the spectacle of watching the film is what connects the viewer’s reality (his/her time and place) to the scattered events that make up the film. a movie’s place in time is solely relevant to the moments that it is captured by the camera during shooting. the camera lens becomes a metaphor for the human eye, and the reel to the human memory. after the events are captured onto the reel, they become preserved and detached from the ticking of the clock. it lies dormant, encased in a tin case that protects it from the passage of time. For the few that were there to witness its production, it becomes a memory. as for the many that will witness its reproduction, it becomes a spectacle that is looked upon with the awareness that it is not real. any playback of the film becomes a temporary reality for the viewer. it is a breach in the

Activating & Deactivating the Senses actual chronology, taking the audience out of their time and placing them in an alternative place for the duration of the film. the cinematic escape encompasses the detachment from the viewer’s current time and place, finding an alternative, and entry into the alternative. the use of the word “escape” connotes a haven or refuge and therefore, it takes a certain mindset to engage in a movie. Films are mass produced and widely distributed making it easily available for anyone to purchase a temporary reality. this phenomenon of easy access has caused the public to overdose on these alternate realities. Like the gamer who is constantly immersed in his virtual world and barely breaks away from his computer screen, movie fans can watch numerous movies on end without noticing the destructive effects it has on their reality. Disconnection from the steady chronology of real life and entry into a circuitousness timeline of fiction can disembody the viewer.

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ilms have been entertaining us since the early 20th century. it began with the silent film, which only engaged our visual sense. the audio aspect for the film was outsourced as most of these films were accompanied by dramatic scores which were performed live in the theater by a musician or orchestra. it wasn’t until 1927, when the first “talkie” was unveiled. these talking films would overcome the silent films by giving the audience both visual and audio stimulants from a single source. this gave the film a more coherent manner of captivating us.


Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Thesis Manifesto

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The Mechanical Lens & the Human Eye T

he motion picture is a projection of what was real – it is showing something that was filmed in the past. It is the film crew, especially the cameraman and director, which are the few privileged ones to see the movie in its reality. Frame by frame, cinematic moments are captured and then preserved on the reel. From this point on, the film is subject to dubbing and editing – alterations that further the movie from its origin and tamper with what is real. In the process of capturing the live action via the camera, a dimension of reality is immediately lost and rewinding and replaying is never the same as the original. Every time the scenes are shown again, it is displayed in two dimensionality rather than having its own realm of space. All that is needed to experience cinema is a flat surface and depth is not a concern.

The human eye is similar to the “eye” of the camera. We also see things in two dimensions. Our perception is only trained by experiences that give our mind explanations to realize depth. We also have the option to manipulate our space by controlled movement. This also attests to how near or far things actually are – once again training our depth perception. We have also conquered depth through drawing. We learn that shading techniques and the perspective viewpoint give the illusion of something being in real space. This type of production exemplifies the fixation of taking a real space or thing, portraying it through two dimensional means (on a canvas, or on photo paper), but wanting it to appear three dimensional. It is the only way to preserve something before time takes its toll.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Thesis Manifesto

Two dimensional visuals are captured ones – pictures, drawings, movies, and memories. These are no longer engaged in their own space. Instead, they are trapped in a single plane frame. Only when something is experienced in “real time”, is when the second plane comes into play. Any movement needs occurs in real space and occurs only within real space, or three dimensional space.

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FURTHER STUDIES 1 < The Ritual as an Escape > 2 < Real Depth in Two Dimensional Images > 3 < Revised and Abridged Thesis Manifesto > 4 < Potential Sites >

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Preliminary studies

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The Ritual as an Escape R

ituals, such as the program of entry into the theater, have the ability to place take us from one mindset and place us in another. the act of the ritual itself is an escape. since these are repeated so often, the repetition of rituals gives us a long-term transitional experience that we become familiar with and are able to perform without much thought. this first application to architecture observes the ritual of entry into the home after a day of work. to get out of the work mindset and to disconnect from the workplace, it is customary for most to remove the work shoes, change out of the work clothes, and sometimes shower or bathe before doing anything particular to being at home. after these steps can the individual be at home and feel comfortable.

