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Fashion - Fall 2013


produced by Light Architect, Fall 2013


Editor Harper Staples harperstaples.com harper@pixyt.com

Designer Samuel Delesque samueldelesque.com sam@pixyt.com

Product Marketer Zachary Obasiolu wafflesafterclass.com zach@pixyt.com

French Agent JĂŠrĂŠmy Cuenin jeremycuenin.com jeremy@pixyt.com

Fashion - Fall 2013


Simon Bendix Borregaard is a Denmark-born, Lon-

don-based photographer about to start his MA at Middlesex University. He credits taking his first photograph at age 7 as the beginning of his love affair with photography. After attending a six-month course at the prestigious Krabbesholm School of Art and Design in Denmark, Borgaard begin to pursue this dream professionally. “I started looking at people and buildings completely differently when I discovered photographers like Gregory Crewdson and Tim Walker. When I make my portraits I often draw parallels and inspiration from Irving Penn.” His most recent work is a documentary-style series of portraits taken at Denmark’s Roskilde Music Festival.

Our cont

Katja Wassermayer currently lives and studies in Berlin, but dreams of working as a fashion and beauty photographer in Japan. Her “Les Somnambules” series is inspired by the surrealistic and intangible figures that appear in dreams. She cites photographers René, Radka and Vee Speers as important influences for this work.

Katja BDR is the one of the youngest of our contributors. At 20 years old, she

has been taking photographs for five years. Her series “Childhood Dreams” was created with the assistance of stylist Amine and model Antoine Musy, and aims give the theme of childhood dreams a fashion context. A futuristic superhero, a sailor and a ‘revisited’ Indiana Jones are just a few of the characters she considers in this project. 16 year old model Katerina Vanková lives in Brno. She began modeling at age 13, when she was invited by a relative to take part in a fashion show, and then went on to be signed by an agency. “My dream in life is live in a foreign country with a good husband and to be successful in my job. I want to continue modeling and later become maybe a lawyer or a psychologist. I love travelling so I would be excited to visit China, Australia, Madagascar (because of the film called “Madagascar” :D), USA, France, Italy, Norway,... When I was 13, I planned round-the-world tour.” For anyone planning to visit Prague, Katarina recommends visiting Vaclavske Namesti Square and Staromestsky Orloj, and Stromovka Park before anything else.

Neringa Rekasiute is a fashion and portrait photographer based in Lon-

don. Her main interest is female sexuality from a feminine perspective, she is always very eager to work with fashion. Currently she is working on two upcoming solo exhibitions in Ibiza and Vilnius, Lithuania.


Danish Camilla Storgaard moved to Berlin four years ago at age 20. She says Berlin finally helped her to figure out who she was and what she wanted. “The freedom was overwhelming and it made me figure out who I was. It’s a relief when you always felt different. I still like to go back to Denmark but it’s hard to keep my friends there as I’ve changed a lot. I’m one of the long lost kids in Berlin now.” She says that her photos mirror her own lifestyle and the people she comes into contact with: “I document all my thoughts, love and concern and hope I in many years will see them as my pictured diary of my youth or maybe the youth of my Berlin generation”. Camilla is starting her B.A in photography in October 2013.

tributors

Borgan Sorg found photography a little later than our other contributors. It was only after being given an old camera by his uncle that he discovered what was to become his greatest interest. After leaving school (and his promising academic record) behind him to pursue what had become “more than a simple hobby”, Borgan had the chance to assist two photographers, who taught him everything he knows about the art. Today he has found the balance between work and his passion: photography.

After several years spent working in the fashion industry and taking pictures in her free time, Emilie Arfeuil decided to find a way to merge her two interests. In her series featured in this issue, Emilie tried to imagine a meeting between the banality of her local area and an ethereal “creature of fashion”. Making use of six images displayed in an editorial fashion, she transforms the six dresses created especially for the shoot by placing them within this unexpected context. “ The café where I drink coffee everyday, the pharmacy under my apartment, my local bakery, the entrance to my garage…the presence of the model made fiction all my local realities.”

