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LIFEWORKS YEAR IN REVIEW 2016


CONTENTS 2016 Highlights

1

Dispute Resolution & Mediation

10

Chairman’s Report

2

Family Violence Prevention

12

CEO’s Report

3

EAP & Business Services

14

Relationship Counselling

4

Our Future

16

Relationship Education

6

Our People

18

Intercountry Adoption Family Support Service

Financial Report

20

8

ABOUT LIFEWORKS RELATIONSHIP COUNSELLING AND EDUCATION SERVICES LifeWorks serves the community by promoting positive relationships to help people achieve wellbeing and the fullness of life. We have a compassionate concern for those experiencing relationship difficulties, isolation and hurt and we celebrate the joy of positive relationships. We believe that every relationship is a thread, which are woven together to form the tapestry of our lives. We are committed to supporting the most crucial threads through life’s challenges and transitions by offering:

RELATIONSHIP COUNSELLING

BUSINESS SERVICES

Specialised couples counselling, family and individual counselling, including counselling for children/adolescents.

Workplace training, e-training, coaching, mediation and investigation services.

EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION PROGRAMS

Counselling and Critical Incident Response services supporting organisations across a range of industries and sectors.

Victoria’s leading provider of men’s behaviour change programs, including partner contact support. School and work-based prevention seminars and workshops.

RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION Evidence-based education programs, seminars and workshops for couples, parents and individuals.

INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICE

DISPUTE RESOLUTION AND MEDIATION SERVICES

National counselling, information and support for couples, families and individuals experiencing intercountry adoption.

Assistance for separating couples, families, older people and community members in resolving conflict and reaching agreements on a wide range of issues. Services include family dispute resolution for children and property matters, child-inclusive practice and lawyer-assisted mediation.

SPECIALIST SERVICES Authorised provider of the VicRoads Safe Driving Program.

LifeWorks acknowledges Aboriginal people as the traditional custodians of the land from which we serve and respects their spiritual and physical relationship with their country. LifeWorks is an access-for-all organisation. The stories and quotes presented throughout the report are indicative of clients seen over the 2015–16 period. Names and identifying details have been changed to protect the privacy of individuals. Statistics are taken from the 2015–16 Performance Monitoring and Review Survey and internal data processes.


2016 HIGHLIGHTS ESTABLISHED THE

CHILD INCLUSIVE PRACTICE AND

CHILD/ADOLESCENT COUNSELLING SERVICE

36% INCREASE

IN CLIENTS MANAGING PROPERTY MATTERS THROUGH DISPUTE RESOLUTION

25% INCREASE

IN MEN’S BEHAVIOUR CHANGE PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NATIONAL

INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICE CONTINUED EXPANSION OF ONLINE SERVICE DELIVERY WITH THE DELIVERY OF THREE NEW

WEBINARS

STRENGTHENED THE OVERALL FINANCIAL POSITION THROUGH

NEW FUNDING STREAMS

5% INCREASE

AND INCREASED SERVICE USE

28% GROWTH

IN EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM COUNSELLING SESSIONS

EXTENDED SERVICE OFFERING AND HOURS IN

WANGARATTA

IN LIFEWORKS CLIENTS TO

OVER 5,100+

TWO NEW SERVICE DELIVERY SITES IN

ARMADALE AND

PRAHRAN

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW

THREE-YEAR STRATEGIC PLAN

INTRODUCTION OF NEW

PARENTING AFTER SEPARATION INTENSIVE PROGRAM

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

1


CHAIRMAN’S REPORT In my 2015 report, I outlined the steps that we had taken that year to prepare for the future. I wrote then that LifeWorks was ‘now a significantly stronger organisation than it was a year ago’. Twelve months on, LifeWorks is further strengthened and there is every prospect of that trend continuing into the foreseeable future. In her report, CEO Janet Jukes writes that LifeWorks has enjoyed a ‘fantastic’ year. Janet provides key figures and describes some of the initiatives taken over the past 12 months to support that assertion. The steady improvement in the affairs of LifeWorks, looked at from any angle, reflects her success in implementing the strategic vision and objectives with which she was charged by the LifeWorks Board two years ago. It is fair to say that the metamorphosis of the capability and resources of LifeWorks which the Board set out to achieve has now been realised. Most importantly, this has been done without detracting from the high standard of services provided to clients or any lessening of the underlying service culture and ethos of the organisation. In fact these have been enhanced, retaining the boutique status that makes LifeWorks unique in our sector. A significant achievement has been the growth in numbers of clients and the expansion of our outreach, within and now beyond Victoria. More than ever before, people who are in need of the support and hope that LifeWorks can offer, as they navigate difficult relationships, have come to know how LifeWorks can help them and to utilise our services. I have every confidence that this trend will be sustained in the years to come; the strategic planning process that Janet describes in her report will focus on this.

