Page 1

Unknown, the island of Taiwan is an incredible nexus for Chinese culture,where futuristic modernity and ancestral traditions meet. «Made in Taiwan » How many times did you read these three undissociable and trite words ? The famous set phrase is tightly linked with the country just as much as you can find it on the label of electronic equipment . With such a rehash, who could conceive an island different from the little urbain, polluted, industrial and laborious nation we all imagine ? Nonetheless, Taiwan is not of the readymade, boring and tedious kind. In fact, it is the exact opposite. Otherwise, why would the Portuguese seafarers of the XVIth century, have baptised it "Ilha Formosan", the Portuguese for "The Beautiful Island" ?

Made in Taiwan... Photos and text ©Marc Dozier/LightMediation Contact - Thierry Tinacci LightMediation Photo Agency +33 (0)6 61 80 57 21 thierry@lightmediation.com


1729-28: In Changhua, Taoist ceremony organized by the group Goang Jiang Shou Goalu, the Eight Generals dance, three teenagers personifying war divinities of the Taoist pantheon


Made in Taiwan / 1729-01: Taipei, Taipei 101 tower, one of the highest towers in the world by architect company CY Lee & Partner Architects / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-02: Taiwan, Chiayi district, Alishan mountains, pickers Liao Lai-Men and Lee Li-Li picking up tea leaves in a plantation / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-03: Taipei, Martyr's Shrine, built in 1969 in a Ming style, changing of the guard / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-04: Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, Gold Buddha Building / Taiwan /


Made in Taiwan / 1729-05: Taroko National Park, Eternal Spring Shrine / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-06: In Taipei at theTaiwan Cement Hall, Taipei Eye, Chine opera singers Yang Shu Chin and Chang Snow striking a pose before going on stage / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-08: Taiwan, Taipei, National Chiang Kai shek Memorial Hall, built in memory of the former Chinese head of state Tchang Kai Shek / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-09: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, the Main Shrine housing / Taiwan /


1729-02: Taiwan, Chiayi district, Alishan mountains, pickers Liao Lai-Men and Lee Li-Li picking up tea leaves in a plantation


Made in Taiwan / 1729-10: In Tainan district, Tainan, Hsin Ji Gong Taoist temple, an actress from the Chinese opera company chinois Hsiou-Jen / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-11: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, the Great Buddha, 40 m high and surrounded by 480 Buddha statues / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-12: Taroko National Park, Chang Tchun Tse temple, nestling in the heart of the park mountains which can culminate at 3000 m high / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-13: Sun Moon Lake area, Confucius temple (Wen-Wa) / Taiwan /


Made in Taiwan / 1729-14: In Puli, Buddhist monastery Chung Tai Chan drawn by architect Lee They Yan, young nun maintaining the marble glossy aspect / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-15: Taiwan, Tainan district, Tainan, Hsin Ji Gong Taoist temple, during a Taoist ceremony called Kao Kung / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-16: Sun Moon Lake area, Pagoda Tsen (46 m high) built in 1971 on Mount Shapalah / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-17: In Tainan, Hsin Ji Gong taoist temple, Kao Kung ceremony / Taiwan /


1729-55: Taiwan, Taipei, downtown, street


Made in Taiwan / 1729-18: Taiwan, Taitung district, Chengkung, Sanhsientai bridge, or the Terrace of the Three Immortals / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-19: Lugu mountains, Oolong Tea plantations, considered as one of the best in the world, tea picker Huang Yiou / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-20: Taiwan, Nantou district, Puli, Buddhist monastery Chung Tai Chan drawn by architect Lee They Yan / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-21: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, the Great Buddha, 40 m high and surrounded by 480 Buddha statues / Taiwan /


Made in Taiwan / 1729-22: Taiwan, Kaohsiung district, Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, Sutra Calligraphy Hall workshop, students training to write Chinese calligraphy / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-23: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, gardener Wang Tu Jie watering plants in the garden called Five Hundred Arhats Garden / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-24: At Changhua, Taoist ceremony organized by the group Goang Jiang Shou Goalu, a teenager, Aoda, embodies one of the war divinities of the Taoist pantheon / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-25: In Taipei, National Chiang Kai shek Memorial Hall, built in memory of the former Chinese head of state Tchang Kai Shek / Taiwan /


1729-64: Taiwan, district de Kaohsiung, commune de Dashu, monastere bouddhiste de Fo Guang Shan, le temple Main Schrine abrite 3 Bouddhas : le Bouddha de la compassion "Amitabha", le Bouddha de

