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The new Tripoli of Africa For years Tripoli would make the headlines, under the rubric "troublemaker" in the so-called international scene. Vilified for a long time, the capital of Libya is finally freeing itself of its satanic reputation to today aspire to the title of mentor to the whole of the Mediterranean. Photos by Pascal Meunier / LightMediation Text by Eve Gandossi


2691-29: Libya. Tripoli. Airport. Since the end of 2003, international airlines are again landing in Tripoli. Sign of this opening up: a new airport will be built very soon.

Contact - Thierry Tinacci - LightMediation Photo Agency +33 (0)6 61 80 57 21 email: thierry@lightmediation.com


2691-01: Libya. Tripoli. View of the medina and on the harbour. Restored a few years ago, the medina of Tripoli is visited by the tourists again. The former Carthaginian trading post has regained its influence of

2691-02: Libya. Tripoli. Green Square. Used as a parking lot during the day, the Green Square, link between the medina and the Italian district, becomes in the evening a pleasure spot for the Tripolians. For

2691-03: Libya. Tripoli. Souq Erbaa Al Kadim. In 1981, Muammar al-Gaddafi had the souks closed in favor of state shops. But faced with the failure of this, he authorized their reopening. Today, souks are

2691-04: Libya. Tripoli. Gurji mosque. One of the most beautiful places of worship in the medina, the Gurji Mosque, constructed in 1833 by a rich trader, is covered in multicolored tiles. On the picture: the stairs


2691-05: Tripoli. Futuristic projects. In just a few years, the real estate projects have prospered. Everywhere in the city, new contemporary design towers and shopping centers are built.

2691-06: Libya. Tripoli. Street in the medina. Children playing soccer. Abandoned by the Libyans who prefer the new comfortable houses, the medina henceforth houses mostly foreigners. Its narrow streets

2691-07: Libya. Tripoli. Post office coffeeshop. Italian heritage. Italian atmosphere at the CafĂŠ de la Poste. This coffeehouse is located under the huge Mussolini styled archways of the Institute for Social

2691-08: Libya. Tripoli. Trendy shop. The First of September Street is the trendy occidental street in the Italian district. Everywhere, the shops sell fashion clothing, which has nothing to do with traditional Libyan


2691-05: Tripoli. Futuristic projects. In just a few years, the real estate projects have prospered. Everywhere in the city, new contemporary design towers and shopping centers are built.


2691-09: Libya. Tripoli. Jamahiriya Museum. Entrance hall of the archaeological museum of Tripoli. This museum, the largest in the country, houses among other things statues from the Leptis Magna

2691-10: Libya. Tripoli. Al Shaab mosque. Located outside the old city, the Al Shaab mosque must henceforth cohabit with all the industry on the coast.

2691-11: Libya. Tripoli. Bab el Jedid coffeeshop. Most of the customers at the Bab el Jedid coffeehouse are Algerians, Moroccans or Tunisians. This is a meeting place for many immigrants.

2691-12: Libya. Tripoli. Corniche. Port. After years under embargo, trade ships again pull into the port of Tripoli, a former Corinthian trading post. Some inhabitants delight in the sight of this new ballet of boats.


2691-13: Libya. Tripoli. National Museum. Collection of ancient Roman statues in the archaeological museum occupying the eastern part of the citadel of Tripoli.

2691-14: Libya. Tripoli. Entrance hall of the luxury hotel Bab el Bahr. Today, there are more portraits of Muammar al-Gaddafi in hotels than in the streets of the capital.

2691-15: Libya. Tripoli. Small streets in the medina. Old town. The medina of Tripoli is composed of hundreds of miniscule labyrinth-like streets with archways to protect from the sun.

2691-16: Libya. Tripoli. Old town. Medina. The old city is composed of many ottoman-style houses. Behind the wood doors and the colorful walls hide many treasures, unfortunately in a sorry state from lack of


2691-07: Libya. Tripoli. Post office coffeeshop. Italian heritage. Italian atmosphere at the CafĂŠ de la Poste. This coffeehouse is located under the huge Mussolini styled archways of the Institute for Social Welfare.


2691-17: Libya. Tripoli. Marc Aurele arch and mosque. Vestige of its prestigious Roman past, Tripoli has preserved the triumphal arch of Marcus Aurelius, with, in front of it, the Sidi Abdul Wahab mosque, dating

2691-18: Libya. Tripoli. Souq Al Liffa. If the escalators of the shopping centers are the new places for young people to flirt, the souq remains the ideal place for pleasurable encounters.

2691-19: Libya. Tripoli. Tajoura baths. The Tajoura bath is located in the suburb of Tripoli. This bath is more visited than those of the medina because it is composed of a swimming pool, a sauna, cabins with

2691-20: Libya. Tripoli. Beach. Modern city. The coast Tripoli is adorning itself with huge towers. The inhabitants of the medina are leaving its old small streets, preferring the new, comfortable apartments. In a


2691-21: Libya. Tripoli. Sudanese coffeeshop. In this part of the old city, many immigrants run the shops and restaurants. In the photo: Sudanese immigrants.

2691-22: Libya. Tripoli. National Museum. The Leptis Magna Hall in the Jamahiriya Museum (National Museum) with the representation of the Septimius Severus Arch and remains of its frescos.

2691-23: Libya. Tripoli. Clothes souq. In spite of the arrival of the new international clothing retailers, the stalls of the souk still have customers. Here is sold above all the traditional clothing, like farmla, those

2691-24: Libya. Tripoli. Othman Pacha Koranic school. The Othman Pacha madrassa, built at the end of the 17th century, is one of the most beautiful Koranic schools in the city. Its architectural plan was inspired


2691-13: Libya. Tripoli. National Museum. Collection of ancient Roman statues in the archaeological museum occupying the eastern part of the citadel of Tripoli.


2691-25: Libya. Tripoli. Souq designer. For 50 years, Hadj Ali has been unceasingly embroidering the farmla in the Al Liffa souk. These waistcoats or vests are made with Syrian fabrics and Italian threads.

2691-26: Libya. Tripoli. Harouss caravanserai. Break time for the weavers, one of who, Mohamed Hamza, has been making traditional Libyan clothing in this Harouss caravansary for 45 years.