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Also of significance has been the consolidation of LifeWorks’ finances. It is not unknown for smaller not-for-profit entities to experience fluctuations in their financial results from one year to the next. This year we are able to report a strong turnaround in our fortunes. This reflects additional funding streams, increased fee income and ongoing operating efficiencies that are all a direct result of the constant hard work and dedication of our CEO, our management team and our staff. This outcome also reflects very favourably on the highly regarded work of our team of capable professional practitioners. I commend to your attention the case studies that are included in this Year in Review. These reflect the growing diversity of our outreach and provide a tiny glimpse of the services that LifeWorks provides to the community. On behalf of the Board, I wish to acknowledge the energy and dedication of all our professional, management and administrative staff that has led to this turnaround. To conclude, I acknowledge the members of the LifeWorks Board, all of whom volunteer their time and expertise. I greatly appreciate their support, their energy and time commitment, and the range of skills and experience that they so freely give to LifeWorks. Peter Harcourt Chairman

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CEO’S REPORT LifeWorks has had a fantastic year. While 2014–15 was marked by constant change, 2015–16 has been a year of enhanced service quality, growth and innovation, which is reflected by a five per cent growth in total client numbers across all programs and ten per cent growth in the number of service events. At the beginning of the 2015–16 financial year we affirmed our mission, vision and values through a board and staff values clarification exercise. We aim to empower people to live fulfilled and engaged lives. Our work is underpinned by the values of hope, community, diversity, dignity and growth. Throughout 2015–16 we have continued to strengthen this vision and commitment and proudly present to you our achievements in this year’s Year in Review. LifeWorks continues to offer a range of professional relationship services including individual and couples counselling, family therapy, pre-marriage education, relationship education programs, family dispute resolution and mediation services. This work is at the heart of what we do. However, the impacts of our relationships and the ways that we connect with each other are not just a private matter, restricted to our family lives. We grow and develop as individuals and in our relationships across many dimensions and in many settings. We are partners, parents, grandparents, sons and daughters. We are also workers, employers, employees, volunteers, friends, and members of communities and sporting clubs. A rich and fulfilling life comes from the many connections we make across the vast tapestry of life. LifeWorks recognised this some time ago when we developed our Business Services and Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and this recognition has been central to our redevelopment and expansion of these programs in 2015–16. EAP in particular has seen significant growth with 25 per cent more clients seen this year. Our success in this area is due in part to our strong commitment to professional development, quality systems and evidence-based practice. Our achievements in our social businesses have allowed us to further enhance our family violence prevention strategies beyond the limited public funding available. Increased government funding and policy focus has allowed us to increase the number of Men’s Behaviour Change programs (MBCP) on offer and to extend the model of support provided to include pre- and post-program support. This work recognises and responds to the building body of evidence that effective behaviour change requires sustained and long-term support. Alongside our MBCPs, we continue to work with men at a pre-prevention stage through our Roadworthy for Dads program. This work is driven by the fact that, for many men, being a better father is a key YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

motivator to take responsibility for the impact of their behaviour on those around them. The establishment of the Intercountry Adoption Family Support (ICAFS) Service this year extends our relationship counselling and education services to families formed through intercountry and expatriate adoption. Through this program, and our partnership with International Social Service Australia, families and individuals can access counselling, information and support at any stage in their pre- and post-adoption journey. The ICAFS Service has also allowed us to establish a national presence. The 2015–16 year has also seen a strengthening of our commitment to those family members whose voices are often unheard during relationship breakdown: the children. Through the introduction of our Child Inclusive Practice and Child/Adolescent Counselling services, we have created a safe and secure space where the most vulnerable family members can express their anxiety, stress, grief and concerns during parental separation. Many of the case studies presented in this year’s report reflect the significant role family relationship services can play in providing support to all members of the family unit. We continue to expand and modernise our online education offerings, recognising the significant impact that rapid technological changes are having on how people engage, communicate and access support. In the last financial year we have delivered new education webinars, in addition to providing couples counselling and mediation services through online technologies. Finally, our Board and senior management have engaged in a range of strategic discussions and workshops that will form the basis of our next three-year strategic plan. The plan identifies the key priorities that will frame our work into the future. In addition, I want to take this opportunity to thank the Board, Chairman Peter Harcourt, LifeWorks’ senior management team, practitioners and staff who keep our vision alive, serving the community by promoting positive relationships to help people achieve wellbeing and the fullness of life. Janet Jukes Chief Executive Officer

