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Page 16 — Sunday, March 30, 2014

Muskogee Phoenix

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

2014

Spring Visitors Guide

Muskogee Phoenix

A teen photographs her friends as they pose in spring finery in front of azaleas in Honor Heights Park.

muskogeephoenix.com

Special photo by Mandy Lundy

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Muskogee Phoenix

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Special photo by John Hasler

A group of 80s rockers march in the 2013 Azalea Parade. This year the parade steps off at 11 a.m. April 12 with the state teacher of the year as grand marshal.

Azalea Parade to bring surprises State teacher of the year to serve as grand marshal

surprise or two,” Everett If you go said. “There will be a big surprise right at the front WHAT: Azalea Parade. of the WHEN: 11 a.m. April 12. parade. It’ll WHERE: Downtown be a nice By Travis Sloat Muskogee on Okmulgee addition and Phoenix Staff Writer Avenue and Broadway. it’s someINFORMATION: (918) thing we’ve Joel Everett said there 684-6302, ext. 1473. never done was a big surprise in store Markes before.” for the viewers of this The 2014 year’s Azalea Parade. “There’s going to be a parade will start at 11 a.m. April 12 and will traverse Okmulgee Avenue and Broadway. This year’s grand marLooking for a Good Job? shal will be Oklahoma State Teacher of the Year Questions you should ask your Peter Markes of Edmond. prospective employer... Markes is an eighththrough 12th-grade string Will you guarantee me a pay raise every year? Will you The Air Force can orchestra and Advanced provide free medical and dental care for me? Will you answer “YES” to all these questions! furnish my housing or give me extra tax-free money for Placement music theory Can your prospective rent? If I want to continue my education, will you pay teacher from Edmond employer? 100% of my tuition? If I get married, will you increase my pay? Can I retire from your company after 20 years and receive a monthly income for the rest of my life? Is the training your company provides college accredited? 033010076201

For more information contact SSgt Gale Air Force Recruiting Office 501 Main St., Muskogee 918-682-1397 or 918-381-9624 roger.gale@us.af.mil

(See PARADE, Page 4)

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

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Muskogee Phoenix

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CALENDAR

Powwow connects visitors to tradition

Arts MUSKOGEE ART GUILD JUDGED ART SHOW AND SALE, April 5 through 12, Arrowhead Mall. The event is open to the public. Categories: Oil/acrylic on canvas; canvas board; masonite or wood; watercolor/acrylic on paper; drawing — pastels, charcoal, pencil, pen and ink or monoprints; mixed media; photography and threedimensional free standing art. Information and registration: (918) 683-4200 or (918) 9311981. ART SHOW AND SALE, April 6 through 30, Five Civilized Tribes Museum. Information: (877) 587-4237. ARTISTS’ RECEPTION, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 12, The Gallery Downtown. Meet and greet with artists displaying in the gallery. ART UNDER THE OAKS, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 19 and 20, Five Civilized Tribes Museum. Handmade arts and crafts, food and entertainment. Information: (877) 5874237.

Events HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD WALKING TOUR, 4 p.m. March 29, Beckman Park. Join a group tour for an afternoon stroll through the Founders’ Place and Kendall Place Historic Districts of Muskogee. Walk along Silk Stocking Lane where the city's founders built their finest homes. Cost: $5 (cash only). Wear comfortable shoes and clothing appropriate for the weather. Information: okieheritage.com. DAFFODIL DAY AND TEA, March 29, ThomasForeman Historic Home. Cost: $5, which includes tea and home tour. The Muskogee Garden Club has planted 1,500 daffodils in the

By E.I. Hillin

Phoenix Staff Writer

Special photo by John Hasler

A family pauses for portraits in front of azaleas blooming in Honor Heights Park during last year’s Azalea Festival. Thomas-Foreman Historic Home gardens. For $10 you can start your tour at Three Rivers Museum, 220 Elgin St., and take a trolley from there to the Thomas-Foreman Home to enjoy a plant sale, spring daffodils and a tea provided by Muskogee Garden Club members. 30TH ANNUAL AZALEA PAGEANT, March 29, Roxy Theatre. The pageant is held each year and is open to girls from birth to 18 years. Winners will receive crowns, banners, and trophies and will be eligible to ride in the Azalea Parade. Information: Debbie Morgan, (918) 4632693. MUSKOGEE RUN, 8 a.m. April 12, Honor Heights Park. Information and registration: www.themuskogeerun.eventb rite.com. AZALEA-FEST CRAFT SHOW, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 12, VFW Post 474, 3811 W. Okmulgee Ave. Information

and applications: (918) 6868005. PARTY IN THE PARK, 1:30 to 6:30 p.m., April 19, The Papilion, Honor Heights Park. Tasting of Oklahoma wines and beer and food from Muskogee-area restaurants. Music by NSU Jazz Ensemble. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door; includes tasting glass. Proceeds benefit Turn Wine into Water. Information: (918) 680-1239. 31ST ANNUAL QUICHE AND SALAD LUNCHEON AND BAKE SALE, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 24, St. Joseph Church Parish. A variety of delicious salads, quiche and a drink. Cost: $7. Homemade baked goods for sale. Information: (918) 616-7956. A NIGHT IN THE TROPICS, 6 p.m. June 21, Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame. A fundraiser benefiting the Kelly B. Todd Cerebral Palsy and Neuro-Muscular

Center. The menu: Whole roasted hog; a variety of island side dishes and tropical drinks. Dancing will be led by Randy McBride. Silent and live auctions available. Seating is limited. Information and reservations: (918) 6834621.

Festivals 15th ANNUAL BARE BONES INTERNATIONAL INDEPENDENT FILM & MUSIC FESTIVAL, April 3 through 13. Headquarters: Studio Broadway, 213 W. Broadway. Information: (918) 608-5394.

Parades AZALEA FESTIVAL PARADE, 11 a.m. April 12, downtown Muskogee. Theme: Celebrations. No entry fees. Information: (918) 684-6302, ext. 28.

