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Roaring Fork MAY 2017

RoaringForkLifestyle.com

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Spring GREEN WE-CYCLE BUILDS COMMUNITY WITH BIKES SAFEGUARDING THE VALLEY’S INDIGENOUS TROUT A DIY GREEN HOME IN SATANK


At Heritage Park Assisted Living, our specially trained team understands the need for each resident to maintain as much independence as possible, and our assisted living wing is designed for individuals to do just that. Each assisted living resident occupies his or her own apartment, designed to provide a safe and homelike environment. Respite stays are available year-round, and participants enjoy all the benefits and amenities of full-time residents, including: • Three healthy and delicious meals daily • 24-hour emergency response system monitored by on-site associates • Comfortable and secure accommodations • Scheduled activities • Physical, occupational and speech therapy available during your stay

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Real estate agents affiliated with Compass are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Compass. Equal Housing Opportunity. Compass is a licensed real estate broker located at 117 South Monarch, Aspen, Colorado 81611. All information furnished regarding property for sale or rent or regarding financing is from sources deemed reliable, but Compass makes no warranty or representation as to the accuracy thereof. All property information is presented subject to errors, omissions, price changes, changed property conditions, and withdrawal of the property from the market, without notice. To reach the Compass main office call 970.925.6063.


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Lifestyle Letter

Nurturing Nature in our Valley

A

h, May: the month that truly brings the Roaring Fork Valley back to life. After a cold winter and the ever-unpredictable month of April, May ushers us from mud season to sun season in a mere 31 days. Cue the green trees, late hours of daylight, and picnics in the park. This time of year, the world around seems to positively jingle with delights: neighborhood gardens bursting with blooms, scents of freshly cut lawns, rivers gushing with cold snowmelt, rays of sunshine warming everything they touch. Have you put your bare toes in the grass yet? It’s time.

MAY 2017 PUBLISHER

Rick French | RFrench@LifestylePubs.com 970-618-8981 EDITOR

Caitlin Causey | Caitlin.Causey@LifestylePubs.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Caitlin Causey, Adrian Fielder, Morgan Hill, Kate Lapides, Nicolette Toussaint, Geneviève Joëlle Villamizar CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kendall Bakich, Susy Cota, Bailey Haines, Steven Haines, Heather McDermott,

The month of May delivers many treats for those who find joy in the natural world, but it also serves as a reminder that everything around us is alive. After the long sleep of winter we see the buds form, the birds stir, and the fish flicker in the stream; but, these wonders do come with a cost. We must work to care for them if we wish to enjoy their return each spring. In this issue, our writers examine the efforts that many individuals and organizations in the Roaring Fork Valley are putting forth to help maintain this spectacular natural environment that we all love so dearly. Kate Lapides reports on a new midvalley WEcycle initiative, Geneviève Joëlle Villamizar brings insight on green waste management and the value of fostering artistic creativity in the wild, and Nicolette Toussaint tells the story of an incredible energy-producing home in Satank. A note on air quality from Garfield County Public Health’s Morgan Hill and a reflection on sustainability from Colorado Mountain College’s Adrian Fielder add a layer of expertise from within the community. Plus, I had the distinct pleasure of working with local aquatic biologist Kendall Bakich to record the fascinating story of the valley’s indigenous cutthroat trout subspecies. If you can catch one of Kendall’s frequent presentations about her work, do— it’s fascinating stuff. Our valley is one beautiful, beloved place. Let this month of May ask the question, “What can we do to nurture it?” I’d love to hear about your favorite springtime sights from across the region. I’ll start by sharing mine: carpets of bright yellow dandelions spread as far as the eye can see across the fields of Missouri Heights.

Siouxanne Mease, Brent Moss Photo, Beth White Photography, Draper White/Tyler Stableford Production, Kevin Rogers, Garry Schalla, Karin Teague, Nicolette Toussaint, Erik Wardell, Peggy Wilkie, EverGreen ZeroWaste

CORPORATE TEAM | Steven Schowengerdt

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

TALK TO US

P.O. Box 12608 Overland Park, KS 66282-3214 Proverbs 3:5-6 Roaring Fork Lifestyle™ is published monthly by Lifestyle Publications LLC. It is distributed via the US Postal Service to some of Roaring Fork’s most affluent neighborhoods. Articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect Lifestyle Publications’ opinions. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Lifestyle Publications does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Information in Roaring Fork Lifestyle™ is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed.


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May 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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May 2017

Departments

26

10

Publisher’s Letter

12

Good Times

16

Around Town

20

Artist’s Palette

22

Times Past

38

Locally Owned

40

Healthy Lifestyle

42 DIY

20 Wild at Heart

Wilderness Workshop Artists Connect Creativity and

Environmental Advocacy

44

Lifestyle Calendar

50

Parting Thoughts

22 West Canyon Tree Farm

A Favorite Local Business Springs Back to Life

40 The Air We Breathe

Mindfulness, Responsibility, Respect

20

22

Lifestyle Publications Arizona | California | Colorado | Florida | Georgia | Idaho | Illinois | Kansas | Minnesota | Missouri | Montana North Carolina | Ohio | Oklahoma | South Carolina | Tennessee | Texas | Utah

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Publisher’s Letter

Spring Green or Cone Orange?

S

pring is a time when you usually think of new green sprouts poking through the soil—but for those of us who spend a lot of time in the car commuting, spring also means a fresh crop of attractive orange traffic cones lining the roads. Sometimes it seems there are more traffic cones than spring flowers, more orange than the poppy fields in The Wizard of Oz.

This is a ritual we are never prepared for, but it has always been a signal that spring has finally arrived. Or maybe we can view the annual cone gauntlet as a kind of community-offered “skilled driving course:” a refresher for those of us who currently possess driver’s licenses, and an automatic pass for young people who are just learning to navigate the roads. The cone challenge also brings a huge display of driver "courtesy," as spring seems to bring out the best in us as we maneuver through the valley. Lane closures spur drivers to speed up in the closed lane until the last moment when they can force their way in the open lane. Net result: saving two or three minutes in their overall commute! Only pregnant women or someone in need of medical services should see an advantage in this huge time saver.

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

Then you get the opposite of the spectrum, the driver who sees the signs calling for speed reduction due to road work ahead. This driver takes the signs literally. The new posted speed is 25 miles per hour but they think that slowing to 15 is safest, completely ignoring the worker frantically waving a caution sign to encourage them to speed up. Finally, there is the hand wave of appreciation for letting someone cut in line or pull in from a side road. On occasion when I am the driver trying to nudge my way into traffic, I see another fun wave: the one using only a single finger instead of the full hand. Boy, someone is having a bad day. Apparently I am spending way too much time on the roadway. I need to return my thoughts to those new spring green sprouts, and fast.

Rick French, Publisher RFrench@LifestylePubs.com 970.618.8981


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11


Good Times

MFHC Dental Clinic Opening

In March, Mountain Family Health Centers (MFHC) celebrated the opening of the organization's new Mobile Dental Van in El Jebel. MFHC CEO Ross Brooks and others from the team welcomed the public to tour the van and learn more about its services. PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARRY SCHALLA.

Basalt Mayor Jacque Whitsitt, Eagle County Executive Director of Human Services Jone MFHC CEO Ross Brooks with Pitkin County Bosworth, and Valley Settlement Executive Mobile dental van staff. Director of Human Services Nan Sundeen. Director Jon Fox-Rubin.

Pitkin County Manager Jon Peacock gives MFHC Dental Director Garry Millard with CEO MFHC CEO Ross Brooks with Roaring Fork opening remarks. Ross Brooks. (Photo: Siouxanne Mease) Lifestyle's Rick French.

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017


Spellebration: Literacy Under the Big Top

In April, Glenwood's Literacy Outreach hosted its annual adult spelling bee at the Hotel Colorado. The circus-themed event, benefiting Literacy Outreach and Colorado Mountain College's Learning Labs, featured outrageous costumes and 30 teams competing for bragging rights as the best spellers in the county. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SUSY COTA.

Blair Lowery, Ruth Sante, and Deb Cutter's team Several teams sponsored by Colorado Mountain Team "Cirque du So Lame" featuring Gail Petry, College pose before the competition. Vanessa Caranese, and Jill Lafontaine. "Three Saggin' Old Bags" won Best Costume.

Alpine Bank's "Amazing Monetary Transactors" The "Safe Circus Spellers" Sarah Buckley, Crystal The "Zirque du Zoleil" team of Heather Exby, Kevin Cote, and Virginia Nicolai took first place with the Steve Shute, Melissa Matlock, Chrissy McCaslin, Young, and Julie Olson. winning words "thimerosal" and "saxifrage." Tara Bair, Brandi Short, and Kyle Skyock in front.