1729-51: In Taipei, Taipei 101 tower, one of the highest towers in the world by architect company CY Lee & Partner Architect


Made in Taiwan / 1729-26: In Tainan, Hsin Ji Gong temple during a taoist ceremony / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-27: Lugu mountains, Oolong Tea plantations, considered as one of the best in the world, tea pickers Chen Se, Huang Yiou, Kang Shieu-Chu, Chen Chiu-Wei and Kang Bin / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-28: In Changhua, Taoist ceremony organized by the group Goang Jiang Shou Goalu, the Eight Generals dance, three teenagers personifying war divinities of the Taoist pantheon /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-29: In Puli, Buddhist monastery Chung Tai Chan drawn by architect Lee They Yan, Buddha made out of white marble imported from Brazil / Taiwan /


Made in Taiwan / 1729-30: Taiwan, Nantou district, Sun Moon Lake area, Confucius temple (Wen-Wa) / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-31: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, Buddha of the Main Shrine / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-32: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, temple dedicated to the women, Great Compassion Shrine, woman praying / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-33: In Changhua, Taoist ceremony organized by the group Goang Jiang Shou Goalu, a teenager, embodies one of the war divinitie of the Taoist pantheon / Taiwan /


1729-66: In Tainan, Hsin Ji Gong Taoist temple, during a Taoist ceremony called Kao Kung


Made in Taiwan / 1729-34: Taiwan, Taitung district, Chengkung, Sanhsientai bridge, or the Terrace of the Three Immortals / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-35: In Taipei, Tong-Hawa night market, Ling Jiang Street, Mrs Juang Hin-Jun, fried squids seller / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-36: In Taipei, Taipei 101 tower, one of the highest towers in the world by architect company CY Lee & Partner Architects / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-37: Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan Cement Hall, Taipei Eye, Chine opera singer Yang Shu-Chin / Taiwan /


Made in Taiwan / 1729-38: Taiwan, Tainan district, Tainan, Tainan park, pavilion / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-39: Taiwan, Taipei, Lin Liu-Hsin Puppet Museum, puppets exhibition / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-40: In Taipei, Pao An (Bao An) Taoist temple, person in the room where the donors list is represented by small lights / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-41: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, the Great Buddha, 40 m high and surrounded by 480 Buddha statues / Taiwan /


1729-06: In Taipei at theTaiwan Cement Hall, Taipei Eye, Chine opera singers Yang Shu Chin and Chang Snow striking a pose before going on stage


Made in Taiwan / 1729-44: In Taipei, Lin Liu-Hsin Puppet Museum, master Chen Xi-Huang improvising a muppet show on the stage Xin Wan-Dan / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-45: In Tainan, Hsin Ji Gong Taoist temple, during a Taoist ceremony called Kao Kung / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-51: In Taipei, Taipei 101 tower, one of the highest towers in the world by architect company CY Lee & Partner Architect / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-55: Taiwan, Taipei, downtown, street / Taiwan /


Made in Taiwan / 1729-58: Lugu mountains, Oolong Tea plantations, considered as one of the best in the world, tea pickers Chen Se, Huang Yiou, Kang Shieu-Chu, Chen Chiu-Wei and Kang Bin / Taiwan /

1729-59: Ta誰wan, district de Changhua, commune de Changhua, ceremonie taoiste organisee par le groupe Goang Jiang Shou Goalu, danse des Huit Generaux, camion transportant l'orchestre

Made in Taiwan / 1729-60: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, the Main Shrine housing / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-61:In Tainan, M. Chang Yi-Chang practicing Kung fu Sword / Taiwan /


1729-25: In Taipei, National Chiang Kai shek Memorial Hall, built in memory of the former Chinese head of state Tchang Kai Shek


Made in Taiwan / 1729-62: Sun Moon Lake area, Confusius temple / Taiwan /

1729-64: Taiwan, district de Kaohsiung, commune de Dashu, monastere bouddhiste de Fo Guang Shan, le temple Main Schrine abrite 3 Bouddhas : le Bouddha de la compassion "Amitabha", le Bouddha de

Made in Taiwan / 1729-66: In Tainan, Hsin Ji Gong Taoist temple, during a Taoist ceremony called Kao Kung / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-70: In Taipei, Taipei 101 tower, one of the highest towers in the world by architect company CY Lee & Partner Architect / Taiwan /