Christophe Arnaudin is a fashion designer based in Paris. He works for

Alexandre Vauthier, a must-know Haute Couture house. However, Christophe is not only a designer; he has also worked as a professor of fashion and design at ESMOD, and has written articles and books about fashion. Read more about Rachel Saddedine and Dina Goldstein in their interviews below.

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Vancouver-based photographer Dina Goldstein considers an alternative ending for pop culture icons Barbie and Ken in her acclaimed series “In The Dollhouse”, set in an alternative world where ‘K’ struggles with his sexuality and ‘B’ faces the reality of a loveless marriage. Everything may be pink, but it’s certainly not rosy.


“In the Dollhouse” is a series that plays out as a narrative, peeking into the home and marriage of the world’s most iconic dolls, Barbie, and her partner Ken. It offers a commentary on the transient nature of beauty, the difficulty of marriage and the importance of authenticity.

inized by his manufacturer to the point where he is emasculated and his image defies social convention. Barbie is a representation of a woman that bears perfect and unnatural proportions. Although she has had many careers and has become the most powerful doll in the world, she is still mostly played with by litI wanted to question the nature of tle girls, who cast her as the happy marriage as a traditional institution homemaker. and whether it remains is a realistic contemporary concept for today. Finally I wanted to question society’s perception of beauty. How and why Also I wanted to examine the gender we value beauty? How much weight rolls of the two dolls; the social and does it carry within the walls of our behavioral norms that are generally lives? considered appropriate for either a man or a woman. Ken has been femFashion - Fall 2013


How did you come up with the concept of ‘B’ and ‘K’? Did your series “Fallen Princesses” have any effect on this project? The inspiration for “In the Dollhouse” came partly from watching my two daughters, Jordan (now age 7) and Zoe (age 3), playing with their Ken and Barbie dolls. I started to think

about the messages they were receiving from these figures. Barbie, for example, is supposed to represent the ‘perfect’ woman, but her body has impossible proportions, while Ken, the ‘male’ figure, seems to become more and more effeminate every year. I let my imagination go wild and created an alternative world for these characters.


B’s identity seems to be in flux during this series: she tries to transform herself into what she believes is K’s “ideal”, but it actually ends up destroying her (she quite literally “loses her head”). Why do you choose this approach to B’s representation?

hair! But at the end they all end up missing a limb or a head. In my scenario Barbie has completely broken down and eventually loses her head - her identity, her hair, her confidence, her hope.

How do you imagine K’s life after the When kids play with the dolls they series? Does he finally accept his sexare mostly acting out scenes, play- uality? acting…and for that time they get to be the dolls. They get to be these ide- Yes! He finds his true authentic self al people. With great teeth and great and comes out of the closet per say. Fashion - Fall 2013


As a mother to two daughters, do you have concerns with the female ‘ideals’ perpetrated by the media? I would like to think that women can make themselves happy despite their appearance. However, the concept of a fairytale happy ending and unrealistic physical ideals of today are a bit ridiculous. Modern life is about constant change and women today have to adapt and learn how to grow from adversity. Everyone must define what being ‘happy’ means to them and then move towards that.

Did you think the Barbie and Ken dolls have a role to play in a modern childhood? Or are their characters too controversial now? You play around with the concept of Ken repressing his sexuality: where did you get the idea that he could be gay? Isn’t he traditionally Barbie’s “boyfriend”? I read somewhere that he was created to be her brother...in any case he has become her boyfriend and then later her husband right? I just giggle when I watch the girls playing with him because he is the male figure in the playhouse but when I look at him I think that he would be way more into Bob than Barb...