entrance into an architectural escape seems to call for a similar ritual - one that separates the individual from where they have come from so they are ready to immerse themselves in a different state of mind. the plan constitutes a change in floor material upon entry. the different floor material, either being a soft carpet or grass, is obvious to the user and the unusual texture becomes uncomfortable to walk in with work shoes. Built- in cubbies on a nearby wall are a gesture for the option of removing and storing the shoes and socks. the next gestures are subtle pegs which also appear on the wall. the individual can recognize these as coat hangers and remove their coats, hats, and scarves if they would like to become more comfortable. a warm shallow pool is the next program of the ritual. the users must walk through this to go on to whatever the path will lead to.

this removal of shoes and clothing is also a removal of associations with the workplace. For a user to truly escape and place themselves in a different mindset, all associations and connections to the real world must be eliminated for the individual to experience everything an escape has to offer.


Real Depth in Two Dimensional Images i

found that a couple of scenes in the film moulin Rouge, played with intensive layering to portray the depth of their backdrops. if one of these scenes is cut up into pieces depending on how near or far they are supposed to be from the perspective point, these pieces can be moved in the third dimension and make the depth of the image real. this puts the image in real space, and puts it outside the confinement of the single plane frame. in this liberation, the image itself creates its own space in the separation of its components. in between the components are empty spaces that are supposed to

be filled with the objects that the perspective could not capture. these objects are hidden behind what can be seen and therefore not acknowledged or recognized in a single plane frame such as a picture. When the image is dispersed in real space, however, these hidden objects hang onto existence through the in-between empty spaces created by the components of the moulin Rouge frame. the sum of the depth of these hidden objects will determine the amount of space to be left in between the dispersed components and therefore help to restore the real space that the scene originally had.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Preliminary studies

if we were to reapply the â&#x20AC;&#x153;filteringâ&#x20AC;? process mentioned earlier, these dispersed components can become architectural programs that the user must pass through in order to reach a certain comfort zone. For instance, in this particular scene, the sky is visible only through a confined frame, formed by everything cluttered in front of it. if someone would like to better engage in the sky, they would have to pass through all the foreground elements before reaching the sky in the back. as they near their destination, the unwanted clutter is stripped away as the sky becomes more disclosed.

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Revised Thesis Manifesto I

n the case of the cinematic escape, the first regard is of the actual movie theater experience. Here, the viewer steps out of their reality and ends up in a place and time that has no footholds in the present. The routine of watching the film is the only connection of the viewer’s reality (his/her time and place) to the scattered events that make up the film. A movie’s place in time is solely relevant to the moments that it is captured by the camera during shooting. The cinematic escape encompasses the detachment from the viewer’s current time and place, finding an alternative, and entry into the alternative. The use of the word “escape” connotes a haven or refuge and therefore, it takes the viewer into a more desirable state of mind. Inside the theater, focus is no longer on the self and the individual’s place in the world. Form here on, the viewer is separated from his/her reality.

< Applying this observation to the perception of architecture begins with the noticeable detachment that people (specifically city pedestrians) have from their surrounding environment >

It is understandable due to the repetitive branding and corporate “stamped”architecture that the city is bombarded with. Take for instance, the nationwide supermarkets and drugstores or chain coffee shops that tend to find a place on every city block. These buildings are anticipated in their design and unsurprising. The city resident becomes desensitized to what is around them and no longer shows interest in architecture. Other reasons for detachment regard the 9-5 schedule that most city workers have. Pedestrians commute before the start of the shift, for an hour during a lunch break and after the work shift. The strict control of time in these working districts creates destination-oriented pedestrians, or those with a mission to get from point A to B in the least amount of time possible. This rushed state of mind is another calling for disconnection between the individual and the valid experience of their immediate surroundings.

hike will usually take up a weekend in order to account for the drive time. The nature in the city, such as parks and other undeveloped areas, are not a substantial substitute to the real nature that lies beyond the city. These green areas are confined to the man-made city grid, bound by a concrete poured sidewalk and have a city backdrop of noise and high-rise buildings. The solution is innovative and unusual building concepts that will revitalize the experience between the individual and city architecture. The concepts should break the sense-depriving boundaries of the city and allow the individual to step out of the mundane reality of the city and immerse into an alternative. In order to achieve this, the immersion and focus aspects of cinema are combined with the conceptual phases of architecture for the proposal entitled the Cinematic Escape.