The "Sideshow Spellers" with Janelle Schuler, Diane Webster, and "The Sensational Spellini Sisters" Gloria Farmer, Suzanne Kirch, and Emma Axelson took home third place but won the Golden Elephant award for most money raised. Nicolette Toussaint.

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13


Good Times

Lon Winston Theatre Naming

Carbondale's Thunder River Theatre Company (TRTC) celebrated opening night of their recent production of Shakespeare's The Tempest by announcing the newly named Lon Winston Theatre. Winston, who directed and designed The Tempest and many other productions, founded TRTC more than 20 years ago. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BETH WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY. 

TRTC board president Eric Smith makes the TRTC founder Lon Winston (left) with current announcement to the cast and audience. executive artistic director Corey Simpson.

TRTC's new black box theatre sign.

Board president Eric Smith (left) with Lon Winston. Cast and crew of The Tempest.

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15


Around Town

AROUND TOWN

15TH ANNUAL FESTIVAL LAS AMERICAS

The Rumery family of Osage Gardens. Photo: Heather McDermott

Glenwood Springs-based Roaring Fork Rotary, better known as Club Rotario, will host its Festival Las Americas on May 5. The event, held this year from noon to 9 p.m. at Sopris Park in downtown Carbondale, raises scholarship funds awarded to local Colorado Mountain College students.

marjoram, mint, oregano, tarragon, thyme, and others; many of

Festival admission is free, but donations are encouraged.

these can be found in grocery stores and on restaurant menus

Attendees can expect a celebration of the traditions of the Americas

across the Roaring Fork Valley.

with cultural, artistic, and recreational activities for the whole family.

Osage Gardens operates year-round and encompasses more than

Vendors will be selling a variety of foods representative of different

20 acres of land and a three-acre greenhouse along the Colorado River

cultures, and a full lineup of live entertainment is scheduled through-

between New Castle and Silt. Locals can visit the Rumerys' Little Red

out the day. Musical guests include Mariachi San Jose de Javier de

Farm Store to sign up for the farm's free-choice CSA program. The

los Santos, Grupo Flama Show, and Escolta de Rancho. Special VIP

shop features a selection of Osage Gardens herbs and vegetables

tickets are available for $15 and include snacks, a drink, and time to

plus other locally-sourced goods from regional food producers. Find

chat with the bands. See FestivalAmericas.net for event details.

Osage Gardens on social media and at OsageGardens.com.

SUNLIGHT WELCOMES NEW AVALANCHE DOG

SOL THEATRE CO. AUDITIONS This month, Stage of Life Theatre Co. is holding  auditions  at the

Sunlight Mountain may be closed for the season, but the resort's

Third Street Center for two upcoming shows. Details and examples

new avalanche rescue dog is just getting started. Australian shep-

of audition material can be found at SOLTheatreCompany.org. The

herd-husky mix puppy Denali, born January 22, will spend the sum-

Carbondale theatre group invites young performers to audition for

mer and early fall training to become the newest member of Sunlight

the following:

Ski Patrol's avalanche team.

RENT, directed by Dani Grace Kopf with musical direction by

Denali's owner and primary handler Rachel Thomas noted: "This spring

Jonathan Gorst and choreography by Luke Ryan. Audition dates: May

we have been working on obedience and getting her socialized. She will

13 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with callbacks the following day from noon to

need to be familiar with everything that comes with the job including

4 p.m. Students ages 14-19 should prepare a short monologue and 32

snowmobiles, lifts, skis, snow, and lots of people. We started with 'hide

bars of music that show range, attitude, and commitment. An accom-

and seek,' and next winter we'll progress to finding people hiding in snow

panist will be provided, but a cappella singing is allowed. Students

caves. We will also be going through the American Avalanche Institute K9

must have parental permission to participate due to the mature nature

Training course, working toward advanced certification, and in 2019 we

of the show's themes, and copies of the script can be checked out prior

will attend the Wasatch Backcountry Rescue International Dog School."

to auditions. Rehearsals will run 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday starting

Follow Sunlight Mountain Resort on Twitter and Facebook for Denali photos and updates, or look for her around the slopes during the 2017-2018 ski season.

OSAGE GARDENS 25TH ANNIVERSARY

June 19, with public performances held July 20-23. Annie Get Your Gun, directed by Jennifer Johnson with musical direction by Jonathan Gorst. Audition dates: May 19 from 3:30-7 p.m. and May 20 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with callbacks May 21 from noon to 4 p.m. Students ages 7-14 should prepare a short song that

Tom and Sarah Rumery, owners of New Castle's Osage Gardens,

shows range, comic chops, and personality. A short monologue is

are celebrating 25 years of local, organic farming in 2017. Now

not required but welcome. An accompanist will be provided, but

the largest grower of fine organic culinary herbs in Colorado, the

performers may sing a cappella or to a digital track. Rehearsals

farm began with just six basil plants and now boasts nearly 6,000.

will run 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday-Friday starting July 5, with public

Also grown on-site are over 20 other herb varieties including  dill,

performances held August 3-6.

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

CONTINUED >


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Around Town

(CON TI N UED)

ART AROUND TOWN WALK FEATURES LOCAL SCULPTORS The Carbondale Public Arts Commission (CPAC) will host its annual "Art Around Town" walk on June 1. The event begins at town hall (511 Colorado Avenue) at 5:30 p.m., and concludes with a community reception at The Launchpad downtown at 7 p.m. This year CPAC has chosen to highlight local sculptors, who will be on hand during the tour and reception to discuss their works with attendees. Featured artists include Jack Brendlinger, Nancy Lovendahl, Alicia Matesanz de las Heras, Nathan Slape, and James and Charmaine Surls.

RFHS SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS Roaring Fork High School (RFHS) in Carbondale recently announced that six of its students have received prestigious full scholarships, the most of any high school in the county this year. Four seniors from the class of 2017 were awarded the Daniels Fund Scholarship, which can be used for any nonprofit college or university in the nation, and two seniors received the Boettcher Foundation Scholarship, which can be applied toward any  institution of higher learning in the state of Colorado.  "These six students represent some of the finest we can send forward into the college realm and it is clear that the selection committees recognized their exemplary abilities," said principal Drew Adams. "RFHS believes in maximizing the academic and personal potential of every student and we could not be more proud of the accomplishments of these students." Daniels Fund recipients include Julia Lee, Fabian Rico, Lorenzo Andrade, and Enrique Gonzalez. The two Boettcher Foundation winHigh Quality Plants Exceptional Service Traffic-Stopping Gardens

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ROARING FORK LEADERSHIP RECRUITING PARTICIPANTS Roaring Fork Leadership (RFL), a local nonprofit program that seeks to  build leaders in the community through immersive experiential learning and practical application, is seeking participants for its upcoming class of 2018. RFL is widely recognized by local organizations as a center of excellence for developing effective leaders. The program boasts some 800 graduates, of which about 80 percent reside in the Roaring Fork Valley and work in a variety of professional sectors including government, education, health, and business. The program runs August through May, and interested individuals  can  apply online at  RFLeadership.org. Brief interviews will be held in June, and applicants will be notified of acceptance status in July. Questions can be directed to info@rfleadership.org. 

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19


Artist’s Palette

Wild at Heart WILDERNESS WORKSHOP ARTISTS CONNECT CREATIVITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCACY

ARTICLE GENEVIÈVE JOËLLE VILLAMIZAR

I

n a watershed surrounded by national forest and wilderness, steeped in both prosperity and nonprofit initiatives, it would be easy to presume that money flows from one to the other as freely as the rivers and streams within. But this isn’t always the case. “Support for the arts doesn’t necessarily translate to support for the environment,” points out Rebecca Mirsky, development and program director of Wilderness Workshop's Artist in Wilderness (AIW) program. In connecting the arts with wilderness advocacy, she says that AIW engenders “public support in a far softer way, versus asking people to sign a petition or call a legislator. Creative people might bring unexpected new perspectives on our wild lands, and their creations could engage a new circle of Wilderness Workshop supporters.” Board member Mary Dominick created AIW in 2008. The program commemorates Dominick’s teacher and longtime conservationist, artist, and Wilderness Workshop co-founder, Dotty Fox. Fox shared her love of the wild by teaching watercolor classes at Colorado Mountain College, and her efforts helped secure extensive wilderness protection in our region—including the preservation of the HunterFryingpan, Collegiate Peaks, Raggeds, and Maroon Bells-Snowmass wilderness areas. AIW began with a lone artist in wilderness—one of Fox’s students, actually. Over the next eight years, word spread and support for the program grew. In 2017, five artists selected from a pool of over 130 will enjoy week-long immersive experiences this summer. Thanks to locals opening their seasonal, remote cabins, artists will savor time, place, and solitude, exploring their mediums and processes in the wild lands that the organization works to protect. Over the years, AIW has attracted artists from the U.S., United Kingdom, Canada, and Costa Rica. One of this year’s artists, Brooks Salzwedel, hails from the glass and steel canyons of Los Angeles.