Is there any significance in the fact that it’s Oprah in the cover of K’s magazine? I thought that Ken would be loving on Oprah: her magazine rocks! But Barbie’s magazine in this image is important too. She’s not only on the front cover of her magazine, but is in the advertisement on the back too. Self-made, respected and beloved, she is the All-American “it” girl. Any advice for young photographers? I find that a lot of young aspiring artists today are passionate but lack work ethic. When I started out I worked a lot and didn’t make any money. That went on for years. Now there are a lot of artists coming out of school and expecting to make the big bucks right away. I say pay your dues and don’t charge too much right off the top. Get as much experience as possible and make your mistakes at the beginning without too much consequence. Work up to getting the prestigious jobs. What is your favourite camera? My favorite camera only makes its appearance when I travel. It’s a 645 rangefinder film camera; it feels like a point and shoot. The negatives are super sharp and produce vivid colors with lots of depth.

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On the 'manner' of viewing fashion

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n 1951, Jean Cocteau cited one of Coco Chanel’s maxims: “Art produces ugly things which become more beautiful with time. Fashion, on the other hand, produces beautiful things which become ugly with time”[1]. But since the 1960s this rule has never stopped being transgressed, especially by the English. It’s no coincidence then if Pierre Bergé recalled the above quotation while being questioned in a large-scale investigation in 2000. His article on the subject, What use is fashion?[2], denounced fashion designers who, by claiming the status of artist, actually brought haute couture to its death by calling it a work of art. On the 22nd January 2002, Yves Saint Laurent took the decision to celebrate the end of a forty-year career with a retrospective show held at Beaubourg Centre. In some respects, this seemed to relegate his creations to the realms of a museum, but, on the other hand, this decision allowed him to successfully retain his unchallenged position in fashion. Perhaps this was a way of ensuring a final coup d’éclat to acquire the status of artist. Yet, since the middle of the 90s, a de-

signer like Alexander McQueen had no need to concern himself with the same problem. Convinced that his creations could be considered nothing but art, he made use of every aspect of fashion to help him achieve his vision of beauty, as he pleased, and with little regard to his financial obligations. He did not have the pressures of maintaining a commercial presence in the media, something that Yves Saint Laurent had managed to secure. His creations invited the viewer into a world, which, if anything, was actually anti-fashion, or at least “fashion” as most consider it to be. Through the various themes he considered in his designs; alienation, fascination, sexual violence, death and even cultural exchange, this was a world where fashion was a means of literary expression, an undiluted approach that had not been seen since the democratisation of fashion in the 1960s, and brought to mind the works of Baudelaire, Wilde, Mallarmé, Proust, Collette and Cocteau. A democratisation in which, paradoxically, Yves Saint Laurent had also played a role. It was in 1967 that Roland Barthes’ study on La Système de la Mode de-


Sur la 'manière' de voir la mode

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ean Cocteau citait en 1951 une déclaration de Mademoiselle Chanel : « la couture crée des choses belles qui deviennent laides, alors que l’art crée des choses laides qui deviennent belles »1. Mais depuis les années soixante la règle n’a cessé d’être transgressée, en particulier par les anglais. Ce n’est pas un hasard alors si Pierre Bergé dans son article « à quoi sert la mode ? », interrogé dans une vaste investigation tentant de définir qu’est ce que la mode aujourd’hui ?2 en 2000, se rappelle de la citation pour dénoncer ces créateurs de mode qui se prennent pour des artistes et qui, revendiquant ce statut, entraînent la haute couture à sa mort en la proposant comme œuvre d’art. Hors, le 22 Janvier 2002, c’est au centre Beaubourg que son pygmalion de toujours, Yves Saint Laurent, décide de clôturer plus de quarante ans de carrière dans un défilé rétrospectif, enterrant certes la haute couture dans un musée, mais s’octroyant surtout une position dont il s’était toujours défendu. Cherchait-il un dernier coup d’éclat en décrochant officiellement le premier le statut convoité d’artiste ? Depuis le milieu des années 90, un couturier comme Alexander McQueen ne se posait pas la même question. Convaincu qu’il faisait bien de l’art, il