The city is also host to numerous obstructions and barriers that can hinder the connection between an individual and the natural environment. The city’s central location is an obstacle when the resident is trying to leave and go elsewhere. A camping trip or a

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Revised Thesis Manifesto

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* < POTENTIAL SITES >>>>>>>>>>>> < San Francisco, CA >>>>>>>>>> curious locations such as alleyways, abandoned buildings, spaces above low-rise buildings, and underneath freeways where sought after due to their presence as “voids” in the normal city fabric. these sites should allow the visitor to “step out” of the reality of the city and easily immerse into the architecture. ca san francisco, the project calls for numerous pavilions throughout the city in order to bolster the architectural statement.

< ST GEORGE ALLEY < st george alley

WACHOVIA

above the low rise buildings

<

* <

EMPTY LOT

empty lots

underneath the 80 freeway

4TH ST & I-80


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The grid, bound by a concrete poured sidewalk and have a In the case of the cinematic escape, the first regard It is understandable due to the repetitive branding hike will usually take up a weekend in order to account events that make up the film. A movie’s place in time is city resident becomes desensitized to what is around city backdrop of noise and high-rise buildings. is of the actual movie theater experience. Here, the and corporate “stamped”architecture that the city is for the drive time. The nature in the city, such as parks solely relevant to the moments that it is captured by the them and no longer shows interest in architecture. viewer steps out of their reality and ends up in a place bombarded with. Take for instance, the nationwide and other undeveloped areas, are not a substantial The solution is innovative and unusual building camera during shooting. and time that has no footholds in the present. The supermarkets and drugstores or chain coffee shops that substitute to the real nature that lies beyond the city. Other reasons for detachment regard the 9-5 schedule concepts that will revitalize the experience between the routine of watching the film is the only connection of the tend to find a place on every city block. These buildings These green areas are confined to the man-made city The cinematic escape encompasses the detachment that most city workers have. Pedestrians commute individual and city architecture. The concepts should viewer’s reality (his/her time and place) to the scattered are anticipated in their design and unsurprising. The grid, bound by a concrete poured sidewalk and have a from the viewer’s current time and place, finding an before the start of the shift, for an hour during a lunch break the sense-depriving boundaries of the city and events that make up the film. A movie’s place in time is city resident becomes desensitized to what is around city backdrop of noise and high-rise buildings. alternative, and entry into the alternative. The use of break and after the work shift. The strict control of time allow the individual to step out of the mundane reality solely relevant to the moments that it is captured by the them and no longer shows interest in architecture. the word “escape” connotes a haven or refuge and in these working districts creates destination-oriented of the city and immerse into an alternative. cameratherefore, during shooting. solution is innovative and unusual building it takes the viewer into a more desirable state pedestrians, or those with a mission to get from pointThe A thefocus Other reasons for detachment regard the 9-5 schedule concepts that will the experience between In order to revitalize achieve this, the immersion and of mind. Inside the theater, focus is no longer on the to B in the least amount of time possible. This rushed individual andofcity architecture. The concepts The cinematic encompasses that most aspects cinema are combined with the should conceptual self and escape the individual’s place inthe thedetachment world. Form here statecity of workers mind is have. anotherPedestrians calling for commute disconnection breakphases the sense-depriving of the city and the from the current time and place, finding an beforebetween the startthe of the shift, for hour during a lunch of architectureboundaries for the proposal entitled individual andan the valid experience of their on,viewer’s the viewer is separated from his/her reality. the individual to step out of the mundane reality alternative, and entry into the alternative. The use of break and after the work shift. The strict control of time allow Cinematic immediate surroundings. Escape . the word “escape” this connotes a haventoor refuge and in these working districts creates destination-oriented of the city and immerse into an alternative. < Applying observation the perception therefore,of it takes the viewer into a more state pedestrians, or is those a mission to getUNDERNEATH from point A and THE I-80 AND 4TH ST The city alsowith host to numerous obstructions architecture begins with desirable the noticeable In order to achieve this, the immersion and focus of mind. detachment Inside the theater, focus to B in the least amount of time possible. This rushed is no longer on the barriers that can hinder the connection between an that people (specifically city aspects of cinema are combined with the conceptual of mind isand another callingenvironment. for disconnection self and the individual’s place in the world. Form here the natural The city’s pedestrians) have from their surrounding state individual of architecture for the proposal entitled the between the individual and theobstacle valid experience ofresident their phases on, the viewer is separated from his/her reality. central location is an when the is environment > immediate Escape. tryingsurroundings. to leave and go elsewhere. A camping trip orCinematic a