2691-27: Libya. Tripoli. City walls and hotel Corinthia. The city walls of the Bab El Jedid gate still protect the old city from the modern, whose present-day symbol is the Corinthia hotel, the new Mecca for finding

2691-28: Libya. Tripoli. Gurji mosque. On of the most beautiful places of worship in the medina, the Gurji Mosque, built in 1833 by a rich trader, is covered in multicolored tiles. In the photo: the stairs where the


2691-61: Libya. Tripoli. Al Naga Mosque. The Al Naga mosque is the oldest place of worship in Tripoli. It was also the most important before the construction of the Karamanli mosque in 1738. Some of its

2691-30: Libya. Tripoli. Nap in the souq. Unlike other medinas in the Arab African countries, the sellers of Tripoli do not force the visitors to buy. But this may change with mass tourism.

2691-31: Libya. Tripoli. De Bono arcade. The former De Bono arcade, today renamed the Al Karama arcade, will be restored for the first time since its construction by the Italian colonists in the thirties.

2691-32: Libya. Tripoli. Coppersmithes souq. At the foot of the Clock Tower, the copperware workers of the Al Ghizdarq souk make, among other things, pots, jugs, plates, and crescents that ornament mosques.


2691-27: Libya. Tripoli. City walls and hotel Corinthia. The city walls of the Bab El Jedid gate still protect the old city from the modern, whose present-day symbol is the Corinthia hotel, the new Mecca for finding one's way around this city that never stops spreading.


2691-33: Libya. Tripoli. Small streets in the medina. The medina of Tripoli is composed of hundreds of miniscule labyrinth-like streets with archways to protect from the sun.

2691-34: Libya. Tripoli. Zawiya Al Kadriyya. Old town. Medina . Across from the Al Naga mosque, a small shaky-looking minaret indicates the Zawiya Al Kadriyya. In this part of town can be found the liveliest

2691-35: Libya. Tripoli. Jamahiriya Museum. Reconstruction of the picturesque typical life of Libyan nomads, in the Jamahiriya museum.

2691-36: Libya. Tripoli. Sidi Salem mosque. Children playing football. Old town. Constructed on the side of the hill of Uiat (the former Tripoli city), the Sidi Salem mosque is said to date from before the 15th century.


2691-37: Libya. Tripoli. Souq closed. The sellers in the souk close their shops during lunchtime and until the middle of the afternoon. A simple sheet covers the goods to be sold.

2691-38: Libya. Tripoli. Harbour. Fisherman. Symbol of the years under embargo, the rusted carcasses of ships in the port of Tripoli today provide for an excellent catch of fish, to the fishermen's great joy.

2691-39: Libya. Tripoli. Karamanli palace. The Karamanli palace, constructed in the 18th century, has become the museum of Ottoman culture. Each room represents the daily life of rich Ottoman families.

2691-40: Libya. Tripoli. Darghout bathhouse. Today, there are only two public baths in the old city. Most of the rare clients are immigrants who do not have bathrooms in their small apartments.


2691-04: Libya. Tripoli. Gurji mosque. One of the most beautiful places of worship in the medina, the Gurji Mosque, constructed in 1833 by a rich trader, is covered in multicolored tiles. On the picture: the stairs where the imam preaches.


2691-41: Libya. Tripoli. Green Square. Used as a parking lot during the day, the Green Square, link between the medina and the Italian district, becomes in the evening a pleasure spot for the Tripolians. For

2691-42: Libya. Tripoli. Abandoned boat used in a recent past as restaurant. Today half sunk, the boat Ouagadougou was still just a few years ago one of the upper-crust restaurants of Tripoli.

2691-43: Libya. Tripoli. Trendy shop. The First of September Street is the trendy occidental street in the Italian district. Everywhere, the shops sell fashion clothing, which has nothing to do with traditional Libyan

2691-44: Libya. Tripoli. Leaving the medina. Although they were restored a few years ago, the streets of the medina have been subjected to the ravages of the 20th century: for roofs, electrical wires have


2691-45: Libya. Tripoli. De Bono arcade. The former de Bono arcade, today renamed the Al Karama arcade, will be restored for the first time since its construction by the Italian colonists in the thirties.

2691-46: Libya. Tripoli. The newlyweds' souq. The newlyweds' souk is a new market place located outside of the city. Here, the future brides can find a large part of their trousseau.

2691-47: Libya. Tripoli. Coffeehouse on a boat. People relaxing on a boat used as a coffeehouse across from the Tripoli harbour. Since the end of the embargo, there is more activity in the port.

2691-48: Libya. Tripoli. Helga bathhouse. There are only few traditional baths remaining in Tripoli. The Helga bath, located in the souk of the medina, is the most visited. Some clients relax, while other test the


2691-58: Libya. Tripoli. Darghout bathhouse. Seneca used to say that the public steam bath was a place where we sweat without making any effort. That's not the case for this client. On the marble slabs, many regular customers are trying to keep in shape.


2691-49: Libya. Tripoli. Old harbour. Tripoli has kept its old harbour. There are no ocean liners here, just some old boats that head out to sea each day.

2691-50: Libya. Tripoli. Gold souq. Gold and jewelry are sold in the As Sagha souk but also by street vendors who set up small stalls and wait for customers.

2691-51: Libya. Tripoli. Gaddafi Coffeeshop. Teatime in a coffeehouse, under the watchful eye of the Guide, in power for 40 years

2691-52: Libya. Tripoli. Old house in the medina. The medina is composed of Ottoman houses that are often dilapidated because of a lack of maintenance. The owners of this house have realized the value of it


2691-53: Libya. Tripoli. Coffeehouse in the medina. After their nap, men meet in the many coffeehouses located in the small streets of the medina.

2691-54: Libya. Tripoli. Darghout mosque. The Darghout mosque was named in honor of the famous corsair Darghout Pacha, who was governor of Tripoli in the 16th century. Its unusual "T" form came about

2691-55: Libya. Tripoli. Ben Zekri caravanserai. The medina was said to be composed of about fifty caravansaries. The restored Ben Zekri caravanserai is now the place for gold workshops.

