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P H OTO M AG A Z I N E - I S S U E 1 2019

NEW ON THE MAP Z i e l i ń s k a , S t ę p i e ń , Wr ó b l e w s k a , B o r s , Wo j t a s , P a t yc k i , Jaśkiewicz, Lach

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Adrian Lach @lachadrian

@likeloveshare_magazine


Issue 1

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L New On The Map

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See

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Ada Zielińska My Dad Was a Firefighter

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Paweł Starzec Documenting Neverland

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Kuba Stępień Mana 38

Alicja Wróblewska Reef 48

Kuba Bors When The Radon Level Drops 58

Karolina Wojtas We Can’t Live Without Each Other

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Michał Patycki Sun 82

Paweł Jaśkiewicz Zenith 96

Adrian Lach Whatever Happens At Least It Has Begun

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My dad

was a firefighter

Ada Zielińska ‘89

Visual artist, working in the field of photography and installation. In her works she tries to documeant the catastrophe surrounding her, confront with disintegration. At the same time, she observes her attraction to these. In effect, her works are an attempt to capture a moment of power at the time of total disintegration. These observed moments serve a specific self-therapy, and photographs of these apparent accidents take the form of the author’s note about the world around her, an effort to control what is inevitably going to an end. A graduate of the ‘Media Art’ department of the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, currently a student of the Institute of Creative Photography in Opava. 4


I moved out from home when I was 23. By that time I studied photography at Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. A few weeks later, I started to work on the series Automotive Stills, which was my master diploma. I wanted to set up a car on fire on the purpose of a photo. I knew that my father was a fire fighter back in the 1980s so I called him and asked how to do that... “Call this guy, and this guy to get a car to burn, we will need a place to do that, and I will help you with the rest�.

Ever since this photo I took with a help of my dad, I keep coming back to stage a fire for photography. Since two years ago- when I finished my therapy, I stopped asking my father for help with burning things, but I am still doing this. First thing I realised was how strong connection I have with my father, second- how this attempt to capture a moment of power at the time of total disintegration serves me as a form of self-therapy. 2017 Since I organize exercises for fire fighters which I direct to achieve the frame I have in mind. These are mostly cars which fire fighters extinguish and then cut to improve their skills during car crashes. 5


My Dad Was a Firefighter

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Mana

Kuba Stępień ‘97

Photographer and visual artist living in Łódź. He studies at the Faculty of Visual Arts at the Academy of Fine Arts in Łódź. He made his debut in the ShowOFF Section at Photomonth in Krakow in 2018. Participant of the exhibition organized by Sexedpl and Vogue Polska in Powidoki / Museum of Modern Art in Warsaw. A graduate of the Academy of Photography in Krakow. 18


Mana is energy. It cuts through all of the material world, whether animate or seemingly lifeless. In traditional Polynesian faith, mana is the power of nature manifesting itself, creating a bridge between various kinds of being. It seems that the industrialisation and consumerism of contemporary societies have made them insensitive to the energy of the universe. As we rush about, packed into the tight spaces of our cars, apartments, and offices, we increasingly see only the surface, missing the depth of reality that hides beneath what is visible at a glance. We are satisfied with simple solutions, though we feel as though something is missing. Mana records a search for the omnipresent force. The creative use of photography lets us cross the boundaries of human perception, and cull the essence from landscapes, objects, and people. Here the energy of the surroundings interacts with the energy of the viewer, his or her spiritual state, emotions, and needs. Mana proves that “everything flows�, or rather, flows on by — but for everyone, perhaps, on different tides. Text by: Oliwia Kacprzak 19


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Paweł Starzec Documenting Neverland

The heritage of indecisive m o m e n t documentary photography & question of territory.

We are standing on some kind of hill, presumably. We see a city from distance, pictured in dusk or dawn, below the viewer, distant. It’s picture perfect early autumn, or spring before everything starts to blossom. If we’re lucky, there’s a river, meandering through the middle, disappearing in the lower part of the frame. What is this place? Why was it photographed, and what was the original intention of getting up that hill? Let’s move forward. A corner between two streets, so empty it actually could be a movie set, well lit. An old car is the only vehicle that could be seen in the frame, somewhere between an old classic well maintained car, and beaten up one. It is red, contrasting with pale yellowish backdrop of a building, enhanced by the afternoon light. Again, what is the story there? There is something deeply interesting in seeing the backstage of long-term personal documentary projects. Let’s face it; most of our photographic activity serves mostly us, and reaches mostly our peers, working on their own stories in a similar manner. So, sharing the behind-the-scenes with us gives us both practical knowledge, and feeling of belonging to a wider circle of shared interest. I am, personally speaking, fascinated by how small occurrences leave huge imprint on the shape of long-term documentaries. For example, how 30