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

AIW 2017 artist Andrea Korber. Photo: Brent Moss Photo AIW 2017 artist Brooks Salzwedel.


A piece by Andrea Korber.

A piece by Andrea Korber.

“During my residency, I hope to capture the essence of the land within my drawings. Is the landscape open, with a sense of loneliness?” he asks. “Or is it forested, with a feeling of closeness to the animals and plants? I hope to find new ways of adding natural color to my work. I’d also like to find the details of the native trees, like ponderosas, juniper, spruce, and aspens.” Salzwedel’s brooding pieces inspire pause. He explains that his monochromatic works explore “the subtle and sometimes not-so-subtle ways humankind has selfishly changed the landscape for better or worse.” His self-created process involving an atypical assemblage of materials results in “curios” Salzwedel describes as “haunted, dreamlike visions of otherworldly landscapes.”     “I recently did a series of drawings devoted to national parks and forests. One of the drawings was of the Colorado Rockies. Since that drawing,” he says, “I knew I had to go there someday.” Salzwedel will live, breathe, and work in them this summer. AIW will also welcome Land + Shelter architect and Carbondale artist Andrea Korber this summer. Though Korber’s professional world unfolds in three dimensions of a grand scale, she seeks in her artistic life to express the somatic experience of landscape within the constraints of two dimensions. “A rustle of grass, the moment the light turns blue before the sun sets for the night, a gust of wind passing through tough shrubs, or just a second when everything—even the sun–is still. It’s hard to tell if these moments are personal or universal, because when a wet field feels electric—so do I,” she reveals. “Maps and landscape patterns have long been a source of inspiration for my work...I intend to work on a body of work inspired by pastures and the feelings they possess. The energy these places give off can be joyful, chilly, welcoming, lazy, brutal, teeming, or lonely. I drive by and

want to meditate on what a pasture is doing,” Korber reflects. “I’m thrilled and grateful to have the chance.” It is clear in the words of artists near and far that AIW has tapped the value of wilderness through creative expression. AIW succeeds in part through the hospitality of locals gifting time in their getaway cabins to artists in residence. Karin Teague is one such benefactor. "It is always a pleasure and privilege to share our magnificent, wild backyard with visitors, but it is especially wonderful to invite an artist, who will deeply see and feel the landscape, to spend multiple days there. It is win-win-win." To offer your cabin in or adjacent to the wild lands that Wilderness Workshop  protects, contact Rebecca@ wildernessworkshop.org. The local Teague family donates time in their secluded cabin to the AIW program each year. Photo: Karin Teague

"Rocky Mountain National Park" by Brooks Salzwedel, 2014.

May 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

21


Times Past

ARTICLE CAITLIN CAUSEY

WEST CANYON TREE FARM A FAVORITE LOCAL BUSINESS SPRINGS BACK TO LIFE

L Glenn and Diane Wright

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ongtime locals may recall spring and summer days spent strolling the grounds of West Canyon Tree Farm years ago, selecting shrubs or flowers to plant at home with their families. From 1980 to 2007, the farm was a bustling center of activity that served green thumbs and gardening novices alike. “People have told me that they would come here when they were kids with their parents, and they remember wandering through the trees and playing here at the farm,” says current proprietor Glenn Wright. “It was

known as a ‘mecca’ of gardening supply and nursery needs before it closed to the public in 2007. What we want to do now is bring it back to what it was thirty years ago--we hope to be the first ones that people think of when they need plants, shrubs, and trees.” Wright, who took over at West Canyon Tree Farm with his wife Diane in October 2014, worked to reopen the business to the public the following year. This wasn’t the first time Wright had helped nurture a business back to life; in fact, he has something of a knack for it.


“I’ve worked in a lot of different jobs or fields over the years, but many know that I can come in and fix a business,” he says. “I took over a landscaping business in New Mexico and turned it around, helped farms get back to being profitable, and even fixed a restaurant that was failing once, too.” So when a friend of Wright’s proposed the idea that he turn West Canyon Tree Farm around, Wright was sold. “Plus, my wife and I are both from Colorado and we love it here,” Wright notes. “Our kids are grown up and out of the house, so it seemed like a good opportunity for us to do something we wanted to do.” Wright says the farm, situated between Glenwood Springs and New Castle near Canyon Creek, began as a dairy a century ago when the main house and barn were constructed in 1917. Around 1980, the land was purchased by a local family and converted into what became the original West Canyon Tree Farm. Lino Magana, who began working at the farm in 1982, was rehired as foreman by Wright in 2015 to help the business get back on its feet. “In the 1980s it was small, but we brought it all to life,” Magana remembers. “We built a nursery, greenhouse, garden center, and I worked 26 years to the day at the farm. Because I spent so many years of my life here before, being hired again was like coming back home for me.”

Wright adds that Magana’s presence in the current operation has been key. “Welcoming Lino back in 2015 has been a vital asset in bringing about the rebirth of West Canyon Tree Farm,” he says. This season, the farm is open and fully stocked with a vast variety of trees, shrubs, annual and perennial flowers, vegetable starts, and supplies suitable for home gardening. Wright hopes to see local families once again strolling the property, making memories together and choosing plants that they can take home and watch grow. “We are getting to know the community in a different light and it has been quite an adventure,” he says. “Reopening to the public has been a great joy.” Visit WestCanyonTreeFarm.com for farm news and seasonal information.

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MISSOURI HEIGHTS Located at the end of a beautiful country road on 8.58 acres, this lovely 4475 sq. ft. western villa provides all of the privacy and comfort you desire. Enjoy spacious living areas, a main floor master and office, two en-suite guest rooms, tons of storage and spectacular views. The outdoor patio is an entertainer’s dream. Less than ten minutes to Catherine Store. A tremendous Value. $1,298,000 Web Id#: RF146467

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Enjoy total seclusion in the beautiful pinyon forest yet Carbondale is minutes away. Stunning protected view across 500 acre Sutey Ranch. Well crafted single owner home plus guest apartment above four car garage. Features include: Impressive oversize wood plank front entry door, saltillo tile floor, log and beam southwest accents, kiva fireplace, custom cabinetry, and stainless appliances. Just 7 minutes to Hwy 82. $1,200,000 Web Id#: RF145444

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Situated on 385 feet of Crystal River frontage, this 3.9-acre idyllic setting is easily accessed via a private driveway easement through Forest Service Land. Total serenity engulfs you the moment you walk out onto your patio, just steps away from the soothing sounds of your private river frontage. $1,991,325 Web Id#: RF146467

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Overlooking a private stretch of the Crystal River, this custom log home has never been on the market until now. With over 3,400 sq. ft. plus an oversize garage, there is plenty of room for family and guests. The two-story rock fireplace is complimented by floor to ceiling windows, hardwood floors, and an open living/kitchen area suitable for large and small gatherings. The wraparound deck enjoys the seclusion of river and forest and is perfect for al fresco activities. $1,185,000 Web Id#: RF147334

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SUSTAINABILIT Y AND COMMUNIT Y WE-cycle Introduces Latino Outreach Program

ARTICLE KATE LAPIDES PHOTOGRAPHY ERIK WARDELL

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reating community, one pedal stroke at a time: That’s the vision of Mirte Mallory, co-founder and executive director of WE-cycle, the Roaring Fork Valley’s nonprofit bike-share program that offers an efficient, simple, sustainable transit alternative for residents and visitors. Founded in 2010, WE-cycle began from the desire to provide a green transportation option to help Aspen attain carbon emissions and traffic congestion reduction goals articulated in the city’s 2005 Canary Initiative and 2012 Aspen Area Community Plan. While this environmental focus remains a foundational piece, the use of bikes to fundamentally transform a city’s culture by connecting locals and visitors to the town, the landscape, and each other in new ways is an equal and vitally important goal of the program. “When people get out of their cars and head out on foot and on bike and interact with each other, it creates community –– and fosters a vibrant and sustainable culture,” says Mallory. “It changes the way a community feels, from one that is car-centric to one that is multi-modal. It energizes people, and makes them feel more alive. You become a part of a place and experience a city in such a different way when you go by bike.” CONTINUED >

May 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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PEDALING TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY—AND COMMUNITY (CON TI N UED)

The experience of this transformation isn’t just theory for Mallory, it’s something she’s experienced first-hand. She spent part of her childhood in France and lived in Switzerland for a year after graduation from Dartmouth College. Those experiences, coupled with travels to cities where bikes are woven deeply into the culture, sparked her awareness about the ways in which cycling can transform the connections of daily life. Mallory wanted to bring that vibrancy and community back home to Aspen, a place where she not only has deep roots, but one for which she feels a keen sense of responsibility as a third-generation Aspenite from a family that’s very civically engaged. Thanks to WE-cycle, thousands of people have now experienced that vibrancy in the Roaring Fork Valley. Students from the Aspen Music Festival and School regularly use WE-cycle bikes to cart their instruments to and from the Benedict Music Tent, RFTA commuters use them to travel the first and last mile of their bus commutes, and locals use them to run errands. Plus, locals and visitors alike pick up bikes and ride them to the Hunter Creek and Smuggler Mountain trailheads to keep their recreation carbon-free. The organization encourages social engagement with friendly contests such

Movimiento en Bici Program Manager Diana checks out a bike at Willits Town Center. Diana and Fernando take a ride on a sunny day.

