Issuu on Google+

Docked offshore the Tanzanian coasts, the Zanzibar isle fosters a romantic and mysterious atmosphere inherited from African, Arab and European influences. The promise of an exotic journey on a legendary island, which to this day hides many secrets.

Zanzibar, the Treasure Island. Photos and texte ŠMarc Dozier/LightMediation Contact - Thierry Tinacci - LightMediation Photo Agency +33 (0)6 61 80 57 21 thierry@lightmediation.com


1930-06: Stone Town district, Hurumzi street which leads to the sea front, Nassoro Mohamed Issa


1930-01: Jambiani, small boats rigged with a typical Latin sail called mtumbwi and sterred by sea men Sadik, Muhamedi and Bura

1930-02: Town of Zanzibar, Stone Town district, Sultan J Mugheiry, an old Zanzibarite seaman taking a stroll in front of the famous sculpted wooden door in Sokomuogo street

1930-03: Stone Town district, Emerson & Green Hotel (236 Hurumzi street), the bedroom Ball Room

1930-04: Kizimkazi, Mirhab of the mosque, muezzin Youssouf Ashkina reading the Koran, Islamic calligraphy attesting the Persian settling to Zanzibar in the 12th century


1930-05: Jambiani, Simni Abdula Idi collecting seaweeds(Euchema Spinosum et E Cottinii) exported and used in the making of numerous products

1930-06: Stone Town district, Hurumzi street which leads to the sea front, Nassoro Mohamed Issa

1930-07: Matemwe, traditional Arab sailing vessels, called dhows, gone fishing in the lagoon

1930-08: Kizimbani, spices freshly collected : pepper, cardamome, cinnamon, curry, ginger, clove, nutmeg


1930-15: Stone Town, Forodhani gardens, late afternoon, teenagers gather on the sea front


1930-09: Changuu island, to the north-east of Unguja island (Zanzibar), giant tortoise (Geochelone Elephantopis Vandenburghi) whose first specimens were imported from the Seychelles in the 18th century

1930-10: Jambiani, Ibada Mohamed Rajab planting stakes to which seaweeds are attached (Euchema Spinosum et E Cottinii) harvested, exported for the making of numerous products

1930-11: Town of Zanzibar, Stone Town district, Afro Ramla beauty salon, Hurunzi street, Shekha Mohamed Juma draws a henna motif on Mayala Saleh Abdalloa 's palm

1930-12: Mafia island, to the south of Unguja island, small islet (aerial view)


1930-13: Town of Zanzibar, Stone Town district, classified as World Heritage by UNESCO, small street on the sea front in front of the People 's House and the Palace Museum

1930-14: Stone Town district, Sultan J Mugheiry and his nephew Said Salim playing draughts in the street

1930-15: Stone Town, Forodhani gardens, late afternoon, teenagers gather on the sea front

1930-16: Stone Town, Darajani market, shop Jusa, spices which makes the reputation of the Spice Island : yellow curry, cardamon, cumin, and black pepper


1930-38: Stone Town, site of the former slave market, monument built in 1998 to the memory of the slaves packed in the caves of the market


1930-17: Stone Town, Myriam Bakari on the phone observing the street from the old dispensary 's window

1930-18: Jozani forest, red colobus monkey with young (endemic monkey species)

1930-19: Jambiani, small boats rigged with a typical Latin sail called mtumbwi and sterred by sea men Sadik, Muhamedi and Bura

1930-20: Zanzibar, Stone Town district, mother and daughter waiting for the bus


1930-21: Mafia island, to the south of Unguja island, former trading post between Kilwa and Zanzibar (aerial view)

1930-22: Town of Zanzibar, Catholic church

1930-23: Chwaka Bay beach at low tide

1930-24: Zanzibar, Stone Town district, children on bicyles riding in front of the Museum Palace, Mizingani street, on the sea front


1930-11: Town of Zanzibar, Stone Town district, Afro Ramla beauty salon, Hurunzi street, Shekha Mohamed Juma draws a henna motif on Mayala Saleh Abdalloa 's palm


1930-25: Stone Town district, classified as World Heritage by UNESCO, Peace Memorial Museum, small scaled reproduction of Aya Sofia in Istanbul

1930-26: Stone Town district, a dhow (typical Arab sailing vessel)

1930-27: Jambiani, Simni Abdula Idi collecting seaweeds(Euchema Spinosum et E Cottinii) exported and used in the making of numerous products

