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ENDORSED BY SAPMA, SAPSDA, SAVAMA AND VAMCOSA

From pumps to masks – fighting Covid-19 Urgent dewatering solutions during lockdown

MAY/JUN 2020


We offer valves for precision processes - and demandingapplications Our valves fulfill the highest of standards and are designed for many years of safe and reliable operation. Our service specialists regularly check, monitor and maintain all relevant system components - depending on what has been agreed. Our modular framework agreements offer you individual service and spare parts concepts. And we even go one step further. We additionally check systems for efficiency in order to reduce operating costs and increase productivity. For example, with the SES System Efficiency Service.

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Contact our dedicated Valves Sales Engineers for all your Valve requirements 011-876-5600 or email us info-za@ksb.com KSB Pumps and Valves (Pty) Ltd • www.ksb.com/ksb-za Your B-BBEE Level 1 Partner

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CONTENT COVER STORY Impact COVID-19 has had on companies around the globe

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PUMPS

ENDORSED BY SAPMA, SAPSDA, SAVAMA AND VAMCOSA

Urgent dewatering solutions during lockdown

MAY/JUN 2020

6

How a Warman® SHW submersible slurry pump can overcome dewatering challenges

8 14

Digital reliability delivers smart solutions

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Improving pump reliability is essential

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Reduce emissions with BLUE BOX

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Troubleshooting

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VALVES Liquid natural gas floats on a wave of success

From pumps to masks – fighting Covid-19 Urgent dewatering solutions during lockdown

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INDUSTRY NEWS

On the cover AMD ROTOLOK

Mine employers & Covid-19 - the Guidelines & Mandatory Code of Practice unpacked

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From pumps to masks – fighting Covid-19

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+27 (0) 11 674 1166, theo.sherman@amd-rotolok.co.za, www.rotolok.co.za

Water infrastructure woes increasing Modernising water infrastructure: what will it take to address the water challenges in Africa?

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Pumps & Valves Africa

Aurecon designs unique duckbill spillway for the raising of Garden Route Dam

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WATER

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COMPANY PROFILE Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Peter Ker-Fox from Stewarts & Lloyds Holdings (Pty) Ltd

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Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Stephen Leatherbarrow from Bray Con-trols Africa

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Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Tiaan Smit from Pleix-Quip Africa

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Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Detlev Börner from Walter Meano Engineering

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Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Dr Jean-Patrick Leger from Vesconite Bearings

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Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market from Vac-Cent

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BUYERS GUIDE

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Disclaimer

Opinions in this Publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of this publication, its editorial board, its editor or its Publishers SAPMA. or VAMCOSA The mention of specific products in articles and advertisements does not imply that they are endorsed or recommended by this Publication or its publishers in preference to others of a similar nature, which are not mentioned or advertised. Reliance on any information contained in this journal is at your own risk. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of editorial board makes no representations or warranties, express or implied, as to the correctness or suitability contained and/or the products advertised in this publication. The Publisher shall not be liable for any damages or loss, howsoever arising, incurred by readers of this publication or any other person/s. The Publisher disclaims all responsibility and liability for any damages, includes pure economic loss and any consequential damages, resulting from the use of services or products advertised in this publication. Readers of this publication indemnify and hold harmless the publisher, its officers, employees, and servants for any demand action, application or other proceedings made by any third party and arising out or in connection with the use of any services and/or products or the reliance on any information contained in this publication.

Managing Editor: Surita Marx Tel: +27 (0) 87 153-1217 Cell: +27 (0) 83 281-5761 Email: info@pumpsandvalves.co.za Web: www.pumpsandvalves.co.za Sales: Lusana Mrkusic Email: lusana@pumpsandvalves.co.za Production Manager: Xane Roestroff Email: adverts@pumpsandvalves.co.za

Advertisers AMD Rotolok OFC Bray 33 Enserve 11 Industrial Valves Summit 42 Integrated Pump Technology 17,21 KSB IFC,IBC LVSA Group 29 Macsteel OBC Mine Track & Tools 26 NET Logistics 22 Pleix-Quip 34 SAM Engineering 14 Stewart & Lloyds 31 Vac-Cent 41 VAMCOSA 7 Vesconite 39 Walter Meano Engineering 37

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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Impact COVID-19 has had on companies around the globe The Covid-19 pandemic has had a swift and severe impact on companies around the world. Requiring quick action and big changes to remain operational amid lockdown conditions, business, as usual, is a concept of the past. Pipes, Pumps & Valves Africa spoke to Theo Sherman, Managing Director at AMD Rotolok, about their experience and outlook.

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Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa -May/Jun 2020


COVER STORY Unprecedented and unexpected hardly even begin to sum up the events of the past few months. Amid a global pandemic supply and demand, cycles have been disrupted – in some instances resulting in complete chaos. Restrictions in various sectors and strict measures of what can and can't be done have left no industry untouched. “It has not been an easy couple of months,” says Sherman. “As an essential service we have remained open throughout the lockdown, but the way we worked before Covid-19 and now is very different.” He says dealing with the ongoing uncertainty, while reassuring staff has been a core priority at AMD Rotolok. “Our business is about the people here. They are the most important aspect of it all. Not only do we need to ensure they are working in a safe and healthy environment from a physical point of view, but also their psychological health is important. Keeping the morale up is critical.” Under remote working conditions, social distancing and continuous sanitising employee morale can rapidly decline. "Many of our employees face new challenges and have found themselves overwhelmed with the changes both in their personal and professional lives," says Sherman. "Business, as usual, does not exist anymore and I don't think that is going to change very soon. Furthermore, we continue to live and work under general uncertainty and worry." According to Sherman keeping his employees informed at all times has been essential. "All operations have lost time due to the new sanitizing procedures that all businesses have to adhere to. We have also instituted these in our offices and factory. Despite these added time constraints, it was clear that we needed to also make time to keep in regular contact will all the employees." AMD Rotolok has put much emphasis on being connected to its people. "One way we can alleviate some of their concerns is to make sure the staff are aware of the steps the company is taking at all times. Nothing is going to surprise them and we are not going to catch them unaware of anything." Just as important, says Sherman, has been the transparency. “We have to be upfront about the challenges we are facing, but we also want to inspire and encourage our team that it is going to be okay and that we are going to survive this as a business.” Meeting deadlines amidst a crisis Whilst AMD Rotolok is an essential service not all of their suppliers are and supply chains were extremely disrupted in the first few months. Several projects were also put on hold as financial strain set in. "The economy was already struggling before Covid-19 and it is clear that the pandemic has had a big impact on cash flow."

Operations have also become slower due to smaller workforces and restricted operational times. Some parts have not been available. "Cost is something that is a concern as the overall cost of projects is expected to go up. Prices are rising and are expected to do so, even more, going forward in light of the higher project cost, slower turnaround times and difficulty in finding supplies. Budgets for 2020 have to be redone and many deadlines have to be reset." Despite this, Sherman believes that there are still many opportunities for the local manufacturing industry particularly now. “We have the skill and the ability in this country to make world-class products. It is essential, however, that our products are protected from cheap imports as there is a high risk that this could now occur.” Creating a thriving environment for local manufacturing is critical. Incentives for companies purchasing valves from local producers is one way of boosting the domestic manufacturing industry. "It is time to trust the local market and allow them to prove what they can do." Keeping it positive Sherman says he is positive about the increase in enquiries seen in the past few weeks indicating that there is hope on the horizon. “I am very happy with the level of interest we are starting to see as it indicates some return of normality. Especially the depth of information that is being requested is a very good sign,” he says. “We are not out of the woods, but we can turn this around. We do need to remain positive and change the way we have operated. We are going to have to think out of the box and be innovative.” Also, research and development have been ongoing throughout the lockdown, says Sherman. "One of the products that there is keen interest in is the new lump breaker we are developing. There has been quite a lot of market interest in that already. Rotolok also has several new products in the pipeline. These are all positives." Sherman and the team have remained committed to servicing their clients, despite the many challenges of the past few months. "That is not going to change. We will continue to supply equipment of uncompromising quality to the South African and overseas markets."

AMD Rotolok, Theo Sherman, +27 (0) 11 674 1166, theo.sherman@amd-rotolok.co.za, www.rotolok.co.za

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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Urgent dewatering solutions during lockdown

PUMPS

Responding quickly with the right solutions, Integrated Pump Rental has continued as a secondary emergency supplier throughout the lockdown, including helping to dewater a coal mine in northern KwaZulu-Natal. “The customer urgently needed fit-for-purpose dewatering equipment to prevent flooding in the open pit,” says Henru Strydom, operations manager at Integrated Pump Rental.

to state power producer Eskom to continue their operations during Alert Level 5 ,even as most business activity came to a standstill.

The unexpected failure of one of the mine’s own pumps came at a bad time.

Rainfall across much of the coal-producing province of Mpumalanga raised the risk of flooding and led to Integrated Pump Rental also delivering solutions to a number of its customers there during the lockdown.

The national coronavirus lockdown meant that it would be some time before pump repairs were possible. Some heavy downpours aggravated the situation, demanding that there be no delay in pit dewatering. The answer came in the form of a Sykes HH130 high-head diesel-driven pump. The rugged, five tonne unit was promptly delivered to site by truck, and transferred to an on-site trailer for easy mobility. The six-inch pump is capable of pumping at a head of over 140 metres high at a flow of between 80 to 90 litres per second. “From our experience of the mining sector, we know that water in a coal mine is acidic,” Strydom says. “The complete pump-end we supplied was, therefore, of stainless steel construction to resist corrosion and ensure reliability and uptime.” Lockdown regulations allowed those coal mines supplying

Strydom emphasises that, in addition to maintaining their vital dewatering activities, mines gain other benefits from renting pumps. There is no large capital outlay, for instance, and running costs can be controlled. “The renting option means that we handle the maintenance, so that mines can better control their costs,” he says. “We also ensure the pump’s optimal performance, so that mines don’t risk costly downtime.” Integrated Pump Rental, +27 (0) 11 894-2906, admin@pumprental.co.za, www.pumprental.co.za

The Sykes HH130

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Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020


VAMCOSA VALVE AND ACTUATOR MANUFACTURERS CLUSTER OF SOUTH AFRICA

Tel: +27 (0) 79 492-3043 +27 (0) 82 677-5374 Fax: +27 (0) 57 357-4217 Email: info@ariafrica.co.za Web: www.ariafrica.co.za

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Tel : +27 (0) 11 422-4326/7 Fax: +27 (0) 11 421-7842 Email: sales@dualvalves.com web: www.dualvalves.com

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Tel: +27 (0) 11 433-3968 Fax: +27 (0)11 433-9107 Email: sales@uvc.co.za Website: www.ainsworth-valves.co.za

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Tel: +27 (0) 12 653-1156 Email: sales@paltech.co.za Web: www.paltech.co.za Tel: +27 (0) 11 908-3760 Email: info@avkvalves.co.za Web: www.avkvalves.co.za

Tel : +27 (0) 11 882-8030 Fax : +27 (0) 11 882-8038 Email: nivenp@rgrtech.co.za Web: www.rgrtech.co.za

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Tel: +27 (0) 11 028-4221 Email: info@zenzelevalves.co.za Web: www.zenzelevalves.co.za


How a Warman® SHW submersible slurry pump can overcome dewatering challenges

PUMPS

Tired of your operations being disrupted by unreliable submersible slurry pumps? We explore how the versatile Warman® SHW provides reliable submersible dewatering in the most aggressive mining applications.