Made in Taiwan / 1729-71: In Taipei, Taiwan Cement Hall, Taipei Eye, percussionists during a Chinese opera representation / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-79: In Taipei, Taiwan Cement Hall, Taipei Eye, Chine opera singers Yang Shu Chin striking a pose before going on stage / Taiwan /

Made in Taiwan / 1729-73: In Lugang, Wu Duen-How has been making traditional lanterns since he is 15 years-old / Taiwan /


1729-04: Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, Gold Buddha Building


1729-09: In Dashu, Fo Guang Shan Buddhist monastery, the Main Shrine housing


Made in Taiwan... Unknown, the island of Taiwan is an incredible nexus for Chinese culture,where futuristic modernity and ancestral traditions meet. ÂŤMade in Taiwan Âť How many times did you read these three undissociable and trite words ? The famous set phrase is tightly linked with the country just as much as you can find it on the label of electronic equipment . With such a rehash, who could conceive an island different from the little urbain, polluted, industrial and laborious nation we all imagine ? Nonetheless, Taiwan is not of the readymade, boring and tedious kind. In fact, it is the exact opposite. Otherwise, why would the Portuguese seafarers of the XVIth century, have baptised it "Ilha Formosan", the Portuguese for "The Beautiful Island" ? With 370km of length and 140km of width, the Beautiful is not a tiny State-Island. Seven times the size of Bali, the island is a hundred kilometres away from continental China and is split by a long mountain chain covered with dense tropical vegetation. The majority of the population lives on the western urbanized plain, the rest of the island remaining really wild. From the northern plains surrounding Taipei to the high slopes of the west and the centre, Taiwan produces 20000 tons of tea each year, including the famous Alishan variety, which is considered as one of the best in the world. The island is also famous for its multitude of natural and architectural sites which names are full of poetry: the marble caves of Taroko - ranked among the seven wonders of Asia-, the superb mausoleum of the eternal spring, the pagoda of the Sun and the Moon's Lake, and, above all, the Fo Guang Shan monastery - a real little town where almost 800 monks and nuns are living which is in the biggest three of the world. Despite the bloody upheavals of a History shadowed by China's influence, the Taiwanese people are deeply attached to their Chinese cultural heritage. Preserved from the cultural divorce provoked by the Maoist revolution, the country managed to preserve the refined heritage of the Han culture. Here, modernity did not wash away tradition. Instead it took its inspiration from it.

This is why the famous Taipei 101 tower, also known as "the majestuous turquoise blue bamboo", borrows a lot from various classical forms, in order to elaborate its futuristic design. Only a couple of blocks away, in the old district, it is not rare that the traffic flow stops because a Taoist procession is on its way. Fireworks, drummings accompany the eight generals, grimed and armed with tridents, which come straight out from Hell. Nobody will be surprised because here, religious processions, calligraphy, opera, music, medicine and traditional gastronomy are part of everyday life. Taiwan truly is a genuine concentration of Chinese culture no bigger than a 36 188 km2 pocket handkerchief.


Made in Taiwan...(Frenc h text) «Made in Taiwan » Combien de fois a-t-on lu ces trois mots aussi galvaudés qu'indissociables ? Obsédante, la fameuse formule colle en effet au pays comme les petites étiquettes au dos de nos produits électro-niques. Fabriqué à Taiwan : à force de rabâchage, qui pourrait imaginer l'île autrement que comme une petite nation-atelier, urbaine et tentaculaire, polluée, industrielle et laborieuse ? Une terre sans âme en somme, croisement hybride entre un Hong Kong high-tech et une antique banlieue soviétique. « Beaucoup de visiteurs qui découvrent pour la première fois Taiwan sont surpris de constater (...) qu'en réalité, notre île est essentiellement couverte de collines verdoyantes et de montagnes escarpées... », regrette ainsi Janice Seh-jen Lai, la directrice général de l'office du tourisme. Longtemps boudé par les voyageurs, le pays qui ambitionne aujourd'hui d'attirer cinq millions de touristes en 2008, est bien - il faut le reconnaître - victime de son image. Si les stéréotypes puisent d'ordinaire leurs racines dans un terreau de vérité, force est de constater que les préjugés n'ont jamais autant fait mentir les idées reçues. Désignée en France sous le nom de Formose jusque dans les années 1960, Taiwan n'a rien d'une île ready made, en préfabriqué, ennuyeuse et insipide. Les marins portugais ne la baptisèrent-ils pas Ilha Formosa (La Belle Île) au XVIè siècle ? Avec trois cent soixante-dix kilomètres de long sur cent quarante de large, la