1930-28: Stone Town, Mahurubi Palace, built in 1880 by Sultan Bargash, Muhd Keis Omar, Mkenya Magogu and Ali Omar Mohd discussing


1930-29: Nungwi, Mnarani aquarium, hawksbill sea turtle

1930-30: Kidichi, Sisso Kassim Saleh waiting for visitors in the Persian baths, built in 1847 by Sultan Seyyid Bin Said

1930-31: Stone Town, Forodhani gardens, late afternoon, teenagers gather on the sea front

1930-32: Stone Town, Darajani market, spices


1930-43: Matemwe, Makame Hamadi coming back from fishing


1930-33: Stone Town, Wafwa Koranic school, Mohamed Mlenge and Ali Nbarouk reading the Koran

1930-34: Pwani Mchangani Mdogo, beach of Blue Bay hotel

1930-35: Stone Town, Sokomuogo street, famous sculpted door

1930-36: Stone Town, Darajani market


1930-37: Matemwe, Makame Hamadi, fisherman with only a harpoon, signal buoy and a diving mask

1930-38: Stone Town, site of the former slave market, monument built in 1998 to the memory of the slaves packed in the caves of the market

1930-39: Chwaka Bay, facing Michamvi beach, captain Juma Ame Shaali and his assistant Habibu Mselemu Haji fishing on a dhow (traditional Arab sailing vessel)

1930-40: Mafia island, to the south of Unguja island, small islet (aerial view)


1930-48: Stone Town, Wafwa Koranic school, teacher Salum Machano Mwadini in a madrasah


1930-41: Matemwe, fisherman Makame Hamadi

1930-42: Stone Town, Catholic church

1930-43: Matemwe, Makame Hamadi coming back from fishing

1930-44: Stone Town, Wafwa Koranic school, teacher Salum Machano Mwadini in a madrasahh


1930-45: Stone Town, Forodhani gardens, late afternoon, teenagers gather on the sea front

1930-46: Stone Town, young Amina

1930-47: Jozani forest, Zala (Zanzibar Land Animal Park), chameleon

1930-48: Stone Town, Wafwa Koranic school, teacher Salum Machano Mwadini in a madrasah


1930-53: Stone Town, Emerson & Green Hotel (236 Hurumzi street), the most romantic hotel of the world according to the American press


1930-49: Stone Town, Hurumzi street which leads to the sea front, Nassoro Mohamed Issa

1930-50: Stone Town, Forodhani gardens, late afternoon, teenagers gather on the sea front

1930-51: Stone Town, Darajani market, spices

1930-52: Mahonda, Ally Kondo on a dhow (typical Arab sailing vessel)


1930-65: Stone Town, hôtel Emerson & Green (236 de la rue Hurumzi) qualifié d' hôtel le plus romantique du monde par la presse américaine///Stone Town, Emerson & Green Hotel (236 Hurumzi street), the most

1930-54: Baie de Chwaka, face à la plage de Michamvi, le capitaine Juma Ame Shaali et son assistant Habibu Mselemu Haji pêchent à bord d'un dhow (boutre traditionnel)///Chwaka Bay, facing Michamvi

1930-55: Stone Town, rue Sokomuogo, porte sculptée très connue///Stone Town, Sokomuogo street, famous sculpted door

1930-56: Pwani Mchangani Mdogo, plage de l' hôtel Blue Bay///Pwani Mchangani Mdogo, beach of Blue Bay hotel


1930-25: Stone Town district, classified as World Heritage by UNESCO, Peace Memorial Museum, small scaled reproduction of Aya Sofia in Istanbul


1930-57: Stone Town, beach in front of Tembo House hotel

1930-58: Stone Town, classified as World Heritage by UNESCO, Mbweni ruins, old school for girls, Sainte Marie (1873)

1930-59: Matemwe, fisherman Makame Hamadi

1930-60: Stone Town, Emerson & Green Hotel, 236 Hurumzi street, Ball Room bedroom


1930-61: Chwaka Bay, a dhow (traditional Arab sailing vessel)

1930-62: Stone Town, Sultan J Mugheiry, an old Zanzibarite seaman taking a stroll in front of the famous sculpted wooden door in Sokomuogo street

1930-63: Mahonda, Mussa Hassan Ame and Ally Kondo fishing with pots

1930-64: Stone Town, Samia Self and Myriam Bakari


1930-17: Stone Town, Myriam Bakari on the phone observing the street from the old dispensary 's window


Zanzibar, the Treasure Island.