Varying fluid levels, changing slurry consistencies, mineral types and even the beneficiation chemicals present can significantly impact the performance and wear life of your pump. This transforms what should be a reliable, low maintenance piece of equipment into something that not only demands significant time to repair, but also has a negative impact on your bottom line due to part replacements and production downtime. Issues commonly affecting submersible pumps include moisture intrusion into critical internal electrical or lubricated components, abrasive wear of wetted components, impellers clogging due to particle size or slurry fluid composition, and insufficient slurry feed flows that causes overheating and cavitation. In this article, we explore the root causes of these problems, and how different features allow the heavy-duty Warman® SHW submersible slurry pump to provide reliable dewatering in almost any application.If your submersible slurry pump regularly goes into a failure state, there’s a good chance it’s because slurry has penetrated the motor housing or seal chamber. There are a number of ways you can prevent this from occurring and reoccurring, whether the fluid intrusion 8

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

is due to the pump’s housing, the wear materials being unsuitable for the slurry it’s processing, or incorrect mechanical seal selection. Leverage the right wear materials In the case of a general failure in the pump casing, this is likely due to the wear material being unsuitable to withstand some aspects of the slurry being pumped either the abrasive qualities of the particles contained within or a corrosive property of a chemical that was introduced at some point in the beneficiation process. Without changing the slurry composition or processing method, the only real way to resolve these problems is to ensure that you’re using a heavy-duty submersible slurry pump with wear materials especially designed to meet the challenges of your application. For example, the Warman® SHW has specifically been built for the most demanding submersible pumping applications, with a heavy-duty, all high-chrome (A05) wet end. Ultrachrome® A05, is proprietary high chrome white iron designed by Weir Minerals to provide a long, dependable service life in highly abrasive applications. The Warman® SHW casting material can be selected to


meet the needs of specific applications with different wear factors, such as in copper ore processing and other corrosive applications. Use mechanical seals to prevent leakage Most of the failures of submersible pumps can be attributed to a mechanical seals failure; a failure in the seal will permit moisture ingress to the electric motor and components, causing major electrical and mechanical damage to both the electric motor’s stator and rotor. Finally this causes the pump to stop operating, requiring an expensive, time consuming repair process that often requires specialist expertise.

PUMPS

The Warman SHW pump’s double mechanical seal arrangement not only prevents slurry leakage into the motor, but only exposes a minimal wear area to the slurry. The Warman® SHW’s balanced double-seal arrangement encloses both sets of seal springs in an oil reservoir, which means the silicon carbide seal faces are only subjected to the submergence pressure, greatly increasing the wear life of the pump. A moisture detector protects the motor and mechanical seal When leakage can’t be prevented, the best way to manage a pump is to use a moisture detector which will automatically shut off the pump when moisture makes its way into the motor. The Warman® SHW pump uses a twin electrode system that provides double protection, by detecting intrusion in the motor housing and the chamber of the mechanical seal. Once detected, the Warman® SHW shuts off the motor to prevent pump failure and raises an alarm to let operators know that maintenance is required. The pump’s T-bolt construction makes gaining access to the wet end simple, allowing rapid disassembly of the pump for quick maintenance. Preventing cavitation and overheating Constant submergence plays a critical role in cooling the motor and preventing over-heating of submersible pumps. If the flow of water to the sump is interrupted, the pump’s motor is at risk of overheating or cavitating, which in turn decreases its efficiency and may lead to permanent damage or even complete failure. While this generally isn’t an issue for static, shore-mounted pumps, the changing water level of submersible pumping applications can quickly lead to the pump running dry. To manage this, all Warman® SHW pumps feature winding thermostats that protect the motor by sending a signal to a relay supplied to the customer. This relay can be used for sounding an alarm or shutting down the unit if internal temperatures exceed safe operating limits due to a lack of water. In applications where the fluid level varies significantly, the Warman® SHW can optionally be outfitted with a cooling jacket, which enables continuous operation of the pump

while the motor is not completely submerged by enclosing the motor housing with coolant. Clogging In high solids slurry applications with larger solids particles, submersible pump impellers are prone to becoming blocked by larger particles which prevents fluid from flowing smoothly through the pump. Without this consistent flow of fluid, the pump is at risk of overheating, cavitating and ultimately failing. In these high solids applications (up to 50% by weight), the Warman® SHW suction saver prevents tramp material and large solids from blocking the impeller through the installation of a wear-resistant filter mesh at the bottom of the pump. The ultimate heavy-duty submersible slurry pump Through Weir Minerals’ global footprint and large Warman® pump install base, Weir Minerals engineers have developed a unique understanding of how to optimise submersible slurry pumps for a variety of slurry applications and sump types. As a solutions company, we don’t sell pumps without first visiting the site, understanding the application and slurry characteristics, and ensuring that we’re providing an optimised solution that will deliver efficient and reliable operation for as long as possible, with as little maintenance as possible. In addition to providing the right pump for the job, we’re committed to supporting our equipment to maximise its lifespan via our global network of more than 150 locations, which ensures that we can deliver the pumps, parts and expertise when it’s needed most, no matter where your mine might be. Weir Group, +27 (0) 11 292 2706, www.global.weir Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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Digital reliability delivers smart solutions

PUMPS

There is a growing realisation in the pumps industry that technology, in itself, is not the object, but rather the means to unlocking reliability.

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Technology for technology sake has no purpose. When it comes to the reliability of equipment having a clear picture of each machine’s health in real-time is what makes the difference. Imagine eliminating all accidents, even fires, from any operation. In fact, imagine eliminating all downtime due to machinery breakdowns. That level of reliability would immediately raise overall profitability. According to Andrey Kostyukov, CEO and president of Dynamics Scientific Production Center (DSPR), this is exactly what digital reliability introduces into operations. “With the right system, process facility teams get realtime feedback on the health of machinery as well as specific prescriptions for maintenance and repair before catastrophic issues occur. Sensors detect and identify root causes of malfunctions several minutes, hours or even days before equipment failure.” What does it mean? “You can virtually eliminate all accidents and fires and know the real-time health of all the equipment in your facility. This in turn empowers you to schedule maintenance and repairs in the most costeffective manner possible.” David Reed, director plant maintenance at Eastman Chemical in the US, says this would address some of the real challenges that exist in pump operations. “There is a lot of good condition based modelling available; a lot of data, but where we have to close the loop is our

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

measurement systems and how we use that data.” He says more often than not the analysis of data is just not robust enough. “We have tons and tons of data, but what we do with that is not much.” Amy Odom, an asset manager at chemical company BASF in North America, agrees saying more often than not in the operational environment the collection of data does not transfer into any meaningful changes. “We are not checking all the boxes to use data as optimally as we should be doing. We have still some way to go in the journey when it comes to machine learning and incorporating AI.” Use it or lose it Kostyukov says many companies have realised the importance of data collection and have taken real steps in this regard. Most understand that achieving efficiency improvements throughout an asset lifecycles whilst reducing unscheduled downtime has advantage. “Data just for data sake has no point. Garbage in and garbage out,” he says. “One can gather a lot of data, but it has no point. For example, if the data you are collecting is not relating to any particular failure or malfunction on any piece of equipment, why do you need it? The same goes for data that assists you to identify failure on a machine at the final stage of degradation. Again, no point as it is too late to use this information efficiently and react to the failure.”


PUMPS

He says this is where digital reliability introduces a completely different approach and concept. “Digital reliability moves the focus from the prognosis of equipment failure to the diagnosis of equipment. It means that the operations team know exactly what is going on with any machine in a plant, not just the critical equipment that usually has some measurement tools of some sort on them. Ultimately this knowledge allows for the prevention of all redundant maintenance never mind failures and completely downtime due to accidents.” Kostyukov says it translates directly into spending the smallest amount of money possible to support a piece of equipment for a lifetime. “Overall digitalization brings transparency and driven value. It allows everyone in the organisation from the managers to the operational and maintenances teams to know and understand correctly what is happening on equipment at any given time.” Recipe for success For digital reliability to work it requires several things, says Kostyukov. “Firstly, it must be cost effective digital

infrastructure that is introduced and secondly, it needs to collect informative data about destructive forces that appears in the weakest part of the equipment so that these can be eliminated ahead of time.” Introducing an operational efficiency much of its success lies on it having the proper infrastructure. “The data sources also have to be reliable.” One of the major benefits of this approach is in the ability to then make data driven decisions with the increased asset and machine health visibility achieved. “We have seen the benefits first hand in operations that have implemented digital reliability systems. In one case we saw reactive maintenance drop from around 15% to zero, while the availability of equipment went from 97% to 100% operating non-stop for 3,5 years.” He said improved safety and reliability in maintenance operations was another benefit. “The cost of unscheduled shutdowns can run into millions. Instead of taking this risk, why not rather prevent any possible defects altogether ensuring there are never any breakdowns.”

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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Improving pump reliability is essential

PUMPS

Improving pump reliability is essential to reducing operational costs and increasing profitability. One of the first areas to show failure in a pumping system is the mechanical seal. Chris Dean, technical training officer for AESSEAL, sheds some light on where to find the fault. Picture yourself making a cup of tea. You fill the kettle and switch it on. As you do this it blows a fuse or trips the breaker. You shrug, these things happen after all. Without much further ado you either insert another fuse or reset the breaker. Still wanting that cup of tea you switch the kettle on a second time, just to have the fuse blow or breaker trip again. Question is, do you now go and insert a new fuse or reset the breaker again? The short answer is no. The average person would not think twice about it – the problem lies with the kettle. Odds are a new kettle will be purchased long before new fuses to get that much-longed-for cup of tea.

of problems in the pumping system as a whole.” Why the mechanical seal? “If we look a pump then there are four sealing areas that one has to contend with. The suction flange gaskets can be anything from 25 to 75mm wide and are held in place by multiple bolts used to employ a high hydrostatic force to create a seal.” The same applies to the discharge flange. Also, the back cover or casing gadgets are very similar even though they are narrower. Here the width could be as low as 6mm, but more studs are used for a higher hydrostatic end force to close a narrower gasket.

But what does your faulty kettle have to do with mechanical seals one might ask?

“The mechanical seal, on the other hand, is different,” explains Dean. “

Everything, says Dean, who has shared his insights in a series of videos for the company.

The sealing face is only about 3mm wide yet it sees the same fluid, temperature and pressure as the other three sealing areas. At the same time, it is also more dynamic. It has by far the hardest job to do in any system.”

“Mechanical seals often act as a fuse in an electrical system, but unlike a fuse, they are not designed to fail. If there are upset conditions in the equipment though it will, in turn, cause a mechanical seal failure.” Instead of looking for the upset condition pump operators more often than not continue to focus on the seal. “And so they purchase a new seal and replace the faulty one only to find it does not function properly either and so they buy another one. When this one also does not work they opt for a new supplier completely, but because the underlying upset conditions have not been addressed, the new supplier’s seals are also faulty,” he says. “And until the underlying conditions have addressed and are no longer occurring in the system, no seal is going to work.” Instead of focusing on the seal, says Dean, look at the proverbial kettle instead – the pump and the equipment attached to it. “In the majority of the cases re-occurring mechanical seal

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failure is an indication

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

Dean maintains that despite their widespread use mechanical seals are too often not given enough consideration. “Better understanding of seals, their selections and operational requirements can improve equipment reliability significantly by reducing operating downtime When it comes to mechanical seals Dean advocates some key fundamentals that include seal faces be kept as clean and well lubricated as possible. Lubrication should also be of high quality. According to Dean seal life is directly affected by the quality of lubrication. A seal should last until the faces wear out. “Frequent seal failure, however, is not an indication about the quality of the seals, but rather that something more serious is wrong in the system.”


Reduce emissions with BLUE BOX Sulzer is collaborating with Atlantica, a global player with a strong portfolio in sustainable infrastructure, to install its BLUE BOX™ advanced analytics solution on the performance-critical pumps at two solar power plants. Located 160 km northeast of Los Angeles, US, the Mojave 280 MW solar plant generates clean electricity to power approximately 90 000 households, preventing the emission of 350 000 tons of CO2 annually.

The Mojave 280 MW solar plant generates clean electricity to power approximately 90'000 households, preventing the emission of 350 000 tons of CO2 annually. Sulzer’s BLUE BOX advanced analytics solution on the boiler feedwater and heat transfer fluid pumps will strengthen Atlantica’s anomaly detection capabilities and thus increase uptime, improve reliability and eliminate operational risks of their renewable energy plants. After successful completion, Atlantica aims to implement Sulzer’s cloud-based technology in all its assets worldwide as a part of their enterprise-level digitalization efforts. The latest version of Sulzer’s BLUE BOX is now capable of enhancing operational performance of pumping systems in both the short- and long-term. This includes automated flagging of anomalous operations detected and estimated remaining lifetimes as well as pro-active recommendations on actions by Sulzer experts aiming for more targeted maintenance. Atlantica will benefit from a new BLUE BOX with artificial

With Sulzer’s help, Atlantica expects to generate significant cost savings and higher revenue. Besides, BLUE BOX helps understand the operational performance of the pumps, therefore providing the possibility for proposed efficiency or output gains in the future. The new version of BLUE BOX makes use of artificial intelligence and combines statistical with physical models based on Sulzer’s expertise.

PUMPS

KaXu Solar One in South Africa has a capacity of 100 MW and saves emissions to the amount of 315 000 tons annually.

intelligence features, strengthening their machine learning capabilities.