Sunrise Ross attended many powwows during her early years. “You watch it, you’re around it, you become part of it,” Ross said. Ross of Coweta will be Head Lady Dancer at the ninth annual Azalea Powwow, scheduled for 2 to 10 p.m. April 19 at the Muskogee Civic Center. Powwow visitors will have the chance to explore a variety of Native American traditions. A dance contest will be held. Gourd dancing and tribal music will take place throughout the day. “I’ve grown up around the powwow arena,” said Ross, of Muscogee (Creek) and Otoe Missouri descent. “My grandfather was an emcee to many powwows.” Ross’ immersion into the culture of dancing from an early age has stayed with her. She has passed it down to her children. “I started dancing at an early age,” Ross said. “I remember taking my kids into the arena when they were really young.” Ross will be performing the Southern Cloth style of dancing. Other women’s dancing styles include buckskin, fancy shawl and jingle dress. “Southern Cloth is a simple, meek, graceful dance style,” she said. Head Man Dancer will be Larry Tsosie, a member of the Kiowa and Navajo tribes. Men’s dance styles will include traditional, straight, fancy and grass. The “tiny tots” also will have their chance to show their unique dancing style. The Azalea Powwow has become one of the highlights of the Muskogee area’s spring events. “We started out very

If you go WHAT: Ninth annual Azalea Powwow. WHEN: 2 to 10 p.m. April 19. WHERE: Muskogee Civic Center, 425 Boston St. INFORMATION: Charlene Allen, (918) 3515892 or Joyce Deere, (918) 230-4734. ADMISSION: $3. SCHEDULE: Gourd Dancing, 2-5 p.m. Dinner Break, 5-6 p.m. Gourd Dancing, 6-7 p.m. Grand Entry, 7 p.m.

small at St. Paul (United) Methodist, and it’s expanded each year,” said Fife Indian United Methodist Church board chairperson Cheryl Hensley. Fife and the city of Muskogee Multicultural Division will host the annual Azalea Powwow. “We have honored guests coming — Miss Indian Oklahoma, Robynn Rulo, and Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, Nikki Amos,” Hensley said. Edwin Marshall, public relations manager for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, will be the master of ceremonies for the powwow. Marshall is looking forward to participants and visitors from all over Oklahoma, he said. The projected attendance is in the thousands. “It’s an honor being associated in the head staff with other very distinguished individuals in the Indian Country,” Marshall said. Head Gourd Dancer for the powwow is Ira Kauley, Kiowa, and Head Singer is Kinsel Lieb, Ponca. Reach E.I. Hillin at (918) 684-2926 or ehillin @muskogeephoenix.com.

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Muskogee Phoenix

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Quilters stitch stories through work By Cathy Spaulding

If that’s true, the halls of St. Paul United Methodist Church will Stitched inside every brim with stories April 11 quilt is a story to be told, and 12. quilters say. The Muskogee Quilters Phoenix Staff Writer

Guild’s annual Quilt Show will feature around 100 entries in 12 categories. They include machinequilted and pieced, handquilted and pieced, wall

hangings, miniatures, If you go mixed techniques and group quilting. WHAT: Muskogee Quilters Guild Quilt Show. Quilt show chair Brenda WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 Haxton said the show also p.m. April 11 and 12. will feature categories for WHERE: St. Paul youth and first-time quilUnited Methodist Church, ters. 2130 W. Okmulgee Ave. Visitors also might be ADMISSION: $5. able to read stories about many of the quilts, Haxton entering the show to put said. “We always want people stories with each quilt,”

she said. “They almost always have one. Maybe someone found grandma’s quilt blocks in a trunk somewhere. I always enjoy reading about how they came to make the quilt, what was special about it, what was the pattern and the like.” Haxton has stories

ety of celebrations in our community and in this area,” he said. “The things people do from holidays, churches, schools and from different ethnic backgrounds. It’s a celebration of all the different things people bring into the mix that is the Muskogee community.” According to the parade application, entrants will consist of civic clubs, dance units, pageant

kings and queens, churches, schools, politicians and more. Everett said there was a “wide variety” of entries. “The entries you see in these parades show the diversity and the talents that are right here under our noses that we don’t think about,” Everett said. “It might be anything from building a classic car in your garage, which is amazing, to being in a band or a talent show or a beauty contest. And this year running for office.” Everett also said one of the exciting things about the parade for him is seeing the wealth of community involvement. “All of the things you don’t think about, you come to one place downtown as a community and it kind of blows your mind,” he said.” You get to see what’s going on with the Shriners and the local schools. There are people dancing and playing music. That’s the spice of life — seeing all the different talents and passions that we as a community have.” Reach Travis Sloat at (918) 684-2908 or tsloat @muskogeephoenix.com.

Parade Continued from Page 2

North High School in the Edmond School District. Everett, the special projects manager for the Muskogee Parks and Recreation Office, said the parade theme would be “Celebrations.” “It emphasizes the vari033000354305

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(See QUILTERS, Page 7)

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

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M USKOGEE M USEUM E VENTS S UMMER A CTIVITY G UIDE 2014

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Run Continued from Page 8

the 15K run, featuring the infamous “Chickenwing Hill,” so named after an event worker decided to serve chicken wings to runners as they crested the highest peak during the run. Updike, the race director, said this year they were going to wait until the end of the race to serve the chicken wings. “What we’re doing this year is offering free chili tasting kits to the first six people who reach the top of the hill,” he said. “Then we’ll be raffling off more kits at the end of the race. We think the race fits in nicely with the Chili CookOff. We’re marketing it as one of the many events of

the Azalea Festival.” Updike also said what makes the run special is the inclusion of a 15K event. “We’re one of the few people in the area who offer that,” Updike said. “We think that allows us to draw from a wide pool of runners who are interested in going that distance. It’s also a USA Track & Field sanctioned and certified event.” Approximately 180 runners competed in the races last year. The event is also two weeks from the Oklahoma City Marathon, and Updike said he hopes some runners would use the Muskogee Run as their final training run before the half or full marathon. “We’re hoping to grow this year,” Updike said. “Over 200 people would be a good turnout, but we can

Muskogee Phoenix

If you go WHAT: Muskogee Run. WHERE: Honor Heights Park. WHEN: 8 a.m. April 12. COST: Register before April 4, $35 for the 15K; $25 for the 5K; $20 for the One-mile Fun Run. Register after April 4, $40 for the 15K; $30 for the 5K; $25 for the One-mile Fun Run. INFORMATION: Register online at www.themuskogeerun. eventbrite.com.

easily accommodate 300 runners. Hopefully, we get those numbers.” Updike said the 5K course is relatively flat, and is done west of Honor Heights Park. The 15K is flat as well, but with a few challenging hills. “It’s a really pretty course,” he said. “I’d say it’s moderately challenging. It’s a route that takes

you some places where not a lot of people have probably gone, even those who live here. Last year was our first year for the 15K, and all the runners had good things to say about it.” The more you participate in local runs, the more you’ll get to know other local runners, Updike said. “We think this is going to be an enjoyable event, Updike said. “It’s a great way to spend a Saturday morning. It’s a nice event for anyone who wants to walk, jog or run. There’s something for everybody, and you get a nice shirt as well. We really want people to start signing up for this. April is a great time of year, and it’ll be a beautiful setting. Reach Travis Sloat at (918) 684-2908 or tsloat @muskogeephoenix.com.