2691-56: Libya. Tripoli. Post office coffeeshop. Italian heritage. Italian atmosphere at the CafĂŠ de la Poste, located under the huge Mussolini styled archways of the Institute of Social Welfare.


2691-20: Libya. Tripoli. Beach. Modern city. The coast Tripoli is adorning itself with huge towers. The inhabitants of the medina are leaving its old small streets, preferring the new, comfortable apartments. In a few years, Tripoli has changed, leaving some Libyans perplexed about the future.


2691-57: Libya. Tripoli. Weaver break. At lunchtime, this weaving workshop becomes the meeting place for friends in the district. On the walls, there are hundreds of pictures of the medina's inhabitants.

2691-62: Libya. Tripoli. Fortress. Many times destroyed and reconstructed, the Assarya Al Hamra citadel owes its exterior appearance to the Spanish colonists of the 16th century and the interiors to the

2691-59: Libya. Tripoli. Hotel entrance hall with a "seventies" design. Phone booths with a seventies design, in the entrance hall of the Bab el Bahr "sea gate" hotel.

2691-60: Libya. Tripoli. New shopping center. The El Talat shopping centre has just opened. Inside this mall, a lot of international trademarks are sold. This is something new for the Libyan people, now that the


2691-63: Libya. Tripoli. General view of the medina. Restored a few years ago, the medina of Tripoli is visited by the tourists again. The former Carthaginian trading post has regained its influence of old.


The new Tripoli of Africa For years Tripoli would make the headlines, under the rubric "troublemaker" in the so-called international scene. And when playing in the major league, the maverick players are hardly appreciated. Vilified for a long time, the capital of Libya is finally freeing itself of its satanic reputation to today aspire to the title of mentor to the whole of the Mediterranean. If the story of Tripoli were told? it would be the story of a long life, of a star, forgotten and rejected, but ready to do anything to once again take center stage. A sad enough story made up of faded sequins and sadly missed moments of glory and above all being incessantly in the spotlight. The old "western Tripoli", as it is known in Arabic to distinguish it from the eponymous Lebanese port, is awakening from a long sleep. No Prince Charming has stepped in, just an inexpressible will to exist beyond its borders, outside of this too neglected continent. The label of "outlaw state" stuck on Libya by Ronald Reagan in the 1980s seems to be peeling off little by little. The international policy of isolationism is certainly over: the capital is finally disentangling itself from its long drawn out scandals. On its restored docks, the ballet of boats has started again. Cargo ships, and, since not too long ago, cruise liners: foreigners from the other side of the Mediterranean are again adventuring into the thousand year old alleys of the medina. 25 centuries ago the life of this former Carthaginian trading post called Uiat was

governed by the sailors' fishing sprees. From a fishermen and traveling merchant's village, Uiat became the great Oea in the 1st century BC, immortal symbol of a big Roman city. Three meters of sediment accumulated over the centuries cover the history of this once opulent and influential city. A few treasures still emerge from the carpet of sand: four isolated columns in the middle of a deserted alley, the scattered ruins of a temple, and above all the arch of Marcus Aurelius, precious remains of its Roman past. Accorded to an old prophecy "anyone who would dare damage the arch will be subjected to the worst punishment". A fearsome warning which nevertheless did not stop some dauntless people from transforming it into a shop, then a cinema and theatre. Carefully kept sheathed in barriers, it is henceforth the temple of the springtime amours of pigeons... and not exactly homing ones. Two mosques, Sidi Abdoul Wahab from the 17th century and Darghout, one of the oldest in the city and today decked out in its brightly shining electric board telling prayer times, watch over the arch. Or rather hold it in their grip, delicate manner of showing that a page had been turned. Because for thirteen long centuries, Tripoli has traveled the ages veiled: forget Uiat and Oea, it's Muslim Tarablus.. with mixed blood from the Spanish conquistadors, Ottomans and even Italians. The Libyan spirit is in the image of Tripoli: a mosaic of cosmopolitan faces on which, like old parchment, each wrinkle tells the traveler its story. Huddling within the heart of its ramparts of stones many times replaced, the medina lives to the rhythm of the calls to prayer and the TV programs. It's not the souk of Aleppo here, but on the roofs of the old houses the satellite dishes pile up, often all rusted. Teenagers strut about in front of Star Academy Maghreb

while immigrants delight in documentaries in which the audacious travel the world. To each their escape. In the café Jrid de Bab Al Jedid, the walls transport the customers to snow-covered Moroccan mountains. It's the meeting place of ex-patriots, all Tunisians, Moroccans or Algerians. The haggard eyes, the sad features and the velvety taste of capucin on the lips, they try to not think too much of their countries... In Libya, half of the workers come from abroad. And so each day, the hands get busy in the Al Harrara souk. Under the azure plastic coverings or in the little shops, the Sudanese restaurateurs prepare lunch, while the Chadian couturiers work to the rhythm of the "tac tac" of the sewing machines and the African music spat out of the record sellers speakers. All that is far from the peace of the An Nakhasa, Al Mushir, Al Helga or Al Liffa souks, where Tripoli the African steps aside in favor of Tripoli the Arab. In this part of the city, no one is in a hurry. Everyone lives to the rhythm of the Clock Tower whose bells have not rung for eons. The gait is slower, the conversations sifted. In the Az Zahar fonduk, turned into a bric-à-brac café, the men pass the time smoking a hookah. Not far from the curling wreaths of smoke, the coppersmiths in the Al Ghizdarq souk unobtrusively fashion marmites, pots, platters and other metalware... At the Harouss fonduk, Mohamed Hamza makes, despite his tired eyes, traditional Libyan costumes. As does his friend and competitor, Hadj Ali. For fifty years the doyen of the Al Liffa souk incessantly embroiders the farmla, Libyan vests made of Syrian fabric and Italian threads. Sheltered from the sun, the women selling gold, dressed in white veils, like virgins yet certainly not bashful ones, patiently await a buyer. And out of