By analyzing real-time and historical operational data, Sulzer’s pump experts will proactively support Atlantica to make better-informed business decisions. Sulzer’s pump experts will support Atlantica. The award-winning BLUE BOX™ by Sulzer is a set of digitally enabled services, leveraging the Internet of Things for asset optimization and real-time predictive maintenance. It uses existing pump data and machine learning to cut costs in pump operation and maintenance considerably. Sulzer Pumps (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd, +27 (0) 11 820 6000, CSSEnquiries@sulzer.com, www.sulzer.com

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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Troubleshooting This Troubleshooting Guide allows you to review and diagnose potential problems that may be encountered with SAM Engineering’s range of centrifugal pumps. The guide outlines common pumping problems and failures with probable causes and procedures for checking and correcting possible faults. No liquid delivery

Fill the pump and suction pipe with liquid.

Speed too low Check whether the motor is directly across-the-line and receiving full voltage. Alternatively, the frequency may be too low; motor may have an open phase.

Loss of prime Check for leaks in suction pipe joints and fittings; vent casing to remove accumulated air.

Discharge system head too high Check pipe friction losses. Larger discharge piping may correct condition. Check that valves are wide open.

Suction lift too high If no obstruction at the inlet, check for pipe friction losses. However, the static lift may be too great. Measure with mercury column or vacuum gauge while the pump operates. If the static lift is too high, liquid to be pumped must be raised or pump lowered.

Suction lift too high If no obstruction at the inlet, check for pipe friction losses. However, the static lift may be too great. Measure with mercury column or vacuum gauge while the pump operates. If the static lift is too high, liquid to be pumped must be raised or pump lowered.

Discharge system head too high Check pipe friction losses. Larger discharge piping may correct condition. Check that valves are wide open.

Impeller partially plugged Dismantle pump or use piping hand hole to clean the impeller.

Speed too low Check whether the motor is directly across-the-line and receiving full voltage. Alternatively, the frequency may be too low; motor may have an open phase.

Cavitation; insufficient NPSH (depending on installation) a. Increase positive suction head on the pump by lowering the pump or increasing suction pipe size or raising the fluid level. B. Sub-cool suction piping at the inlet to lower entering liquid temperature. c. Pressurise suction vessel. Defective impeller Inspect impeller. Replace if damaged or vane sections badly eroded.

PUMPS

Lack of prime

Wrong direction of rotation Check motor rotation with a directional arrow on the pump casing. Wrong rotation will cause pump damage. Impeller completely plugged Dismantle pump or use piping hand hole to clean the impeller. Air leaks in the suction piping If liquid pumped is water or other non-explosive, and explosive gas or dust is not present, test flanges for leakage with flame or match. For such liquids as gasoline, the suction line can be tested by shutting off or plugging inlet and putting a line under pressure. A gauge will indicate a leak with a drop of pressure. Air leaks in the stuffing box Increase seal lubricant pressure to above atmosphere.

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Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

Defective packing Replace packing and sleeves if badly worn. Foot valve too small or partially obstructed The area through ports of the valve should be at least as large as the area of suction pipe- preferably 1½ times. If the strainer is used, the net clear area should be3 to 4 times the area of the suction pipe. Suction inlet not immersed deep enough If inlet cannot be lowered, or if eddies through which air


is sucked persist when it is lowered, chain a board to the suction pipe. It will be drawn into eddies, smothering the vortex. Wrong direction of rotation Compare rotation of motor with a directional arrow on the pump casing. Wrong rotation will cause pump damage.

Not enough pressure

Pump operates for a short time, then stops Incomplete priming Free pump, piping and valves of all air. If high points in suction line prevent this, they need correcting. See item 5. Suction lift too high If no obstruction at the inlet, check for pipe friction losses. However, the static lift may be too great. Measure with mercury column or vacuum gauge while the pump operates. If the static lift is too high, liquid to be pumped must be raised or pump lowered.

CP S

CP 7

CS X

MP PU

Impeller diameter too small (Probable cause if none of above) Check with the factory to see if a larger impeller can be used;otherwise, cut pipe losses or increase speed, or both, as needed. But be careful not to seriously overload drive.

• Horizontal Split Water Pumps • CPX/HMX Type • SP Type • Vertical Turbine • CPW Type • CSR Type

MP PU

Excessive impeller clearance Adjust impeller clearance.

HM MP PU

Air or gases in liquid (Test in the laboratory, reducing pressure on the liquid to pressure in the suction line. Watch for bubble formation.) The area through ports of the valve should be at least as large as the area of suction pipe- preferably 1½ times. If the strainer is used, the net clear area should be3 to 4 times the area of the suction pipe.

• CP/CPO Series • CP7 Type • Vertical Spindle/ Cantilever Pump • HM Process Pumps • CSW Type • CSY Type • Process Pumps

MP PU

Obstruction in liquid passages Replace packing and sleeves if badly worn.

VERTICAL SP I

Our range of pump products include:

E DL N

Mechanical defects Inspect impeller. Replace if damaged or vane sections badly eroded. Replace packing and sleeves if badly worn. The area through ports of the valve should be at least as large as the area of suction pipe- preferably 1½ times. If the strainer is used, the net clear area should be3 to 4 times the area of the suction pipe.

P -C

Air leaks in the suction piping If liquid pumped is water or other non-explosive, and explosive gas or dust is not present, test flanges for leakage with flame or match. For such liquids as gasoline,

C

PO

Speed too low Check whether the motor is directly across-the-line and receiving full voltage. Alternatively, the frequency may be too low; motor may have an open phase.

Over 25 years of experience in designing and manufacturing a complete range of centrifugal pumps for a broad spectrum CSO/CP of industrial, process and general applications.

www.sam eng.co.za

Impeller diameter too small (probable cause if none of above) Check with the factory to see if a larger impeller can be used; otherwise, cut pipe losses or increase speed, or both, as needed. But be careful not to seriously overload drive.

Providing customised pump solutions to various industries

Pump design techniques that ensure our pumps are manufactured to last

High performance - high quality products, excellent service

Alloys to suit all applications Proud Manufacturers of SAMCO® Pumps

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

15


PUMPS

Air leaks in the suction piping If liquid pumped is water or other non-explosive, and explosive gas or dust is not present, test flanges for leakage with flame or match. For such liquids as gasoline, Air leaks in the stuffing box Increase seal lubricant pressure to above atmosphere.

Stuffing box too tight (Packing) Release gland pressure. Tighten reasonably. If sealing liquid does not flow while the pump operates, replace the packing. If packing is wearing too quickly, replace scored shaft sleeves and keep liquid seeping for lubrication.

Air or gases in liquid The area through ports of the valve should be at least as large as the area of suction pipe- preferably 1½ times. If the strainer is used, the net clear area should be 3 to 4 times the area of the suction pipe.

Casing distorted by excessive strains from suction or discharge piping Check alignment. Examine the pump for friction between impeller and casing. Replace damaged parts. Check for pipe strain.

The pump takes too much power

Shaft bent due to damage - through shipment, operation, or overhaul Dismantle pump and inspect shaft.

Head lower than rating; thereby pumping too much liquid Machine impeller's OD to size advised by the factory. Cavitationa. Increase positive suction head on the pump by lowering the pump or increasing suction pipe size or raising the fluid level.b. Sub-cool suction piping at the inlet to lower entering liquid temperature. c. Pressurise suction vessel. Mechanical defects Inspect impeller. Replace if damaged or vane sections badly eroded. Replace packing and sleeves if badly worn. The area through ports of the valve should be at least as large as the area of suction pipe- preferably 1½ times. If the strainer is used, the net clear area should be 3 to 4 times the area of the suction pipe. Suction inlet not immersed enough Replace packing and sleeves if badly worn. Liquid heavier (in either viscosity or specific gravity) than allowed for The area through ports of the valve should be at least as large as the area of suction pipe- preferably 1½ times. If the strainer is used, the net clear area should be3 to 4 times the area of the suction pipe. Wrong direction of rotation Check motor rotation with a directional arrow on the pump

16

casing. Wrong rotation will cause pump damage.

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

Mechanical failure of critical pump parts Check bearings and impeller for damage. Any irregularity in these parts will cause a drag on shaft. Misalignment Realign pump and driver. Speed may be too high (brake hp of the pump varies as the cube of the speed; therefore, any increase in speed means a considerable increase in power demand) Check the voltage on motor. Electrical defects The voltage and frequency of the electrical current may be lower than that for which motor was built or there may be defects in the motor. The motor may not be ventilated properly due to a poor location. Mechanical defects in turbine, engine, or another type of drive exclusive of motor If the trouble cannot be located, consult factory. Sam Engineering, +27 (0) 11 823 425, sales@sameng.co.za, www.sameng.co.za


Liquid natural gas floats on a wave of success

VALVES

Evermore freighters, cruise ships and even trucks run on liquid natural gas. There are also always valves on board. And LNG also contributes to uninterrupted energy supply in industry and households. LNG also reaches targets that would be made uneconomical by the construction of a pipeline. Its logistic flexibility makes it unique – and attractive – for the natural gas sector. According to the global LNG Outlook by Shell, the demand for liquefied natural gas increased last year by 29 million tons, or 11%, to 293 million tons. And the steep increase in LNG continues. Over the next 20 years, we expect an increase in demand of more than double each year. "In North America, Europe and Asia, LNG will occupy an ever-increasing proportion of the supply for covering the increasing demand up to 2030 and beyond," explains Exxon Mobil. LNG is a decisive link Because LNG has developed from a point-to-point niche business in a few regional markets to a large and growing industry that offers reliable supply worldwide. “Liquid natural gas is the decisive link between the natural gas supplier and the natural gas customer, that are geographically wide apart,” explains Exxon Mobil. LNG benefit

being the use of liquid natural gas as a driving fuel. LNG is already driving a few tankers and freighters. And also, cruise ships by now. The new ship AIDAnova is already making its journeys using liquid natural gas. The new Nova model is setting new standards: The ship will be conveying around 2,600 cabins, a climbing crag, giant water-slides, a Beach Club and a large-scale mini-golf range over the waves. 300 valves on board Almost 300 Herose valves are used onboard the AIDAnova. They are used for the storage and bunkering of the cruise liner. In the storage of LNG onboard, the valves carry out the task of monitoring the LNG and feeding it safely to the drive system. Safety valves protect the system from prohibited over-pressure. “The Herose valves are the foremost and most important valve in the charging processes, or bunkering processes,” says Marketing Chief Mario Esche. These valves are designated as ESD (Emergency Shut down) valves and fulfil the task of interrupting the bunkering process immediately in an emergency. ESD valves are pneumatically-driven shutoff valves that close in the shortest possible time by using spring force. Special sealing On the Aida, the valves are used immediately at the storage tank in the Coldbox, in the bunkering lines and the Fuel Gas Supply System (FGSS). This includes fire safety shut-off valves as manual and powered variants, regulating valves, non-return valves, locking non-return valves and safety valves.

Metso valves are provided for floating LNG, for example. The company offers modular valves, such as on, off, safety and regulation valves for LNG production.The LNG product range includes emergency shut-off, drain, and drier sequencing valves and flows regulation applications. According to Metso, the main challenges include restricted space and weight restrictions in the processing, storage and unloading of shipboard installations. Also, the system must be vibration-resistant. Long-haul with LNG Bestobell Valves, a British manufacturer of cryonic valves, is also active in the LNG sector. The company’s product range includes, for example, fire-tested LNG shut-off valves that are suitable for smaller and medium-sized dispensing systems. One aspect of LNG is the transport, the other 18

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

These applications are not usual or simple for the valves because the entire gas supply system must operate without leaks. “Because, if gas were to escape, this would be a hazard for the crew and the passengers. For this reason, the requirements for sealing of the valves are particularly stringent,” explains Mario Esche. The tightness to the outside is ensured in the Herose factory by a-hundred-percent test regime. "Besides, DIN EN ISO 10497 states that valves for LNG applications must remain functional for a period of at least 30 minutes at up to 1000°C in the event of a fire". In general, the valves need to comply with the requirements of the classification companies. These include material and strength analyses during the cast material manufacture, tests that accompany the product under extremely low temperatures and function and leak tests during assembly. "Also, the materials are selected for their corrosion-resistance concerning salty, aggressive seaair and their fire-resistance following DIN EN ISO 10497," says Mario Esche.


Launching with powerful symbolism The AIDAnova is now gathering speed. A ship of the same construction is due to be launched in 2021. Developments that certainly have powerful symbolism. "When other ocean carriers see that AIDA can be supplied with LNG in ports and that it can remain at sea with this supply for 14 days or more, they will perhaps overcome their reticence," speculates Bernhard Meyer, one of the Managing Directors of the Meyer shipyard.