Even the superb Emerson & Green hotel, setup in an old Zanzibar house, which was labeled with the highly deserved superlative "most romantic hotel in the world". In the streets, the haloed manifestation of veiled Muslim women and men in long white dresses, contribute to this unique atmosphere where Swahili, African and European cultures blend.

Docked offshore the Tanzanian coasts, the Zanzibar isle fosters a romantic and mysterious atmosphere inherited from African, Arab and European influences. The promise of an exotic journey on a legendary island, which to this day hides many secrets.

Multi cultured, the island hence seems to foster its mysteries and protect amazing treasures. In the northwest of Stone Town, the Changuu islet thus hosts an astonishing colony of giant turtles imported from the Seychelles in the 18th century. Inland, the plantations of spices, clove, cinnamon, green pepper or nutmeg, unveil all their flavors and the art of the culture of spices. Further off, the Jozani forest hosts a natural reserve where a colony of apes permanently resides, the red colobus, which could never be implanted away from Zanzibar. On the east coast of the isle, women also grow strange marine gardens where they collect seaweeds during low tide, which will be used for the making of numerous products such as shoes or candies.

Named the "Pearl of East Africa", Zanzibar is one of those legendary islands, which could easily be thought of as an imaginary land. It however does exist at the heart of the Indian Ocean offshore the Tanzania coasts. Here, the turquoise sea unfolds a carpet of wonderful beaches, blinding with its clear sand, piqued with lanky coconut trees and small fishermen villages. In Jambiana, Kiwengwa or Nungwi, the majestic sailboats, the dhows that return with the tide to unload the day's catch, are reminiscent of the historical trade path that once linked India, Arabia and Eastern Africa. Wealthy and coveted by Omanis and Europeans, Zanzibar was indeed up to the 19th century the meeting grounds for the slaves and lucrative spices trade that made the island rich. Witness to these ancient times both violent and prestigious, Stone Town, the island capital listed in 2000 on Unesco's World Heritage, inherited the charm of this romantic decadence. Delicately sculpted age-old doors, old Arab sultans palaces, decaying colonial churches, narrow lanes and afro-oriental style houses? The entire city reeks of a charming obsolescence.

At the south end, the village of Kizimkazi shelters the ruins of a small discreet 11th century mosque, deemed the oldest in Eastern Africa. With its glorious and bloody historical past, its unique nature and age-old blended culture, Zanzibar thus continues to protect again in spite of all, its treasure island secrets.


Zanzibar: l'île aux trésors.-French text«Depuis qu'il a quitté Zanzibar en mars, on est sans nouvelle de David Livingstone », feint de s'inquiéter le guide Taïd Mazouhrgui devant le public de voyageurs, pour donner plus de force à son récit historique. « Envoyé en Afrique par la Société royale de géographie britannique afin de résoudre l'épineuse question des sources du Nil, l'aventurier missionnaire a disparu après avoir quitté l'île en avril 1866. Depuis, pas une dépêche n'est arrivée en trois ans pour rendre compte de son expédition à l'intérieur des terres de l'Afrique de l'Est. Qui sait s'il n'a pas été tué par des Zoulous ? » En Angleterre, le milieu du XIXe siècle et de la haute bourgeoisie anglaise voit ainsi se transformer le mystère des sources du Nil en une obscure énigme autour de la disparition de l'explorateur chevronné, célèbre pour son engagement contre l'esclavagisme, décoré par la Société de géographie et reçu par la reine avant son départ. En quête d'un scoop, le New York Herald mandate alors un jeune reporter du nom de Henry Stanley à la recherche de l'illustre aventurier. « Trouvez Livingstone ! » somme le journal dans un télégramme aussi sec que limpide. Le 28 octobre