POTENTIAL SITES

< Applying this observation to the perception of architecture begins with the noticeable detachment that people (specifically city pedestrians) have from their surrounding environment >

The city is also host to numerous obstructions and barriers that can hinder the connection between an individual and the natural environment. The city’s central location is an obstacle when the resident is ABOVE THE LOW-RISE WACHOVIA trying to leave and go elsewhere. A camping trip or a

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Site Description

CIVIC CENTER EMPTY LOT

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PAVILION 1 1 < site > 2 < initial Design > 3 < Development >

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Pavilion 1

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Bush St Entry


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St. George Alley

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Pine St Entry Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Pavilion 1

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<fig 1>


<fig 2>

Initial Design pavilion concept the lot is in close proximity to san Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cluster of high-rise buildings. to the pedestrian who walks at ground level, the vertical scale of these buildings are a barricade to what lies beyond. Regarding one of my earlier studies entitled Real Depth in two Dimensional images, the process of stripping away the foreground in order to percieve what is behind it is appropriate to this pavilion location. stripping away the building obstructions in the foreground will reveal the sky that is beyond it.

the sky pavilion the emphasis of the pavilion is an upwards focus, so the visitor can view only the sky. in order to do this, a real and projected perspective are provided for the user to choose from. the projected views are on the

vertical walls of the pavilion entry. the projections are literally views of what lies beyond the wall and other obstructions past the wall. the live feed will be provided by a perched camcorder up above. the real perspectives are provided by the sky pods found throughout the building. the pods are vertical tunnels that are at an optimal height to block out everything but the sky. some are located on the entry floor, while others are located above in the roof gardens.

<fig 3>

scripted and produced are projected onto an adjacent wall belonging to the at&t builging. the theater hosts student films or independent film shows. the overall curved edges of the pavilion are designed in order to provide the least abount of angled edges possible. these edges would provide more shadows and light contrast in the space and would possibly take focus away from the intended subjects.

the roof gardens also provide a viewing platform of the city, where users can see the city in a different way. By provided a lifted park area, which is not a common thing in a dense commercial district, users are given the chance to pause and comfortably watch the momentum of the city from a standstill point. another aspect of the pavilion is the theater room. With projections of what is real going on in the ground floor, a contrast happens in the theater room. here, the

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Pavilion 1

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ABOUT the san Francisco Film society is northern californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premiere organization for filmmakers and cineastes. internationally recognized throughout its first halfcentury of groundbreaking activity, and poised to dynamically respond to the rapidly changing needs of its industry and constituents well into the future, the Film society offers an inclusive and rewarding range of year-round public programs that investigate and celebrate the artistry and innovation of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most pivotal and imaginative cinematic visionaries.

the Film society educates, entertains and enriches diverse audiences and communities with programs and events in four core areas: embracing internationalism; educating Bay area youth; celebrating Bay area film and media; and exploring new media and digital technology. through its annual san Francisco international Film Festival and an assortment of equally anticipated events such as the yearly san Francisco international animation Festival, new italian cinema and French cinema now, bimonthly sF360 Film+club multimedia presentations and Film arts Forum filmmaker gatherings, and frequent benefit screenings and film premieres, the Film society shares the best in global

moving-image arts with tens of thousands of viewers who are eager to explore images and ideas beyond the mainstream multiplex. a full slate of Filmmaker services programs, including professional development classes, grants, residencies, fiscal sponsorship, publications and networking events, keeps the Film society in close contact with local filmmaking talent and further establishes the organization as an international model for community engagement through the limitless thrills and potentials of cinema as an art form and a means of social change. [http://www.sffs.org]