Belle n'a rien d'une minuscule île-État. Bien au contraire. Grande comme quatre fois la Corse, l'île ancrée à une centaine de kilomètres à l'est de la Chine continentale est scindée par une longue épine dorsale montagneuse couverte de végétation tropicale dense. Si la majeure partie des vingt-trois millions de Taïwanais occupe essentiellement la plaine urbanisée de l'Ouest, le reste de l'île demeure extrême-ment sauvage. Six parcs nationaux et une kyrielle de réserves naturelles y protègent près de 20 % de sa surface totale. Un véritable sanctuaire botanique, ornithologique et géologique. Les amateurs viennent de loin pour s'enfoncer au c?ur des gorges de marbre de Taroko qui comptent parmi les sept merveilles d'Asie. Pour flâner sur les plages argentées de l'île-satellite de Penghu. Ou pour atteindre le toit de l'Asie du Sud-Est, le mont Yushan où l'on « peut respirer la couleur du ciel » à près de quatre mille mètres d'altitude. Bien sûr, la capitale, Taipei, comme toutes les autres villes de la mégalopole du littoral ouest, souffre de la pollution et des embouteillages. Évidemment, elle connaît son ballet de scooters pétaradants et une frénésie pour l'architecture ultramoderne dont la tour Taipei 101 est considérée comme le fleuron. Achevé en 2004, le gratte-ciel signé par l'architecte C.Y. Lee collectionne les records : 1,7 milliard d'euros pour une capacité de douze mille personnes, cent un étages pour cinq cent huit mètres de hauteur? et seulement trente-sept secondes pour atteindre le sommet embarqué à bord de l'ascenseur le plus rapide du monde avec des pointes à soixante kilomètres/heure. Bien qu'elle ait déjà été dépassée par le chantier de la tour Burj de Dubaï, « One-O-One » comme on la surnomme - restera probablement la plus haute tour achevée

du monde symbole !

jusqu'en

2009?

Tout

un

S'ils sont fiers de ce nouvel emblème dressé comme un pied de nez à la Chine continentale, les Taïwanais restent cependant plus que tout attachés à l'héri-tage de la culture chinoise. Ici, la modernité n'a pas balayé la tradition. Elle s'en est inspirée. Surnommée « majestueux bambou bleu turquoise », la tour Taipei 101 emprunte ainsi de nombreuses formes classiques afin d'élaborer son design futuriste. À quelques rues de là dans les quartiers anciens, il n'est pas rare que la marée automobile s'arrête pour faire place au passage d'un cortège taoïste avec son lot de pétards, ses roulements de tambour et ses huit généraux, gri-més et armés de tridents, tout juste sortis de l'enfer. Personne ne s'en étonne-ra. Ici, processions religieuses, calligraphie, opéra, musique, médecine et gastronomie traditionnelle chinoise font partie intégrante du quotidien. Un véritable concentré de culture Han dans un mouchoir de poche de 36 188 km2. Historiquement liée à la Chine depuis des siècles malgré des périodes de colonisation espagnoles, hollandaises et japonaises, Taiwan devient en effet en 1949 la terre d'exil de Tchang Kaï-chek fuyant le continent et l'armée communiste de Mao Tsé-toung. Accueillant les membres en déroute du parti nationaliste, le Guomindang, et plus d'un million et demi de Chinois, l'île devient alors, de facto, la République de Chine désignée par l'abréviation ROC pour République of China. À ne - surtout ! - pas confondre avec celle qui est devenue la République Populaire de Chine (RPC) : l'immense Chine que l'on dit continentale. Là. Juste en face. À la fois « mère patrie »