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as querying riders on the most creative item they have toted in their WE-cycle bike basket. One impressive entry came from a rider who carted their pet tarantula through town. The program is also achieving its original vision of reducing traffic congestion and emissions in the Roaring Fork Valley. WE-cycle’s overall ridership tripled to over 38,000 rides in its first four years of operation. It expanded its operations to Basalt (including Willits and El Jebel) in 2016 and now includes 190 bikes and 43 stations strategically placed in its service areas. The program is also working on a possible expansion to Carbondale and Glenwood Springs in the coming years, pending funding. It has also become a model program for other mountain towns looking to create bike-share programs. For Mallory, it’s crucial that the bikes and the sustainable, vibrant, and healthy communities they help create are accessible to every demographic, including the local Latino population. WE-cycle was awarded a Better Bike Partnership Grant in 2016 ––  in one of only nine cities nationwide to receive the honor –– to create its Movimiento en Bici (“Bike Ride”) program, developed to encourage ridership, reduce economic barriers to entry, and ensure the program’s cultural relevancy. Through Movimiento en Bici, the organization offers subsidized passes, a Spanish language helpline, and bike safety and riding classes with the support of partner nonprofits including Valley Settlement and English in Action. “It’s really important that we provide equity in our services. We’re all vital members of this community,” says Mallory. “We need to ensure this service is available to everyone. Independence and mobility can be a huge barrier in this community: a barrier to getting to a job, to leaving one’s home, to being physically active.” Despite the challenges of introducing a new transit option with a significant learning curve to a portion of the community with little historical relationship to bike culture, and who are often juggling numerous jobs and facing significant life challenges, WE-cycle is beginning to be embraced by our Latino neighbors. One woman began using it as a way to shorten her commute from a RFTA stop to her workplace and subsequently got her husband involved in riding bikes for recreation on the weekends. “We think of the bikes in terms of agency, especially for women in this community. Of not always having to be reliant on your spouse to do things. Access to wheels can grow independence and confidence, which is huge," Mallory says. "For the women, there was this sense of discovery and freedom and ownership. Some would tell me, ‘I haven’t ridden a bike since I was a kid, and now I’m going to ride with my daughter this weekend.’ Those to me were the stories that shared how these bikes can make a difference in people’s lives.” The sum up, for Mallory, is that change happens when we’re willing to step out of our habitual comfort zones to help create a more sustainable community. “WE-cycle invites an open mind,” says Mallory. “We’re a connector of people and places. The takeaway is that bike-share provides mobility to a community in a new way.  But you first need to try it. And once you’ve tried it, you’ll find that it’s opened up a whole new world to you. There’s nothing like getting on a bike and ending up with a smile on your face and feeling invigorated.”


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CRE E PL U CO

ATES

A DEE P-G RE EN ,

DIY HOME IN SATANK with a little lotta help from their friends

ARTICLE NICOLETTE TOUSSAINT | PHOTOGRAPHY BAILEY AND STEVEN HAINES

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he modern, industrial-chic home that has taken shape on Pine Street in Satank is a dream made concrete by Steven and Bailey Haines. Handsomely finished with touches like weathered cedar siding and trendy concrete countertops, their “Hainestead” isn’t just a treat for the eye, it’s a better-than-net-zero house. That means that this house produces more energy than it uses. An independent Home Energy Rating System (HERS) test rated the house at negative 10. In comparison, the U.S. Department of Energy says that a typical resale home rates around 130; a home built to the 2004 International Energy Conservation Code rates 100. Sitting in the cathedral-ceilinged great room, framed by views of Red Hill and five sun-washed, south-facing windows, the couple muses about why they chose to spend the better part of three years of “free” time involved in gritty manual labor. For Steven, lead solar consultant for Sunsense Solar, “It was about reducing our carbon footprint and proving what could be done. We have the skills to demonstrate that you can build something beautiful, affordable, and efficient.” Bailey, a graphic designer and artist, says that building a house from scratch has been a “lifelong dream.” Anyone who has built or remodeled a house can testify that the travails of constructing a dream home can keep one awake

at night. For couples, hands-on home-building can become a relationship nightmare. (The Haines’ building inspector actually issued a relationship warning to them at the get go!) The Haines’ relationship remained on solid ground, but putting their house onto a solid footing proved a challenge. The soil around Carbondale is hard clay, a peanut brittle chock-a-block with river rocks. But when the Haineses began to dig for foundations, they were astonished to find not rocks, but topsoil—four feet of it. A relic from the time when Carbondale lay mostly where Satank sits today, the soil showed that someone had carefully culled out the river rock to farm where the house now sits. To replace the soft soil, the Haineses had to truck in 230 tons of backfill, then spend three weeks compacting it. In her house-building blog, Bailey wrote, “This process took FOREVER. I think I lost ten pounds…do you remember those vibrating fat burners from the 80s?” Next came laser-leveling, rough plumbing, building wooden forms and what Steven calls “a concrete truck circus” working to create the slab-on-grade “climate battery” that supports the house. The super-insulated slab is a sandwich: two inches of XPS insulating foam, a radon barrier, and then two more inches of foam on top. Like the floor, the walls and roof are super-insulated. (The roof achieves an R-72  thermal resistance rating.) CONTINUED >

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A craftily detailed staircase, created by Dave Kodama of Kenichi Woodworking. It features bookshelves on both the side and the walk-up front. A desk nook nestles in the back. Photo: Nicolette Toussaint.

Framing the house.

The outside cladding of the house includes an eclectic siding mix: a neighbor’s old roof, some found scraps, cedar cutoffs, and hardieboard. Photo: Nicolette Toussaint.

May 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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COUPLE CREATES A DEEP-GREEN, DIY HOME (CON TI N U ED)

Sacred geometry concrete sawcuts; they symbolize water and control cracks.

Steven tells visiting friends that they’re “basically sitting in a Yeti cooler.” (Notes for nerds: To save material cost and reduce thermal bridging, the couple used advanced framing with studs at 24-inch intervals. Instead of typical wood sandwiches, the headers’ interiors are filled with foam. This framing is covered with 7/16" OSB sheathing that's seamed with an airtight, vapor-open, acrylic adhesive tape. House wrap and two more layers of insulating foam sit over that. Lots of details online at BaileyHaines.tumblr.com.) The result: an airtight house. Since humans must breathe, so too must homes. Current building standards call for interior air to be replaced three to five times an hour, or around eight “air changes” a day. (Your grandfather’s drafty house probably leaked 25-75 air changes a day.) Because the ultra-tight Hainestead gets only .07 air changes per hour, and because the house was designed without ductwork, it has a built-in respiration system. Like every other mechanical device in the place, that system is electrical and runs off the home’s 5.5 kilowatt solar electric array. But it’s not just energy efficiency that makes the Hainestead so green. Many of its materials were salvaged and repurposed. “There are parts of four or five houses here,” Steven explains, pointing to a huge ceiling beam, outdoor siding, baseboards, cabinetry, and windows. Many contractor friends helped source materials. Beautiful oak baseboards came from a home in Snowmass; the couple sanded them and rerouted the top edge. They scored the kitchen’s $1200 Julien sink for $100 at Habitat for Humanity in Eagle. The dining room's $1000 Visual Comfort Goodman brass pendant lamp cost $160 at Habitat on Highway 82. The wood stove and all the appliances came from Craigslist. Three of the great room's huge "windoors" were doors salvaged from the former Bookcliffs Art Center. Two flanking windows came from an Aspen home. Because the walls are a foot thick, the windowsills are deep and perfect for displaying rocks or sleeping cats. (The Haineses have two.) The great room's salvaged windoors, framed in meticulously detailed Douglas fir, look brand new. But they’re not. “Those probably represent about $100 in sandpaper,” Bailey chuckles. “We stripped those, and sanded, and sanded. There’s so much labor there.” 32