<ďŹ g 1>


<fig 2>

Developments integrating the sFFs in the program

sky pods

Building skin

in order to further enhance the concept of cinema in the pavilions and to provide more programmatic elements for the spaces, the pavilions will accommodate and cooperate with the sFFs. the st. George alley site will be one of the major office hubs for the sFFs and will also provide two theaters for the bimonthly sF360 Film+club presentations, student film screenings, and other small local productions. the st. George alley site also provides a library with flm archives for visitors and film students to browse through.

the initial proposal of the sky pods was not successful in fully integrating the pods with the rest of the pavilion. Further developements need to ensure that the pods are not only integrated but make a statement in the hierarchy of the pavilion architecture.

the building facade needs to display the overall concept of the pavilion as well as provide a seamless integrattion fo the sky pods in the building system. the first study is a grid of 2’ x 2’ panels varying from window openings to blank panels all throughout the facade and also varying in depth from the ground up. the sky pods would take this form in the horizontal facades of the building. the second study is of verticality. the vertical lines of the second facade are for directing the visitors’ eyes upwards. panels would attach to these vertical members and display projections of movies or of the sky.

Building Form the curvature of the initial design is dismissed due to constructability. providing a column-free space with the curved forms would be nearly impossible. With straight walls, the pavilion can be constructed with light-weight steel framing or standard steel framing for larger spans.

? <fig 3>

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Pavilion 1

Fig 1 > Redesigned with straighter edges, section cuts Fig 2 > skin studies Fig 3 > sky pod development

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ST. GEORGE ALLEY SKY PAVILION

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

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Bush St Entry

immeRse anD FOcUs t

he alley way is in an area which has a lot of high-rise buildings. these obstructions block the sun, cast shadows, and prevent views of the sky. the pavilion uses cinematic aspects to allow the user to look beyond the foreground and reconnect to what lies beyond. the facade consists of LeD panels which display obvious sky views during the day, and movies being screened at night. the sky view is a projection of what lies beyond the city scape and gives the viewer a chance to literally look right through buildings as if they are not there. the sky projections are live , so it is not uncommon to see a cloud float across the facade the st. George alley. the interior program accomodates pavilion visitors, sFFs staff, and film students. Live sky projections span wall lengths on the ground floor, and the main sky pavilion space is located on the top floor.

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SFFS Administration THEATERS

CINEMA ARCHIVE

SKY PAVILION

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

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SFFS and Pavilion North Entry


BUiLDinG sKin the building skin consists of areas of diamondshaped fenestrations (both on vertical and horizontal spans) and LeD panels that work together to provide interior lighting, an exterior statement of the building concept, and the sky pavilion experience.

DaY

Live sky display

niGht

movie clips of screening

the LeD panels on the north and souch building elevations are dynamic in their displays. During the day, the panels show a live-captured sky. the display is constantly updated by a live feed. at night, the sky cameras are turned off and the LeD panels instead display clips from the movie being played in one of the two theaters.

ReFLectiVe LeD paneLs the adjacent buildings to the west of the pavilion provided a blank canvas to work with. this facade lacks windows or anything else to hinder usage. to take advantage of this â&#x20AC;&#x153;canvasâ&#x20AC;?, and since both the north and south theater face this direction, movies are projected almost nightly onto these walls. the theaters can only be used in the evening due to the unusual projection method. movies are projected onto the adjacent buildings in order to promote work and to draw interest from pedestrians.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

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Inside the Sky Pavilion, top ďŹ&#x201A;oor