@pestarzec

opening a new cheap flight connection between two countries could possibly be a contributing factor that some longterm story would be made about the country, now reachable in both economical, and geographical terms. One of those factors is surely the long shadow casted by the narrative of The Big American Documentary Projects on the way people think about the frames of their personal work. So, in a manner known from the beat generation in literature, we travel, and we create our projects on the way. In rare instances, the road eventually turns out to be more important than the goal itself; in more of them, it is a thing to be talked about while talking about how our work was made. To casually mention the effort we had to put in to reach the effect. Somehow, in the digital age of late modern separation of place and identity, as Anthony Giddens put it – we’re still very much opting for the traditional way of talking about the identity through photography of places where it manifests itself. What, and why, is the reason we were standing at that hill in the beginning, both as photographers, and viewers? Answer is, as always, complex – and it draws from many different spheres. The idea that landscape, photographed, could possibly tell a story of human involvement in it, certainly isn’t a new one; it is one of the long-run effects of New Topographics exhibition, curated by William Jenkins in 1975 that was anecdotally the first one to implement this paradigm in both theoretical and practical sense. Of course one can argue, that by that definition, Roger Fenton’s Crimea War pictures were the first one utilising this way of thinking, but it was Jenkins’s exhibition that actually had sewn the seed of this idea, to make it persistent in the decades to come. What is interesting, however, is the question of scale – identity of how broad group could be talked about when using landscape as a possible evidence of it? Robert Gohlke photographed his grain eleva31


Paweł Starzec Documenting Neverland

tors to tell a story about rural US, but first Beher’s typologies aimed upon the post-war German identity. What was also drawn from original New Topographics was a generalised way of thinking about narrative projects in photography. Actually, I would even risk saying that it was as much of an invention as the decisive moment once was; so now there were two ways of relating to time regarding photographic work – the decisive one, where photographer and the Universe aligned perfectly to aim for a perfectly timed picture – and the indecisive one, that might as well be taken in any other time – but this time, the narrative was conveyed not by what we actually see on, in and through single picture, but rather by the context it was set in. Since then, photography – at least partially – ceased to be strictly image-based medium, and started to aim to envision processes bigger that human-scale perception, by looking at their effects, and describing the bigger whole by documenting the smaller fractions. What is incredibly important is the fact that even though at the very same time as Jenkins’s exhibition, a lot of similar ideas were taken into consideration in other places around the world. Enough to say that even Bechers that took part in New Topographics were also responsible for their own brand of landscape-based image storytelling via their positions at Dusseldorf Kunstakademie; their students became figures from the Most Expensive Print Sale lists. But it was New Topographics, closely followed by people like Joel Sternfeld, that became a staple for referring to landscape-based narrative photography. But there was another person, inspired by Sternfeld, that came to ground this paradigm as an unescapable one; Alec Soth.

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@pestarzec

I hardly can imagine talking about modern documentary without mentioning Soth’s name. Not only he is almost universally well received by everybody, he also did a lot of work that inspired thousands of other people to follow. What is somehow lost in this inspiration process is the incredibly american character of Soth’s work. In Ping Pong Conversations, an interview book done by him few years ago, Alec Soth openly states that he can hardly imagine working on his personal projects outside the US, mostly because the american cultural context is an important factor of the way he constructs his narratives. So, the indecisive moment became the gaze strongly connected with how US was, and is, pictured – and as the popularity of the outcomes of this way of work became more and more prevalent, it became a default way of thinking about how one can possibly construct their longterm project about something. The indecisive moment became one of the tools photographers could possibly utilise in their work. Actually, this was a bigger invention than it might seem; what was opened was a toolbox in general, for the first time not only an aesthetical one, but conceptual. Photography became visual storytelling that could possibly draw from other disciplines of creative activity such as writing or film. Capa’s words about being close enough to get good enough pictures suddenly ceased to be universally relevant – what is always at least partially good thing, given the fact that the man who claimed that rule died by stepping on a land mine. What is yet somehow to grasp is the fact that what was also incorporated in that particular toolbox was an Western-centric gaze – the fact that a lot of projects done in this manner stem out from US, and tackled State’s problems in the first place somehow got lost in translation, and what is a result of it? We’re coming back to the hill where we started. 33