historique et « frère ennemi ». Depuis, de crises en apaisements, le statu quo est de rigueur afin de faire le moins de vagues possible dans le mince détroit séparant les deux pays qui ne se reconnaissent, ni l'un ni l'autre, comme des nations légitimes ! Avec ses premières élections présidentielles en 1996, le jeune état démocratique tente cependant d'affirmer sa souveraineté sans froisser son voisin susceptible et gargantuesque qui réclame une réunification dans des termes semblables à Hong Kong et Macao. Sanglants, les rebondissements d'une Histoire sous l'influence de la Chine, du Japon et des cultures originelles austronésiennes ont stimulé un fort sen-timent identitaire et préservé Taiwan de la césure culturelle imposée par la révolution maoïste. Précieuse, cette continuité a ainsi permis de préserver - au terme d'une odyssée de plus quinze ans l'extraordinaire collection de six cent cinquante mille pièces d'art chinois issues de la Cité interdite de Pékin. « Cinq mille ans d'histoire dans une boîte à chaussure », s'amuse à résumer l'un des visiteurs du Musée national du Palais où les trésors sont aujourd'hui conservés. Une permanence historique qui expliquerait également bien des particularités. « C'est parce que notre pays a toujours été libre, se félicite Pang Chu Liu, maître installé à Chung-Li et pratiquant une calligraphie sur céramique spécifique à Formose, que l'art de la calligraphie - pourtant très respectueux des formes anciennes s'autorise ici tant d'innovation et d'originalité pour atteindre la beauté. » Malgré l'omniprésence des supérettes sans âme « 7/11 » et l'idolâtrie puérile pour les dessins du chat japonais Hello Kitty, le raffinement est en effet un art de vivre au quotidien. Une somme de délicatesses ordinaires qui transcendent


but que d'étancher la soif, explique ainsi Hsien-Tang Liu, l'un des responsables de l'asso-ciation des planteurs de la région de Lugu. C'est un art à part entière comme la musique, la peinture ou la composition florale. » Esthètes, les Taïwanais - laborieux et cartésiens - n'en restent pas moins superstitieux et respectueux des traditions ancestrales. Pour s'en convaincre, il suffira de prendre n'importe quel ascenseur du pays. Et de compter les étages qui défilent - 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7... - pour découvrir que le numéro 4, vilain petit canard de la numérologie chinoise, a été proscrit. Définitivement. Prononcé « Si » simplement avec une intonation différente de celle du mot désignant la mort, le chiffre est en effet le comble du mauvais augure. Et à Taiwan, on ne plaisante pas avec les superstitions. Même dans les hôtels de luxe de standard international. Où l'on pourra manger de délicieux croissants à la française, mais en aucun cas demander une chambre au quatrième étage. Un étage qui ne sera jamais, c'est sûr, « Made in Taiwan ». GUIDE PRATIQUE Taiwan * Injustement méconnue, Taiwan réserve bien des surprises avec un détonnant cocktail d'architecture futuriste, de culture chinoise traditionnelle et de gastronomie raffinée.

mémo Y aller 7 Cathay Pacific La compagnie Cathay Pacific propose des vols A/R Paris-Taipei à partir 644 e.

Avec dix vols par semaine de Paris vers Hong Kong (vols de nuit) et vingt vols par jour de Hong Kong vers Taipei, la compagnie est probablement la plus pratique et la plus rapide pour se rendre à Taiwan. Stop-over gratuit à Hong Kong. Vols de prolongement du vol direct gratuits vers Taiwan. Tél. 01 41 43 75 75 www.cathaypacific.fr adresse utile 7 Office de tourisme de Taiwan Renseignements uniquement par téléphone et email. Envoi de brochures gratuitement. c/o Interface Tourism 11 bis rue Blanche 75009 Paris Tél. 01 53 25 12 01 Fax. 01 53 25 11 12 www.taiwantourisme.com taiwan@interfacetourism.com À LIRE 7 Guides - Taiwan, Édition Le Petit Futé, 2007, 16 e. Le guide le plus complet sur le pays. - Taiwan, Édition Lonely Pla-net, 2004, 26 e (en anglais). - Taiwan-Plus, Éditions Soli-lang, 2008, 19 e.

se loger se restaurer 7 Petit hôtel simple dans la région des plantations de thé de Lugu, le Lu Din Manor offre une superbe vue panoramique sur la vallée. Nuit à partir de 50 e. 10/18, Dong Ding Road - Lugu, Nantou 558 Tél. 00 886 (0) 492 75 01 00