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

Turns out that it takes a village to build a Hainestead. Bailey says that friends, family, and neighbors helped in myriad ways, many “swinging hammers on site” and others “providing ideas and advice.” Steven and Bailey can quickly rattle off a list of folks to thank: Keith Brand of Terralink Structures, their building mentor; architect Dana Ellis; Lucy Hunter of Odisea Engineering and two savvy Satank neighbors: lead carpenter Briar Gorman and Will Lennox, who did framing. “We’re so lucky we’re in Satank,” Steven muses. “We just couldn’t have done this without the neighbors. They would walk by, see what we were doing, say ‘cool’ and offer help.” In many places, the Haines’ slow and novel building process might have raised eyebrows, or even hackles. But here, neighborly help raised the roof. To lift a huge salvaged beam that supports the entryway ceiling, neighbor Todd Mathis even loaned the couple a building crane. “We just met with love and support all the way around,” Steven says, noting that Sid Lincicome pitched in with surveying. That Johnny Davis did trucking, delivering  tons of foundation fill. That Scott and Mary Gilbert helped them source building materials, Sid Graves installed their salvaged cabinets, Alpen Badgett pitched in with painting, and Jim Garner taught them tiling. That Keith Henderson and Jim Larrecha mentored their electrical plans, Dana Wilson helped with the plumbing, and that Ron Damon and Sean Kutych did magic with concrete. Bailey offers Marge Palmer the “Best Neighbor Award.” During the two years that Steven and Bailey lived on the worksite in their camper, Marge let them hook it up to her home’s electricity and water. She also provided showers and encouragement. Bailey’s thank-you list of helpers extends to another 46 names, too many to list in this article. Looking back on the “13/16 completed house” (there’s still a garage to build and landscaping to do), Steven advises would-be DIY green builders to “have good karma by working on other people’s projects to learn what it takes.” “Go slow,” Bailey advises. “You will enjoy it more. Stress with building comes mostly from having unrealistic expectations. It should be a once-in-a-lifetime experience, so the point is to enjoy the process, not just get to the end goal.” Still, after a couple years, it's nice to be able to shower at your own house. Bailey and Steven Haines.


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, s e l Of Ridd d n a , s r ive

R

s t a o r h utt

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

ARTICLE CAITLIN CAUSEY

Solving the Genetic Mysteries of Colorado's Native Trout—and Protecting Our Local Subspecies

E

njoy solving riddles? Try this one on for size: The beautiful greenback cutthroat trout, native to the eastern slope of Colorado, is declared extinct in 1937. In the 1950s, it is rediscovered. By the 2000s, it is found across the western slope. How? In recent years, unraveling the mystery of the greenback cutthroat sent state biologists and university researchers into a tailspin of confusion, which spurred intense DNA investigation of this iconic subspecies of Colorado’s native trout. The answer to the riddle, they came to find out, involved a case of mistaken identity and several unfortunate—though well-intended—pioneer stocking operations stretching as far back as the 1870s. Nope, those fish didn’t leap across the Continental Divide on their own.


A STATEWIDE SOUP OF GENETICS

Miners, settlers, homesteaders, ranchers, and families: They came to Colorado in droves in the late 1800s, and they needed resources to eat, to grow, and to mine. In settling the west, they fished the streams and lakes without restraint, dewatered rivers, and poisoned many of the remaining waters with mining and industrial waste. By the turn of the 20th century both the state and federal governments, along with some enterprising private residents, had set up hatcheries in various locations with the intention of producing massive numbers of fish to replenish the waters people had plundered—but without regard to the fishes’ native ranges. It is estimated that tens of millions of trout were raised and scattered across Colorado by the early 1900s, resulting in a statewide soup of cutthroat genetics ladled  on both sides of the Divide. Two of the state’s cutthroat subspecies—greenback (native to the east) and Colorado River (native to the west)—were mixed and mingled in multiple watersheds for the perceived public good.   A state operation at Trapper’s Lake, deep in the Flat Tops  north of Glenwood Canyon, collected and distributed eggs from cutthroats in the upper White River watershed. Further west, a federal hatchery cultivated millions more from wild trout local to the Grand Mesa. Fish from these eggs were relocated up and down the eastern slope, and their descendants still thrive along the Front Range today. Prior to this government work and widespread transplantation of trout, early settlers had been conducting their own fish-stocking

initiatives. In 1873, in hopes of opening an inn along Bear Creek to capitalize on the tourists climbing Pike’s Peak, a Mr. J.C. Jones is believed to have stocked its waters with genetically pure greenback cutthroats procured from their native habitat in the South Platte River watershed. In doing so, he may have inadvertently saved the greenback subspecies from complete extinction, as it later disappeared from its native range. MISTAKEN IDENTITY

Now back to the riddle. How was it that greenbacks could be declared extinct and then rediscovered in such an unusual way? The answer is simple. For years after the greenback was added to the Endangered Species list in 1973, well-meaning state officials had been attempting to increase their numbers by replenishing eastern slope waters with what they believed were greenbacks from a population in the South Platte River valley—but those "greenbacks" weren’t really greenbacks at all. They turned out to be an entirely different subspecies altogether. So, the riddle is a bit of a trick. In the early 2000s, innovative DNA research techniques used at the University of Colorado (CU) Boulder revealed that the “greenbacks” in the South Platte watershed were actually Colorado River cutthroats, native to the western slope, which had been transplanted to the South Platte during early stocking operations at the turn of the  20th century. Unbeknownst to state officials, the unusual-looking cutthroats in Bear Creek were the one true population of greenbacks, and instead they had focused on CONTINUED >

May 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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OF RIDDLES, RIVERS, AND CUTTHROATS

(CON TI N U ED)

the misidentified “greenback” populations elsewhere. Genetic investigations involving the use of trout specimens originally collected by 19th century explorers and preserved in museums across the country later confirmed that those Bear Creek beauties are indeed the only real deal. INDIGENOUS TROUT IN THE ROARING FORK VALLEY

Top: Closeup on a green-lineage cutthroat indigenous to the Roaring Fork Valley. Photo: Kevin Rogers Middle: A researcher examines a specimen from Cunningham Creek. Photo: Kendall Bakich Bottom: Research materials for a cutthroat from Hunter Creek. Photo: Kendall Bakich

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

Today, extensive DNA testing at the state and university level has helped clear up numerous cases of mistaken identity of our beloved cutthroats and determined that each of the six major watersheds in the state had its own genetically unique cutthroat. Here in the valley, officials are currently working to protect one of two previously unrecognized cutthroat subspecies currently identified as the “green-lineage” cutthroat. Efforts are underway to have them taxonomically characterized and named. Colorado Parks and Wildlife Aquatic Biologist Kendall Bakich, based in Glenwood Springs, is working with her team to ensure that these precious local treasures are protected here. “In the Roaring Fork Valley we have two known genetically pure green-lineage populations, and they’re the focus of my conservation work right now,” she reports. “They’re vulnerable. We need to find as many as we can, protect them where they are, and then try to expand them.” Currently, these two populations exist in Hunter Creek near Aspen and Cunningham Creek in the upper Fryingpan River watershed. Their biggest threat? Invasion by other trout species. “Our primary objective is to protect the indigenous fish in their natural habitat, especially from the invasion of non-natives like rainbow, brown, and brook trout,” Bakich notes. “Most of the time the cutthroats live in pretty good conditions up higher in the watershed, but unfortunately the natural barriers that once protected them from other species in these two streams have both failed.”

Bakich says that brook trout, widely introduced from the eastern U.S. for sport fishing long ago, are especially aggressive predators that claim  essential resources from  the indigenous cutthroats. The only way to ensure that the cutthroats can continue to live in their native habitat is to physically remove all the invasive trout. “Of course, that doesn’t mean we can go out there and physically catch all the brook trout in all waters,” Bakich adds with a laugh. “That would be impossible. What we can do is chemical reclamation in streams or lakes that have the appropriate environmental conditions—both for cutthroat trout and efficacy of the chemical. Typically we need a large group of state-certified personnel—over 50 people—to do the project. We use a natural plant-derived chemical to remove the brook trout over the course of a day or two, and then it detoxifies and is gone from the water.” Much of these reclamation projects’ success rides on public awareness and community support, Bakich says. She has made great efforts to inform locals of her team’s conservation work, including a recent Naturalist Nights presentation hosted by Wilderness Workshop, Roaring Fork Audubon, and the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies. “We need community buy-in to make this work,” she adds. “We want to make sure that people understand why, and how, we do this. These are big projects, especially in a large watershed like Hunter Creek.” This month, Bakich is beginning field season with her team and will be working frequently in the Hunter and Cunningham creek areas, but she welcomes community feedback at any time. “If people want to talk,” she says, “I’m taking input.” The author wishes to extend sincere thanks to  Kendall Bakich for her generous assistance with article research.