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Chili Continued from Page 9

(CASA), and the Muskogee Exchange Club’s Shoe and Coat fund, Smith said. “We have given away

Bones Continued from Page 8

which is different, Ray said. Opportunities to provide information to students and to help individuals in need are also part of the festival, Ray said. The festival provides independent filmmakers the opportunity to meet with students at area schools and provide

over $1 million to local children’s charities over the past 30 years,” he added. Arvest Bank is the presenting sponsor for the cook-off, Smith said. Reach Anita Reding at (918) 684-2903 or areding @muskogeephoenix.com. information movies and movie production. Bare Bones focuses on providing to individuals less fortunate in the community, and sponsors several drives that provide food and other items for WISH House and homeless shelters. “The festival makes an emphasis of that,” Ray said. All of the events of the festival are open to the community, Ray said. Reach Anita Reding at (918) 684-2903 or areding @muskogeephoenix.com.

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Quilters Continued from Page 4

about some of the quilts she’s entering. She recalled finding a quilt top her mother made out of salt sacks. “This quilt top was 68 years old, but it has never been quilted,” she said. “Some people have quilts made out of feed sacks.” Lisa Totty of Morris said she is entering a wall hanging depicting a special friendship. “I made it for a friend, it shows three little girls,” Totty said. “Three of us work at Edward Jones. There’s a Tammie girl, a Caroline girl and a Lisa girl.” She said she made quilted wall hangings to give to each friend and is entering one quilt in the show. Totty said she also is entering a “comforter quilt to take to my son’s ball games.”

Muskogee Phoenix

The quilt is done in the colors of Labette Community College in Kansas, where her son plays baseball. The quilt show has attracted entries from Arkansas and “all over northeast Oklahoma,” Haxton said. The show will offer ribbons for best quilts. “Not all quilts in the show have to be judged,” Haxton said. “The critiques are always very positive. If the quilts are judged, people do like to see ribbons on them.” Bartlesville quilter and lecturer Lerlene Nevaril will judge the show, Haxton said. Nevaril conducts workshops and lectures and has written several books on quilting. “We will have demonstrations every hour,” Haxton said. The show also will feature a boutique and a silent auction, she said. Reach Cathy Spaulding at (918) 684-2928 or cspaulding@muskogee phoenix.com.

Sunday, March 30, 2014 — Page 7

Staff photo by Cathy Spaulding

Brenda Haxton of the Muskogee Quilters Guild sets up a quilt display at Muskogee Public Library. The Guild will have a drawing for the quilt at its Quilt Show in April.

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Muskogee Phoenix

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Honor Heights city’s premiere park

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Muskogee Phoenix

Chili, barbecue event brings ‘new, fun ideas’ By Anita Reding

By Cathy Spaulding Phoenix Staff Writer

What began as a weedy, “unkempt” hill has become Muskogee’s showplace of azaleas, butterflies, Christmas lights and recreation. Honor Heights Park — 102 hilly acres of splendor — might very well be the very reason Muskogee has an annual azalea festival. But it is so much more than azaleas, city parks officials say. The park began in 1909 when the city bought 40 acres from the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, said Assistant Muskogee Parks Director Rick Ewing.

The Muskogee Daily Phoenix apparently was not impressed. Ewing quoted from a 1909 issue of the paper: “Honor Heights was covered with an indiscriminate growth of tall weeds. The road leading to the hill was unkempt and there was a total lack of decorative foliage anywhere on the hill.” George Palmer changed all that when he became Honor Heights head gardener in 1910 and the city’s parks director in 1912. “He was park superintendent from 1912 to 1944 and he never missed a day of work,” Ewing said. “He

laid the roadways and the flower beds.” Palmer also designed the waterfall and rock walkways that go down the hill, Ewing said. The Works Progress Administration, a Depression era relief agency, built chimneys and picnic tables during the 1930s, he said. Even then, Honor Heights had a grand reputation. “In 1935, the park won an America the Beautiful contest from ‘Better Homes and Gardens,” he said. When Art Johnson became park director in 1948, public demands of

parks began to change, Ewing said. That was the start of the post-World War II Baby Boom. “He wanted it to be more of a recreation facility, not just a place to look at flowers,” Ewing said, adding that Johnson wanted more color, not the intricate English gardens Palmer favored. Honor Heights’ first azaleas came in 1951. “Someone brought azaleas from her husband’s funeral and she didn’t know what to do with them, so she gave them to Art,” Ewing said. The park began attracting tour buses. Such popularity resulted in the city’s

first Azalea Festival in April 1968. Johnson remained with the city until 1977. Since then, the park went through many changes. The park added paved trails and primitive trails. “Recreational needs of people have changed considerably. People don’t spend much time driving and looking at flowers anymore,” said Ewing. “They will look at Christmas lights, though.” Ewing said the park began its annual Garden of Lights in December 1992, about a year after he became parks superintendent. Honor Heights Park

continues to evolve, attracting a new generation of visitors with a splash pad and arboretum. The Papilion, which opened in 2013, features a butterfly house and a variety of raised flower beds. It now is the park’s main venue for festivals and concerts. In December, a temporary ice skating rink was added to complement the Garden of Lights. The city now plans to install a new “naturethemed” playground at the park. Reach Cathy Spaulding at (918) 684-2928 or cspaulding@muskogee phoenix.com.

Bare Bones Film Festival turns 15 this year By Anita Reding Phoenix Staff Writer

Special photo by John Hasler

Kim Chapuis, left, and another competitor take off at the start of the 2013 Muskogee Run 5K.

Run name recent, history long By Travis Sloat Phoenix Staff Writer

Martin Updike said the newly christened Muskogee Run has had many names in the past. “It was born out of the Azalea 5K,” Updike said. “That went on for 15 years or so, and if you go back

before that it was a Rotary Run. But it’s only been the Muskogee Run for the last four years.” The Muskogee Run will take place at 8 a.m. April 12 at Honor Heights Park, and will consist of a Onemile Fun Run, a 5K and (See RUN, Page 10)

Filmmakers from several states and countries are in Muskogee and are participating in the Bare Bones International Film & Music Festival. This year’s festival — the 15th annual – began April 3 and will continue through April 13. Approximately 300 films were chosen to be included in this year’ s festival, and filmmakers from approximately 40 states and several foreign countries are participating, said Oscar Ray. He and his wife, ShIronbutterfly Ray, began the festival 15 years ago as a gathering of independent filmmakers. “Usually we show about 200 movies in the down-

town area,” Oscar Ray said. “Some of the movies will be shown online.” In addition to screenings of a variety of independent films, the festival features seminars, symposiums, workshop and roundtable discussions, Ray said. The experience level among the films makers at the local festival ranges from “the newbie, the person who has never done anything, to the person who has been working for Disney for 40 years and decided to make their own movie,” Ray explained. “We try to design our festival so that instead of just folks that want to show movies, we also have this tremendous amount of seminars and symposiums and conversation about how to make a movie, how to consider making a movie