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RELATIONSHIP COUNSELLING MORE THAN

8000 COUNSELLING SESSIONS DELIVERED

6%

INCREASE IN CLIENTS ACCESSING FAMILY AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELLING

88%

SUPPORTING STRONG RELATIONSHIPS AND FAMILIES LifeWorks’ Family and Relationship Counselling program continues to develop, meeting the community’s need for a high-quality and supportive service. We have focused on providing children and adolescents with counselling that involves creative arts and play therapy. The hope for the coming year is that parents who are separating will access our child-inclusive mediation and counselling service and see its value as a way to help them through challenges of change and separation. Engagement and support through a client-focused phone intake service has provided help for new clients who are looking for assistance with their relationships, family and changes in family life. Cross referral between education, counselling and mediation has helped clients to address their needs through a range of different services. This supports the process of strengthening and supporting relationships and families, and allows people to reconnect with hope and growth.

OF CLIENTS REPORTED THAT COUNSELLING HAD A POSITIVE IMPACT ON THEIR LIVES

4

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I love my mum and dad, but it’s tough being in the middle of their fights.

CARLY, AGED 12

CASE STUDY Children and adolescents often benefit from creative, play-based approaches to counselling. This case study explores the value of a ‘safe space’ for children coping with parental separation . Carly is a 12-year-old girl who loves her pony and mango smoothies. She came to counselling because her parents had recently separated and were going through a mediation process at LifeWorks. Her mother and father were quite hostile to each other and had different stories about how Carly was handling the separation. They both agreed it could be helpful for Carly to speak to an independent person about how she was feeling and coping with the family break up. Both parents spoke with the counsellor over the phone before Carly was seen. In the first session, Carly told the counsellor that she loved her mother and father but she was feeling caught in the middle of their arguments. She was also feeling quite anxious and sad because her father sometimes seemed very angry. She talked more about her family situation through a sand tray activity, where she showed herself, her mother and their pets separated from her father by fences. He was removed from them and surrounded by snakes.

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

In the second session some work was done to help Carly reduce her levels of stress and anxiety through relaxation and visualisation exercises. She said she felt calmer afterwards and drew a picture of a ‘mango tree in stress-free land’ to represent her happy, peaceful feelings. In subsequent sessions she decorated both sides of a mask to show her ‘outside feelings’ and ‘inside feelings’ and worked with clay to express some of her own sadness and frustration about the separation. With Carly’s permission, her parents were kept informed of some of the content of her sessions to help them understand how she was managing, what her needs were and how they could best support her. The LifeWorks’ counsellor and mediator collaborated to keep Carly’s best interests at the forefront of her parents’ minds and avoid a lengthy, stressful court battle. Carly’s world isn’t always a stress-free place these days, but she is much better equipped to deal with challenges and she feels that her parents are doing their best to consider her in their decision-making processes. It was very important for her to know that her parents valued her perspective. This helped her to keep her self esteem intact through a temporary tough patch.

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RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION OVER

2000 EDUCATION SESSIONS DELIVERED

32%

INCREASE IN ONLINE EDUCATION PROGRAM REGISTRATIONS

99%

OF PAS CLIENTS WILL USE THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE LEARNT IN THE COURSE

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HELPING PEOPLE DEVELOP AND SUSTAIN HEALTHY AND POSITIVE RELATIONSHIPS 2015–16 has been an exciting and challenging year for LifeWorks’ Relationships Education. The changing needs of individuals, couples and families has resulted in an increased need for program flexibility and delivery. A key example is the adaptation of our Parenting After Separation (PAS) course to include a one-day intensive program, which is offered monthly. Its core objectives include raising awareness of the impact of ongoing conflict on children’s wellbeing, and helping parents to create the best possible co-parenting relationship with their former partner. We have continued to expand our use of new technologies. In 2015–16, we ran a series of webinars and one-on-one video-link sessions. The aim is to increase clients’ access to important, evidence-based information through a variety of face-to-face and online channels. In addition, we are developing stronger links with the secondary school community through our Healthy Relationships program. This year we delivered the program to more than 200 year 11 students at an outer Eastern secondary college. The program provides information about elements of a healthy relationship and, more importantly, educates and equips young people to understand and identify unsafe behaviour and violence in relationships.