The increasing goods traffic on road and water will come even more in focus over the next few years. The use of fossil fuels is associated with an increase in CO2 emissions – at the cost of climate and environment. “The introduction of LNG as an alternative fuel for heavy goods traffic would mean that there would be no more fine dust and sulphur dioxide emission, that there would be 80 to 90 percent less nitrogen dioxide in the air and that the CO2 emission would be reduced by 10 to 20 percent,” according to the promotional programme of the EU, INTERREG Deutschland Nederland. Alternative fuel Programmes such as the INTERREG are intended to promote development. The "LNG Pilots" project was initiated to drive forward and accelerate the introduction of LNG as an alternative fuel in trans-border goods transport. The project is intended, amongst other things, to carry out analyses for trimodal infrastructureheavy commercial goods/trucks, riverboats, industrial applications – in ports and to investigate the possibilities of biogas use. "Also, logistics concepts for the neighbouring countries of Lower Saxony and the Netherlands are to be developed and technical innovations in the field of tank charging are to be developed further. In the end, the possibilities for LNG charging stations and storage facilities will be optimised by the application of innovations," according to the project description. Things are also happening in the field of public LNG promotion: The planned costs for the INTERREG project, that will be ending in June 2019,

USA is massively exporting LNG No question, more and more LNG projects are sprouting up out of the ground all over the world. Above all, the USA is massively involved in the export of LNG, as demonstrated over the past two years. The LNG capacity in America will be increasing considerably once more with the construction of five new terminals next year.Experts speculate that the USA could increase its export capacity in the next few years to around 110 billion cubic metres. Europe will be one of the important markets. Russia is also discovering LNG as a promising primary energy carrier, even though the country does not yet count as one of the biggest providers of liquid natural gas. One supplier is the energy company Novatec, whose focus is less on the European market, however, and more on the Asian market. “Jamal LNG” has started production, for example. However, the project produces a modest volume of 5.5 million tons annually for the energy market. It is, however, the first LNG terminal north of the Arctic Circle. Where, again, LNG is a pioneer. Additional products will follow in Russia, such as “Arctic LNG 2”, which will be starting in 2023, and, when fully operational will produce 18 million tons of LNG for the market.

VALVES

LNG on a successful course – a development that has long been no surprise to Herose. The company has supplied valves solutions for more than 70 ships and more than 50 land-based installations. For example, for cruise liners, ferries, freighters and riverboats as well as harbour tugs and harbour dredgers. Land installations, including import terminals, a liquefaction plant and evaporation installations and truck loading stations have been successfully equipped with valves.

after three and a half years, will be around R132 million (6.75 million Euros). It is therefore appropriate that the first LNG charging station has now been opened by Shell in Germany. “This is a signal for the change in goods road traffic,” says Andreas Kuhlmann, Chairman of the Management Board of the German Energy Agency (dena). Previously there were only two LNG charging stations in Germany. To establish LNG as a fuel, dena has been working in the task force with various stakeholders for three years. A development that is naturally being carefully monitored by some valve manufacturers. The use of LNG seems to be unlimited. This year, Scania will be launching an LNG-powered coach. The model is intended to have a range of up to 1,000 kilometres.

Building the LNG infrastructure The LNG sector has grown considerably, particularly in the past few years. Component manufacturers, such as valve manufacturers and plant providers can celebrate full order books. The Linde Group offers technologies and complete solutions both for LNG transport and for the creation of an LNG infrastructure. The products range “from cleaning the natural gas, via storage tanks and evaporation plant for port installations and ships to regional distribution and customer applications,” according to the company. The potential of LNG can also be seen from the fact that: Natural gas, with its proportion of around 30 percent of the world energy market, is one of the most important energy carriers in the world and potentially causes the least air pollution. Even if the gas is primarily supplied via lines and pipelines to the user, LNG is playing an ever-increasing role. A development that could in future made itself felt in Germany as well. For example, by the LNG terminal in Brunsbüttel. VALVE WORLD EXPO 2020, +49 211 4560 541, HartmannP@messe-duesseldorf.de, www.valveworldexpo.com Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

19


INDUSTRY NEWS

Mine employers & Covid-19 - the Guidelines & Mandatory Code of Practice unpacked The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy has issued Guidelines for a Mandatory Code of Practice (COP) on the Mitigation and Management of Covid-19 (Guideline). Employers have until 25 May 2020 to implement the COP.

Before the implementation of the mandatory COP, employers are required to comply with the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP), in addition to all relevant regulations and directives. Once effective (from 25 May) employer's will be assessed against compliance with the Guideline. Failing to prepare and implement a COP in line with the Guideline is a breach of the Mine Health and Safety Act (MHSA) and a criminal offence. The COP aims to ensure that mine employees and any other persons at mines are protected from transmission of Covid-19 at the workplace and now also notably "where reasonably practicable in the community". The Guideline assists employers in establishing and maintaining a Covid-19 prevention, mitigation and management programme at mines and provides several key considerations which employers must bear in mind in drafting and implementing their COP's. The Guideline requires that procedures be put in place to be followed by employees to exercise their rights in terms of section 23 of the MHSA during the Covid-19 outbreak. The intention appears to be that a specific Covid-19 related procedure dealing with section 23 of the MHSA be prepared as reference has not been made to existing procedures dealing with section 23 of the MHSA. The Guideline must be read in conjunction with existing regulations and directives and should be overseen by appointed Covid-19 compliance officer in conjunction with existing managerial systems. The Guideline provides for 5 key elements to be addressed in the mine's COP, summarised below: Risk assessment & review - employers must conduct a risk-based assessment. The Guideline requires that the risk assessment covers all 20

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

workings at the mine and lists the minimum considerations that must be included in the risk assessment including aspects such as all sources of transmission, operations and workplaces with potential risk of transmission, occupations and skills that may be impacted and the risk of vulnerable employees while at work. Control measures include the de-densification of employees, review of human resources policies and frequent monitoring. Employers must conduct a risk-based assessment considering the World Health Organisation's (WHO) classification of SARS-CoV-2 infection risk groups, namely: • very high exposure risk / high exposure risk / medium exposure risk / low exposure risk. The risk assessment must be reviewed regularly and whenever circumstances arise or change at the mine that could have an impact on the original assessments and the risk of contracting Covid-19 in the workplace. Start-up & on-going procedure for mines - employers must develop a safe start-up procedure. The start-up procedure in the COP must be aligned with previously issued instructions from the Chief Inspector of Mines. Some aspects that must be addressed include: • cleaning and disinfecting or industrial sanitising of surfaces which employees come into contact with; • screening and testing procedures; • withdrawal procedures, to be used by mines in the event of a localised Covid-19 outbreak, and • measures in place to collaborate with the Department of Health for the prevention and management of Covid-19 for migrant workers at ports of entry. Management Programme - employers must develop a mitigation & management programme. The employer must set out a mitigation and management


programme to manage the transmission of infection. The Guidelines list key principles that the employer must consider.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

• Employers must ensure that employees returning from areas which are regarded as epicentres of Covid-19 are quarantined for 14 days, before they can be permitted to return to work. • Clear procedures must be implemented to report when employees are sick or experiencing symptoms and "who, where and the duration of isolation will take place for employees suspected of being infected with Covid-19". Details of where employees who are suspected of Covid-19 infection must be screened, diagnosed and tested (including what will lead to admission to a health care facility and all associated transport arrangements). Selfisolation requirements must also be set out. • The management programme must provide support for employees who display symptoms consistent with Covid-19 and employees who have been in contact with confirmed Covid-19 cases, whether symptomatic or not. Support includes establishing a dedicated 24-hour hotline which employees will use to reach the mine’s dedicated healthcare workers. The management programme must also deal with issues around screening, isolation, monitoring of employees etc. Employers must consider several topics when preparing the COP. Some of these are: • Providing adequate, useable and appropriate training and information material. This must include proper hygiene and controls, prevention of discrimination, disclosure of preexisting conditions and available support and assistance. • Acquiring knowledge of pre-existing medical conditions. Such employees will only be permitted to return to work after receiving a certificate of fitness from the OMP. • Developing procedures for returning employees. • Communicating and collaborating with the Department of Health (DOH) to be familiar with the district's plan including arrangements for hospitalisation of employees if a mine does not have a hospital. • Ensuring enough resources including isolation and quarantine areas, staff, equipment and medical supplies and flu vaccinations. Requirements for such self-isolation are set, where this is possible. • Screening of employees and, as far as possible, communicating new procedures to employees before they return to work.

A specific procedure dealing with screening including when and where this must take place must be addressed. • Determining appropriate PPE and application of dedensification including applying a staggered approach on the number of employees to be screened per day to limit crowding. At areas where there may be crowding, maximum capacity must be determined and maintained • Implementing a contact tracing system for cases identified on the mine and communicating with the DOH on tracing of contacts beyond the mine. The National Institute of Communicable Diseases (NICD) contact tracing protocol must be followed. • Implementing follow up systems including further medical assessments and fitness to work assessments and referrals for further management of other conditions other than Covid-19. • Putting in place procedures to prevent infection to employees and visitors to the mine including procedures to deal with potential cross infection during the medical surveillance systems and the suspending of all spirometry and/or audiometry unless enough infection prevention controls are in place. Programmes of personal hygiene must be limited. • Breathalyser testing and biometrics are permitted but only where measures have been taken to assess risks and prevent cross infection. Monitoring & reporting - employers must record and report Covid-19 cases in the workplace The Guideline requires the employer's Covid-19 steering committee to develop a system for investigating all confirmed Covid-19 positive cases at the mine and recording and reporting such information to the NICD and the health and safety structure in the workplace. The steering committee must also consolidate the NICD

2019/12/05 15:04:44

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

21


INDUSTRY NEWS

reports into a monthly report, which is then reported to the Principal Inspector of Mines. The employer must report confirmed positive cases at the mine to the Principal Inspector of Mines with 24 hours and conduct investigations in terms of section 11(5) of the MHSA. Compensation - employers must apply for compensation on behalf of the employee. The employer must follow the process stipulated in the Notice on Compensation for occupationally acquired Covid-19. Standard Operating Procedure for South African Mines (SOP) There are several differences between the SOP and the Guideline, which employers should be aware of when drafting their COP's. These differences are tabled below.

The SOP The Guideline • Employers must provide screening measures for employees who are using transport provided by the employer. • Employers must inform employees of the duty to report should they have tested positive for Covid-19 during the nationwide lockdown. • The verification procedure for non-contact thermal scanning/screening is not provided for in the SOP. • The WHO's risk classification for providing PPE is not provided for in the SOP. • The SOP does not refer to a contact tracing programme. • The SOP only required posters on infection prevention to be visible at all areas of the medical centre. • Quarantining of employees returning from areas which are regarded as epicentres of Covid-19 is not provided for. • The SOP does not make it mandatory for an employer to establish a 24-hour hotline for employees. • The SOP requires a follow up system which requires employees to call the medical centre to arrange for an

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Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

assessment and the issuing of a clearance letter after the isolation/admission period. • The mine's COP must include screening measures for employees from labour sending areas within South Africa who use their transport at the mine before they return to work. • Employers are required to inform employees of their duty to report should they test positive for Covid-19 during the nationwide lockdown, over a long weekend or while on leave.(our emphasis) • Employers are required to develop a calibration or a verification procedure for non-contact thermal scanning/ screening i.e. when, where, who and how to calibrate or verify the non- contact instrument/s to correlate with the core body temperature. The calibration or verification procedure should be in line with the original equipment manufacturer’s specification. • Employers must consider the WHO's risk classification to provide PPE to employees. • The employer must put in place a contact tracing programme for contacts of Covid-19 cases identified on the mine and communicate with the DOH on tracing of contacts beyond the mine. The NICD contact tracing protocol must be followed. • The COP must provide for the displaying of posters on Covid-19 to be visible at all areas of the mine as identified in the risk assessment. • Employers must implement a 14-day quarantine programme for employees returning from areas which are regarded as epicentres of Covid-19 before they can be permitted to return to work. These areas are not yet defined. • The employer must establish a 24-hour hotline which employees will use to reach the mine’s dedicated healthcare workers. • The employers follow up system must provide that employees require a medical assessment and that a letter be obtained from the isolation/health care facility. In the case of self-isolation, an employee must submit a letter from the legal health care worker. • The Guideline requires the employer to provide training on the prevention of Covid-19 stigma and discrimination amongst the suspected, the infected and their families. • The Guideline requires the employer to review the mines emergency response plans in consideration of Covid-19.