décortiquait la mode sous toutes ses coutures, pour mener à bien sa vision de la beauté, bien gré et malgré ses obligations financières, d’ailleurs sans vraiment s’occuper d’une présence médiatique commerciale que Saint Laurent a par contre su se forger. Ses propositions s’ouvraient sur un imaginaire étant à l’opposé de celui de la mode ou du moins telle qu’on la conçoit. Par les divers thèmes qu’il développait comme l’aliénation, la fascination, la violence sexuelle, la mort ou même l’échange culturel, il relevait plutôt d’un objet littéraire de la mode qui semble s’être étiolé avec sa démocratisation depuis les années soixante dont participaient à sa mémoire, en leurs temps respectifs, Baudelaire, Wilde, Mallarmé, Proust, Colette, ou Cocteau. Démocratisation dont, paradoxalement, Yves Saint Laurent en est un rouage. Enfin, en 1967, l’étude le système de la mode de Roland Barthes venait rompre le charme de cette culture littéraire mais élitaire3 avec un discours scientifique basé d’une part sur les mécanismes de sa représentation commerciale dans « un langage » de la presse populaire et d’autre part la fonction socialisante et statutaire du vêtement régie par des « codes », liant irrémédiablement les deux pôles. L’étude devenait alors scientifique, s’attachait à une vision Fashion - Fall 2013


livered the final blow to this aforementioned charming, but elitist, literary culture[3] with his scientific study based in part on fashion’s commercial representation through the “language” of the press, and in part on the ‘status’-giving function of clothes regulated by social ‘codes’. In so doing, Barthes permanently linked these two elements. As the study delved deeper into the scientific, and considered the subject with a ‘global’ vision, the magic of the designer was concealed behind the social function of fashion. However, as the author himself advised in the introduction to his study that the work was already out-dated, it could be asked if these studies, which continue to be revised even today, can be allowed to interfere with a historical perspective of fashion. Or perhaps they should instead be seen simply as anecdotal quips from a period when fashion understood how to conceal its finery. The same goes for the study by Pierre Bourdieu in 1974, focusing the introduction of his first issue of Actes de la Recherché en Sciences Sociales on the elitist machinery of the designer and his brand with the idea of a marketing strategy in between the designer’s “habitus” and the product’s image[4] as a symbol of its time. In a research paper considering The History of Art in 2001, Odile Blanc submitted some observations on the complex methodologies of the history of costume[5]. She emphasises the sociological interest that fashion

has in the construction of appearance, which provokes a certain hesitance from historians. Affirming a contemporary dimension in which Barthes did not consider fashion in its essence but rather by its representation in the media, she stated that his study provides a physical understanding of the subject but led to gross historical ignorance that was based on texts and images that were themselves subject to social practice and representation. She also realised that Art History held a horror of the very idea of style, the structure of its form, on which fashion relies heavily even before acting as a social signifier (without which it would be lost in every possible etymological sense).So, apart from some recent and alternative exhibitions, which obviously cannot be considered part of French historical academica, like, for example, those at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, we have to resign ourselves to the fact that fashion items displayed in museums are rarely done so as a piece of art, but rather as a sociological reference related to a certain artistic movement, for example the Pop Art


globale, occultant la « magie » du couturier pour un vêtement correspondant à un besoin social. Par contre, l’auteur affirmant dès son introduction que son ouvrage était déjà daté, on peut se demander si ces études vraiment épisodiques jusqu’à aujourd’hui, peuvent intervenir dans une perspective historique vraiment globale de la mode, ou si elles ne sont qu’anecdotiques et révélatrices d’une époque donnée que la mode a su justement recouvrir de ses atours. Il en va de même pour l’étude de Pierre Bourdieu qui consacrait sérieusement l’ouverture de son premier numéro des Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales aux mécanismes élitaires du couturier et de sa griffe en 1974 avec l’idée d’un marketing balbutiant entre représentation d’un « habitus » du couturier et l’image de son produit4 qui marquait encore une époque. Dans la revue de recherche en histoire de l’art, Odile Blanc en 2001 soumet quelques observations sur la méthodologie complexe de l’histoire du costume5. Elle relève un intérêt sociologique de la participation du vête-