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Locally Owned

A Greener,

CLE ANER VALLE Y EVERGREEN ZEROWASTE LEADS THE CHARGE FOR BETTER WASTE MANAGEMENT

ARTICLE GENEVIÈVE JOËLLE VILLAMIZAR PHOTOGRAPHY EVERGREEN ZEROWASTE

L

ong ago, eight-year-old Davey Reindel would lurk in his Ohio ‘hood with a BMX posse, “raiding trash cans for cool stuff on pick-up day—our scores would then migrate to the woods to build forts,” he remembers. By the time he was eleven, Dave was collecting recyclables from construction sites for nickels and dimes. Meanwhile, across the Mississippi River, enterprising little Alyssa quietly looted the neighbor’s trash bins, pilfering soda pop cans. “I’d take them to the gas station, feed ‘em to the machine, get my change and turn around to buy candy,” she recalls today. Fast forward a few decades to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. “I got started at CU Boulder by jumping in the dumpster,” admits Alyssa, partner-owner of Carbondale’s EverGreen ZeroWaste (EGZW), now married to Dave. “People were moving in and dumping their cardboard in the trash. I just stayed in the dumpster, throwing out recyclables. ‘I said no, this is not where it goes!’” she wails. Smiling at the memory, Dave crows out, “That’s the girl for me! That’s my girl!” Upon sharing goo-goo eyes at a college New Year’s Eve party, destinies merged. “Between CU Boulder’s recycling program and EcoCycle—which is ‘the tip of the 38

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

spear’ nationally, for a nonprofit recycling organization—we both worked at highly prestigious recycling organizations, some of the best ones in the country,” explains Dave. Both were inspired by and contributed to what he says was “this really stupendous model.” Despite starting EGZW amid 2009’s recession, Dave is still amazed. “We’ve done nothing but grow. What helps us is that our program is a reflection of this community’s values.” Traditionally, waste is a nonprofit industry funded by municipalities and taxes, Dave explains. “But we created this company as a social enterprise, to show that we’re all about improving our communities and showing that it can be done as an individual company focus,” he notes, adding that this hopefully leads the way to future economies. In collecting more than a million pounds of organic waste from hundreds of homes, businesses, and events throughout the Roaring Fork Valley, EGZW’s business model has won state and national recognition. The company’s outreach impacts thousands through local school presence and presentations, and through the “greening,” or waste reduction, of community businesses and events.

The Reindel family. Photo: Peggy Wilkie

“We are so appreciative of Evergreen ZeroWaste’s instruction with students and staff about how to recycle and compost,” says Sonya Hemmen, head of Ross Montessori School in Carbondale. “Their service to our school fosters environmental stewardship for our learning community. Alyssa and Dave are current Ross parents and their expertise in composting and recycling enriches our school on a year-round basis." These students probably won’t turn lurker or looter like Alyssa and Dave did when they were kids, but they are absorbing the value of composting—the easiest way to combat climate change. Purchasing solar panels and electric cars can be a challenge for a family, but anyone can toss organics into a compost bin. “There are a lot of perceived barriers to starting a compost program in businesses,” says Dave. “They say, ‘We’re tight on space, we’re too busy, it’s gonna cost extra.” “Or, there’s bears,” Alyssa adds. However, Peppino’s Pizza is one local business that was willing to try anyway. “They started out with a half-yard bin. Within about two weeks they had another one. Two weeks later they added another. Shortly after that, a two-yard dumpster. Before summer hits, I’m giving them a


Alyssa Reindel saves resources from being trashed at the 2016 Strawberry Days Festival in Glenwood.

I got started at CU Boulder by jumping in the dumpster,” admits Alyssa The EGZW team began making the Aspen Ideas Festival a zero-waste event in 2015.

three-yard dumpster,” says Dave. “They have no trash cans in the dining area. Everything they have is reusable or they ‘upstream.’” Upstream resourcing is a fun challenge for Alyssa, one for which she has earned an Environmental Protection Agency award. She helps businesses like Peppino’s identify dead end materials (trash) and replace them with affordable, recyclable, compostable or reusable products— saving money and resources, and ultimately, preventing more pollution. “It’s the natural cycle of the earth,” she points out. “It’s the natural cycle we can operate on, too.”

No other green waste management business in the Colorado Rockies provides the services of EverGreen ZeroWaste. As Dave and Alyssa tag team stats on their company, the environment, composting, green initiatives, and future models, it’s like watching their two inner garbage-loving kids play ping pong: they’re agile, excited, on it. By helping the rest of us make the world a better place, Dave and Alyssa have transformed a lifelong adventure into their fun labor of love.

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Healthy Lifestyle

The Air We Breathe MINDFULNESS, RESPONSIBILITY, RESPECT

ARTICLE MORGAN HILL

I

t’s a delight to call the Roaring Fork Valley home. We enjoy beautiful vistas, a plethora of outdoor activities, and excellent community events. Our love of the outdoors generally comes with an appreciation for a clean environment and a healthy place to live. However, we often don’t pause to think about how our daily activities can impact air quality, both locally and globally. As air quality program coordinator for Garfield County Public Health, I try to practice what I preach and walk or bike to work, and it’s really a gift to live close enough to my office to be able to do so. The days I spend not using my car help me feel healthier and happier about my reduced contribution to air pollution. But often in this valley, reducing driving can seem like an impossible proposition. Many people have to drive out of town for work, have to drop kids off at activities or have errands to run, and so on. Some of us may be sheltered from the impacts of the Grand Avenue Bridge construction, but nearly everyone will experience them to some degree as we head into August. A 25 percent reduction in vehicle traffic will be needed to limit substantial delays on the detour during the approximately three-month period without a Grand Avenue Bridge. That means we’ll have to get 400 to 600 vehicles off the road per hour during peak times (6 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.). This is a great time to consider how to make changes in your life to limit driving. Can you bike or walk with your kids to school? Set up a carpool or vanpool with co-workers? Adjust your work schedule to avoid peak times? Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA) will also be expanding its bus services to offer greater frequency of downvalley buses and extended routes to Parachute. We hope you’ll enjoy the benefits these actions produce and then consider utilizing them long-term. Aside from the bridge construction, there are numerous changes we can all make to reduce air pollution in our community. Vehicle idling can contribute significantly more emissions than you might think: just one minute produces more carbon monoxide than the smoke from three packs of cigarettes, and leads to more wear-and-tear on your vehicle than turning the engine off and starting it again. A home energy audit can reduce energy consumption and save money on heating and cooling costs. Cleaning products and other chemicals can also be a source of air pollution and often have safer alternatives. Smoke from fires can also impact air quality. Wood-burning stoves can provide a fairly cheap and efficient way to heat homes, but improper burning techniques or the use of an older, non-Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified stove can be a major source of localized air pollution. Open burning of slash piles and woody materials should only be done with the proper permits, and burning trash is never allowed. Garfield County operates an extensive air monitoring network that looks at a variety of outdoor air pollutants, including real-time monitoring for ozone and particulate matter such as dust and smoke. If you ever notice a haze or odors in the air, you can find up-to-date air status information by searching “Garfield County Air Quality” online. It’s rare that Garfield County air is downgraded from the “Good” classification of the EPA’s Air Quality Index, but if it is, sensitive groups such as those with respiratory conditions, the elderly, and the very young may want to limit outdoor activities. Steps taken by one unique individual or business to reduce air pollution may seem like a small thing, but with the actions of many we can all breathe cleaner air. Morgan Hill is a western Colorado native and outdoor enthusiast in the Roaring Fork Valley. She has been an environmental health specialist at Garfield County Public Health for over five years.

40

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017


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DIY

LOVE’S TRUEST LANGUAGE Full of beautiful colors and bright blooms, spring is a flower lover's dream come true. Follow these simple steps to create a beautiful centerpiece everyone can enjoy this season. ARTICLE RIANA JONES | PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL VERSLUIS 42

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017


Riana.JonesAndCo@gmail.com @JonesAndCoFlowers - Instagram

Flowers are love’s truest language. - Park Benjamin, American poet, journalist, editor

PREPARATION:

HOW-TO:

1. Select your flowers—explore your local grocery store,

1. Start by using your greens to create a backdrop for your arrangement. Cover

farmers markets and even your backyard garden for your

most of the tape/floral foam/chicken wire with greens. Don’t be afraid to leave some

favorite blooms. Give yourself plenty of colors and flowers

greens at different heights to create textures and interest.

to work with. I like to use four to six different flowers to give

2. Next, add in your flowers—start with the larger blooms, placing them in a focal

enough interest in the arrangement. Don’t forget to select

spot to shine. I’ll fill in with smaller flowers turning the arrangement to keep it even

greens, usually one to three different varieties. This spring

on all sides. You can always add more greens or flowers until it feels full.

don’t forget succulents!