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CASE STUDY Family separation can be a very difficult time for everyone involved. This case study illustrates the positive impact of specialised education about positive parenting on the relationships between parents and children. John’s distress was evident when he rang LifeWorks to talk to an educator about his recent separation. John wants the separation process to be amicable, to avoid legal implications and minimise the emotional and financial impact of ongoing conflict on everyone involved. Unfortunately he has experienced hostility from his former partner and, as a result, the time he has been able to spend with his children has dramatically reduced.

During the initial call, the educator was able to establish a rapport and help John to feel understood and clarify his needs. John explained that his former partner had already rejected the suggestion of mediation. However, he chose to attend our Bringing Up Great Kids parenting program in order to enhance his emotional connection with his children. ‘I feel more confident about reaching out for support,’ John commented after completing the course. He has gone on to register to attend the Keep Calm and Parent On program to gain more knowledge and personal insight into parenting styles and approaches. In addition, John also attended the intensive Parenting After Separation (PAS) program and the extended PAS weekend program to learn how to build a positive co-parenting relationship with his former partner. John, like many single fathers, had issues relating to parenting teenage girls. LifeWorks provided him with a personalised individual session with our Child and Adolescent Counsellor to support him to discuss his emotional and practical concerns. John is now interested in accessing further educational programs, demonstrating his commitment to learning how to improve his relationships.

I feel better equipped to deal with my kids’ needs and I’ve learned a lot about myself. JOHN, AGED 47

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

7


INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICE 250

SERVICE ENQUIRIES SINCE LAUNCH

35%

OF ICAFS SERVICE CLIENTS ARE ADOPTEES

57%

OF CLIENTS ACCESS COUNSELLING SUPPORT

SUPPORTING AUSTRALIAN FAMILIES FORMED THROUGH INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION The Intercountry Adoption Family Support (ICAFS) Service was opened in April 2016 and since then has grown in profile, scope and demand. In partnership with International Social Service Australia, the ICAFS Service provides counselling, information and support to families across Australia formed through intercountry adoption, including adult adoptees. Through LifeWorks’ 1300 number, people can access highly qualified counsellors and information and support from workers who are experienced in the unique challenges that face families formed through adoption. Counsellors help families to manage the impact of the intercountry adoption process, the transition to parenthood, challenging behaviours, attachment difficulties and cross-cultural issues. Information and support workers assist families with issues common to intercountry adoption and can make referrals to specialised services within local communities. They also support families through tracing and reunification processes. Counsellors and information and support workers work collaboratively to provide a unified service for people with wide-ranging needs. The ICAFS Service has come out of an identified need to support intercountry adoption families beyond that which is provided through the adoption process. The federal government’s commitment to funding the service’s establishment recognises a gap in the provision of professional support to this community outside the formal adoption process. Since the ICAFS Service began, LifeWorks and ISS Australia have worked to build the national profile of the service, engaging with federal, state and local government, other service providers and consumers. We will continue to connect and collaborate with the range of stakeholders in this area of great need.

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Counselling helps me to get things off my chest.

BEN, AGED 12

CASE STUDY Counselling as an early intervention can support the process of healing from trauma, and instil an enduring and positive attitude to the importance and value of counselling. This case study explores the issue of stealing – often seen amongst adopted children. The parents have an adopted son, Ben, aged 12, from the Philippines. The mother’s primary concern was that Ben was stealing from the family at home and also from students at school. He also struggled sometimes with managing his emotions. The school, although very supportive in addressing these issues with him, had made it clear that he must attend counselling in order to remain enrolled. In the sessions, the ICAFS counsellor explored with Ben the emotions and subsequent thoughts that trigger the impulse to steal, and discussed more effective ways to express his

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

emotions and manage these impulses. The counselling process later revealed that he had feelings of deep insecurity and issues of safety that caused him great anxiety. Over six sessions, Ben has managed to stop stealing and has a growing tolerance for his underlying anxiety, which has reduced his need to ‘act out’. When asked how he felt about counselling, his response was that it helps ‘to get things off my chest’ and gives him strategies for managing his feelings and responses. Although the stealing was the issue that brought the family to counselling, it was also a catalyst for revealing other deepseated disturbances in Ben. Counselling became a safe place and one that he can return to address these issues when he needs to.