1871, enfin, après des mois de recherches au plus profond du Continent noir, exténué par la marche et la faim, Stanley intimidé lance à celui qu'il rencontre dans le petit village de Ujiji : « Docteur Livingstone, je présume ? » Pleine de réserve et de tact, la phrase, devenue depuis célèbre, surprend le vieil homme blanc, barbu et amaigri, qui lui répond alors d'un « Oui » laconique en soulevant sa casquette et, du même coup, le voile de mystère qui entourait sa disparition. Rue Bububu, à la périphérie de Stone Town, la capitale de l'île, se dresse toujours la maison présentée comme celle de Livingstone, bien qu'il n'y séjournât que quelques semaines pour préparer sa dernière expédition en 1866. En débarquant à Zanzibar cette année-là, le missionnaire s'indigne de la situation de ses habitants : « Personne ne bénéficie ici d'un bon état de santé (...). La puanteur des entrepôts d'ordures sur la plage est horrible (...). On devrait l'appeler Stinkibar et non Zanzibar » écrit-il en jouant sur les mots, stink signifiant « puer » en anglais. Un siècle et demi plus tard, le terme de « Zanzibar », doux et rocailleux à la fois, ronronne aujourd'hui à l'oreille comme une étrange mélodie exotique, évocatrice d'une terre mythique que l'on placerait volontiers sur la carte des îles imaginaires si elle n'existait pas bel et bien au coeur de l'océan Indien, à l'est des côtes de la Tanzanie. Considéré comme fabuleux, Zanzibar désigne en effet un archipel bien réel qui regroupe une myriade d'îlots et deux îles principales : Pemba au nord et Unguja au sud, simplement surnommée par extension - et par facilité - Zanzibar. « L'île est minuscule et oubliée », concède avec le sourire Fauz M. Adbdailah, un petit hôtelier originaire d'Oman

...cependant elle est liée à tous les recoins du monde par son histoire commerciale extraordinaire. » Presque invisible sur les cartes mais bien connue des hommes de mer, Zanzibar fut, et reste aux coeurs des marins et marchands, l'épicentre d'une route commerciale historique qui reliait l'Inde, l'Arabie et l'Afrique de l'Est. Entre le XIIe et le XIXe siècle, les boutres voguaient alors de ports en ports, la cale pleine d'épices, d'or, d'ivoire... ou d'esclaves. Les grandes voiles latines triangulaires gonflées par le souffle du commerce et des vents de mousson parcouraient des milles avant de revenir s'approvisionner ou décharger à Zanzibar, connue comme l'un des ports les plus importants de l'océan Indien. Convoité par les grandes puissances, tour à tour aux mains des Omanais, des Portugais et des Anglais, l'île-État rayonna sur tout l'océan Indien, avant de décliner à la fin du XIXe siècle avec l'abolition de l'esclavage, l'interdiction du commerce de l'ivoire et, surtout, l'évolution de la marine marchande. Ici, sur cette terre d'un million d'habitants, que l'on surnomma « La perle de l'Afrique de l'Est », on vit maintenant pauvrement, de la pêche, de la culture des épices ou des algues organisées en jardin, et de plus en plus du tourisme. Les cargos, bananiers et autres rafiots des mers ont volé la vedette aux dhows, ces voiliers légendaires, en ne laissant dans leur sillage que le souvenir de ce passé florissant. Témoin de cet « autrefois » prestigieux, Stone Town, la capitale de l'île, classée en l'an 2000 au Patrimoine mondial de l'humanité, a hérité du charme de cette déliquescence romantique et superbe. Crépis décrépis, murs à la blancheur éteinte et façades poussiéreuses aux peintures fanées semblent soutenir les

demeures immenses, abandonnées ou habitées chichement. Dans la chaleur moite de la cité blafarde, les ruelles ombragées transpirent cette atmosphère décatie et exotique à la croisée des influences entre l'Afrique et l'Orient. La rencontre du monde bantou africain et des marchands indiens, arabes et perses donna ici naissance à la culture swahilie qui s'étend au Kenya, en Tanzanie et sur les archipels côtiers. Commerçante, musulmane et ouverte sur le monde, Zanzibar reste pourtant une île à la culture pudique, voilée derrière les lourdes portes sculptées qui font la renommée de Stone Town. Il faut accepter de se perdre dans le dédale des venelles ombragées de la cité-labyrinthe, pour trouver, comme par hasard, les portes les plus finement ciselées. Plus que de simples issues d'accès, elles symbolisent l'origine et l'opulence de leur propriétaire, cachant mille et une significations secrètes. Non loin du front de mer, la porte de la maison bâtie en 1309 par Armed Mohamed Almarijab, est l'une des plus - tristement célèbres. Surnommé Tippu Tip, ce dernier est en effet connu comme le plus grand marchand d'esclaves de toute l'Afrique de l'Est. Aujourd'hui, la maison privée dont on ne peut admirer que la façade, n'est pas ouverte aux visiteurs, à moins que l'actuel propriétaire, Aspara Fwad, ne surprenne les curieux à flâner devant sa demeure et ne les entraîne dans une tournée privée dont il espérera soutirer de quoi s'offrir, en « bon » musulman, une bière bien fraîche... « Autrefois, le commerce des esclaves était secret et il était honteux que la population découvre le visage des prisonniers. Un tunnel menait ainsi directement de la mer sous le corps du bâtiment », explique-t-il en montrant une trappe scellée. Aussi étonnant que cela puisse paraître, il