From pumps to masks – fighting Covid-19

funds to non-profit organisations as well as water technology equipment in support of temporary hospital construction efforts. In a statement, the company said it was important to not just be focussed on their core task of ensuring no disruptions to water supply, but also to look at creative ways to re-purpose their technologies for healthcare applications. In this regard, it decided to repurpose one of its flow control pumps, normally used in the pharmaceutical market, for ventilators. From millions of dollars donated for research to the changing of production lines to deliver supplies and equipment to use on the frontlines of this global battle, it has been unprecedented. Pump and valve companies also took up this global call to arms. Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa finds out more. It took the Grundfos team only 36 hours to deliver a visor prototype after being called by a medicines agency in March asking for assistance. The global pump manufacturer was ready for full-scale production, to begin with, the ability to deliver 5000 face shields daily.

INDUSTRY NEWS

Companies around the world have stepped to the fore showcasing versatility and commitment in the fight against the novel coronavirus.

International pump manufacturer Sulzer realised its need for faces marks to keep its production sites around the world operational would add strain to already stressed medical equipment supply chains. According to Darius Pardivala, president of Rotating Equipment Services Americas for Sulzer, the health and safety of employees has become of critical importance due to the global Covid-19 pandemic.

“I am incredibly proud of our skilled colleagues, who have established this so quickly. It is imperative that everyone contributes to solutions in any way possible, so we can support our health and care staff in the fight against coronavirus. We are ready to do everything within our power,” said Morten Bach Jensen, Grundfos Group Vice President. A key factor in developing the visor was making it easy to manufacture and easy and convenient for staff to use. Consisting of a normal sheet of A4 foil attached to a plastic frame it was distributed around the world in countries where Grundfos have a presence. “It is very important for our company to take social responsibility. We can help produce something, which is a deficiency, and this is not something we have to make money from. It’s just an attempt to help,” said Jensen. As countries around the world continued to lockdown, anxiety over the pandemic rose. This saw Grundfos sponsor a book for children aged between 5 and 8 about the coronavirus. Titled Milton and the invisible coronavirus the purpose of the book is to teach and explain in a non-frightening way to children what corona is as well as why there is a need to be careful about hygiene and contact with others. Pump manufacturer Xylem also decided to produce face shields. “This is an extraordinary time, as communities around the world come together to face the challenge of Covid-19. Life is being disrupted in many ways for nearly everyone,” said CEO Patrick Decker, who led the company in donating

“Being an essential service with many clients in the energy sector we had to very quickly take drastic measures and put procedures in place to ensure our business continued uninterrupted,” he said. With demand at its peak for N95 masks used by medical staff and first respondents, Pardivala said they did not want to see Sulzer’s demand increase to facemask shortages. It, therefore, commissioned a 3D printing company to design and print a reusable facemask for use by Sulzer employees. It has since extended this brief and commissioned the company, Essentium, to also design and print re-usable masks for children that Sulzer has distributed at youth shelters. The reusable mask frame allows for easy cleaning and is used with a single-use, replaceable filtration media. Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa -May/Jun 2020

23


Water infrastructure woes increasing

South Africa’s water infrastructure was under pressure long before the outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Concerns have been mounting that management and maintenance of an already aged infrastructure might be yet another impact of the pandemic.

WATER

It is no secret that South Africa’s failure to improve its water infrastructure will have dire consequences adding significantly to the country’s economic woes. Speak to the experts and they speak of real worry about the ageing water infrastructure across the country that is increasingly being put under more pressure despite it already being unfit for purpose. Covid-19 has seen this pressure increase as attempts to move water to under-addressed areas as quickly as possible. “Without water, we cannot address a health pandemic,” says Achim Wurster, chairman of the Water Institute of Southern Africa. “It is an absolutely essential service and priority without which societies cannot function. Even more so in pandemic situations especially from a public health perspective. Increased challenges Water shortage has been cited as a growing challenge. During the past few years the impact of the severe drought in the Western Cape where a Day Zero – when water runs out completely – became a near reality only highlighted the need for a different approach to water. “Even before Covid-19 what water is available has been a

24

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

big challenge,” says Henk Smit of Vovani Water. “Although if you have a source you can at least take it from there. The technology and capability to treat water and to distribute it across the country are there. What is a challenge is the cost of doing that. According to the South African Institution Of Civil Engineering (SAICE), budgeting and spending on maintenance, rehabilitation and expansion remain inadequate for water supply in all areas.Damage caused by increased service delivery protests in urban and rural areas has also seen funding being diverted from maintenance and expansion budgets. Consequently, given continually growing demands, communities face an increased risk of supply failures. SAICE has found that water leakage and other contributors to non-revenue water remain unacceptably high. Leakage alone has resulted in losses of up to 40%. Demand management requires concerted attention to be effective, says the organisation, that grades bulk water infrastructure and non-urban water supply facilities at D-grade. It is slightly better in urban areas with a C+ grade. The low grade belies the further deterioration in the ageing bulk water infrastructure portfolio as a result of insufficient


maintenance and neglect of renewal, partly due to funding shortfalls, says SAICE. Serious depletion of skilled personnel and officials at senior levels generally in the water sector has contributed to the situation, while systems are more often than not operated too close to failure. Major projects also remain critically behind schedule – a situation that will only be exacerbated by Covid-19.

after these treatment plants. There are many companies and original equipment manufacturers in the country that have the necessary technology, experience and know-how to do it,” says Smit.

Considerations and consequences

According to Benoit le Roy, Chief Executive Officer and Alchemist at Enviro-One, South Africa has been at the forefront of developments in the water sector such as the treatment of water at sewage plants for re-use in the industrial and commercial sector.

According to Wurster, it is critical that the current infrastructure must be managed and maintained despite the outbreak of a pandemic in the country. “We cannot allow it to degrade further,” he says.

“Yes, we have an ageing infrastructure and it has to be improved and we have to speed up the process of doing that, but we have the technology and expertise in this country to provide potable water to everyone.”

South Africa’s water infrastructure is under pressure

But, he warns, it requires the necessary political will and a strong managerial team to drive it forward, because only then will it happen efficiently and effectively. This initiative is also necessary, says Smit, because so many of the current systems, particularly in the treatment of water sector, have just not been looked after and are old and are therefore not fixable. “We have to put in new infrastructure and the best solution is to get private companies to do it and to look

Hennie Pretorius, Industry Manager: Water and Wastewater at Endress+Hauser, says cost is an important consideration in all of this.

WATER

“While there may not be a lot of scopes to implement and expand supply and water recycling initiatives, now is the ideal time to put the necessary infrastructure in place.”

“Thousands of litres of water are pumped from the Vaal River to the urban areas in Gauteng where it ultimately is discharged to wastewater plants to be semi-treated before being pumped back into the river system. If we can harvest that water into a water re-use scheme it would make a huge difference of water supply and also address the massive capital expenditures required for the current system.” Water, says Wurster, remains extremely complex that has to be replenished and managed more carefully. Reduce, re-use and augment is the only way forward.

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

25


Modernising water infrastructure: what will it take to address the water challenges in Africa?

WATER

Water is a critical resource and has a tremendous impact on Africa’s development. Unfortunately, climate change, together with a soaring population, has led to an increase in the demand for water - a demand that in many countries, outstrips the available resources. As the availability of water declines, the facilitation of water for domestic consumption, agriculture and other uses is becoming critical, as is the modernising of water infrastructure to meet the growing demand. Bear in mind that Africa is a continent with 1.2 billion people, and a population expected to double by 2050. It will be made up of 89 cities of over 1 million inhabitants by 2030, 17 cities of over 5 million by the same year and boasts 400 companies with annual revenues of over a billion dollars. At the same time, 40% of the population of Sub-Saharan Africa lack access to safe water. Simply put, managing Africa's limited water resources is becoming increasingly critical to not only meet a rapidly growing population and increasing demand for farming and energy while guaranteeing the health and longevity of water ecosystems. As a continent, Africa is unique and diverse, in terms of its variety of cultures, societal structures, economic development and natural resources. There isn't a 'one-size-fits-all' solution to Africa's water challenges, but rather specific solutions tailored for each region. This is also true for water-related issues which, despite their overarching nature, are governed by the multifariousness of the continent's landscapes and climate. There have been several initiatives by countries in conjunction with the international community to meet the safe drinking water and hygienic sanitation facilities requirements of the Millennium Development Goals, yet many African countries have failed to meet their targets. This is a huge problem because water is used directly or indirectly in almost every economic sector on the continent, including agriculture, manufacturing, mining,

transport and tourism. Citizens need access to clean drinking water, as well as water for crop irrigation and hydropower - its importance cannot be underestimated. All environments, whether rural, urban, and peri-urban environments each have specific requirements concerning the availability, as well as the use and management of water resources, and these nuances need to be top-ofmind when the formulation of policies related to the modernisation, as well as development and management of water resources. There are also a finite number of sources of water available to provide clean drinking and other water to Africa's citizens. Too often, surface water sources are often contaminated or polluted, and the infrastructure that is required to pipe water from fresh, clean sources to dry and arid areas is prohibitively expensive. Groundwater is the most practical way to bring clean water into citizens' taps across Africa, particularly those in rural Africa, as it is usually free from pollutants, and is a good source during the dry months. The challenge here includes the high costs of drilling for water, as well as the technical challenges associated with finding sources that are vast enough to meet the needs of the region's population. The Africa Water Vision 2025 is for "An Africa where there are an equitable and sustainable use and management of water resources for poverty alleviation, socio-economic development, regional cooperation, and the environment," speaks to how the management and modernisation of water supply should be addressed. It covers sustainable management, as well as how to address the burgeoning population, a lack of proper water governance and regulation, as well as depletion due to pollution, deforestation and the degradation of the environment. Another major threat to water resources is the inadequate financing of investments in water supply and modernisation. At the same time, what is required, are pure-play water technology companies that can work with the public sector, and who possesses deep application expertise from decades of leading innovation in the global market, and can learn and adapt to local environments, working in true partnership with all stakeholders. Having diverse geographic and end-market exposure brings the ability to solve water issues across the full water cycle, to solve Africa's water challenges. Xylem, +27 11 966 9311, Chestan.Mistry@Xyleminc.com, www.xylem.com.

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Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020


Mine single most most influential influential valve valve company companyto tothe themines minesthat that Mine Track Track & & Tools Tools serves serves as as the the single mine running through through the the Witwatersrand WitwatersrandBasin. Basin. mine the the Great Great Gold Gold Reef Reef running

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Vincent Mulder +27 79 517-4489 vincent@minetrack.co.za vincent@minetrack.co.za

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Aurecon designs unique duckbill spillway for the raising of Garden Route Dam

WATER

When engineering, design, and advisory company Aurecon was tasked to raise the Garden Route Dam, the main supply for water-scarce George in the Western Cape, it devised a novel solution due to unique technical constraints. The ‘duckbill’ spillway developed, so-called due to its shape, not only allowed for the dam’s existing storage capacity to be increased by 25% but it also significantly increased the discharge capacity of the spillway so as to boost the dam’s safety by preventing overtopping. A duckbill spillway is a type of non-linear spillway, similar to the more generally-known labyrinth spillway, explains Frank Denys (PrEng, PhD), from the Water Engineering Unit at Aurecon. Aurecon is currently in the process of rebranding as Zutari, after officially announcing the separation of the African business from the Aurecon Group, effective from 1 January 2020. The main aim is to increase the overflow length such that the spillway or weir can pass more flow for a given overflow depth. This allows for the construction of very long spillways, typically four to five times longer than a linear spillway, in a limited area. The existing Garden Route Dam spillway was only 25 m wide. However, the non-linear spillway extended this distance to 80 metres by curving the spillway in the upstream direction. Raising the dam’s water level was originally envisioned to be limited to increasing the overflow sill of the spillway, or installing some form of fusegate system on the spillway. These options were subjected to technical feasibility studies and an environmental impact assessment. The various spillway gate options appeared attractive from a cost perspective, but undesirable when considering long-term maintenance. Furthermore, re-evaluation of the dam’s flood hydrology,