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DISPUTE RESOLUTION & MEDIATION 26%

INCREASE IN CHILD AND PROPERTY FAMILY DISPUTE RESOLUTION

700+ DISPUTE RESOLUTION CLIENTS SUPPORTED

50+

REGISTRATIONS TO OUR FIRST SURVIVING RELATIONSHIP SEPARATION WEBINAR

WORKING WITH PEOPLE TO EFFECTIVELY AND SAFELY RESOLVE DISPUTES LifeWorks’ Dispute Resolution service continues to broaden and adapt to meet the changing demands and needs of the community. This year we demonstrated our commitment to providing and growing child-focused practices. Staff from across different streams participated in specifically tailored child-inclusive practice training. Clients involved in Family Dispute Resolution (FDR) can access this service to have their children’s voices included in the decision-making process in a safe and supportive way. In addition, our Child and Family Counsellor is able to provide individual and ongoing support to children of parents who are trying to resolve issues arising from separation. Our CoMET Counselling and Mediation model enables a therapist to attend joint sessions with the FDR practitioner, or offer additional one-on-one support. This support is particularly useful for helping parents to focus away from their own conflict and consider the needs of their children. Our legally assisted Dispute Resolution service continues to expand. Along with the Women’s Legal Service, we now have a number of community legal centres and private and not-for-profit legal firms that assist our clients during family dispute resolution processes. Without this support, many of these clients would have been excluded from mediation because of a lack of capacity, safety or power and would have had to access expensive and lengthy court processes to resolve their issues. LifeWorks provides flexible delivery services, including telephone and online mediation, to clients who can’t attend our offices in person. We have provided services for clients who live remotely, interstate or overseas or who are incarcerated. Flexible delivery also enables clients who may have safety issues to participate in the process, as they do not have to be physically present during joint sessions. Online services have been used to provide education and information to a wide audience. The webinar on Surviving Relationship Separation walked participants through important information about separation as well as encouraging them to look after their personal wellbeing.

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CASE STUDY Our clients reflect the increasing diversity and complexity of modern family structures. To meet their needs, practitioners must embrace the new norms of these modern families. They need to be aware of unconscious assumptions and stereotypes that may impact on their ability to offer clients an inclusive and non-judgemental service. Jenny, Kate, Andy and Peter have two children together: nine-month-old Luka and four-year old Ollie. Jenny and Kate are in a relationship and Jenny is the biological mother of both children. Andy and Peter are in a relationship; Andy is the biological father of Ollie and Peter is the biological father of Luka. The two couples see themselves as the family of the children, with both women identifying as mothers and both men identifying as fathers. The two couples have a shared long-term friendship and a history of co-operative parenting and good communication.

The practitioner had intakes with each couple and two joint sessions with all parents present. The parents were encouraged to explore their understanding, beliefs and expectations about parental roles in the children’s lives and to give voice to their different perceptions. They were honest and brave with each other and their perceptions all shifted slightly, as they gained an understanding of how the ‘other’ parents feel. By mutual agreement, a Child and Family Practitioner participated in the second mediation session. This gave additional focus to the needs of the children and encouraged arrangements that promoted and continued strong relationships with all parents. The parents have now generated a number of likely scenarios for resolution and the process continues.

They came to mediation because Kate has been offered an interstate secondment with her work and the mothers want to relocate with the children for 12 months. This has caused conflict between the couples. The fathers want the children to remain in Melbourne and believe that Kate will be able to combine commuting with working online. The mothers don’t want to live separately and neither of them want to be away from the children for lengthy periods of time. Neither do the fathers. Despite their good relationship, the couples are faced with very difficult decisions.

They explored their understanding, beliefs and expectations of parental roles.

