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Roaring Fork

RoaringForkLifestyle.com

OCTOBER 2017

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Living History DOC HOLLIDAY LIVES ON IN LINWOOD CEMETERY THE RIO GRANDE TRAIL KEEPS VALLEY CULTURE ON TRACK A RARE PHOTOPLAYER TRANSPORTS LISTENERS THROUGH SOUND


From DOWN VALLEY to DOWN UNDER, this diligent dozen Trudi Watkins

Susan Daryll Joanie Bronwyn Brian Darlene Cathy Nancy Scott Stacey Hilary Dillingham Grosjean Haggerty Anglin Hipona Johnson Markle Quinsenberry Wirkler Craft Porterfield

get the deal done.

Riverfront Château in Carbondale | $3,600,000

3 Bungalow Homes | Downtown Basalt | $1,215,000

Joanie Haggerty Joanie.Haggerty@evusa.com| 970.618.2730

Stacey Craft Stacey.Craft@evusa.com| 970.618.2730

Engel & Völkers has been providing sellers and buyers with premium services throughout Europe since 1977, and today, we expand the globe. Our Roaring Fork team has merged with Basalt Realty to combine local expertise with E&V’s innovative international platforms and technologies. We look forward to continuing to provide you with our exceptional service for all your real estate needs.

ROARING FORK

Visit us at our new home: ENGEL & VÖLKERS 206 Cody Lane | Basalt CO 970.927.9955 roaringfork.evusa.com


MISSOURI HEIGHTS

Beds 4 | Baths 2.5 | $929,000 Newly renovated home featuring a bright open floor plan and sleek, modern finishes. Convenient location, stunning views and space for horses with over three acres. A truly special property. So many upgrades including central A/C, three-car garage, new high efficiency furnace, Nest thermostats, new electrical and plumbing, new kitchen with quality appliances and so much more. Come see! Web Id#: RF150532

Roshni Slali 970.379.6580 roshni@masonmorse.com

Nancy Emerson 970.366.1194

Leslie Newbury 970.379.6556

nemerson@masonmorse.com

BASALT

Commercial | $280,000 Premier riverfront commercial space in Downtown Basalt. Upgrades including bamboo flooring, floor to ceiling windows, AC and high speed internet. Perfect for a commercial office and/or retail. Web Id#: RF148425

leslie@masonmorse.com

GLENWOOD

Beds 3 | Baths 2.5 | REDUCED! $994,000 Situated on 4 mile creek, amazing views and privacy. Luxury home with acreage is located next to Sunlight Ski area is a one of a kind. Wake to the sounds of the creek and relax watching the sunsets from the large decks. This beautiful western property would make an amazing corporate retreat or VRBO. Web Id#: RF145084

Christy Clettenberg 970.920.7398 christyc@masonmorse.com

THE SOURCE

Erin Bassett 970.309.3319 ebassett@masonmorse.com

GLENWOOD

Beds 4 | Baths 3 | $685,000 This tastefully built home has modern finishes and an open concept. Soak in your master freestanding tub with a view of Mt Sopris or reflect off your master deck. Enjoy cooking on a 36” chef’s gas range while the fireplace warms your living space. Outfitted with a twocar garage for plenty of gear storage and a mud room to minimize clutter. Web Id#: RF149851

Joy White 970.366.9636 joy@masonmorse.com

For Real Estate in the Roaring Fork Valley


I’m SOLD

on an agent who’s

LOOKING OUT FOR ME.

BASALT

Beds 4 | Baths 3.5 | $1,125,000 Chef’s kitchen, stainless appliances, custom cabinetry, ample Caesarstone countertops. Open floorplan flows to wraparound decks for outside living. Four bedrooms for children and guests. Walk to town, schools, and Arbaney Park! Hardwood floors, three fireplaces with impressive custom stone chimney. Radiant heat. Vaulted and nine foot ceilings. Borders Basalt Open Space with historic coke ovens. Web Id#: RF149586

Jim Cardamone 970.948.2832 jcardamone@masonmorse.com Patty Brendlinger 970.379.5484 pbrendlinger@masonmorse.com

BASALT

Beds 3 | Baths 2.5 | $650,000 Beautifully remodeled and upgraded, this Willits Townhome boasts brand new quartz kitchen countertop, new appliances, carrera marble vanities in the master bath, gas fireplace, and new flooring throughout including hardwood floors on the main level. Surrounded by mature trees providing shade and privacy, this home is excellently located on a quiet cul-de-sac with no highway impact and no neighbors out the back door, yet close to bike trails and Willits amenities. Web Id#: RF150717

Jackie Daly 970.309.4775

jackie@masonmorse.com

Experienced. Patient. Prudent. The value of patience is underappreciated. But it’s what Andi Johnson most treasures in her agent and kindred dog lover Sarah Moore. They’re single minded, knowing that when everything is right, they have all the resources to close the deal.