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Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

following large flood events experienced in the recent past, resulted in flood peaks significantly higher than the original dam and the proposed gate options were designed for. The updated hydrology required that the crest of the embankment also had to be raised to ensure its safety. A new spillway concept, with a significantly higher capacity than the previous alternatives, was devised to be able to pass the flood peaks with as low a head as possible to minimise by how much the embankment would need to be raised by.Besides the fact that the spillway needed to have a high discharge capacity, extreme floods also have to pass underneath the road and main water-supply pipeline bridge across the existing spillway, in order to limit the high construction costs of raising this bridge, as well as consequent disruption. The sizeable and relatively flat approach channel allowed for the construction of a fixed concrete weir that extends upstream from the existing spillway overflow and training walls. This resulted in the design of a trough or a labyrinth type of weir. Ultimately, the geometry of the site and hydraulic analysis led to the duckbill-shape spillway of the final design. The new sill is a reinforced concrete cantilever structure some 4.9 metres tall in places, which is unusual for hydraulic structures of this type as these are normally selfstable by their mass. To enhance the stability, the structure is provided with rockfill on the upstream side of the wall footing, in addition


to rock anchors. The rock of the channel in the centre of the duckbill had to be lined with concrete to prevent erosion. This slab also had to be held in place with rock anchors. Further to this, the foundation underneath the new spillway sill was grouted to minimise seepage underneath the wall. The main dam wall was raised 1.76 metres by placing new earth fill on top of the existing embankment. This task had to be achieved in confined spaces, atop high slopes, mostly using available material of suitable quality from the dam basin, and some imported from commercial sources. Selected material was placed as follows: General fill (12500 m3), rip-rap (2500 m3), filter sand (750 m3), and topsoil (2050 m3). In terms of the spillway, even though the Full Supply Level (FSL) of the dam was raised by 2.5 metres, due to the local terrain, the tallest portion of the new spillway wall is 4.9 metres tall. A total of 1780 m3 of concrete was used (750 m3 mass concrete, 300 m3 for the walls, 390 m3 for the wall footing, and 340 m3 for the channel) The quantity of steel used was 150 tons. The construction period was seven months, from 13 May to 12 December 2019. However, the various planning stages for the project date back over a decade, with the idea of raising the dam first being investigated as far back as 2004.

The main client and dam owner is the George Local Municipality, with project funding from the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant. The 2.5-metre raising of the FSL of the dam equates to an increase in the storage capacity of 2.5 million m3 to a total gross storage capacity of 12.5 million m3. “This will add much-needed drought resilience to the water-supply system. Expanding an existing water-supply resource is also preferable to the development of new sites, as it limits the extent of the environmental impact to an already impacted site,� Denys concludes. Aurecon, Rashree Maharaj, +27 (0) 427 2000, Rashree.maharaj@aurecongroup.com, www.aurecongroup.com Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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COMPANY PROFILE

Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Peter Ker-Fox from Stewarts & Lloyds Holdings (Pty) Ltd As times of uncertainty prevail amidst a global health pandemic, Divisional Manager, of Stewarts & Lloyds Holdings (Pty) Ltd shares his opinion and trends of the pipes, pumps and valves market. Tell us a little about yourself and your professional background. I have worked in the Plastic Pipe industry for some 20 years having initially started my working career as a Stewarts and Lloyds trainee in the 80’s so I have come full circle now working as the Divisional Manager of S@L Fluid Control How has your business been impacted by the current crisis and how are you navigating it to remain competitive in the market? The effect of this crisis on our business environment has not yet been fully ascertained although this been said many of our customers have suffered hardship and are struggling to make ends meet so one can only deduce from this that we are going to have a tough time ahead. I have said in the past – and I will say it again one of the key successes to our business is that we are a one stop shop in that we supply a wide array of customers with a very broad range of products from steel, hardware, valves ,pumps and irrigation products to fencing, roof sheeting and steel piping products. What are the biggest challenges facing the pipes, pumps and valves sector today?

Peter Ker-Fox from Stewarts & Lloyds Holdings (Pty) Ltd assisted our sales activity during these trying times.

The number of manufacturers in the pump and valves sector combined with the imports of these products is such that supply outstrips demand resulting in price becoming the overall driver in purchasing decisions resulting in quality standards been lowered or disregarded completely. In the steel pipe market the opposite is true – as we have manufacturers who have already closed down resulting in limited supply and increased prices.

Do you have any key lessons learned during these trying times that you can share with our readers?

What are the trends in the sector that you are seeing?What do you attribute it to?

Stewarts & Lloyds (Pty) Ltd, +27 (0) 11 917 0778, peterk@sltrading.co.za, www.stewartsandlloyds.co.za

More and more customers are starting to realise the benefits of the one stop shop principle which has obviously

Difficult trading conditions place a huge responsibility on ones sales personnel and if you have the right people with the right attitude you can overcome many of these hurdles as people buy from good sales people willing to go the extra mile for their customers.

Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Pierre O’Driscoll from Stewarts & Lloyds Holdings (Pty) Ltd As times of uncertainty prevail amidst a global health pandemic, Group Brand Manager, of Stewarts & Lloyds Holdings (Pty) Ltd shares his opinion and trends of the pipes, pumps and valves market. Tell us a little about yourself and your professional background. Similarly I joined the group early 80’s working in a number of branches around the country as well 30

as spending time out side in a similar parted with clients is going to be a industry major factor in the future. Do you have any key lessons learned during these trying times that you can share with ? Only been back at S&L for a month so I can’t really comment however chatting to a number of contractors it seems as though the reputable contractors are reasonably busy. I believe that service and knowledge Pierre O'Driscoll Group Brand Manager

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020


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Customer care: 0860 10 27 99 www.stewartsandlloyds.co.za Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020 31


COMPANY PROFILE

Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Stephen Leatherbarrow from Bray Controls Africa

As times of uncertainty prevail amidst a global health pandemic, General Manager, of Bray Controls Africa shares his opinion and trends of the pipes, pumps and valves market. Tell us a little about your company At Bray Africa, it is the strength of our team that is our differentiator. It’s an experienced team that is fully aligned to our business strategy and the core values of customer satisfaction. I see my role as that of a facilitator allowing our industry specialists, product support and logistics team to interact seamlessly to provide the knowledge at all levels that our customers require. We have in excess of 100 years’ experience in the team and its this knowledge that underpins the value and expertise that Bray Africa offers. How has your business been impacted by the current crisis and how are you navigating it to remain competitive in the market? The impact at Bray globally has been minimal. Being a large privately-owned global Valves and Controls company meant that we were able to act with agility very quickly and early during the pandemic. With multiple manufacturing facilities we were able to reschedule production locations and share inventory globally to maintain our connection to the customer. Bray has also been fortunate to engage our customers and stakeholders in a modern digital platform where we have online training sessions, industry focused webinars and increased our presence on social media platforms such as LinkedIn. This has received huge support and continues to strengthen our value to the customer. Bray Africa has utilised all these resources during the lockdown period in addition to many customer meetings on audio/video platforms. Bottom line is that Bray must add value at every step of our interaction with the customer. Finally, despite Covid we have kept our focus on the 3-year Strategic Plan for Bray Africa. With further investment in manufacturing, improved processes in logistics and a 32

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

Stephen Leatherbarrow, General Manager at Bray Controls Africa (Pty) Ltd continued investment in people. When combined with the flexibility that Bray International provides, we see Bray Africa well positioned for the future. What are the biggest challenges facing the pipes, pumps and valves sector today? With the huge geographical complexity of Africa, we see the greatest opportunity is that of increasing the technical connection to the customer by understanding the new applications demands and participating as a partner on solutions that add value to the customers such as aligned inventory, new technology and service. These value-added services come from local companies whom carry the infrastructure to deliver these benefits. It does come with an additional capital cost but its value in the total cost of ownership needs to be considered. What are the trends in the sector that you are seeing? What do you attribute it to? In the Valves and Control sector our customers face the day-to-day challenge of operating in increasingly extreme conditions in both a safe and environmentally responsible


way. The product technologies and solutions that we offer must keep pace with these demands. Bray has a focus on technology transformation, creating innovative solutions and products that its customers can rely on. Bray has a significant investment and commitment to its research & development (R&D), including the Bray Raymond Technology Center, in Houston. The Bray Chief Technology Officer states: “It’s important we keep up with what our customers face today, but also respond to the technology trends in the industry that will take them to the next level tomorrow.”

What is your outlook for pipes, pumps and valves in South Africa? What is the role of your company in this outlook? From a Bray perspective, the outlook in the valves sector looks positive for both our export and domestic markets. Bray provides high performance Despite the current covid-19 global pandemic, we remain flow regarding control to handle optimistic the solutions future and the demand for valves and related products. your most challenging applications.

Recent technical and commercial successes include Tri Lok – Triple Offset Butterfly Valve, Series 98 Scotch Yoke Pneumatic Actuator, M1 Severe Service Ball Valve, S19 Segmented Control Valve and numerous other valves, actuators and controls accessories. Understanding the customer’s challenges enables Bray to provide not just good products, but solutions to our customer’s needs. By listening to the voice of the customer, and hearing their needs, we can develop, validate and produce products that exceed customer expectations in terms of reliability and performance. Bray has also aligned the business to the market with industry specialists that are best suited to understand the specific industries needs and requirements.

more Do you haveTo any learn key lessons learnedabout during these trying times that youcomplete can share with our readers? our portfolio of Definitely value your people and stay connected to your valves, actuators and controls, customer. We provided increased access to our customers visit usdigital online at and BRAY.COM through multiple platforms maintained a connection frequency through Industry and sales support teams.

Bray will continue to invest in delivering innovation and service that provides VALUE to our clients. And all this begins with having the right people with a high level of competency in their role.

Bray Controls Africa (Pty) Ltd, +27 (0)10 007 3222, stephen.leatherbarrow@bray.com, www.bray.com

Unit 11, ABC Business Park 10 Mastiff Rd, Linbro Business Park Sandton 2090, South Africa Telephone: +27 10 007 3222

HIGH PERFORMANCE

FLOW CONTROL Bray provides high performance flow control solutions to handle your most challenging applications. To learn more about our complete portfolio of valves, actuators, and controls, visit us online at BRAY.COM Unit 11, ABC Business Park 10 Mastiff Rd, Linbro Business Park Sandton 2090, South Africa Telephone: +27 10 007 3222

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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COMPANY PROFILE

FLOW CONTROL


COMPANY PROFILE

Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Tiaan Smit from Pleix-Quip Africa As times of uncertainty prevail amidst a global health pandemic, Managing Director, of Pleix-Quip Africa (Pty) Ltd shares his opinion and trends of the pipes, pumps and valves market. Tell us a little about yourself and your professional background After an initial career in IT Project Management with the Damelin Education Group and later Leadership Development with the Centre for Applied Leadership Excellence, I joined household names in the Valve Industry – Dr. Daan du Plessis and Jimmy Short at Pleix-Quip cc in 2006. I also completed an MBA degree just after joining. I took over as Managing Director of Pleix-Quip Africa (Pty) Ltd in 2014. How has your business been impacted by the current crisis and how are you navigating it to remain competitive in the market? The Pleix-Quip Africa team is a family and the biggest impact we have experienced lies here. Not being able to work together and supporting each other has been tough. We made the decision to go into lock-down, two weeks prior to the governments orders and have managed the situation on a remote basis ever since. Our stores are open though. Everybody knows our level of service and the kind of relationships we keep with our customers. This has realised in great support from our market which has stood us in good stead during this time. What are the biggest challenges facing the pipes, pumps and valves sector today? I don’t think that our sector is spared from the normal weakening of the economy, exchange rate fluctuation, political insecurity, labour & environmental issues that all other industries are also faced with. What the long-term impact of COVID-19 will be remains to be seen. I wish for less regulation and administrative burden on companies and rather a supported business environment where we are allowed more freedom to do business in the way we want to and in such a way that we can create jobs for those who want to work and, in this way, build our beautiful country and nation. What are the trends in the sector that you are seeing? What do you attribute it to? Definite trends in our sector is a move away from traditional markets and supplying into the larger African continent. Our continued business development excels from doing this well. Customer demand for correct specifications have escalated in importance. This is what the Pleix-Quip brand of valves has always been celebrated for. Another trend is the way that participants in our 34

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

Tiaan Smit, Managing Director at Pleix-Quip Africa (Pty) Ltd market support each other. I think it is a result of the tough times our industry has been experiencing over the past 10 years. We have taken notice of each other and the fact that we are not alone in this. What is your outlook for pipes, pumps and valves in South Africa? What is the role of your company in this outlook? I believe that the short to medium future will be very tough, but ultimately rewarding for those who are able and willing to persevere. It is the age of the entrepreneur who can take ownership of their relationships with and their offering to their customers. We have made effort with our stockholding during this time and are ready for the market opening up as the lockdown restrictions are eased. Do you have any key lessons learned during these trying times that you can share with our readers? Nurture your relationships with your customers and employees, manage your cashflow, support others in your industry and community. You never know when you will be the one requiring support. Take responsibility and be a role model regarding health & safety during this time. Count your blessings.