SKY PODS STURDY HEIGHTS DEPENDENT ON VIEWS NOT CONTROLLABLE INDEPENDENT PODS

JOINT SKY PODS HANGING CLOTH OF VARIOUS LENGTHS MOVEMENT WITH WIND FACTOR

ST GEORGE SKY PAVILION HANGING DRAPES DRAPE LENGTHS ARE HUMAN CONTROLLED

FINAL DESIGN OF THE SKY PAVILION the initial design suceeded at providing a meditative space for individual users, but was impractical to build on the rooftoops of a light weight framed building. the second design provided a lighter system which lacked the height and enclosure of the initial design. the final design is a constructed interior space for structure and ease of circulation. it becomes the top floor of the building and is an indoor/outdoor space. the drapes are adjusted to the userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s preference (they are operated manually by a retractable cord) and can fall the entire height of the room so the user is completely enclosed in a personal space which focuses up above.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

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GRASS AREA

20'-5"

UP

DWN

PINE STREET ENTRY

HT:15' 40'-3"

DWN

STAIRS TO TOP FLOOR PAVILION 10'-6" STAIRS TO THEATER AND ADMINISTRATION

GRASS AREA

UP

administration/theater lobby

HT:10'

DROP DOWN 5'-3" DRAPES FOR PRIVATE SKY VIEWING

UP

SKY PROJECTION HALL

DWN empty facade

ht: 14'-7" 15'-9"

10'-6"

PROJECTION ROOM

MOVIE PROJECTION ONTO ADJACENT BUILDING

SKY PROJECTION HALL

empty facade

SKY PROJECTION HALL CINEMA ARCHIVES AND VIEWING STATIONS

KITCHEN AREA

STAIRS TO TOP FLOOR PAVILION

UP

MARKETING/ PUBLICATIONS

UP

10'-6"

UP 10'-6"

OPEN TO BELOW

SFFS COORDINATION/ PLANNING 16'-11" SKY PROJECTION HALL

DWN

40'-3"

DWN UP

22'-2" 16'-11"

EDUCATION/ GRANTS FILM MAKER SERVICES

MOVIE PROJECTION ONTO ADJACENT BUILDING

4'-1"

OPEN TO BELOW DIRECTORS/ ASSISTANTS

SKY PROJECTION HALL

PROJECTION ROOM

A

STAIRS TO TOP FLOOR PAVILION

OPEN TO BELOW

UP

16'-11"

FILM LIBRARY

4'-1"

empty facade

MEETING AND COLLABORATION SPACE

FILM LIBRARY

FILM LIBRARY

THRID FLOOR BUSH ST ENTRY

BUSH ST ENTRY

SECOND FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

20'-5"

UP

DWN

GROUND FLOOR


DWN ht: 14'-7"

MOVIE PROJECTION ONTO ADJACENT BUILDING

PROJECTION ROOM

15'-9"

KITCHEN AREA

GRASS AREA

OPEN TO BELOW MARKETING/ PUBLICATIONS

SFFS COORDINATION/ PLANNING

OPEN TO BELOW

GRASS AREA

EDUCATION/ GRANTS FILM MAKER SERVICES

DROP DOWN DRAPES FOR PRIVATE SKY VIEWING

OPEN TO BELOW

HT:15' DIRECTORS/ ASSISTANTS

MEETING AND COLLABORATION SPACE

GRASS AREA

HT:15' 20'-5"

UP

40'-3"

DWN

A

DWN

HT:10' GRASS AREA

DROP DOWN DRAPES FOR PRIVATE SKY VIEWING

CINEMA ARCHIVES AND VIEWING STATIONS

UP

16'-11"

DWN

DWN

22'-2"

40'-3"

PROJECTION ROOM

MOVIE PROJECTION ONTO ADJACENT BUILDING FILM LIBRARY

SECOND FLOOR

THRID FLOOR

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

ROOF PLAN

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SECTION A SCALE: 1/16" = 1'


40 ‘ 3” pavilion floor

interior sky projections

21 ‘ 1/8” office floor (not shown in section)

0’0” ground floor

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

P.41


Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

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THE SKY PAVILION CASE STUDY

PRADA TOKYO HERZOG & DE MEURON A seamless transition between vertical and horizontal fenestrations where needed in the design of the sky pavilion. The continuous diamond-shaped frames that make up the Prada store in Tokyo are seamless even at the creases that form the building. This rare characteristic of an unchanging pattern was what I needed to complete the sky pavilion. This revelation would allow me to integrate the â&#x20AC;&#x153;sky podsâ&#x20AC;? into the building and dedicate an entire floor space to sky gazing.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / St. George Sky Pavilion