3. There are no rules when arranging for yourself—you get to choose what looks

2. Prep your flowers by pulling off all the foliage from the stems. If

good to your eye. Don’t be afraid to cut the stems and have flowers be different

anything is left behind it can contaminate the water, which in turn

heights—keep them taller to let them reach or cut them shorter to hide inside the

will clog the stems—a quick way to shorten the life of your flowers.

arrangement. Experiment each time and try new shapes in your arranging. Just

3. Prep your vase or container with tape, floral foam or

have fun with it. If it doesn’t work, pull it out and try another spot!

chicken wire. Make sure you are working with a clean vase,

4. Don’t forget to change your water every couple of days. Keeping it clean will

fresh water and clean scissors.

ensure that your flowers will last long enough for you to truly enjoy them! May 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

43


Lifestyle Calendar

May MAY 5 FESTIVAL LAS AMERICAS SOPRIS PARK, CARBONDALE Glenwood's Club Rotario hosts its 15th annual Festival Las Americas, a cultural celebration and scholarship fundraiser for local CMC students. Family-friendly activities include kids' games, delicious foods,

MAY 9

and live entertainment from featured musical guests. Free general

ROARING FORK CHARITY CLASSIC

admission. Visit FestivalAmericas.net. 

ROARING FORK CLUB

MAY 5 & 6 AT 7 P.M., MAY 7 AT 2 P.M.

The Roaring Fork Charity Classic Golf Tournament, benefiting the Basalt High School Athletic Department and Project Graduation, is scheduled

GODSPELL

for May 9. Cost is $200 per golfer. For information about sponsoring call

THIRD STREET CENTER

Diana Elliott at 970.927.4693 or visit LonghornsTennis.org to register. Stage of Life Theatre Co. presents Godspell, a musical for the

MAY 12

entire family! The story follows a

MUSIC AT THE LIBRARY: STRINGS ATTACHED

series of parables, interspersed

BASALT REGIONAL LIBRARY

with modern music set primarily

The Music at the Library series in Basalt continues May 12 at 5:30

to lyrics from traditional hymns.

p.m. with Strings Attached. Featured musicians include jazz pianist

Directed by Jennifer Johnson.

Lenore Raphael and guitarist Wayne Wilkinson.

Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for kids ages 12 and under.

MAY 12

Visit SOLTheatreCompany.org

CASINO NIGHT FUNDRAISER

for tickets and sponsorship

DOC HOLLIDAY HARLEY-DAVIDSON

information.

Join the Glenwood-based Early Childhood Network for their sixth

MAY 6

annual fundraiser! This fun casino night features dinner, raffle prizes, and a cash bar plus games like roulette, craps, blackjack, and

RIVER PUT-IN FAMILY PROJECT

Texas hold 'em. Regular admission is $20, VIP tickets are  $40. Call

CARBONDALE RIVER PUT-IN

970.972.7111 or visit EventBrite.com to reserve.

Roaring Fork Outdoor Volunteers will host this family-friendly project at the Roaring Fork river put-in near the Highway 133 bridge in Car-

MAY 12

bondale. Kids welcome! Volunteers will help improve the boat ramp,

CONSENSUAL IMPROV!

add a separate kayak put-in, build a new river overlook, and trim

THUNDER RIVER THEATRE COMPANY

nearby vegetation. Snacks and dinner provided. See RFOV.org  for

Thunder River Theatre Company's hilarious and clever comedy im-

the full list of public 2017 events.

prov posse is back for another night of new games, giggles, and good

MAY 6 MAYFAIRE WALDORF SCHOOL ON THE ROARING FORK

times! Doors and bar open at 7:30 p.m., show starts at 8 p.m. Ready for belly laughs? These performances always sell out, so reserve tickets now ($10) at ThunderRiverTheatre.com or 970.963.8200.

Join the students and teachers of Waldorf School on the Roaring

MAY 12 & 13

Fork for their quintessential springtime celebration: Mayfaire! The

DANCERS DANCING: A LEGACY

event is free and open to the public, with food and activities priced

GLENWOOD SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL

separately. Make flower crowns, watch a marionette play, enjoy

The Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts celebrates 25 years of Danc-

Maypole dancing, and more. Find Mayfaire 2017 on Facebook or

ers Dancing at Glenwood Springs High School's Jeannie Miller Theater

visit WaldorfSchoolRF.com for more information.

on May 12 at 7 p.m. and May 13 at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are available at the door ($16 adults, $10 students) or online at GlenwoodArts.org.

44

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017


MAY 13 DANDELION DAY SOPRIS PARK, CARBONDALE Carbondale's annual Dandelion Day celebrates sustainability, com-

workshop cost is $15 and will begin at 3 p.m., followed by a free

munity, and springtime! Festivities begin with a parade on Main

informal studio presentation of Toogood's past works at 5 p.m. Visit

Street and continue to Sopris Park, where participants can enjoy ed-

DanceInitiative.org for details.

ucational talks, activities, a children's dance performance, songwriters' showcase, food, and artisans selling sustainable goods. Find the

MAY 13 & 14

festival page on Facebook for updates.

LILLY'S PURPLE PLASTIC PURSE THUNDER RIVER THEATRE COMPANY

MAY 13

Thunder River Theatre Company's new kids program continues

BEGINNER BEEKEEPING WORKSHOP

this month with four matinee performances of Lilly's Purple Plas-

SUSTAINABLE SETTINGS

tic Purse, presented at 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. on both dates listed

Sustainable Settings hosts Session I of "Bee Guardians with Cor-

above. Directed by Wendy Moore and featuring six talented local

win Bell" on May 13. Intended for those just getting started, the class

actors, the show is perfect for the young and young at heart!

will cover bee ecology and the basics of creating a hive. Cost is $75,

Tickets: ThunderRiverTheatre.com or 970.963.8200.

and lunch is potluck so bring a dish to share. For information call 970.963.6107 or email Rose@SustainableSettings.org.

MAY 14 MOTHER'S DAY CONCERT

MAY 13

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

DANCE INITIATIVE WORKSHOP AND PERFORMANCE

Treat Mom to a special 4 p.m. afternoon performance by Symphony in

THE LAUNCHPAD

the Valley on Mother's Day in Glenwood Springs. Musicians are all lo-

Dance Initiative welcomes New York dance artist Melissa Toogood

cals from Garfield County and surrounding communities. Visit sitv.org 

for a workshop and informal studio presentation in Carbondale. The

for more information.

CONTINUED >

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45


Lifestyle Calendar

(CON TI N U ED)

MAY 15

MAY 18

BASALT LIONS CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT

RUEDI RESERVOIR TOUR: STORING WEST SLOPE WATER

ASPEN GLEN CLUB

RUEDI RESERVOIR

Come enjoy one of the premier golf courses in the Roaring Fork Val-

Join Roaring Fork Conservancy and Mark Fuller from Ruedi Water and Power

ley, all for the benefit of the Basalt Lions Club and their many charity

Authority to tour and learn more about Ruedi Reservoir and its significance in

projects. The fundraiser includes great prizes for participants and the

the Roaring Fork watershed. Event is free for members, $10 for non-members.

chance to win a new car. Register before May 9 by purchasing tick-

Registration is required and can be completed online at RoaringFork.org. 

ets for the event at EventBrite.com. 

MAY 20 SUBARU DOG ADOPT-A-THON GLENWOOD SPRINGS SUBARU Glenwood Springs Subaru is teaming up with Colorado Animal Rescue (CARE) and other local shelters for their annual adopt-a-thon extravaganza in West Glenwood! From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., all adoption fees for dogs present at the event will be waived. Come adopt a new best friend and enjoy complimentary lunch, free pet ID tags, raffle prizes, and more.

MAY 25 GLENWOOD TALENT SHOW GLENWOOD VAUDEVILLE REVUE Got talent? Jugglers, singers, dancers, musicians, comedians, and other talented individuals of all ages and abilities are welcome to compete in this judged community talent show! Admission is free, but guests are encouraged to arrive hungry and thirsty to take advantage of the menu and full bar. Call John at the theatre at 970.945.9699 for talent registration details.