Pleix-Quip Africa (Pty) Ltd, +27 (0)11 736 4994, pleixquip@pleixquip.co.za, www.pleixquip.co.za


COMPANY PROFILE

Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Detlev Börner from Walter Meano Engineering As times of uncertainty prevail amidst a global health pandemic, Managing Director, of Walter Meano Engineering shares his opinion and trends of the pipes, pumps and valves market. Tell us a little about yourself and your professional background I graduated from Wits with a BSc Mech Eng in 1985 with a bursary from Anglo American. After a short time on the gold mines, I moved to Kentron as a design engineer working on stabilised systems for the Rooivalk helicopter. I then spent a few years in Germany working on the design of turbine blades for the European Transonic Wind Tunnel and Wind Turbines. Coming back to SA in 1994, I was exposed to production at Kolbenco, producing parts for the motor industry. I took over the reins at Walter Meano in 1999 when my father in-law Eric Meano, Walter’s son, tragically passed away. As time went by the family shareholding changed, with us eventually buying out the remaining family shareholders in 2006. How has your business been impacted by the current crisis and how are you navigating it to remain competitive in the market? We are fortunate that the impact is not that great, in that we have not seen a significant drop in demand. We are attributing this to a catch up in the time lost during shut down and are expecting a decline in demand, as the effects of the pandemic start restricting business from working at full capacity. What are the biggest challenges facing the pipes, pumps and valves sector today? Most of the challenges in the business environment are a result of government policies. There is little that can be done in the short term – so batten down the hatches, keep your powder dry and this too will pass. What are the trends in the sector that you are seeing? What do you attribute it to? It’s difficult to have a positive outlook with the continuous decline in skills and expertise in our industry. Unless government realises that they need to create a businessfriendly environment and improve on our education system, the slow decline will unfortunately continue with the survivors picking up the scraps.

Walter Meano Engineering, +27 (0)11 873 8620, wme@mweb.co.za, www.wme.co.za 36

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

Detlev Börner, Managing Director at Walter Meano Engineering What is your outlook for pipes, pumps and valves in South Africa? What is the role of your company in this outlook? Walter Meano was established in 1967 and we are now in the 4th generation of the family business, with Walter’s great granddaughter Kirsten, having joined the company at the beginning of this year. With new ideas and approaches we have survived setbacks in the past and will survive this as well. Do you have any key lessons learned during these trying times that you can share with our readers? Don’t panic - prepare for the worst - keep on smiling and as Winston Churchill said, “Never let a good crisis go to waste”. People are more open to change during difficult times, so now is the time implement those changes. Walter Meano Engineering, +27 (0)11 873 8620, wme@mweb.co.za, www.wme.co.za


VersaFlo pumps

manufactured by Walter Meano Engineering. We have over 40 years’ experience and ISO 9001:2015 accreditation, resulting in WME’s products being renowned for their performance, quality and robust design.

From left to right: VSE 100, VPM E, Diapump, Pompie and VPM H.

Cnr. Aquila & Orion Streets, Germiston Ext 17 PO Box 797, Germiston, 1400 Tel: +27 (11) 873-8620 | Fax: +27 (11) 825-1401 | Email: wme@mweb.co.za Web: www.versaflo.co.za


COMPANY PROFILE

Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market by Dr Jean-Patrick Leger from Vesconite Bearings As times of uncertainty prevail amidst a global health pandemic, the CEO of Vesconite Bearings shares his opinions on trends in the pipes, pumps and valves market Tell us a little about yourself and your professional background My father started Vesco in 1958, the year I was born. I grew up hearing stories about bushes - as a child I thought my parents were discussing small trees! As a teenager wanting to earn money to build a canoe, I helped test the wear performance of various formulations for the early Vesconite grades. Today this polymer bearing material is used globally by many OEM pump manufacturers. My own background includes chemical engineering, so I have continued the tradition of developing low friction polymers and investigating new applications in which they can be used. Interestingly, my first job (and masters in chemical engineering) was at South Africa’s then National Institute for Water Research, which aimed to inform water decision making through science and technology, so South Africa’s water industry has always been close to my heart. The water sector, and the pumps industry, is a vital and growing part of the Vesconite polymer business. We supply line-shaft bearings, bowl bearings, wear rings, as well as many new applications currently under development. How has your business been impacted by the current crisis and how are you navigating it to remain competitive in the market? Extremely challenging! Yet I have always believed, from our greatest challenges, come our greatest opportunities.

Dr Jean-Patrick Leger from Vesconite Bearings With all our sales and support staff working from home to reduce infection risks, we have had to think creatively about how to work and communicate with clients. A big part of this is persuading clients to engage face-to-face with video. Where clients are open to video we have done remote presentations. The result is that we have been able to share the latest technical developments exceptionally quickly, something which would have taken a long time previously. What are the biggest challenges facing the pipes, pumps and valves sector today? We have seen sales to our South African market shrink dramatically - in the last three months sales were down by 58%. With such a downturn, for many companies this is life threatening and will cause disruptions: many suppliers may not survive, having a domino effect. Many companies face supply-chain havoc as components are manufactured in countries badly impacted by Covid, and there are also the disruptions in air and sea freight. Importers and exporters continue to try and adjust logistics strategies to the different timelines for pandemic recovery in different countries. For companies that were not prepared for the crisis, their businesses slowed down as they tried to adapt to a new work style, including working from home where possible

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Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020


and social distancing. What are the trends in the sector that you are seeing? What do you attribute it to?

Vesconite Bearings, +27 (0) 11 616 1111, vesconite@vesconite.com, www.vesconite.com

There is great interest in reducing maintenance through long-life wear parts - more so than ever before. Water utilities, and the companies that service them, are concerned with having field staff exposed to the virus, and are investigating alternatives to reduce in-field maintenance. Fortunately, Vesconite parts fulfil this need, and answer the call for longer life and less maintenance. With the vulnerability of supply chains under the spotlight due to unreliable transportation and shipping delays, companies are turning towards trusted suppliers that are able to manufacture items and despatch them quickly. Vesconite Bearings has been able to take advantage of the need for custom bushing and wear items that it can C engineer considerably more quickly than many traditional suppliers’ delivery times. It has also benefitted from having M a number of warehouses globally, which have been able to supply stock materials where global trade and logistics Y planning having been difficult. What is your outlook for pipes, pumps and valves in South Africa? What is the role of your company in thisCM outlook? MY

There are three sides to this. Much of our infrastructure has been pillaged and allowed to run down without serious CY attempts at maintenance. As an example, in the Free State goldfields town where our factory is based, sewage runs CMY freely in the streets and into the river. Secondly, with our growing population and the inevitability of droughts, water K is an essential service and we need infrastructure projects to safeguard water supplies and ensure that good quality water reaches all South Africa’s people and industries. Thirdly, before Covid, the government was in overdraft and the economy in recession. The fall off in government revenues as a result of Covid means the sector will be hampered by overstretched public finances. For ourselves, we feel our contribution is to provide products that will make pumps and valves more energy efficient, operate more reliably and work for much longer periods. Do you have any key lessons learned during these trying times that you can share with our readers? The pumps and valve industry is large and that there are considerable numbers of untapped opportunities to Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

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COMPANY PROFILE

improve - both in South Africa and worldwide. With the epidemic raging and concerns about finances, we have found many customers are thinking about the long-term cost-benefits of better pumping solutions, including using our energy-efficient materials. In fact, our focus on energy efficiency has become an important source of new applications and new business. With concerns about global carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation – which reached 12 gigatons in 2010 – as well as an awareness that pumps account for 10% of global electrical energy use, technological interventions are valued by pump manufacturers and pump users.


COMPANY PROFILE

Current trends in the pipes, pumps & valves market from Vac-Cent

Reliable, heavy duty extraction pumps

As times of uncertainty prevail amidst a global health pandemic, Vac-Cent shares their opinion and trends of the pipes, pumps and valves market. Tell us a little about yourself and your professional background – In the vacuum business since 2001. Started as valve salesman and moved on to GD Nash Liquid ring vacuum pumps. All vacuum pump training and knowledge was acquired in house and practical experience on customer sites. Gained much of the experience through the paper mills, sugar mills and general industry. Appointed sales manager and in 2011 became General Manager. Appointed MD of Vac-Cent 2014

short and long term.Obviously there is a notable reduction in local mining and production projects and this is having a knock-on the downstream companies who are in South iqEvac effect filtrateonpumps are manufactured 100% reliant on new developments and projects to ensure a Africa as heavy duty process extraction pumps for presustainable separators future. and filtrate receivers.

L

How has your business been impacted by the current crisis and how are you navigating it to remain competitive in the market? As all businesses have had to make sacrifices in regard to turnover, we are in a good position with regards order intake due to the importance of our equipment and or client base which includes chemical, food and beverage, mining, and general manufacturing industries. Significant reduction on order intake over the lock-down period will have a knock on effect for the foreseeable future but sound financial planning and control will insure that no short time or job loss will be on the cards, this being based on the current situation. What are the biggest challenges facing the pipes, pumps and valves sector today? Importation of pirate pumps and parts from China and India and fly-by-night repairers. So many companies are turning to repairs of specialized equipment and are running into difficulties with the final “repaired” or “refurbished” item.

What is your outlook for pipes, LiqEvac filtrate pumps arepumps and valves in TWO SIZES South Africa? proudly South African and are

What are the trends in the sector that you are seeing? What do you attribute it to?

compatible with all company current in this outlook? There What is the role of your • The 2x9, models in the will always be afield. market as long as there is anLiqEvac industry. We maximum flow of hope the government’s plans include the development of 3 60 m /hr or 1 000 the manufacturing BUILT TO industry LAST the country so we can export litres/ min, ranging from 100 to more. 300kPaG pressure These heavy process Vac-Cent Servicesduty (Pty) Ltd has been around for 38 years extraction pumps are trust designed and has built a special with customers also 4x9, • The and LiqEvac for pre-separators and filtrate outside project houses who are involved our borders. maximum flowWe of receivers. The LiqEvac pumps 3 have completed new projects in Mozambique and the DRC 225 m /hr or 3 750 litres/ are available all SGbusiness iron, allout of these regions. recently more in possible min, ranging from 75 to 316 stainless steel wetted ends 310kPaG pressure Do have any keyof lessons learned during these trying andyou combinations SG iron times that yousteel. can share with our readers? and stainless

Importation of pirate pumps are on the increase and will eventually effect users production and repair costs in the

Spend your money wisely and save for the bumps in the road.

The units are being fitted with substandard components and actual expected operational lifetime is being compromised. Clients are using these repairers because they are trying to save money, which is understandable, but the compromise to longevity and quality is not worth the investment.

Vac-Cent, +27 (0)11 827 1536, info@vaccent.co.za, www.vaccent.co.za 40

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020


VAC-CENT SERVICES

Nash 2BE Range

LiqEvac Filtrate Pump

NASH SC Range

INFO@VACCENT.CO.ZA

Frese Balancing Valves

011 827 1536

WWW.VACCENT.CO.ZA


4

TH

International exhibition and conference on valve and flow control technologies

LEADING THE GLOBAL MARKET MAY 26 27 2021 FLOW TH

TH

BERGAMO - ITALY

www.industrialvalvesummit.com Attending IVS - Industrial Valve Summit gives you the opportunity to share knowledge, experience and ideas with other leading industry professionals and organisations.