Paweł Starzec Documenting Neverland

The city we see, and that red car, are parts of a story that is now being made about the national identity of some country’s citizens. About the modern fate of this country. Enabled by open borders, cheap travels and good passports, photographic work started to utilise what was once local to try to grasp things bigger than before. In that sense, decisive moment classic, Frank’s The Americans, is way closer to a lot of those projects in the theoretical sphere. The notion that by documenting various elements of everyday life of a country we can actually aim to tell a story about the country’s modern identity in general is a bold one. But, as in Polish saying that wherever way you turn around, your ass will always be behind you – wherever we would try to picture an national identity that way, somehow we will end up looking for an American Neverland in Somewhere. Why so? Again, answer might be complex. First factor, more obvious, is that by internalising the originally Western way of documenting space, we all also inherited the specifically Western points of visual interest, a system of visual codes and cliches a little too vague to became a separated language, but firm enough to become a documentary storytelling project bingo of big empty billboards, burned cars, under the bridge plains. In that essence, the brilliance of Krzysztof Orłowski’s and Jerzy Piątek’s work comes to mind – while documenting the States so perfectly that a lot of people didn’t noticed that their project was made entirely in Poland, they tapped to the sentiment for the American landscape and points of reference so deeply tangled in the way the indecisive moment documentaries are made. And in a way, it was a meta-documentary by doing so – in my personal opinion, this is more a story about making a documentary story, than about those places and people, in their both fictional, public state, and the backstage, real one.

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@pestarzec

But the second factor draws more from the abstract role of Western world in the West-East balance dynamics. The idea of the end of history that came a long way from Hegel through Marx to Fukuyama became the praise of neoliberal democracy in the works of the last one mentioned. Fukuyama perceived the fall of Iron Curtain as a signal that the global East would eventually catch up to the capitalist West. The West, with US acting as a global policeman, was in fact deeply involved in actively supporting this notion around the world. For documentary photography, the higher ground of Western way of doing it became a contributing factor in making it possible to insist that a Western artist can talk about Eastern problems, and create a narrative about them. But let’s step back a little, to the times of Capa, or generally, the times before Web 2.0 effectively ended the printed press as we knew it. Think about the role of a photojournalist before that. You’re the one that is being sent to the opposite part of the world, to do the incredibly subjective act of picturing something – be it everyday life, or worse, an armed conflict happening there. Your subjective perspective – influenced by the way you were socialised, the values you believed in, the market reality of your work – would actively affect the way you see world, and thus, your photographs. But your pictures would be printed in the press, in a print run that is hard to grasp from today’s perspective. So, your personal view on the state of current affairs would be a contributing factor in the way hundreds, thousands, millions of people perceive the events you were documenting, or places where they were happening. But, the press ends, and you as an photographer become aware of the fact that you can engage with the narrative of your work – it is no longer connected to the then and there of news reporting, and instead it can be developed more freely into a personal narrative piece, be it a one using an indecisive moment way of photographing. 35


Paweł Starzec Documenting Neverland

This is one of the contributing factors of the bigger picture of modern documentary photography; also, one of the reasons why the Western Europe is way less documented than the Eastern one. I think that in a way we, collectively, gained consciousness about the frame we are working with when it comes to narrative documentary photography – the way that we can actively think about what story we would like to create, and what theoretical and visual tools we could utilise – we should also work towards gaining consciousness about the heritage they bring. Of course, one could argue that photography still saves the world – to each their own. I don’t believe that, I think we do what we find crucial or important, and in need to be done. The possible effects of photography in a hyper-visual world are diminished, so we can possibly at least partially consider this activity as an elitist one, reaching mostly other interested in the same type of work – so, to sum up, a social activity in a sense. With no world to save by our work, we can think about how we should improve the paradigm we work in, and the methods we implement. Besides the imminent perspective of looking down on some matters – as we were looking down on a city somewhere eastern from where we live in the beginning of this essay – that falsely makes as complicit in the way Fukuyama see the world’s fate, there are also other issues to be tackled, such as the almost non-existent female artist representation in documentaries drawing direct inspiration from New Topographics way of work. The question of relationships between space and its inhabitants is surely a valid and important one, but the thing to consider is – how to answer it without referring directly to what was invented as a tool to talk about American culture specifically? The true backstage of our work isn’t only the cool part of how we were travelling for ages, but also the way we are trying to avoid being a National Geographic-esque equivalent of 36


@pestarzec

Bronisław Malinowski, looking upon the citizens of Neverland we want to tell a story about. The constructed grammar of photographic documentary should be inspected with care, reinvented and used to own needs, with an awareness regarding the context it was originally created in. Neverland is nowhere to be found on a map, actually, so it is hard to document it in the same way we used to do.

