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T h e P o e t ic Wo n de r o f I sa ac Wa tt s

But it was not to be so. Pinhorne proved to be not only an able teacher of the classics but an earnest Christian who urged all of his students to develop their minds and understandings for the honor of Christ throughout their lives. In this, Pinhorne reinforced Watts Sr.’s instruction to his son: “Learn to know God, especially learn to know him in and through the Lord Jesus Christ and to be acquainted with this blessed Redeemer of God’s elect.”20 Over the next years, Watts mastered Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and French under Pinhorne’s instruction. With respect and affection, Watts wrote his “Pindaric Ode” to pay honor to his tutor and to express the “debt of thanks” he owed him. After rehearsing “Plato’s walks” and “Latium’s fields,” Watts wrote that he despised Zeus, “The fabled ruler of the skies.” He then proceeded to “consecrate his lays,” or to map out the “numbers” or metered lines of his poetic life’s work: Thy name. Almighty Sire, and thine, Jesus, where His full glories shine, Shall consecrate my lays; In numbers, by no vulgar bounds controlled, In numbers, most divinely strong and bold, I’ll sound through all the world th’ immeasurable praise.21 While under Pinhorne’s tutelage, Watts wrote in his personal memoranda of important events in his life: “Fell under considerable convictions of sin, 1688, and was taught to trust 12

The Poetic Wonder of Isaac Watts  
The Poetic Wonder of Isaac Watts  

Read a sample chapter of Douglas Bond's The Poetic Wonder of Isaac Watts.