the question to bargain too long with these decorated matrons. Neglected for years, the medina is little by little regaining its pride: its famous mosques with cupolas, an original Libyan feature, have been rehabilitated, as well as its khans, now transformed into shops, its two last baths, silent doctors for the few rare clients, and its decrepit Ottoman houses. Symbol of this achievement: the Qaramanli palace today houses a museum that recounts the life of the rich families of the 18th century. What a joy it must be for these wax Ottomans to eternally relive those years of ease... The historic treasures have thus been restored, one after the other. The former French and British consulates serve as libraries; the old Spanish castle, once a prison then a school for monks, is now the House of Culture for children; the Saraya Al Hamra castle, built in the spot of a Roman palace, has been transformed into the national museum, and, last little thing, the former tobacco factory is the Heritage museum. Libya has given itself over to its fetish: culture... Or more precisely, to everything connected to its past. Even the buildings from the last colonization have been restored. The Al Karama Gallery, ex-Galleria De Bono and symbol of the 1930s, will undergo its first big facelift... by a team of Italians. They don't do things by halves! So, the intimate streets of the medina contrast with those of the Italian quarter. Large avenues, immense white façades, high arcades: the Tripolitanians live here in the "lento tempo" of the Dolce Vita. At the sidewalk café on the Square of Algeria, under the immense mussolinian arcades of the Institute of Social Welfare, men sip their cappuccinos and enter into heated discussions about soccer. The team Milan Inter or Milan AC, impossible


to get them to agree. On the avenues, the rounded red and white awnings are always out, although torn and covered in dust; the curious walk on the cast-iron plaques engraved with "Pisano Salerno Foundery"; the inhabitants have kept that really Italian gift of gab and the shops follow European fashions. Sequined, low-cut evening gowns, miniskirts, high heels: the fashionatas on the street of September 1st, these young women also pro-Milan, keep themselves well-hidden. We are far from the traditional Libyan Muslim dress seen on the streets of the medina. Result of the regrouping of the old cities of Oea, Leptis and Sabrata, the so named "Three Cities" seems to have conserved its three faces: the old quarter, the Italian and the Gargaresh quarters. If the medina's heart is still beating, it is little by little slowing down. The Libyans are deserting the tiny alleys and prefer the comforts of new housing. Along the gargantuan avenues of Gargaresh, cranes for the future real estate complexes line up next to the existing blocks of buildings. The girls are trendy, the shops lit up, fast-foods packed out and the cars all Chinese. Anonymous in this mad traffic scene, the young men, often dressed in a shirt from some big Italian couturier, eye the young ladies, mobile phone in one hand, steering wheel in the other, proud to be driving their "Cherry", the new car in fashion. "It's possible" announce the signs everywhere. Yes, in Tripoli, everything is now possible. A brand new supermarket has just opened. Welcomed by a cardboard AndrĂŠ Agassi, the Libyans browse in Jennyfer, H&M, Nokia, LG and

eat at Chicken Cottage, a copy of McDonald's, still forbidden in the country. The Bab el Medina complex, with its shopping mall, hotels and towers, will soon see the light of day. And then, there is the creation of the opposition newspaper Oea, the launching of three new television channels, the construction of the future international airport, the luxury residence Palm City, the Tripoli Green Belt with its 750 hectares of greenery around the city and the (too?) many tourist projects included in the Plan 2008-2012, which allocates this sector up to 50 billion euros. The population is starting to worry. Yes to opening up, but not in any old way. "We don't want to become Hammamet or Marrakech", makes clear Ali, fifty-something. Forty years after the establishment of the Grand Jamahiriya, Muammar Gaddafi plans to make of Libya a place not to be ignored on the Mediterranean, in Africa and in the Arab League. In the streets of Tripoli, you count more green flags than official portraits of the Guide and more Fulla dolls than trinkets with the effigy of the leader, today world record holder for his time in power? He who defined himself as a "revolutionary" affirmed in an interview in 2000 that he was "very satisfied with what has been achieved in thirty years", but "there remains much to improve". Ten years later, his wish has been granted. A positive point for the majority of Libyans... who should nevertheless not forget one of their famous proverbs: "Koul takhira fi'khira" or, "sometimes, it's better to be late".


Captions 01-Libya. Tripoli. View of the medina and on the harbour Restored a few years ago, the medina of Tripoli is visited by the tourists again. The former Carthaginian trading post has regained its influence of old. 02- Libye. Tripoli. Place Verte Parking la journée, la Place Verte, charnière entre la médina et le quartier italien, devient le soir le lieu de divertissement des Tripolitains. Pour quelques pièces, les jeunes se font photographier sur des motos et les couples dans de merveilleuses panières décorées. 02-Libya. Tripoli. Green Square Used as a parking lot during the day, the Green Square, link between the medina and the Italian district, becomes in the evening a pleasure spot for the Tripolians. For only a few coins, young people have themselves photographed on motorcycles and couples in beautiful decorated large baskets. 03- Libye. Tripoli. Souk Erbaa Al Kadim En 1981, Kadhafi avait fait fermer les souks au profit des magasins d'Etat, mais devant cet échec, le Guide autorisa leur réouverture. Aujourd'hui, ils font à nouveau partie de la vie quotidienne. 03-Libya. Tripoli. Souq Erbaa Al Kadim In 1981, Muammar al-Gaddafi had the souks closed in favor of state shops. But faced with the failure of this, he authorized their reopening. Today, souks are again part of daily life. 04-Libye. Tripoli. Mosquée Gurji L'un des plus beaux lieux de culte de la médina, la mosquée Gurji, érigée en 1833

par un riche marchand, est couverte de faïences polychromes. Ici, les escaliers du minbar où prêche l'imam. 04-Libya. Tripoli. Gurji mosque One of the most beautiful places of worship in the medina, the Gurji Mosque, constructed in 1833 by a rich trader, is covered in multicolored tiles. On the picture: the stairs where the imam preaches. 05-Libye. Tripoli. Projets futuristes En quelques années, les projets immobiliers ont fleuri dans Tripoli. Partout, de nouvelles tours design et des centres commerciaux se construisent. 05-Libya. Tripoli. Futuristic projects In just a few years, the real estate projects have prospered. Everywhere in the city, new contemporary design towers and shopping centers are built. 06-Libye. Tripoli. Ruelle de la médina. Football Souvent abandonnée par les Libyens qui préfèrent le confort des nouvelles habitations, la médina accueille désormais surtout des étrangers. Ses étroites venelles restent un immense espace de liberté pour les enfants. 06-Libya. Tripoli. Street in the medina. Soccer Abandoned by the Libyans who prefer the new comfortable houses, the medina henceforth houses mostly foreigners. Its narrow streets remain a place for children to play. 07-Libye. Tripoli. Café de la Poste. Héritage italien Ambiance italienne au café de la Poste, situé sous les immenses arcades mussoliniennes de l'Institut de la Protection sociale. 07-Libya. Tripoli. Café de la Poste. Italian heritage

Italian atmosphere at the Café de la Poste. This coffeehouse is located under the huge Mussolini styled archways of the Institute for Social Welfare.