www.ludin.com.tw 7 « From farm to table » : délicieux restaurant où tous les produits sont cultivés de façon biologique dans une ferme appartenant à l'établissement. Qualité assurée. Menu entre 15 et 50 e. 128, Zhong Xiao Dong Lu Si Duan Road Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 227 72 51 23 7 Original ! Excellent restaurant, le Sun Moon Lake Full House B&B propose une cuisine à base de fruits. Compter moins de 10 e par personne. L'établissement propose également des chambres de charme (environ 80 e la nuit). Une bonne adresse. N°8, Shueisiou St, Yuchich Sun Moon Lake - Nantou 555 Tél. 00 886 (0) 492 85 03 07 7 Réputé dans tout le pays, The Lalu, superbe hôtel design combinant luxe et charme, trône sur les rives du lac du Soleil et de la Lune. Nuit à partir de 330 e. N°142, Jungshing Road Sun Moon Lake - Nantou 555 Tél. 00 886 (0) 492 85 53 13 www.thelalu.com.tw 7 Le Shabu Shabu propose des fondues de légumes, poissons, viandes... Délicieux. Entre 5 et 10 e le repas. 119, Zhong Yuan Road - Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 221 00 19 88 7 Cuisine sichuanaise exquise mais très épicée au restaurant Ke Man Tang, à réserver aux amateurs ! Essayer le poulet pigmenté. Compter 4/6 e par repas. 227, Min Quan Road - Lukang Tél. 00 886 (0) 047 75 56 01 7 Le Du Hiao yue est un délicieux petit restaurant économique. Goûter les huîtres frites, le tofu frit et les rouleaux de crevettes. Compter 5 e par repas. N°26, Chung Cheng Road - Tainan Tél. 00 886 (0) 662 23 17 44

À découvrir 7 Haute de 508 m, la tour Taipei 101 est considérée, en 2008, comme la plus élevée du monde. Vue imprenable du sommet. Accès libre au centre commercial. Accès à l'observatoire : 7,5 e. Entrée au 5è étage. 89th Floor - No7 Hsinyi Road Section 5 Taipei City Tél. 00 886 (0) 281 01 88 99 www.tfc101.com.tw 7 Considéré comme le plus grand monastère de Taiwan, Fo Guang Shan est l'un des plus importants sites de pèlerinage de l'île. Impressionnant ! N'hésitez pas à y consacrer une journée. Entrée libre. Visite gratuite mais visite guidée uniquement sur rendez-vous (contact par courriel en anglais : fgs6205@ fgs.org.tw, fgshqhy@ms76.hinet.net ou hue_shou@ yahoo.com). Possibilité de dormir sur place en réservant (donation de 21 e la nuit). Restaurant végétarien sur place seulement pour les pensionnaires (donation libre). Fo Guang Shan, Ta Shu - Kaohsiung 84010 - Taiwan Tél. 00 886 (0) 76 56 19 21 www.fgs.org.tw 7 Ne manquez surtout pas de visiter le musée national du Palais, sanctuaire de l'art chinois qui compte 650 000 pièces (deux fois plus que le Louvre) dont 15 000 sont exposées ! Une impressionnante collection. Entrée : 3 e. 221, Chihshan Road, section 2 - Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 228 81 20 21 www.npm.gov.tw 7 Superbe spectacle d'opéra chinois à la fois traditionnel et moderne. Un grand moment assuré. Représentation chaque vendredi et samedi soir. Entrée : 18,50 e. Taipei Eye - Taiwan Cement Hall 113, Chungshan North RoadSec.2 -


Taipei Entrée par Chinchou Road. Tél. 00 886 (0) 225 68 26 77 www.taipeieye.com 7 Impressionnant, le monastère moderne de Chung Tai Chan peut être visité en partie de 8 heures à 17 heures. Visite guidée gratuite (donation libre). 1, Chung Tai Road - Puli - Nantou 545 Tél. 00 886 (0) 492 93 02 15 www.chungtai.org 7 Le Lin Liu-Hsin, très beau musée dédié aux marionnettes asiatiques, ravira aussi bien les grands que les petits. Atelier de fabrication au rez-de-chaussée. Téléphoner à l'avance pour savoir quand ont lieu les représentations. Entrée : 2,5 e. N°79, Xi-Ning N. Road - Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 225 56 89 09 www.taipeipuppet.com 7 Les gorges de Taroko situées sur la côte est : impressionnant canyon de marbre long de 20 km faisant partie des 7 sept merveilles d'Asie. À ne pas manquer : la visite du Mausolée du Printemps Éternel. 7 Déplacée afin d'échapper à la destruction lors d'un projet d'extension urbain, la maison historique de Lin An-tai permet de découvrir l'architecture et le mobilier d'une maison bourgeoise taïwanaise, il y a deux cents ans. Entrée gratuite. 5, Binqiang Road - Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 225 98 15 72 bonnes pistes 7 Une bonne adresse pour acheter du thé de qualité. Le meilleur est celui des récoltes de printemps et d'automne (12 e). Association des producteurs de thé d'Alisan