Encadrés facultatifs

Pourquoi faire un mystère de ce bâtiment dont les inscriptions coufiques du mur nord originel attestent de l'installation des Perses au XIIe siècle ? Seuls la rencontre avec le muezzin, Youssouf Ashkina et un interrogatoire précis permettent de découvrir l'édifice religieux. « La mosquée de Kizimkazi est toujours un lieu de culte et ne doit pas devenir une attraction touristique » explique-t-il en faisant référence aux excès des grands complexes hôteliers venus s'implanter sur les plages qui ourlent la côte est. De Kizimkazi, au sud, jusqu'à la pointe nord, la mer turquoise déroule un tapis de plages magnifiques, aveuglantes de sable ivoirin, piquées de cocotiers filiformes et tachées, par endroits, d'hôtels orgueilleux face aux petits villages de la côte. À Jambiani, Chwaka, Kiwengwa, Nungwi? les voiles de dhows, dressées comme des flèches vers le ciel, rentrent avec la marée décharger les prises du jour. Avec toute la gamme d'une palette de bleu magazine, de vert chlorophylle et de jaune sable délavé, la carte postale de la plage de rêve se rejoue ici tous les jours autour des poissons multicolores. « Malgré son image de petit paradis, Zanzibar est en pleine évolution », constate pourtant Sultan J. Mugheiry, un ancien marin zanzibarite. « On ne compte plus les Massaïs qui jouent les beach boys dans les hôtels cinq-étoiles, alors que les habitants d'ici ne bénéficient que très peu du tourisme », s'attriste-il. Forte de sa culture séculaire, l'île fragilisée, dont la population a triplé en 30 ans, devra probablement pour garder son âme, résister aux sirènes du tourisme et continuer à protéger, contre vents et marées, ses secrets d'île aux trésors.

L'île aux esclaves Au XVIIIe siècle, alors que la traite des Noirs est en plein essor, Zanzibar devient la plaque tournante du commerce des esclaves d'Afrique de l'Est. Capturés sur les côtes du continent puis à l'intérieur des terres, les prisonniers transitaient par l'archipel avant d'être exportés vers Oman, la Réunion et Maurice, ou exploités dans les plantations d'épices de l'île. Malgré la pression de l'Angleterre, qui déclara illégal dès 1772 ce négoce, les négriers français, hollandais et arabes intensifièrent le trafic qui atteignit jusqu'à 45 000 esclaves vendus par an. On estime ainsi que près de 600 000 hommes, femmes et enfants transitèrent par Zanzibar entre 1830 et 1873, avant que Londres ne parvienne, en juin 1873, à imposer au sultan l'abolition totale de l'esclavage. Clandestin, le trafic perdura cependant dans les zones les plus reculées de l'île avant de disparaître complètement au début du XXe siècle. Le « jardin des épices » Aujourd'hui réputé pour ses épices, l'archipel de Zanzibar fut, dès le milieu du XIXe s., le plus gros producteur de clou de girofle au monde. Originaires d'Indonésie, les plants, après avoir transité par la Réunion, furent en effet introduits sur l'île en 1812 par l'arabe Saleh bin Haramil al Bray. Le sultan Saïd de Zanzibar confisqua alors, en 1827, les terres de Saleh et s'enrichit en imposant aux habitants de « planter trois girofliers pour chaque cocotier ». Directement liée au trafic des esclaves qui travaillaient dans les plantations, la culture prospéra jusqu'à ce qu'un ouragan détruisît, en 1872, la majeure partie des plantations. Parmi tous les aromates actuellement cultivés sur l'île