Most of the customers at the Bab el Jedid coffeehouse are Algerians, Moroccans or Tunisians. This is a meeting place for many immigrants.

08-Libye. Tripoli. Boutique branchée La rue du 1er septembre est la rue branchée et occidentale du quartier italien. Partout des boutiques vendent des habits qui n'ont rien à voir avec la tenue traditionnelle libyenne... 08-Libya. Tripoli. Trendy shop The First of September Street is the trendy occidental street in the Italian district. Everywhere, the shops sell fashion clothing, which has nothing to do with traditional Libyan dress.

12-Libye. Tripoli. Corniche Ancien comptoir corinthien, le port de Tripoli accueille à nouveau les cargos marchands, après un embargo de plusieurs années. Certains habitants se délectent alors de ce nouveau balai de bateaux. 12-Libya. Tripoli. Corniche After years under embargo, trade ships again pull into the port of Tripoli, a former Corinthian trading post. Some inhabitants delight in the sight of this new ballet of boats.

09-Libye. Tripoli. Musée de la Jamahiriya Hall d'entrée du musée archéologique de Tripoli, le plus grand musée du pays et qui abrite entre autres des statues provenant du site romain de Leptis Magna. 09-Libya. Tripoli. Jamahiriya Museum Entrance hall of the archaeological museum of Tripoli. This museum, the largest in the country, houses among other things statues from the Leptis Magna archaeological site. 10-Libye. Tripoli. Mosquée Al Shaab Située en dehors de la vieille ville, la mosquée Al Shaab doit désormais cohabiter avec toutes les industries situées sur le littoral. 10-Libya. Tripoli. Al Shaab mosque Located outside the old city, the Al Shaab mosque must henceforth cohabit with all the industry on the coast. 11-Libye. Tripoli. Café Bab el Jedid Les clients du café Bab el Jedid sont quasiment tous Algériens, Marocains ou Tunisiens. Ici, c'est surtout le lieu de retrouvailles des immigrés. 11-Libya. Tripoli. Bab el Jedid coffeeshop

13-Libye. Tripoli. Musée national Collection de statues antiques romaines dans le musée archéologique qui occupe la partie Est de la citadelle de Tripoli. 13-Libya. Tripoli. National Museum Collection of ancient Roman statues in the archaeological museum occupying the eastern part of the citadel of Tripoli. 14-Libye. Tripoli. Réception d'hôtel Hall d'entrée de l'hôtel de « standing », le Bab el Bahr. Aujourd'hui, on trouve plus de portait de Kadhafi dans les hôtels que dans les rues de la capitale. 14-Libya. Tripoli. Hotel entrance hall Entrance hall of the luxury hotel Bab el Bahr. Today, there are more portraits of Muammar al-Gaddafi in hotels than in the streets of the capital. 15-Libye. Tripoli. Venelle de la médina La médina de Tripoli est composée de centaines de minuscules venelles labyrinthiques à arcades, qui permettent de se protéger du soleil. 15-Libya. Tripoli. Small streets in the medina


15-Libye. Tripoli. Venelle de la médina La médina de Tripoli est composée de centaines de minuscules venelles labyrinthiques à arcades, qui permettent de se protéger du soleil. 15-Libya. Tripoli. Small streets in the medina The medina of Tripoli is composed of hundreds of miniscule labyrinth-like streets with archways to protect from the sun. 16-Libye. Tripoli. Médina La vieille ville est composée de nombreuses bâtisses ottomanes. Derrière les portes de bois et les murs colorés se cachent souvent des trésors, malheureusement souvent dans un triste état, faute d'entretien. 16-Libya. Tripoli. Old town The old city is composed of many ottoman-style houses. Behind the wood doors and the colorful walls hide many treasures, unfortunately in a sorry state from lack of maintenance. 17-Libye. Tripoli. Arc Marc Aurèle et mosquée Vestige de son prestigieux passé romain, Tripoli a préservé l'arc de triomphe de Marc Aurèle, précédé de la mosquée Sidi Abdul Wahab du XVIIe siècle. 17-Libya. Tripoli. Marc Aurele arch and mosque Vestige of its prestigious Roman past, Tripoli has preserved the triumphal arch of Marcus Aurelius, with, in front of it, the Sidi Abdul Wahab mosque, dating from the 17th century. 18-Libye. Tripoli. Souk Al Liffa Si les escaliers mécaniques des centres commerciaux sont désormais les

nouveaux lieux de drague pour les jeunes, le souk est encore l'endroit idéal pour faire d'agréables rencontres. 18-Libya. Tripoli. Souq Al Liffa If the escalators of the shopping centers are the new places for young people to flirt, the souk remains the ideal place for pleasurable encounters. 19-Libye. Tripoli. Hammam Tajoura Situé en banlieue de Tripoli, le hammam Tajoura est beaucoup plus fréquenté que les hammams de la médina, puisque composé d'une piscine, d'un sauna, de cabines avec des baignoires d'eau chaude et d'un mini bazar. 19-Libya. Tripoli. Tajoura baths The Tajoura bath is located in the suburb of Tripoli. This bath is more visited than those of the medina because it is composed of a swimming pool, a sauna, cabins with hot water bathtubs and a small bazaar. 20-Libye. Tripoli. Plage. Ville moderne Le littoral de Tripoli se drape de grandes tours. Les habitants délaissent les ruelles de la médina et préfèrent le confort des nouvelles habitations. En quelques années, Tripoli a chang�� de visage, laissant quelques habitants perplexes pour l'avenir. 20-Libya. Tripoli. Beach. Modern city The coast Tripoli is adorning itself with huge towers. The inhabitants of the medina are leaving its old small streets, preferring the new, comfortable apartments. In a few years, Tripoli has changed, leaving some Libyans perplexed about the future. 21-Libye. Tripoli. Café des Soudanais Dans cette partie de la vieille ville, beaucoup d'immigrés tiennent les commerces et les restaurants. Ici, des Soudanais.