N°68-10, Si Ding - Gong Tian village Tél. 00 886 (0) 652 58 69 89 7 Minuscule échoppe, 1001 thés propose des dizaines de variétés de thés accommodés de mille et une façons. Compter entre 0,4 à 1,5 e. À goûter : le thé à la bière ! 61, Tong Hua Road - Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 227 08 37 31 7 À Taipei, cette petite échoppe propose des formules de massage très variées : pieds et épaule (40 mi-nutes/10 e), pieds seulement (70 minutes/16 e) et corps (2 heures/33 e). 92, Lin Jiang road - Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 222 77 45 67 7 D'après les habitants du quartier, cette petite boutique propose les meilleurs massages de pieds du marché de nuit de Tong-Hwa. À partir de 10 e. New Big Xin - 97, Lin-Jian Road - Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 227 08 68 38 7 Avec le Cooking Studio, du mardi au dimanche, de 9h30 à 13 heures, il est possible de prendre des cours de cuisine taïwanaise mais également chinoise ou japonaise avec un chef réputé. Achat des produits le matin au marché de Taipei, cours et dégustation à midi. Cours en chinois mais il est possible d'organiser une traduction en anglais. Compter 70 e. 2F, N° 170 - Jong Cherng road, section 2 Tien-mou - Taipei Tél. (02) 2876 7167 www.cookingstudio.com.tw 7 À goûter absolument au cours du voyage : un verre de lait de soja pour quelques centimes d'euros. Délicieux ! M. Chen Wenzhen - 73, rue Tong Hua Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 227 08 61 49 7 Depuis soixante ans, Wu Duen-How fabrique à Tainan de superbes lanternes peintes en papier. Compter 2 e pour un petit modèle, 20 e pour une

lanterne de taille moyenne et 600 e pour les plus grandes. 310, Zhong Shan road - Tainan Tél. 00 886 (0) 447 77 66 80 7 Non loin de Taipei, trois artistes (Pang Chiu Liu, Su Kuo et Justin Cheng) fabriquent de façon confidentielle de superbes céramiques calligraphiées. Pièces uniques à partir de 200 e (dimension 30x30 cm). Contacter Justin Cheng (en anglais) par courriel : chengchengyih@xuite.net 50, Yuemei Road - Jhongli Tél. 00 886 (0) 933 86 16 68 7 Francophone et sympathique, Angela Lee organise des séjours sur mesure pour de petits groupes constitués. Tarifs en fonction de la région et de la durée. À partir de 120 e par jour. 2er No.1-1.allery 38. Tai-soon Street 10648 Taipei Tél. 00 886 (0) 939 10 79 91 cutejoyce20012001@yahoo.com.tw

voyagistes 7 L'agence Yoketaï propose un voyage en individuel, entièrement modulable, de neuf jours à partir de 2 185 e par personne. Découverte de Taipei, des gorges de Taroko et du lac du Soleil et de la Lune. Tél. 01 45 56 58 23 www.atlv.net 7 Spécialiste de l'Asie, l'agence Asia propose un séjour de six jours pouvant être complété par des modules de quelques jours, à partir de 1 352 e. Tél. 01 44 41 50 10 www.asia.com 7 La Maison de la Chine propose six jours à Taipei à partir de 720 e. Tél. 01 40 51 95 00 www.maisondelachine.fr et aussi

CFA voyages - Tél. 01 44 23 23 13 www.voyages-a-taiwan.com // Ikhar - Tél. 01 43 06 73 13 - www.ikhar.com // Nomade Aventures - Tél. 0825 701 702 www.nomade-aventure.com // Nostal Asie - Tél. 001 43 13 29 29 - www.ann.fr // Voyageurs du monde - Tél. 0892 23 79 79 - www.vdm.com °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°° °°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°°

Eléments d'information concernant les images principales pour de grandes légendes Légende : Dans une plantation de la région montagneuse d'Alishan, Liao Lai-Men cueille de jeunes pousses de thé. Des plaines du Nord ceinturant Taipei aux versants d'altitude du Centre et de l'Ouest, Taiwan produit plus de vingt mille tonnes de thé par an avec une surface totale de vingt et un mille cinq cents hectares exploités. D'une suprême pureté, les variétés cul-tivées sur l'île (Dongding Oolong, Bai Hao, Tai-Cha...) demandent autant de savoir-faire et de délicatesse que de temps et de main-d'?uvre. Coûteux, le breuvage qui peut atteindre plus de deux mille euros le kilo s'adresse aux connaisseurs, et 99 % de la production est ainsi con-sommée par les Taïwanais eux-mêmes, fins amateurs. Poussant à plus de deux mille mètres d'altitude, le thé d'Alishan - célèbre dans le monde entier - est con-sidéré comme l'un des meilleurs. Cette variété, récoltée seulement deux fois par an, a la particularité de générer des feuilles pouvant être infusées jusqu'à dix fois, la troisième étant considérée comme la plus pure.