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business directory AUTOMOTIVE Phil Long Honda (970) 404-3600 phillonghonda.com

DENTISTS & ORTHODONTICS

Murray Dental Group (970) 945-5112 murraydg.com Verheul Family Dentistry P.C. (970) 963-3010 verheulfamilydentistry.com  

FASHION & ACCESSORIES

Country Rose Boutique (970) 319-8894

HEALTH & WELLNESS Contour Body Spa (970) 355-4897 contourbodyspa.com/ Fahrenheit Body Spas (970) 315-1234 fahrenheitbodyspas.com   Hot Springs Pool & Spa (970) 945-6571 hotspringspool.com   Simply Massage (970) 306-0098 simplymassage.com  

HOME BUILDERS & REMODELERS 3 G Construction (970) 984-7046 Ace Roofing & Sheetmetal (970) 945-5366 aceroof.co  

HOME SERVICES Seamless Design (970) 876-2232

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

Tom Roach Hardwood Floors (970) 274-0944 tomroachfloors.com

LANDSCAPING

Aspen Grove Property Services (970) 279-5530 agps.biz

LEGAL

Balcomb & Green P.C. (970) 945-6546 balcombgreen.com Law Office of Jamie J. Roth (970) 987-5216   The Noone Law Firm PC (970) 945-4500 noonelaw.com  

MEDICAL CLINICS & FACILITIES

Mountain Family Health Centers (970) 945-2840 mountainfamily.org

MORTGAGE

Bay Equity Home Loans (970) 330-5010 bayequityhomeloans.com/ glenwood-springs

OTHER

Ajax Mechanical Services (970) 984-0579 ajaxmechanical.com AV by Design (970) 945-6610 avbydesignllc.com   Delta Disaster Services (970) 712-5298 deltawesterncolorado.com   Dwyer Greens & Flowers (970) 984-0967 dwyergreens.com  

Timberline Pool & Spa Eagle Crest Nursery (970) 920-5251 (970) 963-1173 timberlinepools.com eaglecrestnursery.com   True North Hearth & Home Elite Hardwood Floors (970) 230-9363 (970) 366-1676 truenorthfireplaces.com     Green Tech Electrical West Canyon Tree Farm (970) 618-2163 (970) 305-7556 green-techelectrical.com westcanyontreefarm.com     Midland Shoe (970) 927-0902 PET CARE midlandshoe.com Red Hill Animal Health Center   (970) 704-0403 Network Interiors redhillvet.com (970) 984-9100     Willits Veterinary Hospital Nieslanik Beef, LLC (970) 510-5436 (970) 963-1644 willitsvet.com nieslanikbeef.com     REAL ESTATE Osage Gardens. Inc. Coldwell Banker Mason Morse (970) 876-0668 Real Estate osagegardens.com (970) 963-3300   masonmorse.com PRO TKD Martial Arts   (970) 963-2685 Compass protkdmac.com (970) 925-6063   compass.com Roaring Fork   Valley COOP RAD Development - Glenwood, LLC (970) 963-2220 (970) 309-1540     Space This SENIOR LIVING & (970) 319-4335 SERVICES spacethis.com Heritage Care Center   (970) 963-1500 Spring Creek Land heritageparkcarecenterco.com & Waterscapes (970) 963-9195 springcreeklandandwaterscapes.com   The Fireplace Company (970) 963-3598 thefpco.com   The Glass Guru (970) 456-6832 theglassguruofglenwoodsprings.com  


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VISIT US AT RoaringForkLifestyle.com May 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

49


Parting Thoughts

RISi NG UP by ROOTiNG DOWN

W

ARTICLE ADRIAN FIELDER

hat brought me to the Roaring Fork Valley eight years ago was a deep longing for a place to root down. Having lived in multiple countries, I had encountered many of the world’s treasures but didn’t find “home” until coming here. I landed a position with Colorado Mountain College (CMC), but perhaps it was Mother Sopris that drew my family here with her rooted, humble magnetism: the antidote for an unmoored wanderlust. In this I am like the rest of us, for we are all immigrants beneath this mountain, the difference being when each of us arrived here. During my previous travels through five continents, I learned five languages to become an aficionado of recipes and stories from every place I visited. The more I listened, the more I realized these were all part of the same narrative: the story of our human need to belong and to get along, to know where we fit in the cosmic picture. Our recipes, languages, and cultures are templates for developing and expressing our relationship to one another and the earth. What brought me to sustainability was the realization that these relationships are under threat. Science tells us we are now in the age of the Anthropocene, the first geologic era named after a species—us—for we have radically (and perhaps irreversibly) altered the physical structure of our planet. We humans, who in a span of mere centuries have caused the sixth mass extinction event in the 3.7 billion year history of life on Earth, have endangered our own life-support system—the only known biosphere anywhere in the universe. Along with this loss of biodiversity, the cultural diversity of humanity (or ethnosphere) has also been greatly diminished over the past two centuries as the modern industrial economy has colonized indigenous people on all continents, catalyzing the loss of thousands of languages and lifeways—each of which once preserved sacred knowledge and a unique relationship to the land. Why were we taught that we are separate from nature and from each other, that we can master nature (and other humans) for our own ends, and that we do not depend upon nature (and each other) for our very existence? Science now shows us the profound folly of this notion, but long before that, so did all the mythological traditions 50

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | May 2017

Sustainability Studies students look toward Mount Sopris. Photo: Draper White/ Tyler Stableford Production

of humanity. These stories remind us that we are not separate entities, each whole unto ourselves; rather, we are all parts of a larger whole, and our identity comes from our relationships with all the other parts. However, when we are in constant migration, we cannot rediscover those relationships and remember what we always knew. We need a place to root down. Because of CMC, I was fortunate to find such a place: this valley, so conducive to partnership, reciprocity, and interdependence. This is what makes our home special. Case in point: because of you, our stakeholders, we heard (when we asked you in 2010) that our community needed sustainability education. In response, we launched a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sustainability Studies in 2011. Because our valley is home to some of the most innovative sustainability organizations in the country, we partnered with dozens of local employers to provide training, internships, and job opportunities. To date, 44 students in the Roaring Fork Valley have graduated with this degree and entered a wide variety of fields in which they are now leaders. Among our local graduates are those who conserve land and open space, build soil and grow food on that land, and create local markets for that produce. Others work to protect the water we all need to live, ensure access to the outdoors for disabled children, maintain the environmental health of our communities, convert food waste into compost, and coach the community on both conserving energy and powering their homes and businesses with clean energy. Each of these graduates provides our community with added vitality and resilience, but their greatest value is derived from the relationships among us. These former students have now become our partners, rising up as role models for current and future waves of students. As CMC celebrates the past 50 years of serving our beautiful Rocky Mountain communities, these bright souls now teach us how to grow our own future in uncertain times. Adrian Fielder is Assistant Dean of Instruction at CMC, where he is proud to have co-created one of CMC’s first bachelor programs with a team of excellent colleagues both within the institution and in the wider community.


RECENTLY SOLD PROPERTIES OVER $500,000 NEIGHBORHOOD

ORIGINAL LIST

SOLD PRICE

%SOLD/ ORIGINAL

BASALT Arbor Park

$499,000

$507,000

102%

CARBONDALE Aspen Glen Aspen Glen River Valley Ranch Aspen Equestrian Carbondale Crystal Village Crystal Village Blue Lake

$1,285,000 $1,071,000 $849,000 $750,000 $585,000 $549,500 $499,000 $540,000

$1,175,000 $1,017,450 $800,000 $630,000 $579,000 $528,000 $512,650 $505,000

MISSOURI HEIGHTS Fox Run Meadows Red Table

$3,495,000 $599,000

$2,470,000 $534,435

DAYS ON MARKET

BEDS

FULL BTH

HALF BTH

49

2

2

0

91% 95% 94% 84% 99% 96% 103% 94%

42 475 201 153 349 147 43 289

6 5 4 3 2 3 2 2

4 4 2 2 2 2 1 2

2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0

$241 $184 $242 $198 $302 $315 $304 $231

71% 89%

315 170

6 2

5 2

1 0

$396 $235

GLENWOOD SPRINGS Hyland Park $800,000 $800,000 100% 25 3 2 1 Elk Springs $747,000 $703,000 94% 181 4 2 1 4 Mile Ranch $735,000 $665,000 90% 194 3 2 0 Ironbridge $685,000 $660,000 96% 158 5 4 1 Hyland Park $635,000 $595,000 94% 199 3 3 0 Oak Meadows $589,000 $579,000 98% 186 4 3 0 (This data is a sampling of sold properties from 3/1/17 to 3/31/17, Source: Aspen Glenwood MLS)

SOLD PRICE/ SQ. FT

$298

$290 $241 $256 $140 $253 $184

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Roaring Fork May 2017  

May 2017 Issue of Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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