ment à la construction de l’apparence qui provoque une réticence des historiens. Confirmant une dimension contemporaine où Barthes ne s’intéressait pas à la mode en tant que telle mais délibérément à sa mise en scène par la presse, elle constate que son étude assure donc une connaissance matérielle de l’objet mais induit une méconnaissance historique flagrante qui s’appuyait sur des textes et des images où l’objet était lui-même sujet de pratiques et de représentation. Elle réalise aussi que l’histoire de l’art tient en horreur l’idée de style, du mécanisme des formes, ce dont dépend forcément la mode avant d’être un signifiant social (par lequel elle aura d’ailleurs perdu tout son sens étymologique). Alors, à part quelques expositions récentes, alternatives, évidemment extérieures à l’académisme historiciste français, comme au Metropolitan Museum de New York (avant que l’on propose actuellement le commissariat d’exposition à une journaliste), on se résigne à voir que la mode au musée est rarement exposée comme objet artistique mais comme référence sociologique à tel ou tel mouvement comme les années Pop au centre Pompidou à Paris en 2001 par exemple ou bien encore actuellement l’exposition dédiée aux dessous au musée des Arts Décoratifs de Paris. Ces modèles de haute couture, pour la plupart, ne sont pourtant représentatifs que d’une certaine élite alors, comment peuvent-ils devenir référents et en vertu de quels critères? La petite robe Mondrian de Saint Laurent ou enFashion - Fall 2013


exhibition displayed at the Pompidou Centre in 2001 or even the current exhibition dedicated to lingerie at the Paris Museum of Decorative Arts. If these Haute Couture models, for the most part, are only representative of a certain elite, then how can they become referents and due to what criteria? At the time, the Mondrian dress by Yves Saint Laurent, or even Paco Rabanne’s metallic pastel dresses clearly represented the pop culture of the 60s, even though they were worn only by a happy few! How many women emulated Marlene Dietrich in the 1930s by putting on a three piece suit? How many more wore the corset that Jean Paul Gautier designed for Madonna in the early 90s? Why and what do these pieces represent? These are objects of fantasy and fetish, and are used as such by our historians, but also by the fashion industry. So what can be made of their ‘motivation’, their ‘inspiration’ and not their supposed ‘reflection’ of new social customs? The serpent seems to be biting its own tail. One can only comment on the gap between the history of costume and the history of fashion. Moreover, even though fashion is undeniably linked to sex and particularly to the woman, no study has yet grappled with the idea of sexuality. Is its history misogynistic? A study of contemporary fashion can no longer keep simply a sociological approach without losing all its interpretive value. Adopting this oneaimed approach paradoxically signifies its death, and not its reception. A

fashion that is alive is the one on the catwalk, the key work of the designer. Death is of course the very nature of fashion, today more than ever. It dies after a furtive journey, leaving behind it lifeless clothes, timeless images to be perpetually reborn from the ashes. It is perhaps this metaphysical rebirth that defies history and that

provokes suspicious remarks. But the most frustrating aspect lies certainly with the notion of style. Style is also a collection of tastes, an individual and extremely personal way of dressing oneself, and it’s in this intimate manner in which fashion is connected with its public that creates a


core la robe de pastilles métalliques de Paco Rabanne à la même époque représentent tellement bien cette culture Pop des années 60 alors que seulement quelques centaines d’happy few les ont portées ! Combien de femmes se sont habillées en costume 3 pièces dans les années 30 comme