de CD, DVD, livres, journaux et bandes dessinées, mais également au cours des program-mes télévisés de la chaîne bouddhiste « Beautiful Life Télévision ». Légende : Au nord de Taipei, sur les rives de la rivière Keelung, le mausolée des Martyrs est gardé 24 heures sur 24 par un peloton de soldats sélectionnés parmi les jeunes recrues effectuant leur service militaire. Bâti dans un style d'inspiration Ming en 1969 au coeur d'une enceinte de cinq mille mètres carrés, le monument est consacré au souvenir des trois cent trente mille jeunes soldats morts durant le conflit contre le Japon et la guerre civile avec les communistes dans les années 1940 et 1950. Toutes les heures, la relève de la garde offre au public extrêmement nombreux, généralement composé d'élè-ves des écoles de l'île, un étonnant ballet minutieusement orchestré. Tous les ans, le 29 mars pour la fête de la jeunesse et le 3 septembre pour la fête des mi-litaires, le président vient y rendre hom-mage à ceux qui se sont sacrifiés pour la jeune nation asiatique.

Légende : Au monastère bouddhiste de Fo Guang Shan à Dashu, le moine Hue Shou et une croyante s'attardent devant le bâtiment des Bouddhas d'Or (Gold Buddha Building) serti par quatre-vingt-huit alcôves con-tenant chacune une représentation de Bouddha éclairée à la tombée du jour. ?uvrant à la propagation des lumières du bouddhisme dans le monde, le com-plexe religieux est au c?ur d'un réseau international qui compte plus de deux cents monastères, au Brésil, aux États-Unis, en Australie, en France et même en Afrique du Sud. Exploitant tous les moyens modernes de communication, le centre high-tech diffuse ses enseigne-ments à travers son site Internet (www. fgs.org.tw), la publication

Légende : Lors d'une représentation donnée au théâtre Novel Hall du quartier Zhongshan à Taipei, les danseuses Yang Shu-Chin et Chang-Snow de la troupe Taipei Eye incarnent deux princesses rivales, Xao Chin et Bia Su Jin. Importé de Chine au XVIè siècle par les immigrants des pro-vinces de Fujian et Guangdong, l'opéra chinois - également appelé « opéra de Pékin » - mêle dans un grand spectacle à la fois savant et populaire, la musique, la danse, le chant et le théâtre mais aussi les arts martiaux et le mime. Extrême-ment codifiés et élaborés, maquillages et costumes d'inspiration Ming permettent de personnifier seigneurs, impératrices, guerriers, dieux et démons. Créé en 1915 par Xian-Rong Koo, un homme d'affaire passionné par les arts traditionnels chinois, le théâtre Novel Hall de Taipei fut détruit par les Américains durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Reconstruit par C.F. Koo, fils du fondateur, il a rouvert en 1997 dans un nouveau bâtiment où sont présentées les vendredis et samedis soir des représentations d'opéra chinois.

Légende : Au monastère bouddhiste de Fo Guang Shan, les pèlerins prient dès cinq heures du matin à l'intérieur du sanctuaire prin-cipal (Main Schrine) abritant trois grands Bouddhas : celui de la compassion, Ami-tabha (à gauche), de l'enseignement, Sakyamuni (au centre) et de la médecine, Bhaisajyaguru (à droite). Fondé en 1949 par Shing Yun à Dashu, non loin de Kaoh-siung sur la côte sud-ouest du pays, le site monastique

dont le nom Fo Guang Shan (ou Fokuangshan) peut être traduit par « La montagne de la lumière de Bouddha » est considéré comme le plus important de Taiwan et compte parmi les trois plus grands au monde. Sur plus de cinquante-deux hectares, temples gigantesques, université théologique, salles de méditation, de calligraphie, bibliothèques et jardins font du com-plexe religieux une véritable petite ville abritant près de huit cents moines et nonnes. Ouvert au public, le monastère bouddhiste issu du courant Mahâyâna - dit du « grand véhicule » - accueille plus d'un million de pèlerins par an.

Made in Taiwan...  

Unknown, the island of Taiwan is an incredible nexus for Chinese culture, where futuristic modernity and ancestral traditions meet.«Made in...