IVS - Industrial Valve Summit is the: Forum for the industrial valves industry Innovations’ platform and technology summit Trend-setting meeting point Take-off for investment decisions International network of experts and specialists Organising Secretariat | Ph. +39 035 3230904 | Fax +39 035 3230966 | e-mail: info@industrialvalvesummit.com

ORGANIZERS


PUMPS

PUMPS FIRE PUMPS

AIR OPERATED DOUBLE DIAPHRAGM PUMPS

AESPUMP SA

AESPUMP SA Walter Meano Engineering VersaFlo VSE Pumps T: +27 (0) 11 873-8620 F: +27 (0) 11 825-1401 E: wme@mweb.co.za W: www.versaflo.co.za BOOSTER PUMPS

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za DEWATERING PUMPS

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za HIGH PRESSURE PUMPS

Sulzer Pumps (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 820-6000 F: +27 (0) 11 820-6206 E: CSSEnquiries@sulzer.com W: www.sulzer.com DIESEL PUMPS

Hawk High Pressure Pumps T: +27 (0) 031 274-8555 T: +27 (0) 10 010-0144 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2868 E: sales@hawkpumps.co.za W: www.hawkpumps.co.za

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

T: +27 (0) 11 894-2906 E: admin@pumprental.co.za W: www.pumprental.co.za END SUCTION PUMPS

T: +27 (0) 11 821-9854 E: david.stanford@atlascopco.com W: www.atlascopco.com

KSB (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com

Sulzer Pumps (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 820-6000 F: +27 (0) 11 820-6206 E: CSSEnquiries@sulzer.com W: www.sulzer.com

AESPUMP SA T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za HORIZONTAL SPLIT CASE PUMPS

APE Pumps

APE Pumps

SAM Engineering

T: +27 (0) 11 824-4810 F: +27 (0) 11 824-2770 E: info@apepumps.co.za W: www.apepumps.co.za

T: +27 (0) 11 823-4250 F: +27 (0) 11 823-4943 E: sales@sameng.co.za W: www.sameng.co.za

SAM Engineering T: +27 (0) 11 823-4250 F: +27 (0) 11 823-4943 E: sales@sameng.co.za W: www.sameng.co.za MAGNETIC PUMPS

T: +27 (0) 11 824-4810 F: +27 (0) 11 824-2770 E: info@apepumps.co.za W: www.apepumps.co.za

CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS

Atlas Copco

T: +27 (0) 11 820-6000 F: +27 (0) 11 820-6206 E: CSSEnquiries@sulzer.com W: www.sulzer.com

T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

Integrated Pump Rental T: +27 (0) 11 792-9550 E: eeeaman@mweb.co.za W: www.ernestee.co.za

Sulzer Pumps (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd

BOREHOLE PUMPS

Ernest Electro Engineering

T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za

AESPUMP SA T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za MULTISTAGE PUMPS

KSB (Pty) Ltd

AESPUMP SA T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za

T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com

Sulzer Pumps (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd

Mather & Platt

T: +27 (0) 11 820-6000 F: +27 (0) 11 820-6206 E: CSSEnquiries@sulzer.com W: www.sulzer.com

T: +27 (0) 11 824-4810 F: +27 (0) 11 824-2770 E: info@matherandplatt.com W: www.matherandplatt.com

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

Mather & Platt T: +27 (0) 11 824-4810 F: +27 (0) 11 824-2770 E: info@matherandplatt.com W: www.matherandplatt.com

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

43


VALVES MULTISTAGE PUMPS

PUMPS VERTICAL SPINDLE PUMPS

SELF PRIMING PUMPS

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

AESPUMP SA T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za SLURRY PUMPS

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

PLUNGER PUMPS

Hawk High Pressure Pumps T: +27 (0) 031 274-8555 T: +27 (0) 10 010-0144 F: +27 (0) 31 205-4332 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2868 E: sales@hawkpumps.co.za W: www.hawkpumps.co.za PISTON PUMPS

T: +27 (0) 031 274-8555 T: +27 (0) 10 010-0144 F: +27 (0) 31 205-4332 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2868 E: sales@hawkpumps.co.za W: www.hawkpumps.co.za POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT PUMPS

Walter Meano Engineering VersaFlo VSE Pumps T: +27 (0) 11 873-8620 F: +27 (0) 11 825-1401 E: wme@mweb.co.za W: www.versaflo.co.za

Integrated Pump Rental T: +27 (0) 11 894-2906 E: admin@pumprental.co.za W: www.pumprental.co.za

T: +27 (0) 11 917-0778 F: +27 (0) 11 917-0769 E: peterk@sltrading.co.za W: www.stewartsandlloyds.co.za TRASH PUMPS

SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd

T: +27 (0) 11 723-6500 E: info@franklin-electric.co.za W: www.franklin-electric.com

Integrated Pump Technology T: +27 (0) 11 824-4810 E: info@pumptechnology.co.za W: www.pumptechnology.co.za

T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za VACUUM PUMPS

T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za

Integrated Pump Technology

Pamodzi Unique Engineering T: +27 (0) 11 826-6111 F: +27 (0) 11 826-6162 E: sales@uniqueeng.co.za W: www.uniqueeng.co.za

44

Integrated Pump Rental T: +27 (0) 11 894-2906 E: admin@pumprental.co.za W: www.pumprental.co.za

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

VERTICAL TURBINE PUMPS

T: +27 (0) 11 824-4810 F: +27 (0) 11 824-2770 E: info@apepumps.co.za W: www.apepumps.co.za

Sulzer Pumps (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 820-6000 F: +27 (0) 11 820-6206 E: CSSEnquiries@sulzer.com W: www.sulzer.com

AESPUMP SA

WASTEWATER PUMPS

T: +27 (0) 11 824-4810 E: info@pumptechnology.co.za W: www.pumptechnology.co.za

KSB (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com

T: +27 (0) 11 873-8620 F: +27 (0) 11 825-1401 E: wme@mweb.co.za W: www.versaflo.co.za

T: +27 (0) 17 631-1003 F: +27 (0) 17 631-1002 E: craigg@aespump.co.za W: www.aespump.co.za

VERTICAL SUMP PUMPS

AESPUMP SA

Walter Meano Engineering VersaFlo VSE Pumps

APE Pumps Stewarts & Lloyds (Pty) Ltd

Franklin Electric Hawk High Pressure Pumps

T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

KSB (Pty) Ltd

KSB (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com WELL PUMPS

T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com

KSB (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com


VALVES

VALVES BALL VALVES

Enserve Engineering Services (Pty) Ltd

Valcon Valve & Controls T: +27 (0) 11 453-7537 F: +27 (0) 11 453-6056 E: valconsa@iafrica.com W: www.valcon.co.za

Kaytar Valves (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 21 987-8292 C: +27 (0) 81 555-5288 E: clinton@kaytarvalves.co.za W: www.kaytarvalves.co.za

T: +27(0) 16 971-3385 F: +27(0) 16 971-3935 E: mail@enserve.co.za W: www.enserveonline.co.za

KV Controls (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 16 100-4592 E: fred@kvcontrols.co.za W: www.kvcontrols.co.za

CONTROL VALVES

Pleix-Quip Africa (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 736-4994 F: +27 (0) 11 736-6130 E: tiaans@pleixquip.co.za W: www.pleixquip.co.za

Enserve Engineering Services (Pty) Ltd T: +27(0) 16 971-3385 F: +27(0) 16 971-3935 E: mail@enserve.co.za W: www.enserveonline.co.za

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za BUTTERFLY VALVES

KSB (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd

Pleix-Quip Africa (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 736-4994 F: +27 (0) 11 736-6130 E: tiaans@pleixquip.co.za Web: www.pleixquip.co.za

Invincible Valves (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 822-1777 F: +27 (0) 11 822-3666 E: enquiries@invalve.co.za W: www.invalve.co.za

Pleix-Quip Africa (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 736-4994 F: +27 (0) 11 736-6130 E: tiaans@pleixquip.co.za W: www.pleixquip.co.za

Bray Controls Africa T: +27 (0) 10 007-3222 E: sales@bray.com W: www.bray.com

KV Controls (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 16 100-4592 E: fred@kvcontrols.co.za W: www.kvcontrols.co.za

T: +27 (0) 11 838-4028 C: +27 (0) 82 823-7703 E: rowan.blomquist@macfluid.co.za W: www.macsteel.co.za

Kaytar Valves (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 21 987-8292 C: +27 (0) 81 555-5288 E: clinton@kaytarvalves.co.za W: www.kaytarvalves.co.za GATE VALVES

Bray Controls Africa

CHECK VALVES

T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

Macsteel Fluid Control

T: +27 (0) 10 007-3222 E: sales@bray.com W: www.bray.com

T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

Macsteel Fluid Control T: +27 (0) 11 838-4028 E: rowan.blomquist@macfluid.co.za W: www.macsteel.co.za

T: +27 (0) 16 100-4592 E: fred@kvcontrols.co.za W: www.kvcontrols.co.za

Enserve Engineering Services (Pty) Ltd T: +27(0) 16 971-3385 F: +27(0) 16 971-3935 E: mail@enserve.co.za W: www.enserveonline.co.za DIAPHRAGM VALVES

Invincible Valves (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 822-1777 F: +27 (0) 11 822-3666 E: enquiries@invalve.co.za W: www.invalve.co.za

Mine Track & Tools (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 412-4536 T: +27 (0) 11 412-1665 E: info@minetrack.co.za W: www.minetrack.co.za

Invincible Valves (Pty) Ltd C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd

KV Controls (Pty) Ltd

T: +27 (0) 11 822-1777 F: +27 (0) 11 822-3666 E: enquiries@invalve.co.za W: www.invalve.co.za

Macsteel Fluid Control T: +27 (0) 11 838-4028 C: +27 (0) 82 823-7703 E: rowan.blomquist@macfluid.co.za W: www.macsteel.co.za KNIFE GATE VALVES

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd

KSB (Pty) Ltd

T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

T: +27 (0) 11 876-5600 F: +27 (0) 11 822-2013 E: info-za@ksb.com W: www.ksb.com Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020

45


VALVES KNIFE GATE VALVES

PIPES, PUMPS & VALVES AFRICA GOLF DAY

Mine Track & Tools (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 412-4536 T: +27 (0) 11 412-1665 E: info@minetrack.co.za W: www.minetrack.co.za PINCH VALVES

DATE: 18 September 2020

C

M

Y

TIME: T-off time 10h30

CM

MY

CY

VENUE: ERPM Golf Course, Boksburg FEES: There are 36 Four-balls available at R2000 excl VAT per four-ball

CMY

Valcon Valve & Controls

K

T: +27 (0) 11 453-7537 F: +27 (0) 11 453-6056 E: valconsa@iafrica.com Web: www.valcon.co.za

KV Controls (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 16 100-4592 E: fred@kvcontrols.co.za W: www.kvcontrols.co.za

ACTUATORS

CONTACT: Surita Marx +27 (0) 83 281-5761 info@pumpsandvalves.co.za

VALVE RECONDITIONING

Kaytar Valves (Pty) Ltd Enserve Engineering Services (Pty) Ltd T: +27(0) 16 971-3385 F: +27(0) 16 971-3935 E: mail@enserve.co.za W: www.enserveonline.co.za

Mine Track & Tools (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 412-4536 T: +27 (0) 11 412-1665 E: info@minetrack.co.za W: www.minetrack.co.za ACCESSORIES

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

46

SPONSORSHIP: There are 18 watering holes available at R2500 excl VAT per hole.

T: +27 (0) 21 987-8292 C: +27 (0) 81 555-5288 E: clinton@kaytarvalves.co.za W: www.kaytarvalves.co.za PIPES

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za HOSES

C.R.I Pumps S.A. (Pty) Ltd T: +27 (0) 11 805-8631 F: +27 (0) 11 805-8630 E: cri-za@crifluidsystems.com W: www.cripumps.co.za

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa - May/Jun 2020


Your BBBEE Level 1 Partner KSB Pumps and Valves, operating out of Activia Park, Germiston, is part of the KSB group, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of industrial pumps, valves and related systems. With a company history that dates back to 1871 in Germany, the KSB Group is one of the most experienced pump manufacturers worldwide. Since 1959, KSB Pumps and Valves South Africa has brought the groups extensive expertise and portfolio of world class products to the Local Irrigation, Water Transfer and Treatment, Water Supply and Sewage, General Industry, Chemical and Petrochemical Industry, Mining and Construction markets.

Setting the Standards for 60 years.

We are one of the largest KSB manufacturing entities outside of Germany and France, and proudly hold the KSB MBK quality certificate. This certificate is issued to KSB manufacturing sites within the group which are accredited to produce the KSB range of world products for distribution worldwide. This noteworthy accolade underscores the quality processes within our facilities and is a testament to our local manufacturing capabilities. This combined with the group's unparalleled expertise makes KSB Pumps and Valves a leading pump and valve manufacturer in the local South African market.

KSB Pumps and Valves (Pty) Ltd www.ksb.com/ksb-za • Tel: +27 11 876 5600


Profile for Lifting Africa

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa May/Jun 2020  

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa May/Jun 2020

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa May/Jun 2020  

Pipes, Pumps and Valves Africa May/Jun 2020

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