MEDIATOR

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

11


FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION 25%

INCREASE IN MEN’S BEHAVIOUR CHANGE PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS

ON AVERAGE MEN IMPROVED THEIR INSIGHTS IN NEGATIVE STATEMENTS BY AGREEING LESS WITH THEM AFTER THE COURSE

THE LARGEST IMPROVEMENT WAS A DECREASE IN AGREEMENT WITH THE STATEMENT ‘SHE IS JUST AS MUCH THE CAUSE OF THE PROBLEM AS I AM’

PREVENTING VIOLENCE WITHIN FAMILIES AND CHANGING MEN’S BEHAVIOUR LifeWorks continues to be a leader in the delivery of Men’s Behaviour Change Programs (MBCP) across Victoria. This year has seen continued growth in the number of programs being delivered and the number of men seeking admittance into our programs. Demand continues to outweigh the available places. The delivery of additional programs has resulted in the expansion of our Family Violence Prevention team, which works directly with men and also supports their female partners at the same time. At any one time, up to 12 dedicated employees are working to provide key elements of the MBCP, including group facilitation and partner contact support. During 2015–16 we saw an increase in the presentation of complex cases, to which we responded by diversifying and customising our model of delivery. We offered one-on-one sessions to men from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, men with disabilities and men who for a range of reasons are not appropriate for inclusion in a group-learning environment. In addition, we established a pre-group readiness program for men who may have previously not been accepted into groups, and a post-MBCP group to support men to continue working towards change after the 13-week program. LifeWorks is committed to providing programs that positively impact on individuals and communities. All our MBCPs are evaluated through pre- and post-survey instruments that are designed to measure group changes in attitude. Over the last financial year this evaluation showed that men improved their attitudes towards woman by agreeing less with negative statements after the course. The largest improvement was a decrease in agreement to the statement ‘She is just as much the cause of the problem as I am‘. These results indicate that men seem more willing to take a greater responsibility for the impact their behaviour has on partners and family.

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CASE STUDY The road to change for many men who seek out or are referred to LifeWorks MBCP can be long and confronting. The first step in any man’s journey is their genuine ability to take responsibility for their behaviours and impact on those around them.

Craig underwent an intake and assessment interview with LifeWorks for inclusion in the MBCP. It was identified that Craig would not be appropriate for direct inclusion into the program as he was not yet prepared to accept responsibility for the behaviour identified in the Intervention Order.

Craig is 32 and separated from his partner. He has an Intervention Order and, as a condition of the order, was required to undertake an MBCP and Parenting After Separation (PAS) program.

Craig was referred to the LifeWorks group readiness program to offer him an alternate pathway into the program and help him meet the requirements for inclusion. The group readiness facilitator worked one-on-one with Craig to unpack his resistance to accepting responsibility and the displacement of this responsibility onto others. At the end of this process, Craig was reassessed and offered a place in the MBCP. During the group sessions, Craig gained a clearer understanding of his behaviour, his behavioural motivators and triggers and the impact of his behaviour on his former partner and child. At the end of the program he was referred to the PAS program. As a result of attending both the MBCP and PAS program, Craig was able to reconnect with his former partner in a safe way and re-establish contact with his daughter.

I’m taking small steps, but every step is worthwhile. CRAIG, AGED 38

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

13


EAP & BUSINESS SERVICES 28%

INCREASE IN EAP COUNSELLING SESSIONS

SUPPORTING EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES IN THE WORKPLACE EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Our Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has continued to grow through 2015–16, with more clients and funder organisations than ever before working with LifeWorks.

91%

OF EAP CLIENTS WERE BETTER ABLE TO COPE WITH THE ISSUES AT HAND

98%

OF EAP CLIENTS WOULD RECOMMEND LIFEWORKS EAP TO OTHERS

We have deepened our connections with a number of our EAP funder organisations. Our contract encourages these organisations to redeem the unused portion of their retainer through LifeWorks’ Business Services. Many of them have chosen to work with LifeWorks across service streams, trusting us to help them build and maintain better relationships within their workplace. We have also developed EAP relationships with a number of organisations, including the Anglican Diocese of Melbourne, for which we are an ideal referral source for services such as relationship counselling, family mediation, crisis intervention and management training, and men’s behaviour change programs. This allows these organisations to offer short-term, solution-focused support to their employees through LifeWorks EAP, and also provides a broader, long-term support pathway for their employees and their clientele via LifeWorks professional relationship services and programs. Client feedback has been remarkably positive, which suggests that the strong connections between counsellors and clients are producing effective support and outcomes. Every client is given an EAP feedback form at the start of counselling and asked to return it at the end. We are delighted with the strong results, particularly given the limited, short-term nature of EAP counselling support.