If you go WHAT: Bare Bones International Film and Music Festival WHERE: Various times and locations around Muskogee. See website for schedule. WHEN: Began April 3, continues through Sunday. INFORMATION: www.barebonesfilmfestival.org or (918) 616-1263. SCHEDULE: TBA TICKETS: TBA

for an audience that they may not have thought about beyond just their story,” he said. On the final night of the festival, April 13, awards in 27 categories will be presented during an awards dinner at the Music Hall of Fame. Although awards will be

presented, camaraderie among the filmmakers makes the Bare Bones International Film & Music Festival unique, Ray said. Participants are told upfront that they are participating in the festival as comrades, not competitors, he said, adding that they are told that during the 10days of the festival, they are not competing, they are to learn from each other. The local festival has become known as the “world’s friendliest film festival,” he said. During the festival in Muskogee, filmmakers are provided with training about what’s required to make an independent film with the smaller budgets, and how the process works on a major studio set, (See BONES, Page 10)

Sunday, March 30, 2014 — Page 9

Phoenix Staff Writer

Organizers of the annual Muskogee Exchange Club’s Chili and Barbecue Cook-Off continue to add events and see more individuals compete and participate. This year is the 30th annual event, and more than 100 teams are expected to compete this year, said Robert Smith, chairman. “Every year, we’re bringing new, fun ideas to the cook-off,” Smith said. Approximately 20,000 participants attend the annual event. “The event provides “fun for the entire family,” Smith said. The cook-off will be held at the Civic Center Market Square Festival Area, Fifth and Boston streets, beginning at 11:30 a.m., at the conclusion of the annual

Azalea Festival Parade, Smith said. Cooking teams will be competing for several awards, and spectators are invited to sample chili, brisket, ribs, chicken and other foods. Each taster kit can be purchased for $10, or two can be purchased for $15. Dennis Brown of Muskogee is a member of “The Rattlers” cook team, which includes employees of Diamond Back Steel Inc. The employees’ family members also help during the day. “I just love barbecuing and associating with all the people you see once a year,” he said. Brown has been a member of the team for 10 years. The team has won several awards in individual food categories — including first place and second place on chicken and third place on brisket. “This year, we’re trying to win

it all,” he said. The Rattlers team competes in the barbecue contests annually, and team members also cook between two and five gallons of chili just to give to the spectators as they pass by with their taster kits, he said. The Exchange Club also is bringing The Express Personnel world famous Express Clydesdales, ambassadors for Express Employment Professionals, to Muskogee this year. They will be part of the grand marshal entry for the parade and also will be available for pictures in the Kids Zone area after the parade, Smith said. The Exchange Club’s annual event is for the entire family, and there will be a variety of other activities in the Kids’ Zone, including inflatables, pony and camel rides.

There will also be a youth cooking competition. The Youth Chillin-n-Grillin Youth Cook-off will be for junior cooks in grades 3-12. The young cooks in the cook-off will be challenged to create a grilled hamburger patty. Festivities will begin on April 11 with a kick-off party scheduled from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. outside the Muskogee Civic Center. The concert by Rock Show of Tulsa and party is open to the public (21 and over), free of charge, Smith said. Individuals also can contact The Exchange Club for VIP tickets. Food and beverages will be available for sale, he added. Proceeds from the annual Chili & Barbecue Chili Cook-off will benefit Kids’ Space, Court Appointed Special Advocates (See CHILI, Page 10)

If you go WHAT: Muskogee Exchange Club’s Chili and Barbecue CookOff kick-off party. WHEN: 7 to 11 p.m. WHERE: Civic Center Market Square Festival Area, Fifth and Boston streets. WHO: Open to the public, 21 and over. COST: Free admission or call. Muskogee VIP tickets are available for purchase. (918) 8690733, or muskogee_exchange@yahoo.co m.

• • • WHAT: Muskogee Exchange Club’s Chili and Barbecue CookOff WHEN: 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. WHERE: Civic Center Market Square Festival Area, Fifth and Boston streets. COST: Taster kits, $10 for one, $15 for 2.

Art Under the Oaks offers focus on Native culture, fine art By E.I. Hillin Phoenix Staff Writer

Two more opportunities to celebrate the spring season in Muskogee will take place at the annual Art Under the Oaks Festival and Art Show. “The focus is culture and fine art,” said Five Civilized Tribes Museum Director Mary Robinson. The two events include the competitive art show and the market festival. “Our focus is protecting and preserving the culture and traditions of the Five Tribes from the Southeast through art and artifacts, Robinson said. The art show showcases work from Southeast woodland artists and features paintings, drawings,

If you go WHAT: Art Under the Oaks Competitive Art Show. WHEN: Opening reception is 2 p.m. April 6. The show runs April 6 to 30. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. WHERE: Five Civilized Tribes Museum, 1101 Honor Heights Drive. ADMISSION: Adults, $3; Seniors (62+), $2; Students, $1.50; and chil-

sculpture, pottery, basketry, textiles and jewelry, in addition to other cultural art forms. Awards will be given in each division. The Best of Show award will be given to the entry which best reflects the culture and

dren under 5 are free. Group rates for 10 or more are available.

• • • WHAT: Art Under the Oaks Festival. WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 19 and 20. WHERE: Five Civilized Tribes Museum, 1101 Honor Heights Drive. ADMISSION: Free and open to the public.

tradition of the Five Tribes — Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole. “Award winning artists from across the United States will be entering their artwork,” Robinson

said. Museum visitors will have a chance to cast their vote for their favorite piece in the People’s Choice Award category. The show is judged by Master Artists of the Five Civilized Tribes Museum. The awards reception is scheduled for 2 p.m. April 6 in the museum art gallery. The art will be on display until April 30. “Art Under the Oaks Festival has been a weekend tourist destination for over 30 years,” Robinson said. The annual festival will be during the third weekend in April in conjunction with the Azalea Festival. This year’s event will be April 19 and 20. The fes-

tival is held on the museum’s lawn and will feature storytelling, demonstrators and dancers. The kid-friendly festival includes a “make and take” children’s booth with various crafts. Artists will exhibit and sell their latest creations. Traditional food will be available during the event. The weekend is geared for the family, and events are free to the public. A new edition to the festival will be The Cherokee Booger Dancers. “Their dance is a departure from the traditional ceremonial dances,” Robinson said. Children will be able to create their own version of the masks worn by the

dancers. Keetoowah storytellers, Choogie Kingfisher and Sequoyah Guess will be on hand to entertain the audience with traditional stories as told to them by their ancestors. Experienced craftsmen Noel Grayson and Mike Dart will demonstrate cultural crafts that have survived for centuries. Traditional choirs will perform on the Saturday of the festival. The annual festival is one of the many tourist attractions during the spring in Muskogee. “Each year, it continues to gain in popularity,” Robinson said. Reach E.I. Hillin at (918) 684-2926 or ehillin @muskogeephoenix.com.