(vanille, noix de muscade, poivre...), seuls le clou de girofle, la cardamome et la cannelle sont aujourd'hui exportés. Bien que Zanzibar soit connue comme « l'île aux épices », c'est en réalité sa voisine, Pemba qui produit aujourd'hui 80 % de la production tanzanienne de girofle. Mais sa culture est actuellement source de tension, car le gouvernement impose un monopole sous-évaluant le prix au kilo (moins de 2 euros). Quelques producteurs se risquent à vendre à meilleur prix, mais de façon illégale, leur production, au Kenya tout proche. Un paradis sous tension Réputé merveilleux, l'archipel de Zanzibar demeure pourtant le théâtre de fortes tensions politiques. Après des siècles de dominations portugaises, britanniques et arabes, la révolution sanglante de 1964 chassa le sultan Jamshid du pouvoir et rattacha l'archipel avec le Tanganyika, zone continentale de la Tanzanie, qui donna naissance à l'actuelle République unie de Tanzanie. Depuis, Zanzibar forme un État semi-autonome dont Amani Karume, du parti CCM, est élu président depuis l'an 2000. Controversées, ces élections suspectées d'irrégularités ont donné lieu à de violentes émeutes en janvier 2001, qui firent une vingtaine de morts. Bien que la situation se soit apaisée entre le CCM et le parti d'opposition, le CUF mené par Seif Shariff Hamad, l'atmosphère demeure tendue et les libertés d'expressions bafouées. Dans ce contexte troublé, la population a du mal à accepter le rattachement de Zanzibar, et sa dépendance vis-à-vis de la Tanzanie ; les observateurs internationaux restent pessimistes quant au déroulement des prochaines élections.

°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°

°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°° PRATIQUE

Pratique À la croisée de l'Afrique et l'Orient, Zanzibar est la destination idéale pour revenir le sac plein d'épices et de soleil. Y arriver Parmi les 9 destinations desservies en Afrique par Swiss International Air Lines, la compagnie propose 3 vols hebdomadaires au départ de Paris ou de Nice vers Dar es Salaam via Zurich. Vol aller-retour à partir de 881 euros taxes d'aéroport comprises. Service haut de gamme. Informations et réservations : 0820 04 05 06 ou directement en ligne sur www.swiss.fr. De nombreuses promotions sont proposées régulièrement sur le site. Sur place De Dar es Salaam, rejoindre Zanzibar en bateau (1h30 de trajet - à partir du port non loin de la Cathédrale Saint Joseph. Compter 40 euros. Tél. + (255) 213 7049) ou en avion avec une compagnie locale comme Coastal (Tél. + (255) 2233112) ou Zanair (Tél. + (255) 2233670). Compter 40 euros. Voyagistes Grand spécialiste des périples taillés sur mesure à la découverte des plus belles îles du globe, l'agence Iles du Monde (7, rue Cochin 75005 Paris - Renseignements : 01 43 26 68 68 et www.ilesdumonde.com) organise de nombreux voyages à Zanzibar. Un séjour balnéaire au nord de l'île à l'hôtel Ras Nungwi en demi-pension pour 7 nuits est ainsi proposé à partir de 2 205 euros par


Tél. : 01.53.70.63.66 www.amb-tanzanie.fr Où dormir ? Où Manger ? personne ainsi qu'un séjour en demi-pension de 7 nuits sur la côte sud-est à l'hôtel Breezes à partir de 1 555 euros par personne. Tarifs comprenant l'avion AR de Paris et les transferts locaux. Des voyages à la carte (durée et thématiques variables) peuvent être organisés à la demande. L'agence Comptoir d'Afrique (Tél. : 0 892 238 138) propose au départ de Paris ou en extension à ses circuits Kilimandjaro et safaris, un séjour à Zanzibar organisé à la carte. Compter à partir de 228 euros pour un module en extension de deux jours ou 1105 euros pour 7 jours au départ de la France. Le voyagiste Grandeur Nature (Tél. : 01 45 51 48 80) propose plusieurs formules de voyages en Tanzanie consacrés d'une part à la découverte du parc de Tarangire et N'Gorongoro et à Zanzibar. Compter à partir de 2461euros par personne sur une base deux pour un circuit de 10 jours. Mais aussi : Voyageur du Monde (Tél. : 01 42 86 16 00), Club Faune (Tél. : 01 42 88 31 32), Donatello (Tél. : 01 44 58 30 81), Nosylis (Tél. : 01 53 30 73 00). À Savoir Office de Tourisme 5, avenue Raymond Féraud - 06200 Nice Tél. : 04.93.72.53.71 Renseignements et envoi de brochures. Ambassade de Tanzanie 13, avenue Raymond Poincaré-75116 Paris