BUSINESS SERVICES LifeWorks’ Business Service consultants are experts in workplace, people-related matters and bring together a wealth of experience, skills and insights from a range of different industries and disciplines. Our team offers an array of specialist services that help develop skills and competency, build resilience and teams, mitigate risk and resolve any immediate issues organisations may be experiencing. During 2015–16, we continued to provide organisations with a range of programs such as training and coaching, investigations, mediations and workplace cultural reviews. In addition we have developed a range of one-hour training programs with a wellbeing focus that can be offered at a convenient time, such as a lunch break. LifeWorks is a key presenter in the area of equal opportunity, and Business Services has responded to requests for onsite support and supervision of staff within organisations. Workplace reviews assess the culture of an organisation and highlight how well an organisation is supporting its employees. They also identify challenges and opportunities, establish a baseline, analyse the gaps, and direct the organisation toward improved employee engagement.

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“

Management reported an increase in their confidence to lead and manage their teams.

�

MARYLA, PRINCIPAL CONSULTANT

CASE STUDY At LifeWorks in the Workplace, we pride ourselves on our ability to respond to the unique needs and circumstances of the clients who access our services. Our broad experience and flexible delivery mechanisms mean we are able to tailor solutions that provide meaningful outcomes because they are developed in consultation and refined as the process unfolds. LifeWorks in the Workplace was contacted by a large sized community based service to provide support to management who face daily challenges in relation to staff and customers. We met with senior management to discuss what they felt the issues were, then met with the management team as a group to tease out any further issues. Additionally, we sent out a survey to each of the management team to identify what they saw as their individual strengths and the areas they wished to improve. After this data had been analysed, a further

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

meeting took place with senior management to explore what could be offered and to develop a plan. It was agreed that we would provide individual supervision sessions to each of the management team, along with occasional group sessions of the management team, to develop strategies that would assist them to deal with the day to day struggles. The strategies were based on researched and well evidenced theoretical models and the strategies were welcomed by the staff. After a few sessions, management reported an increase in their confidence to lead and manage their teams and manage customer issues along with stronger support for each other. The sessions now form a strong part of their learning and development and continue on a regular monthly basis. As a result of the success two similar agencies have requested facilitated discussions on specific areas of concern.

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OUR FUTURE During 2016, LifeWorks has undertaken an extensive strategic planning and prioritisation process, engaging Board, senior management and staff from across organisational streams and geographical locations in the formation of our future directions. In addition, LifeWorks has looked externally to the sector for leading research, trends and models in the delivery of best practice professional family support services. This work has culminated in the development of LifeWorks 2016–19 Strategic Plan. The plan, which will be published in tandem with this 2016 Year in Review, underpins and consolidates our vision.

VISION LifeWorks serves the Victorian community by promoting positive relationships for the achievement of wellbeing and the fullness of life. LifeWorks reflects a compassionate concern for those experiencing relationship difficulties, isolation and hurt and celebrates the joy of positive relationships. We are the relationships people who build connected families, workplaces and communities. Over the next four years, LifeWorks‘ approach and strategic priorities will flow from our five strategic pillars.

2

1

4

BUILD ORGANISATIONAL CAPACITY

16

3

CONSOLIDATION AND INNOVATION OF SERVICE MODELS AND PROGRAMS

GROWTH OF SERVICE PROVISION

PROMOTION AND PROFILE BUILDING

5

DEVELOPMENT OF A FINANCIALLY SUSTAINABLE GROWTH STRATEGY

LIFEWORKS


MEASURES OF SUCCESS We will know we have been successful when: • the community is better equipped to navigate the changing nature of relationships so there is less hurt and more hope • children and young people are seen and heard • the next generation of children and young people are better equipped to manage relationships and change • our practice reflects the diversity of relationships and culture of our home, work and social lives • relationship services are recognised as essential to the development and sustainability of safe, respectful families and communities • employers and employees value services that create safe, more inclusive and productive workplaces • people seek support to manage critical life transition points and evolve their relationships. We will continue to collaborate with our funders, partners and the broader family support services across Victoria and nationally to realise these success measures and to support the relationship threads that connect us all.

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

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OUR PEOPLE

L–R: Kate Redwood, Peter Harcourt (Chairman), The Rev. Stuart Soley, Janet Jukes (CEO), Sally Baker, Marika Hubble-Mariott, Andrew Brookes, Rosemary Hehir. .