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Muskogee Phoenix

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Honor Heights city’s premiere park

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Muskogee Phoenix

Chili, barbecue event brings ‘new, fun ideas’ By Anita Reding

By Cathy Spaulding Phoenix Staff Writer

What began as a weedy, “unkempt” hill has become Muskogee’s showplace of azaleas, butterflies, Christmas lights and recreation. Honor Heights Park — 102 hilly acres of splendor — might very well be the very reason Muskogee has an annual azalea festival. But it is so much more than azaleas, city parks officials say. The park began in 1909 when the city bought 40 acres from the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, said Assistant Muskogee Parks Director Rick Ewing.

The Muskogee Daily Phoenix apparently was not impressed. Ewing quoted from a 1909 issue of the paper: “Honor Heights was covered with an indiscriminate growth of tall weeds. The road leading to the hill was unkempt and there was a total lack of decorative foliage anywhere on the hill.” George Palmer changed all that when he became Honor Heights head gardener in 1910 and the city’s parks director in 1912. “He was park superintendent from 1912 to 1944 and he never missed a day of work,” Ewing said. “He

laid the roadways and the flower beds.” Palmer also designed the waterfall and rock walkways that go down the hill, Ewing said. The Works Progress Administration, a Depression era relief agency, built chimneys and picnic tables during the 1930s, he said. Even then, Honor Heights had a grand reputation. “In 1935, the park won an America the Beautiful contest from ‘Better Homes and Gardens,” he said. When Art Johnson became park director in 1948, public demands of

parks began to change, Ewing said. That was the start of the post-World War II Baby Boom. “He wanted it to be more of a recreation facility, not just a place to look at flowers,” Ewing said, adding that Johnson wanted more color, not the intricate English gardens Palmer favored. Honor Heights’ first azaleas came in 1951. “Someone brought azaleas from her husband’s funeral and she didn’t know what to do with them, so she gave them to Art,” Ewing said. The park began attracting tour buses. Such popularity resulted in the city’s

first Azalea Festival in April 1968. Johnson remained with the city until 1977. Since then, the park went through many changes. The park added paved trails and primitive trails. “Recreational needs of people have changed considerably. People don’t spend much time driving and looking at flowers anymore,” said Ewing. “They will look at Christmas lights, though.” Ewing said the park began its annual Garden of Lights in December 1992, about a year after he became parks superintendent. Honor Heights Park

continues to evolve, attracting a new generation of visitors with a splash pad and arboretum. The Papilion, which opened in 2013, features a butterfly house and a variety of raised flower beds. It now is the park’s main venue for festivals and concerts. In December, a temporary ice skating rink was added to complement the Garden of Lights. The city now plans to install a new “naturethemed” playground at the park. Reach Cathy Spaulding at (918) 684-2928 or cspaulding@muskogee phoenix.com.

Bare Bones Film Festival turns 15 this year By Anita Reding Phoenix Staff Writer

Special photo by John Hasler

Kim Chapuis, left, and another competitor take off at the start of the 2013 Muskogee Run 5K.

Run name recent, history long By Travis Sloat Phoenix Staff Writer

Martin Updike said the newly christened Muskogee Run has had many names in the past. “It was born out of the Azalea 5K,” Updike said. “That went on for 15 years or so, and if you go back

before that it was a Rotary Run. But it’s only been the Muskogee Run for the last four years.” The Muskogee Run will take place at 8 a.m. April 12 at Honor Heights Park, and will consist of a Onemile Fun Run, a 5K and (See RUN, Page 10)

Filmmakers from several states and countries are in Muskogee and are participating in the Bare Bones International Film & Music Festival. This year’s festival — the 15th annual – began April 3 and will continue through April 13. Approximately 300 films were chosen to be included in this year’ s festival, and filmmakers from approximately 40 states and several foreign countries are participating, said Oscar Ray. He and his wife, ShIronbutterfly Ray, began the festival 15 years ago as a gathering of independent filmmakers. “Usually we show about 200 movies in the down-

town area,” Oscar Ray said. “Some of the movies will be shown online.” In addition to screenings of a variety of independent films, the festival features seminars, symposiums, workshop and roundtable discussions, Ray said. The experience level among the films makers at the local festival ranges from “the newbie, the person who has never done anything, to the person who has been working for Disney for 40 years and decided to make their own movie,” Ray explained. “We try to design our festival so that instead of just folks that want to show movies, we also have this tremendous amount of seminars and symposiums and conversation about how to make a movie, how to consider making a movie

If you go WHAT: Bare Bones International Film and Music Festival WHERE: Various times and locations around Muskogee. See website for schedule. WHEN: Began April 3, continues through Sunday. INFORMATION: www.barebonesfilmfestival.org or (918) 616-1263. SCHEDULE: TBA TICKETS: TBA

for an audience that they may not have thought about beyond just their story,” he said. On the final night of the festival, April 13, awards in 27 categories will be presented during an awards dinner at the Music Hall of Fame. Although awards will be

presented, camaraderie among the filmmakers makes the Bare Bones International Film & Music Festival unique, Ray said. Participants are told upfront that they are participating in the festival as comrades, not competitors, he said, adding that they are told that during the 10days of the festival, they are not competing, they are to learn from each other. The local festival has become known as the “world’s friendliest film festival,” he said. During the festival in Muskogee, filmmakers are provided with training about what’s required to make an independent film with the smaller budgets, and how the process works on a major studio set, (See BONES, Page 10)

Sunday, March 30, 2014 — Page 9

Phoenix Staff Writer

Organizers of the annual Muskogee Exchange Club’s Chili and Barbecue Cook-Off continue to add events and see more individuals compete and participate. This year is the 30th annual event, and more than 100 teams are expected to compete this year, said Robert Smith, chairman. “Every year, we’re bringing new, fun ideas to the cook-off,” Smith said. Approximately 20,000 participants attend the annual event. “The event provides “fun for the entire family,” Smith said. The cook-off will be held at the Civic Center Market Square Festival Area, Fifth and Boston streets, beginning at 11:30 a.m., at the conclusion of the annual

Azalea Festival Parade, Smith said. Cooking teams will be competing for several awards, and spectators are invited to sample chili, brisket, ribs, chicken and other foods. Each taster kit can be purchased for $10, or two can be purchased for $15. Dennis Brown of Muskogee is a member of “The Rattlers” cook team, which includes employees of Diamond Back Steel Inc. The employees’ family members also help during the day. “I just love barbecuing and associating with all the people you see once a year,” he said. Brown has been a member of the team for 10 years. The team has won several awards in individual food categories — including first place and second place on chicken and third place on brisket. “This year, we’re trying to win

it all,” he said. The Rattlers team competes in the barbecue contests annually, and team members also cook between two and five gallons of chili just to give to the spectators as they pass by with their taster kits, he said. The Exchange Club also is bringing The Express Personnel world famous Express Clydesdales, ambassadors for Express Employment Professionals, to Muskogee this year. They will be part of the grand marshal entry for the parade and also will be available for pictures in the Kids Zone area after the parade, Smith said. The Exchange Club’s annual event is for the entire family, and there will be a variety of other activities in the Kids’ Zone, including inflatables, pony and camel rides.