Marlene Dietrich ? Combien encore ont porté le corset que Jean Paul Gaultier a fait pour Madonna au début des années 90 ? Pourquoi et de quoi sontils représentatifs ? Ces objets sont des fantasmes, des fétiches…et sont utilisés comme tel par nos historiens

mais encore, par la mode aussi. Alors que faire de leur « motivation », de leur « inspiration », et non de leur supposé reflet aux nouveaux comportements sociaux ? Le serpent semble se mordre la queue. On ne peut que remarquer la scissure entre histoire du costume et histoire de la mode. Encore, bien que la mode soit indéniablement liée au sexe et particulièrement à la femme, aucune étude n’entame étrangement l’idée de sexualité. Son histoire serait-elle misogyne ? Une étude de la mode actuelle ne peut plus se restreindre à une approche sociologique sans en perdre toute valeur interprétative. L’unique vision de son adoption signifie paradoxalement sa mort et non sa réception. La mode vivante est celle des podiums, principal travail du créateur. La mort est évidemment la nature même de la mode, aujourd’hui plus que jamais, elle meurt après son furtif passage, laissant derrière elle des costumes sans vie, des images figées, pour renaitre à l’infini de ses cendres. C’est peut être cette renaissance métaphysique, défiant l’histoire qui peut inspirer la méfiance du propos. Mais, le plus gênant reste certainement cette notion de style. Car, le style est aussi l’ensemble des goûts, des manières individuelles et une façon personnelle de s’habiller. C’est bien dans cette manière intime qu’entretient la mode avec son public qu’il y a problème. Jouant de ce rapport de complicité, première architecture enveloppant notre corps, elle Fashion - Fall 2013


problem. Through this complicity, as a first layer covering our bodies, fashion is the first socializing element we have; from being a unique and individual style, it will perhaps be adopted by the public. But in fact is this not one of the aspirations of contemporary art as envisaged by our cultural institutions? It is indeed this “manner” of viewing fashion that is the crux of the issue. Fashion is frivolous, perhaps sometimes outrageously frivolous, like it is sometimes also ironically austere. It follows every current, dissolves in the winds of time, consumed and forgotten. It passes. Tomorrow it will be something else.

translated from french by Harper Staples BIBLIOGRAPHY -BEAUX ARTS (2000) « Qu’est-ce que la mode aujourd’hui ? », Beaux Arts Magazine, numéro spécial, Octobre 2000 -BLANC (2001) Odile Blanc, « Histoire du costume : quelques observations méthodologiques », in Histoire de l’art : parure, costume et vêtement, n°48, Juin 2001. - BOURDIEU (1975) Pierre Bourdieu, « Le couturier et sa griffe : contribution à une théorie de la magie », in Actes de la recherche en sciences sociales, n°1, Janvier 1975, pp.4-36. -LANG (2001) Abigaïl S.Lang (textes choisis par), Mode&contre-mode, une anthologie de Montaigne à Perec, Paris : Institut français de la mode-Editions du Regard, 2001 - MICHAUD (2001) Yves Michaud (sous la direction de), Université de tous les savoir volume 6 : Qu’est-ce que la culture ?, Paris : Editions Odile Jacob, 2001. [1] Lang (2001), pp.29. [2] Beaux Arts (2000) [3] Michaud (2001), pp.338. [4] Bourdieu (1975), pp.11 [5] Blanc (2001) pp.153-161.

est bien sûr l’élément socialisant par excellence : de ce style se voulant unique et individuelle, elle passera peut être à une adoption collective. Mais au fait, n’est-ce pas ici une des aspirations de l’art contemporain envisagée par nos institutions culturelles ? Enfin, c’est bien dans la «manière» de la mode que le bas blesse. Elle est frivole, parfois outrageusement frivole comme parfois ironiquement austère. Elle se dilue dans tous courants possibles, elle est soluble dans l’air du temps, consommable et oubliable. Elle passe. Demain, elle sera autre.


designs: Romain Villiers-MoriamĂŠ photos: Paul Jedwad

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Photo & Make-up: Misha Fashion - Fall 2013