P.45


WHITE NOISE PAVILION 3rd St & I-80

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / White Noise Pavilion

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white noise pavilion site specifications

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Located underneath the 80 freeway between 4th and 3rd st, san Francisco, ca Location initially chosen due to the proximity of undesirable freeway noise parking lot is located underneath the i-80 across 3rd street

^ N

Location

^ N

I-8

White Noise

the noise caused by freeway traffic becomes a normal, unnoticed sound to one who is constantly hearing it. even though it is considered unpleasant, the depreciation and unawareness of the sound and the source is another instance of detachment between the individual and their surroundings.


White N Pavilion oise

^ N

The Noise Breach

the pavilion provides a break in the stream of freeway noise. this temporary point of relief gives users an alternative sound to focus on during their transit through the pavilion or passing by on 3rd street. the overpowering noise of waterfalls is what temporarily replaces the traffic noise.

Noise Transitions

transitions between the two noises will emphasize the existence of one or the other, therefore re-embedding the individual back into their surroundings by having them realize the forgotten sounds of the freeway.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / White Noise Pavilion

P.49


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white noise pavilion

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program layout

the pavilion is still affiliated with the sFFs and provides a single theater larger than E the theaters in the sky pavilion. a high-ceiling reception area is also tucked IS in behind the theater and underneath the waterfall portion of the plan. entry NtoO the upstairs LL circulation is accessed directly from 3rd street by the theater or across 3rd st from FA R the parking lot where stairs and another elevator are provided.TE

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Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / White Noise Pavilion

P.51


first floor reception area


Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / White Noise Pavilion

P.53


Transition Point

the transition point, as pointed out on the left, is the threshold in between the freeway noise section of the pavilion and the waterfall noise section. perhaps the most significant point of the pavilion, this is where the visitor leaves one sound chamber and enters another. at this point, the visitor becomes aware of the change in white noise. the freeway portion of the walkway is constructed with a solid wall reaching 11â&#x20AC;&#x2122; high and supporting the perforated finish on top of it. the perforated section of the wall allows sound to penetrate from the adjacent freeway. since this is a sensory experience, visitors are deprived vision in order to focus on the immediate sounds.


View from the I-80

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / White Noise Pavilion

P.55


FURNITIURE

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Furniture

P.57


Play, Furniture & Architecture T

to say, the original design rarely is the one being constructed in the end.

Play, however, spans deeper in its affinity and occasional incongruities with the creation and use of architectural spaces. This essay will delve into the meaning of play in correspondence to architecture and also discuss the potential architectural play on furniture design.

By choice, people choose to play. If they were forced to do it, or even in the slightest sense felt obligated, then it becomes something else. The tennis player under stress in a Wimbledon match is no longer there to play, but is there for professional salary. As with the built environment, a stagnant building is a mere excuse for architecture. If people choose to occupy it with function and purpose and let it draw interactions and circulation then the architecture is apparent. The choice to make architecture work is done by both the architect and the public users.

Play

Architecture

While there are architects that are practical for their time, others are so-called dreamers. Staying mainly in the conceptual realm of the profession, these are the thinkers that design with the future in mind. Their proposals consist of renderings and technologies that are fit for the next sci-fi thriller. Imagination takes part in these creations as a professional grown-up uses a skill as old as the day he was gifted with cognitive abilities. The presence of a second reality, or makebelieve, is one of the defining elements of play.

As architecture evolves for larger, worldlier reasons, innovative furniture also finds its way into the limelight of design. Furniture is a much more tangible way for architects to experiment with design ideas. The outcome is faster and the scale is usually feasible for someone to work on his or her own project.

here are obvious connections between play and architecture. Take for example how arranging your accumulated belongings into a dorm room-sized apartment can seem like a challenging level of Tetris, or how the complex circulation of a museum can leave you feeling as if you are in a labyrinth. Even the cabinets, drawers, and closets of a home are engaged in a constant game of hide-and-seek.