21-Libya. Tripoli. Sudanese coffeeshop In this part of the old city, many immigrants run the shops and restaurants. In the photo: Sudanese immigrants. 22-Libye. Tripoli. Musée National Salle de Leptis Magna au Musée de la Jamahiriya avec la représentation de l'arc de Septime Sévère et les vestiges de ses fresques. 22-Libya. Tripoli. National Museum The Leptis Magna Hall in the Jamahiriya Museum (National Museum) with the representation of the Septimius Severus Arch and remains of its frescos. 23-Libye. Tripoli. Souk des tissus Malgré l'arrivée des chaînes internationales de vêtements, les échoppes du souk du tissu ont encore des clients. Ici, on vend surtout les tenues traditionnelles, comme les farmla, gilets libyens confectionnés dans la médina. 23-Libya. Tripoli. Clothes souq In spite of the arrival of the new international clothing retailers, the stalls of the souk still have customers. Here is sold above all the traditional clothing, like farmla, those Libyan waistcoats or vests, made in the medina. 24-Libye. Tripoli. Madrassa Othman Pacha Construite à la fin du XVIIe siècle, la madrassa Othman Pacha est l'une des plus belles écoles coraniques de la ville. Son plan architectural s'inspire des écoles d'Iran du Xe-XIe siècles. 24-Libya. Tripoli. Othman Pacha Madrasa The Othman Pacha madrassa, built at the end of the 17th century, is one of the most beautiful Koranic schools in the city. Its architectural plan was inspired by the Iranian schools of the 10th and 11th centuries.

25-Libye. Tripoli. Couturier du souk Au souk Al Liffa, voilà 50 ans qu'Hadj Ali brode sans relâche les farmla, les gilets libyens faits de tissu syrien et de fils d'Italie. 25-Libya. Tripoli. Souq designer For 50 years, Hadj Ali has been unceasingly embroidering the farmla in the Al Liffa souk. These waistcoats or vests are made with Syrian fabrics and Italian threads. 26-Libye. Tripoli. Fondouk Harouss Pause des tisserands, dont l'un d'entre eux, Mohamed Hamza confectionne depuis 45 ans les tenues traditionnelles libyennes dans ce fondouk Harouss. 26-Libya. Tripoli. Harouss caravanserai Break time for the weavers, one of who, Mohamed Hamza, has been making traditional Libyan clothing in this Harouss caravansary for 45 years. 27-Libye. Tripoli. Remparts Les remparts de la porte Bab El Jedid protègent encore la vieille ville de la moderne, dont le symbole actuel est l'hôtel Corinthia, la nouvelle Mecque pour se diriger dans cette cité qui ne cesse de s'étendre. 27-Libya. Tripoli. City walls The city walls of the Bab El Jedid gate still protect the old city from the modern, whose present-day symbol is the Corinthia hotel, the new Mecca for finding one's way around this city that never stops spreading. 28-Libye. Tripoli. Mosquée Gurji L'un des plus beaux lieux de culte de la médina, la mosquée Gurji, érigée en 1833 par un riche marchand, est couverte de faïences polychromes. Ici, les escaliers du minbar où prêche l'imam. 28-Libya. Tripoli. Gurji mosque On of the most beautiful places of worship


29-Libye. Tripoli. Aéroport Depuis la fin 2003, les compagnies aériennes internationales reprennent leurs vols et desservent de nouveau Tripoli. Symbole de cette ouverture : un nouvel aéroport va bientôt être construit. 29-Libya. Tripoli. Airport Since the end of 2003, international airlines are again landing in Tripoli. Sign of this opening up: a new airport will be built very soon. 30-Libye. Tripoli. Sieste au souk À la différence des autres médinas du Maghreb, les commerçants de Tripoli ne forcent pas la main des visiteurs. Une spécificité qui risque de changer avec l'arrivée massive des touristes. 30-Libya. Tripoli. Nap in the souq Unlike other medinas in the Arab African countries, the sellers of Tripoli do not force the visitors to buy. But this may change with mass tourism. 31-Libye. Tripoli. Galerie de Bono L'ancienne Galerie de Bono, aujourd'hui galerie Al Karama, va subir sa première restauration depuis sa construction par les colons italiens dans les années trente. 31-Libya. Tripoli. De Bono arcade The former De Bono arcade, today renamed the Al Karama arcade, will be restored for the first time since its construction by the Italian colonists in the thirties. 32-Libye. Tripoli. Souk des dinandiers Au pied de la Tour de l'Horloge, les dinandiers du souk Al Ghizdarq façonnent marmites, pots, plateaux, croissants qui ornent la coupole des mosquées et autres quincailleries.

32-Libya. Tripoli. Coppersmithes souq At the foot of the Clock Tower, the copperware workers of the Al Ghizdarq souk make, among other things, pots, jugs, plates, and crescents that ornament mosques. 33-Libye. Tripoli. Ruelle de la médina La médina de Tripoli est composée de centaines de minuscules venelles labyrinthiques à arcades, qui permettent de se protéger du soleil. 33-Libya. Tripoli. Small streets in the medina The medina of Tripoli is composed of hundreds of miniscule labyrinth-like streets with archways to protect from the sun. 34-Libye. Tripoli. Zawiya Al Kadriyya. Vieille ville. Médina Faisant face à la mosquée Al Naga, un petit minaret en équilibre signale la Zawiya Al Kadriyya. Dans ce quartier se trouve le c?ur battant des souks les plus animés. 34-Libya. Tripoli. Zawiya Al Kadriyya. Old town. Medina Across from the Al Naga mosque, a small shaky-looking minaret indicates the Zawiya Al Kadriyya. In this part of town can be found the liveliest souks. 35-Libye. Tripoli. Musée de la Jamahiriya Reconstitution d'une scène de vie pittoresque de nomades libyens au musée de la Jamahiriya. 35-Libya. Tripoli. Jamahiriya Museum Reconstruction of the picturesque typical life of Libyan nomads, in the Jamahiriya museum. 36-Libye. Tripoli. Mosquée Sidi Salem. Enfants football. Vieille ville. Médina Bâtie sur le flanc d'une colline contre laquelle se blottissait Uiat (l'ancienne Tripoli), la mosquée Sidi Salem serait antérieure au XVe siècle.