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Photo: Sonka Havlenova Makeup,Hair: Sonka Havlenova/Sonka Nutribju Visage Accessories: Alena Heinrichovรก

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Parles n o u s un peu de toi. Quel âge as tu? Depuis quand fais tu de la photo? Tu as un studio? Je m’appelle Rachel Saddedine, j’ai 24 ans et je suis photographe pro depuis un peu plus de 3 ans. J’ai démarré la photographie en 2008, dans le reportage. Je me baladais avec mon appareil photo et son objectif tout manuel, je suivais les manifestations à Paris, je photographiais les concerts, les artistes de mon entourage, puis j’ai eu envie de me focaliser sur des visages. J’ai beaucoup évolué en photographie. Dans la discipline du portrait j’ai trouvé un rapport privilégié avec l’humain. C’est à travers des séries modes, composée d’histoires et d’ambiances montée de toute pièce, que j’ai pu creuser l’esthétique pur. Aujourd’hui j’ai mon studio et mon bureau dans le centre de Paris, j’ai des locaux que je partage avec un blog de mode masculine, des jeunes créateurs et un site de vente de créateur Français en ligne. Il y a une énergie très positive dans ces lieux. Pourquoi la photo de mode? La mode un acte libérateur, me permettant de vider toutes les images qui sont dans ma tête. J’en fais des séries, je travaille l’exercice,  je cherche à rendre joli quelque chose de simple, à creuser l’esthétique. Il y a encore des choses à raconter. Je transfère des idées, des envies, selon mes inspirations du moment, selon mes émotions. J’ai des phases de couleurs, de personnages, de traitement, j’ai l’impression dans ce domaine que je ne me lasserais jamais, c’est épuisant et grisant.


Tell us a little bit about yourself. How old are you? When did you start shooting photos? Do you have your own studio? My name is Rachel Saddedine. I am 24 and I have been a professional photographer for about three years. I started photography in summer 2008. I walked around with my camera and its manual focus lens and I followed the demonstrations in Paris. I felt like shooting concerts and artists I knew. Then I wanted to focus on faces especially. Since I started, I have evolved a lot but, in the field of portrait photography, I have found a very special kind of relation with the human. Through fashion series that are composed with stories and completely concocted atmospheres, I work on the essence of my aesthetics. Today I have my own studio and my office in the centre of Paris. I share the premises with a men’s fashion blog, young designers and an online design shop. The vibe is very positive there. Why fashion photography? Fashion photography is a liberating process that empties my head of all the pictures inside. I work on series as exercises, seeking the beautiful in simple things and developing my own aesthetics. There are always some things to tell. I express ideas, fancies: all is about the inspiration of the day, the emotion I want to let out. I have some thematic phases: some colours, some characters, some processing. On the one hand I feel harassed Fashion - Fall 2013


Ta meilleure experience? La pire? Il y a beaucoup de très bon souvenirs, lorsque les équipes avec lesquels je travaille m’envoit leur compliment à l’issu d’un shooting, lorsqu’on fini en terrasse épuisé mais ravi, lorsque la mannequin fait un petit cri de joie à la vue d’une image dans l’appareil, quand le client a déjà des idées pour la prochaine série d’ image, sa prochaine collection, quand je découvre la musique pour laquelle j’ai réalisé un visuel... Une mauvaise expérience serait de ressentir que la personne en face ne me fait pas confiance et se refuse à mes indications. Quelles sont tes inspirations? Je suis inspirée par la musique, une chanson, les vieux films, les clips, une phrase parfois, une ambiance dans un lieu, une histoire, quelque chose qui fait échos en moi. Bowie, Hitchkok, Marylin, Courtney Love, les années 60, Madonna... Comment choisis tu tes modèles? Je choisis le modèle en fonction de l’histoire que je vais raconter, comme s’il s’agissait d’une actrice pour un rôle, selon que je la cherche baby-doll, ou bien sauvage, le choix est naturel et évident. Un conseil pour des jeunes photographes? Je dirais qu’il faut se retrouver dans ses images. Etre en phase avec elles. Il ne faut pas copier bêtement ce que l’on a vu car je pense qu’à terme c’est la personnalité qui fera la différence.