Florida Guesthouse Vuga Road - Zanzibar Tél. : (00 255) 242233136 À Stone Town, ce petit établissement familial tenu par M. Fauz M. Adbdailah propose des chambres économiques entre 13 et 45 euros la nuit par personne. Emerson & Green 236 Hurumzi street PO Box 3417 - Zanzibar Tél. : (00 255) 747 423266 www.emerson-green.com Établissement mythique de l'île, « l'Emerson » propose 16 chambres raffinées et romantiques. Compter 150 euros la nuit. Ne pas manquer de manger le soir sur la terrasse. Réserver à l'avance. Passing Show Hotel Po Box 132 - Zanzibar Tél. : (00 255) 2237970 Ce petit restaurant local propose une cuisine zanzibarite populaire de qualité dont un délicieux « Veg. Pauli » (1,5euros) à manger accompagné d'un jus frais de tamarin (0,20 euro). Économique et authentique ! Bluebay PO Box 3276 - Zanzibar Tél. : (00 255) 24 2240240 www.bluebayzanzibar.com Belles plages de sable blanc et cocotiers, voilà le décor de cet hôtel 5 étoiles de la côte nord-est. Compter entre 50 et 264 euros la nuit. Breezes Beach Club PO Box 1361 - Zanzibar

Tél. : +255 747 415049 http://www.breezes-zanzibar.com/ Planté face à la mer, cet hôtel de luxe est l'un des plus agréables de la côte sud-est. Compter entre 82 et 115 euros la nuit.

chambres à partir de 100 ? en demi-pension par personne et par jour. Les amateurs de tranquillité pourront même louer l'île entière... à partir de 2000 euros par nuit pour 20 personnes.

Jardins de Forodhani Rendez-vous des touristes et des guides en quête de clients, le parc qui longe le front de mer, connu sous le nom des jardins de Forodhoni, se pare à la nuit tombée d'un essaim de gargotes qui proposent autour de petits braseros toutes sortes de produits de la mer (2 euros la brochette). Goûtez y les pizzas Zanzibarittes (0,5euro) accompagnées d'un jus de canne à sucre (entre 0,2 et 1euro selon le client !)

À voir & à faire

Chwaka Bay Resort Tél. : (00 255) 24 22 40289 www.chwaka.com Tenu par un couple de suédois très sympathique, cet hôtel 3 étoiles est un véritable havre de paix. L'établissement offre une traversée en bateau traditionnel sur la plage paradisiaque face à l'établissement, l'occasion de s'initier à la voile avec le capitaine Juma, connaisseur de la région plein d'humour. La double à partir de 50 euros. Molly Restaurant Jambiani - Zanzibar Plantée au bord de l'eau, cette petite paillote propose toutes sortes de produits de la mer. La spécialité : le poisson croustillant à la coco sur un lit de confiture de tamarin (4euros). Chapwani Island House of Wonders S.à R.L. Tél. : + 39 051 234 974 www.chapwaniisland.com À 20 minutes de Stone Town, cette petite île privée paradisiaque propose vingt

Visiter les jardins d'épices Le village de Kizimbani est célèbre pour ses jardins d'épices. Parmi les plantations privées, préférer la plantation gouvernementale dite « Kizimkazi Spice Farm ». De nombreux guides (Cf rubriques Bons plans) proposent leurs services aux visiteurs au portail d'entrée. Compter 10 euros la visite. Observer des colobes rouges Au centre de l'île, la forêt de Jozani abrite une colonie de singes endémiques à Zanzibar, les colobes rouges, facilement observables. Entrée 8 euros. Excursion organisable de Stone Town avec un guide. Flâner entre les ruines du Maruhubi Palace À 3 km au nord de Stone Town, les ruines du Maruhubi Palace se donnent des airs de cités perdues au milieu des cocotiers. Entrée 1euro Nager avec des dauphins Au sud de l'île à Kizimkazi, il est possible d'observer des dauphins et même - les bons jours - de nager avec eux. Excursion organisable de Stone Town ou directement auprès des pêcheurs sur la plage en arrivant tôt le matin. Compter entre 20 et 40 euros. Découvrir l'histoire de Stone Town La capitale de Zanzibar mérite que l'on s'y attarde quelques jours afin de découvrir l'histoire de ses nombreux monuments