Photographer, sociologist, educator, journalist. Works on photographic documents. Mainly interested in correlations between space and its context, and in envisioning broader processes through their aftermath and peripherals. Visual sociologist, working in the field of modern iconography, mass visual memory and visual narratives. Art educator responsible for a number of workshop programs as a lecturer and teacher, co-founder of Paper Beats Rock foundation, current member of Azimuth Press collective. Student of Applied Sociology Department of University of Warsaw (Ph. D.), and of Institute of Creative Photography of Silesian University in Opava (MA). Musician and sound artist, currently playing in Mazut, and solo under Centralia moniker. DIY / zine culture enthusiast.

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Photo by Martyna Wyrzykowska

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Reef

Alicja Wróblewska ‘86

Photographer, visual artist, director, based in Warsaw, Poland. Currently student of Institute of Creative Photography in Opava, Czech Republic. In my work I use various media of expression (film, photography, collage, installation). Apart from photographs I also create objects (ready-mades), constituting the extension of a photograph. All my projects have in common the conceptual perspective, based on the arrangement of created scenes, spaces, objects. Through this perspective I aim at showing the effects of dependencies, which are borne out of man – capitalism and globalisation relation. I’m interested in what consequences the above mentioned dependencies have on everyday life of a man, his private life, his environment. How the products of capitalism e.g. plastic objects, destroy the environment that surrounds us and thus lead to degradation, not only of nature, but also of our thinking. 38


Coral reefs are one of the most beautiful and delicate natural phenomena on Earth. They are formed in seas and oceans where the water temperature stays above 18°C. Due to environmental pollution and warming of the climate, and thusly warming of the water, coral reefs are affected by bleaching. In 2017, 90% of the Great Barrier Reef was subject to mass fading. If we do not stop the global warming, the reefs will disappear forever. The project includes photographs of objects made entirely of disposable plastic (bottles, mugs, straws, cosmetics and food packaging, etc.). These objects represent future reefs. If we do not drastically limit production of plastic, especially disposable packaging, the reef will be permanently destroyed and replaced by synthetic creations of anthropocene such as these. Is this what we want for us, for our planet and for future generations? 39


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When The Radon Level Drops Kuba Bors ‘89

I started my university education in Comparative Literature at Jagiellonian University. After this I became fascinated with documentary photography. I attended ‘The Sputnik Mentoring Program’ with Rafał Milach as my mentor and the International Summer School of Photography workshop ‘Photographing The Past’ with Simon Norfolk as tutor. These experiences led me to teaching photography in Academy of Photography in Cracow. Later I began studying photograph at the Institute of Creative Photography in Opava, Czech Republic. Right now I’m pursuing a commercial career with frequent getaways into more personal work. I use photography as a peculiar narrative than has no boundaries. I use many variety of styles ranging from snapshot, post-internet, street photography to documentary and reportage. My expertise are mixed media collages. 48


When the radon levels drop. This project started with typical documentary style registration of the polluted areas sorrounding Poland’s biggest steel plant. At some point I started printing out these pictures and assambling them into forged objet trouvÊ - which represented a notepad found in post-apocalyptic future. Apart from pictures showing the ecological disaster I use pictures from my own private collections. They simulate the life that crushed with the fictional ( but rather possible ) catastrophe. Project was presented in statu nascendi as an orignal object the public could interact with. Later after some evolution I decided to scan it and present it in form a large format prints.

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When The Radon Level Drops

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We Can’t Live Without Each Other Karolina Wojtas ‘96

Photographer. She studies in Film School Lodz and Institute of Creative Photography in the Czech Republic. She lives in a colorful world of experiment and endless fun. She draws from children’s fantasies and memories. Inspiration may become for her a mess in the garden of her grandfather or a huge slide. Through her exhibition, it is impossible to slip, sometimes covered with brocade or balloons. But you can feel like a child – play, abandon and scrounge.

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I was an only child until 13 years old. Whenever my parents asked about siblings, my response was less than positive‌ One day he appeared, and we started our struggle‌ Now I am 23 and nothing has changed. So we decided to document some of our battles and tricks, to teach siblings all over the world how to handle this kind of relationship!