There will also be a youth cooking competition. The Youth Chillin-n-Grillin Youth Cook-off will be for junior cooks in grades 3-12. The young cooks in the cook-off will be challenged to create a grilled hamburger patty. Festivities will begin on April 11 with a kick-off party scheduled from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. outside the Muskogee Civic Center. The concert by Rock Show of Tulsa and party is open to the public (21 and over), free of charge, Smith said. Individuals also can contact The Exchange Club for VIP tickets. Food and beverages will be available for sale, he added. Proceeds from the annual Chili & Barbecue Chili Cook-off will benefit Kids’ Space, Court Appointed Special Advocates (See CHILI, Page 10)

If you go WHAT: Muskogee Exchange Club’s Chili and Barbecue CookOff kick-off party. WHEN: 7 to 11 p.m. WHERE: Civic Center Market Square Festival Area, Fifth and Boston streets. WHO: Open to the public, 21 and over. COST: Free admission or call. Muskogee VIP tickets are available for purchase. (918) 8690733, or muskogee_exchange@yahoo.co m.

• • • WHAT: Muskogee Exchange Club’s Chili and Barbecue CookOff WHEN: 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. WHERE: Civic Center Market Square Festival Area, Fifth and Boston streets. COST: Taster kits, $10 for one, $15 for 2.

Art Under the Oaks offers focus on Native culture, fine art By E.I. Hillin Phoenix Staff Writer

Two more opportunities to celebrate the spring season in Muskogee will take place at the annual Art Under the Oaks Festival and Art Show. “The focus is culture and fine art,” said Five Civilized Tribes Museum Director Mary Robinson. The two events include the competitive art show and the market festival. “Our focus is protecting and preserving the culture and traditions of the Five Tribes from the Southeast through art and artifacts, Robinson said. The art show showcases work from Southeast woodland artists and features paintings, drawings,

If you go WHAT: Art Under the Oaks Competitive Art Show. WHEN: Opening reception is 2 p.m. April 6. The show runs April 6 to 30. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. WHERE: Five Civilized Tribes Museum, 1101 Honor Heights Drive. ADMISSION: Adults, $3; Seniors (62+), $2; Students, $1.50; and chil-

sculpture, pottery, basketry, textiles and jewelry, in addition to other cultural art forms. Awards will be given in each division. The Best of Show award will be given to the entry which best reflects the culture and

dren under 5 are free. Group rates for 10 or more are available.

• • • WHAT: Art Under the Oaks Festival. WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 19 and 20. WHERE: Five Civilized Tribes Museum, 1101 Honor Heights Drive. ADMISSION: Free and open to the public.

tradition of the Five Tribes — Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole. “Award winning artists from across the United States will be entering their artwork,” Robinson

said. Museum visitors will have a chance to cast their vote for their favorite piece in the People’s Choice Award category. The show is judged by Master Artists of the Five Civilized Tribes Museum. The awards reception is scheduled for 2 p.m. April 6 in the museum art gallery. The art will be on display until April 30. “Art Under the Oaks Festival has been a weekend tourist destination for over 30 years,” Robinson said. The annual festival will be during the third weekend in April in conjunction with the Azalea Festival. This year’s event will be April 19 and 20. The fes-

tival is held on the museum’s lawn and will feature storytelling, demonstrators and dancers. The kid-friendly festival includes a “make and take” children’s booth with various crafts. Artists will exhibit and sell their latest creations. Traditional food will be available during the event. The weekend is geared for the family, and events are free to the public. A new edition to the festival will be The Cherokee Booger Dancers. “Their dance is a departure from the traditional ceremonial dances,” Robinson said. Children will be able to create their own version of the masks worn by the

dancers. Keetoowah storytellers, Choogie Kingfisher and Sequoyah Guess will be on hand to entertain the audience with traditional stories as told to them by their ancestors. Experienced craftsmen Noel Grayson and Mike Dart will demonstrate cultural crafts that have survived for centuries. Traditional choirs will perform on the Saturday of the festival. The annual festival is one of the many tourist attractions during the spring in Muskogee. “Each year, it continues to gain in popularity,” Robinson said. Reach E.I. Hillin at (918) 684-2926 or ehillin @muskogeephoenix.com.

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Run Continued from Page 8

the 15K run, featuring the infamous “Chickenwing Hill,” so named after an event worker decided to serve chicken wings to runners as they crested the highest peak during the run. Updike, the race director, said this year they were going to wait until the end of the race to serve the chicken wings. “What we’re doing this year is offering free chili tasting kits to the first six people who reach the top of the hill,” he said. “Then we’ll be raffling off more kits at the end of the race. We think the race fits in nicely with the Chili CookOff. We’re marketing it as one of the many events of

the Azalea Festival.” Updike also said what makes the run special is the inclusion of a 15K event. “We’re one of the few people in the area who offer that,” Updike said. “We think that allows us to draw from a wide pool of runners who are interested in going that distance. It’s also a USA Track & Field sanctioned and certified event.” Approximately 180 runners competed in the races last year. The event is also two weeks from the Oklahoma City Marathon, and Updike said he hopes some runners would use the Muskogee Run as their final training run before the half or full marathon. “We’re hoping to grow this year,” Updike said. “Over 200 people would be a good turnout, but we can

Muskogee Phoenix

If you go WHAT: Muskogee Run. WHERE: Honor Heights Park. WHEN: 8 a.m. April 12. COST: Register before April 4, $35 for the 15K; $25 for the 5K; $20 for the One-mile Fun Run. Register after April 4, $40 for the 15K; $30 for the 5K; $25 for the One-mile Fun Run. INFORMATION: Register online at www.themuskogeerun. eventbrite.com.

easily accommodate 300 runners. Hopefully, we get those numbers.” Updike said the 5K course is relatively flat, and is done west of Honor Heights Park. The 15K is flat as well, but with a few challenging hills. “It’s a really pretty course,” he said. “I’d say it’s moderately challenging. It’s a route that takes

you some places where not a lot of people have probably gone, even those who live here. Last year was our first year for the 15K, and all the runners had good things to say about it.” The more you participate in local runs, the more you’ll get to know other local runners, Updike said. “We think this is going to be an enjoyable event, Updike said. “It’s a great way to spend a Saturday morning. It’s a nice event for anyone who wants to walk, jog or run. There’s something for everybody, and you get a nice shirt as well. We really want people to start signing up for this. April is a great time of year, and it’ll be a beautiful setting. Reach Travis Sloat at (918) 684-2908 or tsloat @muskogeephoenix.com.