OUR BOARD The LifeWorks Board is comprised of non-executive directors who are committed to the vision and mission of the organisation. Board members generously volunteer their time and professional expertise to drive the strategic focus and overarching aims of the organisation. • Mr Peter Harcourt Chairman • Mr Andrew Brookes • Ms Rosemary Hehir • The Rev. Stuart Soley • Ms Marika Hubble-Marriott • Ms Sally Baker (commenced 25 October 2015) • Ms Kate Redwood (commenced 24 February 2016) • Ms Christine Clough (retired 25 October 2015)

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LIFEWORKS CLINICAL GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE • Kate Redwood Chair • The Rev. Stuart Soley • Janet Jukes CEO • Ann Smith Stream Manager, Client Services and Quality Assurance

LIFEWORKS


THANK YOU LifeWorks would like to thank the individuals and organisations who have supported us in 2015–16. In particular, we would like to thank our funders: • Australian Government Department of Social Services • Department of Health and Human Services, Victoria • Corrections Victoria • Anglicare Victoria: Communities for Children In addition, we thank our partners and those organisations who we have worked closely with over the past financial year including: • Anglicare Victoria (Wangaratta site) • Kildonan UnitingCare (Preston site) • Wesley Mission (Ringwood site) • Latrobe Health Centre (Geelong site) • WIRE – Women Talk Money Project • No To Violence • National LGBTI Health Alliance • Women‘s Legal Aid • Centre for Excellence in Child and Family Welfare

LIFEWORKS FINANCE RISK & AUDIT COMMITTEE • Rosemary Hehir Chair • Peter Harcourt • Andrew Brookes • Marika Hubble-Mariott • Janet Jukes CEO • Julie McPhee Finance Manager

YEAR IN REVIEW 2016

OUR MANAGEMENT TEAM • Janet Jukes Chief Executive Officer • Sue Pratt Counselling, Education and EAP Services Stream • Julie McPhee Finance and Corporate Services Stream • Cath Tregillis Dispute Resolution Services Stream • Ann Smith Client Services and Quality Assurance Stream • Justine Dalla Riva Marketing and Communications • Jamie Anderson EAP • Laura Sykes Frankston Branch • Maria Singleton Wyndham Branch • Margaret Hodge Family Violence Prevention and Melbourne City Counselling Branch

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FINANCIAL REPORT STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

for the financial year ended 30 June 2016

as at 30 June 2016

2016 2015 $ $

Revenue Current assets Government funding 3,181,186 2,389,273 Cash and cash equivalents Project revenue & fees 1,624,733 1,711,099 Trade and other receivables Other 154,668 67,977 Other assets Total revenue

4,960,587

4,168,349

Expenses Employee benefits Advertising and marketing Consulting Depreciation Employee development and training Occupancy Finance Other

(2,915,097) (2,951,153) (15,167) (19,709) (132,515) (167,178) (80,943) (78,349) (41,651) (493,189) (20,160) (729,892)

(12,268) (518,652) (18,882) (468,660)

531,973

(66,502)

Other comprehensive income

Total comprehensive income for the year

531,973

(66,502)

Surplus for the year

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2016 2015 $ $ 970,574 195,017 168,350

483,482 209,381 177,848

1,333,941

870,711

Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment Other assets

277,389 8,312

268,106 -

Total non-current assets

285,701

268,106

1,619,642

1,138,817

Current liabilities Trade and other payables Revenue in advance Provisions Borrowings

208,836 309,594 173,414 55,305

263,475 130,879 182,479 48,315

Total current liabilities

747,149

625,148

Non-current liabilities Provisions Borrowings

69,047 110,082

88,502 263,776

Total non-current liabilities

179,129

352,278

Total liabilities

926,278

977,426

Net assets

693,364

161,391

Members’ funds Accumulated surplus

693,364

161,391

Total members’ funds

693,364

161,391

Total current assets

Total assets

LIFEWORKS


LIFEWORKS LOCATIONS Melbourne City Level 4, 255 Bourke Street Melbourne 3000 T 8650 6200 Frankston 345 Nepean Highway Frankston 3199 T 9783 7611 Wyndham 1 Johnson Avenue Hoppers Crossing 3029 T 9974 3200 Wangaratta 39 Ovens Street Wangaratta 3676 T 8650 6200 Other locations Armadale, Prahran, Ringwood, Preston, Moonee Ponds, Geelong For the national Intercountry Adoption Family Support Service call 1300 543 396

www.lifeworks.com.au lifeworks@lifeworks.com.au lifeworksau

@lifeworksau



LifeWorks Year in Review 2016