Dear siblings-proprietor. Stay strong

and do not stop the struggle for your position. Show them, those who are also from the body and blood of your parents, that you’ll not give in to their taunting!

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Sun

Michał Patycki ‘95

Based in Gliwice, Poland. Photographer and bohemist with BA in Creative Photography at Silesian University in Opava, currently continuing his education in a Master’s degree programme there. Captivated by visual language of photography, he uses it to execute his ideas. He is also fascinated by archives and the opportunities of the medium alongside its influence on the space and environment. He has exhibited his work both in Poland and abroad. 70


“Staszek Zięba (from the Szombierki mine) finished his shift. After eight hours underground with only a flaashlight, he rode the elevator to the surface, dropped his chit into the box, gave back his light to the shop, and then pulled his civvy pants off the hook on his way to the bathroom. After washing up, still stark naked, Staszek heads straight to the solarium, where he strolls between two rows of ultraviolet lamps, taking a sunbath that is supposed to cancel out the dearth of sunlight he suffers from while on shift.” If the Sun went out, life on Earth would cease in about a week. Sunlight is a fundamental source of energy in the Earth’s energy budget and is necessary for nearly all forms of earthly life to exist. The Sun has been heating our planet for millions of years, driving the annual growth of hundreds of billions of plants across Earth, and has in the past supplied the energy that we release today by burning oil and coal. 71


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Zenith

Paweł Jaśkiewicz ‘91

Photographer who resides in Poznan, Poland. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Arts in Poznan. While studying there, he also completed the exchange program at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. He has also photographed under the guidance of Magnum photographers Antoine D’agata and Jacob Aue Sobol at the Magnum Workshop Tokyo, which led to having his work exhibited with Magnum. Since then, Paweł’s photographic works have been exhibited in both Germany and his homeland, Poland. 82


Zenith is an imaginary point, located directly above a particular location. Perspective from there turns landscape into a pattern, creating an ideal, objective order - also imaginary. However, this is a theory. Real perception comes out of empirical experience, filtered through subjective view. Zenith is a body of work, collecting topographic view on various non-places. Stating idea behind this term, Marc Auge coined it to describe places without enough significance to be thinked of as proper places, but this also comes down to a subjective perception. As man alters landscape, it becomes an imprint of the perception of both the creator and the user, thus being an evidence of their actions and intentions that will eventually last. Even when in perfect order from up above, all places are subjected to a constant reformulation and repurposefication. And this is the subject of this story. 83


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Whatever Happens At Least It Has Begun Adrian Lach ‘89

Born in Bielsko-Biała, Poland. Zodiac sign: Pisces. Numerology number: 11. Student of the Institute of Creative Photography in Opava. Some people says that he’s different. He’s divergent too much but also too little. Borderlands of artificiality, create for him the field to create other realities. Due to the fact that he is fascinated by impermanence, he run into space.

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Where did life come from?

Did life come from space as some say?

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WE ARE OPEN FOR SUBMIS SIONS

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WE WILL L L& S YOUR PROJECT Submit finished body of work up to 10 mb with a descripton or share link to your website & Instagram account. @likeloveshare_magazine likelovenshare@gmail.com

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Colophon

Like Love & Share Magazine CREATED BY Krzysiek Orłowski @krzysiek_orlowski Marcin Płonka @m.plonka ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Tokio @tokio.design PHOTO EDITOR Krzysiek Orłowski CONTRIBUTORS Ada Zielińska @adsoadsoadso, Kuba Stępień @apkvp, Alicja Wróblewska @alkawroblewska, Kuba Bors @kubabors, Karolina Wojtas @matriioszka, Michał Patycki @mpatycki, Paweł Jaśkiewicz @pawel_jaskiewicz, Adrian Lach @lachadrian, Paweł Starzec @pestarzec CONTACT likelovenshare@gmail.com

2019 © Like Love & Share Magazine No part of this publication may be used or reproduced without written permission from the editors. All photographs & copy are property of the owners.

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LL&S magazine is what we think deserves to be liked & shared with a broader audience. Focused on all aspects of contemporary photography we bring projects usually reserved for photo festivals & books.

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In the first issue of our magazine we want to share with you a fresh selections of talented photographers yet unrecognized widely.

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Like Love & Share Magazine no.1  

LL&S magazine is what we think deserves to be liked & shared with a broader audience. Focused on all aspects of contemporary photography we...

Like Love & Share Magazine no.1  

LL&S magazine is what we think deserves to be liked & shared with a broader audience. Focused on all aspects of contemporary photography we...

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