2014 Spring Visitors Guide

Chili Continued from Page 9

(CASA), and the Muskogee Exchange Club’s Shoe and Coat fund, Smith said. “We have given away

Bones Continued from Page 8

which is different, Ray said. Opportunities to provide information to students and to help individuals in need are also part of the festival, Ray said. The festival provides independent filmmakers the opportunity to meet with students at area schools and provide

over $1 million to local children’s charities over the past 30 years,” he added. Arvest Bank is the presenting sponsor for the cook-off, Smith said. Reach Anita Reding at (918) 684-2903 or areding @muskogeephoenix.com. information movies and movie production. Bare Bones focuses on providing to individuals less fortunate in the community, and sponsors several drives that provide food and other items for WISH House and homeless shelters. “The festival makes an emphasis of that,” Ray said. All of the events of the festival are open to the community, Ray said. Reach Anita Reding at (918) 684-2903 or areding @muskogeephoenix.com.

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about some of the quilts she’s entering. She recalled finding a quilt top her mother made out of salt sacks. “This quilt top was 68 years old, but it has never been quilted,” she said. “Some people have quilts made out of feed sacks.” Lisa Totty of Morris said she is entering a wall hanging depicting a special friendship. “I made it for a friend, it shows three little girls,” Totty said. “Three of us work at Edward Jones. There’s a Tammie girl, a Caroline girl and a Lisa girl.” She said she made quilted wall hangings to give to each friend and is entering one quilt in the show. Totty said she also is entering a “comforter quilt to take to my son’s ball games.”

Muskogee Phoenix

The quilt is done in the colors of Labette Community College in Kansas, where her son plays baseball. The quilt show has attracted entries from Arkansas and “all over northeast Oklahoma,” Haxton said. The show will offer ribbons for best quilts. “Not all quilts in the show have to be judged,” Haxton said. “The critiques are always very positive. If the quilts are judged, people do like to see ribbons on them.” Bartlesville quilter and lecturer Lerlene Nevaril will judge the show, Haxton said. Nevaril conducts workshops and lectures and has written several books on quilting. “We will have demonstrations every hour,” Haxton said. The show also will feature a boutique and a silent auction, she said. Reach Cathy Spaulding at (918) 684-2928 or cspaulding@muskogee phoenix.com.

Sunday, March 30, 2014 — Page 7

Staff photo by Cathy Spaulding

Brenda Haxton of the Muskogee Quilters Guild sets up a quilt display at Muskogee Public Library. The Guild will have a drawing for the quilt at its Quilt Show in April.

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M USKOGEE M USEUM E VENTS S UMMER A CTIVITY G UIDE 2014

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Quilters stitch stories through work By Cathy Spaulding

If that’s true, the halls of St. Paul United Methodist Church will Stitched inside every brim with stories April 11 quilt is a story to be told, and 12. quilters say. The Muskogee Quilters Phoenix Staff Writer

Guild’s annual Quilt Show will feature around 100 entries in 12 categories. They include machinequilted and pieced, handquilted and pieced, wall

hangings, miniatures, If you go mixed techniques and group quilting. WHAT: Muskogee Quilters Guild Quilt Show. Quilt show chair Brenda WHEN: 9 a.m. to 4 Haxton said the show also p.m. April 11 and 12. will feature categories for WHERE: St. Paul youth and first-time quilUnited Methodist Church, ters. 2130 W. Okmulgee Ave. Visitors also might be ADMISSION: $5. able to read stories about many of the quilts, Haxton entering the show to put said. “We always want people stories with each quilt,”

she said. “They almost always have one. Maybe someone found grandma’s quilt blocks in a trunk somewhere. I always enjoy reading about how they came to make the quilt, what was special about it, what was the pattern and the like.” Haxton has stories

ety of celebrations in our community and in this area,” he said. “The things people do from holidays, churches, schools and from different ethnic backgrounds. It’s a celebration of all the different things people bring into the mix that is the Muskogee community.” According to the parade application, entrants will consist of civic clubs, dance units, pageant

kings and queens, churches, schools, politicians and more. Everett said there was a “wide variety” of entries. “The entries you see in these parades show the diversity and the talents that are right here under our noses that we don’t think about,” Everett said. “It might be anything from building a classic car in your garage, which is amazing, to being in a band or a talent show or a beauty contest. And this year running for office.” Everett also said one of the exciting things about the parade for him is seeing the wealth of community involvement. “All of the things you don’t think about, you come to one place downtown as a community and it kind of blows your mind,” he said.” You get to see what’s going on with the Shriners and the local schools. There are people dancing and playing music. That’s the spice of life — seeing all the different talents and passions that we as a community have.” Reach Travis Sloat at (918) 684-2908 or tsloat @muskogeephoenix.com.

Parade Continued from Page 2

North High School in the Edmond School District. Everett, the special projects manager for the Muskogee Parks and Recreation Office, said the parade theme would be “Celebrations.” “It emphasizes the vari033000354305

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(See QUILTERS, Page 7)

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CALENDAR

Powwow connects visitors to tradition

Arts MUSKOGEE ART GUILD JUDGED ART SHOW AND SALE, April 5 through 12, Arrowhead Mall. The event is open to the public. Categories: Oil/acrylic on canvas; canvas board; masonite or wood; watercolor/acrylic on paper; drawing — pastels, charcoal, pencil, pen and ink or monoprints; mixed media; photography and threedimensional free standing art. Information and registration: (918) 683-4200 or (918) 9311981. ART SHOW AND SALE, April 6 through 30, Five Civilized Tribes Museum. Information: (877) 587-4237. ARTISTS’ RECEPTION, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 12, The Gallery Downtown. Meet and greet with artists displaying in the gallery. ART UNDER THE OAKS, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 19 and 20, Five Civilized Tribes Museum. Handmade arts and crafts, food and entertainment. Information: (877) 5874237.