comme le Palace Museum, le vieux Fort, la Cathédrale Saint Joseph et Anglicane, l'ancien marché aux esclaves, le vieux dispensaire et la maison des merveilles. Un bon guide local (Cf rubriques Bons plans) permettra de comprendre le passé rebondissant de la cité et de débusquer les plus belles portes sculptées et les ruelles animées. Farniente à Nungwi Au nord de Zanzibar, le village de Nungwi où l'on construit les fameux dhows, offre les plus belles plages de l'île. Il est possible de dormir dans l'un des nombreux lodges et guesthouse de la côte. Approcher des tortues géantes À 30 minutes de Stone Town en bateau, l'île de Changuu abrite une impressionnante colonie de tortues géantes importée de Seychelles au XVIIe siècle. Entrée 2 euros. Excursion organisable par une agence locale ou directement sur le front de mer avec les propriétaires des bateaux (18euros). L'aquarium Mnarani de Nungwi permet également d'observer des tortues marines dans un grand bassin naturel. Entrée 2euros. La Maison de Livingstone Rue Bububu - Zanzibar Tél. : (00 255) 24 223 34854 Transformé en office de tourisme - officiel, excentré et peu efficace -, la maison de Livingstone ne présente que peu d'intérêt sauf pour les amateurs de mémoire lancés sur les traces de l'aventurier. Bons plans

Louer une voiture Aliy Keys - Coco de mer hôtel Tél. : (00 255) 747 411797 Pour les voyageurs indépendants, louer un véhicule est idéal pour découvrir l'île. Voiture : 40 dollars. Scooter ou moto : 20 dollars. Assurance comprise. Téléphonez directement à Aliy Keys qui viendra vous rencontrer dans votre hôtel. Acheter des épices Jussa Traders Market street - Zanzibar Tél. : (00 255) 223 35448 Au centre du marché de Stone Town, cette échoppe propose toute la variété des épices produites sur l'île (0,10 euro le petit paquet) à des tarifs beaucoup plus intéressants que ceux proposés lors des « Spices Tours » de Kizimkazi. Culture Musical club Vuga Road - Zanzibar Bon plan authentique et économique : de 19h à 21h, les soirs de semaines, il est possible d'assister aux répétitions de la formation musicale traditionnelle de l'île. Entrée gratuite. Renseignements auprès de Iddi Suwedi : 0748 33 58 11. Island Express Safaris & Tours Kajificheni Street P.O.Box 3567, Zanzibar Tél. : (+255 24) 2234375, tél./Fax : 2236313. www.zanzibarsafaris.com Particulièrement recommandable, cette agence locale basée à Stone Town organise transferts, visites, réservations et circuits à la carte à Zanzibar et en Tanzanie. Contacter Robert A. De Mello (islandexp@zitec.org ) par email en anglais. Encadré facultatif

Découvrir Zanzibar accompagné d'un guide local Connus sous le nom de Papasi en Swahili (Tiques), de nombreux guides improvisés proposent leurs services aux visiteurs à l'arrivée des ferries de Zanzibar, dans les jardins de Forodhani et les ruelles du centre de Stone Town. Si certains d'entre eux se révèleront souvent peu efficaces, être - bien accompagné permet cependant de découvrir le charme des petites ruelles et tous les secrets de l'île. Il faudra compter entre 10 et 30 euros pour une visite ou une journée. Outre les guides des agences locales et des hôtels, de nombreux guides indépendants méritent d'être mentionnés comme « Saïd » Bounaya Khamis (saidrf@hotmail.com) qui parle le français pour Stone Town et les environs ; Muhamedi Haji Mwinyi (Fatma315@hotmail.com - Tél. : (00 255) 0747 481937) pour la côte sud et sud-est dont il est originaire, Saïdy Idaya (Tél. : (00 255) 0747 43 9887) pour les jardins d'épices ou Sultan J. Mugheiry (Tél. : (00 255) 2230697) pour Stone Town. Guides Tanzanie & Zanzibar - Bibliothèque du voyageur Gallimard, 2004, 25,60 euros Guide Tanzanie - Zanzibar - Petit Futé, 2003, 16,15euros


Zanzibar, the Treasure Island.