36-Libya. Tripoli. Sidi Salem mosque. Children playing football. Old town. Medina Constructed on the side of the hill of Uiat (the former Tripoli city), the Sidi Salem mosque is said to date from before the 15th century. 37-Libye. Tripoli. Souk pendant la fermeture À l'heure du déjeuner et jusque vers le milieu de l'après-midi, les marchands des souks ferment boutique. Un simple drap recouvre les produits vendus. 37-Libya. Tripoli. Souq closed The sellers in the souk close their shops during lunchtime and until the middle of the afternoon. A simple sheet covers the goods to be sold. 38-Libye. Tripoli. Port. Pêcheur Symbole des années noires dues à l'embargo, des carcasses rouillées de bateaux en plein c?ur du célèbre port de Tripoli, font aujourd'hui le bonheur des pêcheurs. 38-Libya. Tripoli. Harbour. Fisherman Symbol of the years under embargo, the rusted carcasses of ships in the port of Tripoli today provide for an excellent catch of fish, to the fishermen's great joy. 39-Libye. Tripoli. Palais Karamanli Le palais Karamanli, du XVIIIe siècle, est aujourd'hui transformé en musée de la culture ottomane. Chaque pièce illustre la vie des riches familles ottomanes. 39-Libya. Tripoli. Karamanli palace The Karamanli palace, constructed in the 18th century, has become the museum of Ottoman culture. Each room represents the daily life of rich Ottoman families. 40-Libye. Tripoli. Hammam Darghout Aujourd'hui seulement au nombre de deux dans la vieille ville, les hammams

accueillent encore quelques bien rares clients, surtout des immigrés, privés de salle de bains, dans leur logement sommaire. 40-Libya. Tripoli. Darghout bathhouse Today, there are only two public baths in the old city. Most of the rare clients are immigrants who do not have bathrooms in their small apartments. 41-Libye. Tripoli. Place Verte Parking la journée, la Place Verte, charnière entre la médina et le quartier italien, devient le soir le lieu de divertissement des Tripolitains. Pour quelques pièces, les jeunes se font photographier sur des motos et les couples dans de merveilleuses panières décorées. 41-Libya. Tripoli. Green Square Used as a parking lot during the day, the Green Square, link between the medina and the Italian district, becomes in the evening a pleasure spot for the Tripolians. For only a few coins, young people have themselves photographed on motorcycles and couples in beautiful decorated large baskets. 42-Libye. Tripoli. Bateau restaurant abandonné Aujourd'hui à moitié coulé, le bateau Ouagadougou fut encore il y a quelques années un des restaurants les plus huppés de la capitale. 42-Libya. Tripoli. Abandoned boat used as restaurant Today half sunk, the boat Ouagadougou was still just a few years ago one of the upper-crust restaurants of Tripoli. 43-Libye. Tripoli. Boutique branchée La rue du 1er septembre est la rue branchée et occidentale du quartier italien. Partout des boutiques vendent des habits qui n'ont rien à voir avec la tenue


trousseau.

traditionnelle libyenne. 43-Libya. Tripoli. Trendy shop The First of September Street is the trendy occidental street in the Italian district. Everywhere, the shops sell fashion clothing, which has nothing to do with traditional Libyan dress. 44-Libye. Tripoli. Sortie de la médina Bien que restaurées depuis quelques années, les ruelles de la médina ont subi les outrages du XXe siècle : en guise de toit, les fils électriques se sont substitués aux arcades de pierre. 44-Libya. Tripoli. Leaving the medina Although they were restored a few years ago, the streets of the medina have been subjected to the ravages of the 20th century: for roofs, electrical wires have replaced the stone arcades. 45-Libye. Tripoli. Galerie de Bono L'ancienne Galerie de Bono, aujourd'hui galerie Al Karama, va subir sa première restauration depuis sa construction par les colons italiens dans les années trente. 45-Libya. Tripoli. De Bono arcade The former de Bono arcade, today renamed the Al Karama arcade, will be restored for the first time since its construction by the Italian colonists in the thirties. 46-Libye. Tripoli. Souk des jeunes mariés Le souk des jeunes mariés est un nouveau marché situé en dehors de la ville. Ici, les futures épouses trouvent une bonne partie de leur trousseau. 46-Libya. Tripoli. The newlyweds' souq The newlyweds' souk is a new market place located outside of the city. Here, the future brides can find a large part of their

47-Libye. Tripoli. Café bateau Moment de détente sur un bateau transformé en café, en face du port de Tripoli, qui a repris de l'activité depuis la fin de l'embargo. 47-Libya. Tripoli. Coffeehouse on a boat People relaxing on a boat used as a coffeehouse across from the Tripoli harbour. Since the end of the embargo, there is more activity in the port. 48-Libye. Tripoli. Hammam Helga Il reste peu de hammams traditionnels dans la capitale libyenne. Situé dans le souk de la médina, le hammam Helga est le plus fréquenté. Certains clients se prélassent, tandis que d'autres testent un massage vivifiant. 48-Libya. Tripoli. Helga bathhouse There are only few traditional baths remaining in Tripoli. The Helga bath, located in the souk of the medina, is the most visited. Some clients relax, while other test the stimulating massage. 49-Libye. Tripoli. Vieux port Tripoli a conservé son vieux port. Ici, pas de gros paquebots, mais quelques bateaux anciens qui prennent chaque jour la mer. 49-Libya. Tripoli. Old harbour Tripoli has kept its old harbour. There are no ocean liners here, just some old boats that head out to sea each day. 50-Libye. Tripoli. Souk de l'or L'or et les bijoux sont vendus au souk as Sagha mais aussi par des marchandes qui s'installent un étal de fortune et attendent le client. 50-Libya. Tripoli. Gold souq Gold and jewelry are sold in the As Sagha souk but also by street vendors who set up small stalls and wait for customers.