Events HISTORIC NEIGHBORHOOD WALKING TOUR, 4 p.m. March 29, Beckman Park. Join a group tour for an afternoon stroll through the Founders’ Place and Kendall Place Historic Districts of Muskogee. Walk along Silk Stocking Lane where the city's founders built their finest homes. Cost: $5 (cash only). Wear comfortable shoes and clothing appropriate for the weather. Information: okieheritage.com. DAFFODIL DAY AND TEA, March 29, ThomasForeman Historic Home. Cost: $5, which includes tea and home tour. The Muskogee Garden Club has planted 1,500 daffodils in the

By E.I. Hillin

Phoenix Staff Writer

Special photo by John Hasler

A family pauses for portraits in front of azaleas blooming in Honor Heights Park during last year’s Azalea Festival. Thomas-Foreman Historic Home gardens. For $10 you can start your tour at Three Rivers Museum, 220 Elgin St., and take a trolley from there to the Thomas-Foreman Home to enjoy a plant sale, spring daffodils and a tea provided by Muskogee Garden Club members. 30TH ANNUAL AZALEA PAGEANT, March 29, Roxy Theatre. The pageant is held each year and is open to girls from birth to 18 years. Winners will receive crowns, banners, and trophies and will be eligible to ride in the Azalea Parade. Information: Debbie Morgan, (918) 4632693. MUSKOGEE RUN, 8 a.m. April 12, Honor Heights Park. Information and registration: www.themuskogeerun.eventb rite.com. AZALEA-FEST CRAFT SHOW, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 12, VFW Post 474, 3811 W. Okmulgee Ave. Information

and applications: (918) 6868005. PARTY IN THE PARK, 1:30 to 6:30 p.m., April 19, The Papilion, Honor Heights Park. Tasting of Oklahoma wines and beer and food from Muskogee-area restaurants. Music by NSU Jazz Ensemble. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door; includes tasting glass. Proceeds benefit Turn Wine into Water. Information: (918) 680-1239. 31ST ANNUAL QUICHE AND SALAD LUNCHEON AND BAKE SALE, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 24, St. Joseph Church Parish. A variety of delicious salads, quiche and a drink. Cost: $7. Homemade baked goods for sale. Information: (918) 616-7956. A NIGHT IN THE TROPICS, 6 p.m. June 21, Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame. A fundraiser benefiting the Kelly B. Todd Cerebral Palsy and Neuro-Muscular

Center. The menu: Whole roasted hog; a variety of island side dishes and tropical drinks. Dancing will be led by Randy McBride. Silent and live auctions available. Seating is limited. Information and reservations: (918) 6834621.

Festivals 15th ANNUAL BARE BONES INTERNATIONAL INDEPENDENT FILM & MUSIC FESTIVAL, April 3 through 13. Headquarters: Studio Broadway, 213 W. Broadway. Information: (918) 608-5394.

Parades AZALEA FESTIVAL PARADE, 11 a.m. April 12, downtown Muskogee. Theme: Celebrations. No entry fees. Information: (918) 684-6302, ext. 28.

Sunrise Ross attended many powwows during her early years. “You watch it, you’re around it, you become part of it,” Ross said. Ross of Coweta will be Head Lady Dancer at the ninth annual Azalea Powwow, scheduled for 2 to 10 p.m. April 19 at the Muskogee Civic Center. Powwow visitors will have the chance to explore a variety of Native American traditions. A dance contest will be held. Gourd dancing and tribal music will take place throughout the day. “I’ve grown up around the powwow arena,” said Ross, of Muscogee (Creek) and Otoe Missouri descent. “My grandfather was an emcee to many powwows.” Ross’ immersion into the culture of dancing from an early age has stayed with her. She has passed it down to her children. “I started dancing at an early age,” Ross said. “I remember taking my kids into the arena when they were really young.” Ross will be performing the Southern Cloth style of dancing. Other women’s dancing styles include buckskin, fancy shawl and jingle dress. “Southern Cloth is a simple, meek, graceful dance style,” she said. Head Man Dancer will be Larry Tsosie, a member of the Kiowa and Navajo tribes. Men’s dance styles will include traditional, straight, fancy and grass. The “tiny tots” also will have their chance to show their unique dancing style. The Azalea Powwow has become one of the highlights of the Muskogee area’s spring events. “We started out very

If you go WHAT: Ninth annual Azalea Powwow. WHEN: 2 to 10 p.m. April 19. WHERE: Muskogee Civic Center, 425 Boston St. INFORMATION: Charlene Allen, (918) 3515892 or Joyce Deere, (918) 230-4734. ADMISSION: $3. SCHEDULE: Gourd Dancing, 2-5 p.m. Dinner Break, 5-6 p.m. Gourd Dancing, 6-7 p.m. Grand Entry, 7 p.m.

small at St. Paul (United) Methodist, and it’s expanded each year,” said Fife Indian United Methodist Church board chairperson Cheryl Hensley. Fife and the city of Muskogee Multicultural Division will host the annual Azalea Powwow. “We have honored guests coming — Miss Indian Oklahoma, Robynn Rulo, and Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, Nikki Amos,” Hensley said. Edwin Marshall, public relations manager for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, will be the master of ceremonies for the powwow. Marshall is looking forward to participants and visitors from all over Oklahoma, he said. The projected attendance is in the thousands. “It’s an honor being associated in the head staff with other very distinguished individuals in the Indian Country,” Marshall said. Head Gourd Dancer for the powwow is Ira Kauley, Kiowa, and Head Singer is Kinsel Lieb, Ponca. Reach E.I. Hillin at (918) 684-2926 or ehillin @muskogeephoenix.com.

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Special photo by John Hasler

A group of 80s rockers march in the 2013 Azalea Parade. This year the parade steps off at 11 a.m. April 12 with the state teacher of the year as grand marshal.

Azalea Parade to bring surprises State teacher of the year to serve as grand marshal

surprise or two,” Everett If you go said. “There will be a big surprise right at the front WHAT: Azalea Parade. of the WHEN: 11 a.m. April 12. parade. It’ll WHERE: Downtown be a nice By Travis Sloat Muskogee on Okmulgee addition and Phoenix Staff Writer Avenue and Broadway. it’s someINFORMATION: (918) thing we’ve Joel Everett said there 684-6302, ext. 1473. never done was a big surprise in store Markes before.” for the viewers of this The 2014 year’s Azalea Parade. “There’s going to be a parade will start at 11 a.m. April 12 and will traverse Okmulgee Avenue and Broadway. This year’s grand marLooking for a Good Job? shal will be Oklahoma State Teacher of the Year Questions you should ask your Peter Markes of Edmond. prospective employer... Markes is an eighththrough 12th-grade string Will you guarantee me a pay raise every year? Will you The Air Force can orchestra and Advanced provide free medical and dental care for me? Will you answer “YES” to all these questions! furnish my housing or give me extra tax-free money for Placement music theory Can your prospective rent? If I want to continue my education, will you pay teacher from Edmond employer? 100% of my tuition? If I get married, will you increase my pay? Can I retire from your company after 20 years and receive a monthly income for the rest of my life? Is the training your company provides college accredited? 033010076201

For more information contact SSgt Gale Air Force Recruiting Office 501 Main St., Muskogee 918-682-1397 or 918-381-9624 roger.gale@us.af.mil

(See PARADE, Page 4)

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A teen photographs her friends as they pose in spring finery in front of azaleas in Honor Heights Park.

muskogeephoenix.com

Special photo by Mandy Lundy


Muskogee Spring Visitors Guide 2014