To engage in play, is to enter a realm of uncertainty – that is, not knowing the outcome beforehand. Whims, turnarounds, and whatever the unexpected bestows are entirely likely in the course of a game. In architecture, drafts are produced until the client is happy. Changes of any scale may occur in between these drafts. Needless

Furniture is important in that it finishes off what the architecture leaves behind. These are accessories of the space, and the style and type of furniture can better define what the area is meant to do. A large barren space can become a welcoming lobby area with the right amount of comfortable seating and lighting, a library would not exist without something to store and organize the books, and so on.

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Furniture

Furniture Inevitably, Architectural play has made its way into furniture design in the form of newfound versatility, mobility, and materiality. These novel designs usually result in the user interacting with the pieces more often as versatility gives you more reasons to use it and mobility lets you easily move it. This new control that users have isn’t just a chance to alter the furniture within itself. Every piece of furniture has a function, and when these are moved around in a space, that space’s function can easily be reassigned according to the user. These changes can have dramatic outcomes such as giving the user the right to movable walls or barriers. I believe play would exist in a furniture piece that lacks an identified function – a true work of ambiguity. All the designer needs to do is to present something that has potential. My idea of this piece is either something purely simple – something as plain as a solid figure of one of the platonic shapes, or something more intricate than the norm, such as a piece characterized as being expandable, contractible, or one having movable joints. To make a truly ambiguous work, an architect has to set aside any finished intentions. Designing and building it then becomes a form of art, where each addition to the plan is based on composition and aesthetics. Allowing the user to “mold” it into his or her needs turns art into something functional. Curiosity and intuition would get the best of the users as they decide whether to sit on it, eat off it, place books on it, install a light bulb in it, or put garbage in it.

P.59


section

5”

dimesions + materials

SLINGSHELVES

7 3/4”

1 1/2” diam EMT Conduit 3/4” diam steel/aluminum rod

5’- 6”

MDF

4’ x 8’ x 3/4” pine ply

2 7/16”

SLING SHELVES Project Description > Taking a toy concept and applying it to furniture Toy > Sling Shot Concept The sling shot has two settings- taut and loose. Applying these settings to a shelving system would give the user a choice to have sturdy shelves or sagged shelves that can form aroudn the object. Working with something easily transformable, such as rubber bands, would also allow for numerous configurations of shelves. So why limit the user to the conventiional horizontal shelves? To allow for even more freedom of use, the bands wrap around steel rods that are also easily reconfigured.

Initial Design [ above ] The unit is attached to a swivel base so the user can arrange it perpendicular to a wall to use both sides or lay flat against the wall to conserve space. The concern for having the shelves attached to a wall came when gauging the weight of the shelves and it’s lack of selfsupport. The unit woudl rotate around the base on casters.

5”

1 1/2”

” 7 1/2

1 1/2

1’- 3

1 3/4”

2’ball transfer

3”

3”


Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Furniture

P.61


FINAL DESIGN an aluminum server rack is used to support the shelves. the piece no longer rotates and is no longer on wheels. Both plywood faces are attached directly to the server rack and the shelves are well-balanced and will not tip over. the plywood has a grid perforation so the steel rods can be placed in numerous configurations.

MATERIALS USED salvaged aluminum server rack 3/4â&#x20AC;? perforated birch plywood steel rods industrial strength rubber bands

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Furniture

P.63


00

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‘FURNITURE TO LIFE’ ANIMATION A stop motion animation feature made for the studio’s furniture show. The animation was a collaboration of my piece and two others. As the title states, the intention was to bring the furniture to life with playful animation, tying into the show’s theme of “PLAY”.

SEE HOW IT WORKS AT

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nx-HWR9a-g

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Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Furniture

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W TABLE Materials used 3/4” Birch plywood Wood glue Hardwood trim 3” Zinc mending plates for structure stability

Lila Baghzouz / THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE / Furniture

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>


THE CINEMATIC ESCAPE LiLa BaGhZOUZ


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the Cinematic Escape