51-Libye. Tripoli. Café Kadhafi Pause thé dans un café sous l'?il du Guide, au pouvoir depuis 40 ans. 51-Libya. Tripoli. Gaddafi Coffeeshop Teatime in a coffeehouse, under the watchful eye of the Guide, in power for 40 years 52-Libye. Tripoli. Maison de la médina La médina est composée de maisons ottomanes, souvent en piteux état, faute de moyens pour restaurer. Ici, les propriétaires ont pris conscience de la valeur de leur bien et ont entamé les travaux. 52-Libya. Tripoli. Old house in the medina The medina is composed of Ottoman houses that are often dilapidated because of a lack of maintenance. The owners of this house have realized the value of it and have just begun the restoration work. 53-Libye. Tripoli. Café de la médina De nombreux cafés, investis par la clientèle masculine après l'heure de la sieste, se nichent dans les impasses de la médina. 53-Libya. Tripoli. Coffeehouse in the medina After their rest, men meet in the many coffeehouses located in the small streets of the medina. 54-Libye. Tripoli. Mosquée Darghout La mosquée Darghout fut baptisée ainsi en l'honneur d'un célèbre corsaire, Darghout Pacha, également premier gouverneur de Tripoli au XVIe siècle. Sa forme inhabituelle en « T » fut imposée car la mosquée utilisa le corps d'une église. 54-Libya. Tripoli. Darghout mosque The Darghout mosque was named in honor of the famous corsair Darghout Pacha, who was governor of Tripoli in the

16th century. Its unusual "T" form came about because the mosque was built on the framework of a former church. 55-Libye. Tripoli. Fondouk Ben Zekri La médina aurait compté une cinquantaine de fondouks. Le caravansérail Ben Zekri, restauré, accueille aujourd'hui des ateliers d'orfèvrerie. 55-Libya. Tripoli. Ben Zekri caravanserai The medina was said to be composed of about fifty caravansaries. The restored Ben Zekri caravanserai is now the place for gold workshops. 56-Libye. Tripoli. Café de la Poste. Héritage italien Ambiance italienne au café de la Poste, situé sous les immenses arcades mussoliniennes de l'Institut de la Protection sociale. 56-Libya. Tripoli. Post office coffeeshop. Italian heritage Italian atmosphere at the Café de la Poste, located under the huge Mussolini styled archways of the Institute of Social Welfare. 57-Libye. Tripoli. Pause du tisserand À l'heure du déjeuner, cet atelier de tisserand devient le lieu de rendez-vous des amis du quartier. Au mur, sont accrochées des centaines de photos d'habitants de la médina. 57-Libya. Tripoli. Weaver break At lunchtime, this weaving workshop becomes the meeting place for friends in the district. On the walls, there are hundreds of pictures of the medina's inhabitants. 58-Libye. Tripoli. Hammam Darghout Ce client contredit le sage Sénèque, qui critiquait le bain de vapeur, affirmant qu'on y suait sans effort. Sur les dalles de


marbre, on voit pourtant de nombreux habitués qui profitent de leur séance au hammam pour entretenir leur forme physique. 58-Libya. Tripoli. Darghout bathhouse Seneca used to say that the public steam bath was a place where we sweat without making any effort. That's not the case for this client. On the marble slabs, many regular customers are trying to keep in shape. 59-Libye. Tripoli. Hall d'hôtel. Ambiance « seventies » Cabines téléphoniques au design « seventies » dans le hall d'entrée de l'hôtel Bab el Bahr « la porte de la mer ». 59-Libya. Tripoli. Hotel entrance hall with a "seventies" design Phone booths with a seventies design, in the entrance hall of the Bab el Bahr "sea gate" hotel. 60-Libye. Tripoli. Nouveau centre commercial Le centre commercial El Talat vient d'ouvrir ses portes. À l'intérieur, un grand nombre de marques internationales sont proposées au client. Une nouveauté pour les Libyens, qui sortent tout juste de l'embargo. 60-Libya. Tripoli. New shopping center The El Talat shopping centre has just opened. Inside this mall, a lot of international trademarks are sold. This is something new for the Libyan people, now that the embargo has been lifted. 61-Libye. Tripoli. Mosquée Al Naga La mosquée Al Naga, le plus ancien lieu de culte de Tripoli, fut aussi le plus important jusqu'à l'édification de la

mosquée Karamanli en 1738. Certaines de ses colonnes proviennent d'édifices romains d'Oea, l'ancienne Tripoli. 61-Libya. Tripoli. Al Naga Mosque The Al Naga mosque is the oldest place of worship in Tripoli. It was also the most important before the construction of the Karamanli mosque in 1738. Some of its columns were taken from the Roman buildings of Oea, the ancient Tripoli. 62-Libye Tripoli. Forteresse Maintes fois abattue et reconstruite, la citadelle Assarya Al Hamra doit son allure extérieure aux colons espagnols du XVIe siècle et ses aménagements intérieurs aux Qaramanli (XIXe siècle). 62-Libya. Tripoli. Fortress Many times destroyed and reconstructed, the Assarya Al Hamra citadel owes its exterior appearance to the Spanish colonists of the 16th century and the interiors to the Qaramanli (19th century). 63-Libye. Tripoli. Vue générale de la médina Restaurée depuis quelques années et à nouveau fréquentée par les touristes, la médina de Tripoli revit. L'ancien comptoir carthaginois retrouve aussi de son influence d'antan. 63-Libya. Tripoli. General view of the medina Restored a few years ago, the medina of Tripoli is visited by the tourists again. The former Carthaginian trading post has regained its influence of old.


The new Tripoli of Africa