by the new ideas coming everyday, but on the other hand it’s like I’ll never get tired of finding new limits to go beyond. Actually photography is as exhausting as exciting! The best experience you’ve ever had on set? The worst? I have many good memories: when the model is letting out little cries of excitement and happiness as she has a look at the pictures on the screen of my camera; when the staff I have worked with sends compliments after a shooting; when we’re having a drink out together after a hard day of work; when a customer tells me about some new ideas for a next shooting with me; when I hear for the first time the music of a band I have to work or have worked with. The worst experience would be to feel that someone doesn’t trust me or refuse to cooperate. What are your inspirations? I am inspired by music, a song or a video clip, old movies, the identity of a place, a story, sometimes just a sentence, anything that resonates with me. Bowie, Madonna, Courtney Love, Hitchcock, Marilyn Monroe, the sixties... What makes you choose one model over another? I pick a model that corresponds to the story I want to tell, like an actress for a role in a film: either a baby doll or a wild woman. Anyway the choice is always obvious and easy.


Fashion - Fall 2013


Parlez nous de votre procédé créatif - comment procédez vous pour obtenir l’effet final? Je pars d’une idée, d’une envie, et j’imagine une certaine lumière, un certain traitement pour l’ambiance globale de la série. Je fais ensuite de la pige, j’ai beaucoup de dossier d’images d’inspiration, j’établis alors une forme de planche tendance que je vais soumettre à mes équipes. La lumière, puis le stylisme, les makeup/coiffure, j’écris aussi quelques mots clef pour que mes équipes entrent dans l’ambiance. Je travaille en étroite collaboration avec la styliste, qui va me faire des suggestions plus précises de pièces de créateurs, de bureau de presse, je lui dis ce qui me plaît, ce qui ne me plaît pas. Ensuite je caste les mannequins en agence, je sais souvent si je veux une brune, une blonde ou une rousse, car la mannequin est l’actrice de la série. Le jour du shooting on avance plus sérieusement sur le moodboard, on établi l’évolution en fonction du makeup, de la lumière, des fonds, du décors. Ce n’est qu’une fois que je lance les images dans Photoshop que je suis rassurée! Tes photographes favoris? Mondino , Bruno Dayan, Ellen Vun Unwerth, Mert & Mercus, ou encore Hedi Slimane.  Camilla Akrans que j’ai vraiment découverte il y a peu.

Any tips for starting photographers? I would say that you have to recognize yourself in your own pictures, like in front of a mirror. There is no point in copying exactly something you’ve seen. In the end, your very own personality will always make the difference. Tell us about your creative process. How do you go about achieving the final effect you want? It all starts with an idea, an urge. I imagine a kind of light, a kind of processing that fits the mood of the whole serie. Then I do some research. I always have lots of files with pictures that inspire me. I create a sort of mood board that I will submit to my staff. Then we discuss about the light and fashion design, hair and make-up. I also write a couple of keywords so that my partners understand the spirit. I work closely with the stylist, who suggests accurate designer clothes, press offices. I tell them what I like, what I don’t, and the idea is growing. Then I cast models in agencies. I often know whether I want a blonde or a brunette or a redhead because the model is the key character of the serie. Then, on the day of the shooting, we work more on the mood board: the make-up evolution from one scene to another, the lights and backgrounds and the props. I feel relieved only when I can see the pictures open in Photoshop! translated from french by Laurent Auffret.


Fashion - Fall 2013


Fashion - Fall 2013


Fashion - Fall 2013


Fashion - Fall 2013


Fashion - Fall 2013


Fashion - Fall 2013


Fashion - Fall 2013


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LAM #3 - Fashion issue