888.354.7500 | masonmorse.com


Lifestyle Letter

History Repeats Itself

W

e gathered in the dark at 12th Street and Bennett, lanterns in hand, preparing to embark on a walk to Glenwood’s pioneer graveyard, Linwood Cemetery. It was a brisk October evening, and the chill in the air helped quicken our pace up the rocky hillside toward the final resting places of many of the valley’s first European settlers. What during the daytime would have been a cheery jaunt up one of the town’s most popular hiking paths had, at night, turned eerie and tinged with the supernatural. Our group, a large late-night round of Ghost Walkers led by a Glenwood Springs Historical Society volunteer on the Saturday evening before Halloween, was giddy with anticipation. Who would we encounter on this tour of the past? As we entered the cemetery and gathered around to hear the tales of each of the “ghosts,” or costumed locals portraying certain graveyard residents amongst the tombstones, I was reminded: there is no better or more effective route to learning about history than to engage with it in such a living, breathing way. Under the timeless cast of autumn moonlight, I left Linwood that night feeling I’d had a meaningful connection with the people and stories of our community’s past. Before the little ghouls and goblins haunt the valley’s streets in search of candy later this month, we thought it would be fun to take a look at several of the area’s opportunities for a living history connection. Start in New Castle with a glimpse of the Vulcan Mine explosion and other regional coal mining tales, and move on to Glenwood to read about a walking, talking Doc Holliday and a marvelous 1920s Wurlitzer photoplayer that treats its listeners to remnants of the silent film era. Then take a jaunt to Marble to see how contemporary artists are sculpting the town’s famous namesake, and continue back up the Roaring Fork along the Rio Grande Trail to learn about not only its important historical roots but its multifaceted role in connecting the entire valley today. This is local history repeating itself—but in the best way possible.

OCTOBER 2017 PUBLISHER

Rick French | RFrench@LifestylePubs.com 970-618-8981 EDITOR

Caitlin Causey | Caitlin.Causey@LifestylePubs.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Nicolette Toussaint CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Angie Anderson, Caitlin Causey, Bridget Grey, Suzanne W. Kirch, Trina Ortega, Nicolette Toussaint, Geneviève Joëlle Villamizar CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Hunter Causey, Donna Graham, Alya Howe, Steve Mundinger, Malissa Ahlin Photography, Mountain Home Photo, Trina Ortega, Olivia Savard, Marc Schuman, Jeremy Swanson, Nicolette Toussaint

CORPORATE TEAM | Steven Schowengerdt

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

CHIEF SALES OFFICER

| Matthew Perry

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DIRECTOR OF MARKETING ART DIRECTOR OPERATIONS DIRECTOR

| Sara Minor | Janeane Thompson

EDITORIAL MANAGER EDITORIAL

| Nicolette Martin

| Victoria Perry, Lindsey Howard

AD MANAGER AD COORDINATORS

| Chad Jensen

| Cyndi Harrington, Andrea Thomas Alicia Huff, Adella Wrisinger

LAYOUT DESIGNERS

| Cyndi King, Jessica Sharky, Dana Rudolph

PUBLISHER SUPPORT

| Melanie Carlisle

EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTANT

Caitlin Causey, Editor

APPLICATION ARCHITECT WEB DEVELOPERS

RoaringForkLifestyle.com ON THE COVER Robert Boyle poses as the

infamous Western outlaw Doc Holliday PHOTOGRAPHY BY DONNA GRAHAM

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

JOIN US

TALK TO US

| DeLand Shore | Brad Broockerd

| Randa Makeen

| Michael O’Connell

| Hanna Park, Scott Lavigne

P.O. Box 12608 Overland Park, KS 66282-3214 Proverbs 3:5-6 Roaring Fork Lifestyle™ is published monthly by Lifestyle Publications LLC. It is distributed via the US Postal Service to some of Roaring Fork’s most affluent neighborhoods. Articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect Lifestyle Publications’ opinions. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Lifestyle Publications does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Information in Roaring Fork Lifestyle™ is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed.


HURRICANE RELIEF

The tragedy of a natural disaster can strike anyone, and the normal lives of families in Texas and Florida have been devastated by recent hurricanes Harvey and Irma. News headlines change quickly, and it can be easy for us in Colorado to forget that many of these people will continue to suffer for months or even years as they attempt to piece their lives back together. Many in Texas and Florida lost everything: their homes, cars, personal belongings, pets, and some even lost family members. They returned home

after evacuations to find nothing left. Imagine losing everything you’ve spent years working for, and you can begin to understand what these fellow Americans are going through. It is time to react with your heart. Help load relief trucks with canned food, clothing, supplies, and children’s items. Or, make a donation to a reputable organization such as The American Red Cross. Give now, give tomorrow, or give next month and find a way to make a difference for people who urgently need your help.

RedCross.org/Disaster-Relief/Hurricane


October 2017

Departments

34

20 “Marble/marble” Launches Careers and Changes Lives

10

Publisher’s Letter

12

Good Times

14

Around Town

20

Artist’s Palette

22

Local Limelight

40

Open House

42

Renovate & Refine

44

Lifestyle Calendar

50

Parting Thoughts

51

Realty Report

Carving Colorado’s Yule Marble with Friends From Around the World

40 Prince Creek Perfection

Sopris Views and Spacious Valley Living

42 Fall: Home Renovation Season

Tom Roach Hardwood Floors Offers Tips On Choosing And

Maintaining Beautiful Flooring

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Lifestyle Publications Alabama | Arizona | California | Colorado | Florida | Georgia | Idaho | Illinois | Kansas | Maryland | Michigan | Minnesota Missouri | Montana | North Carolina | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | South Carolina | Tennessee | Texas | Utah


Scott Dillard

Founder/Broker Associate cell: 970.355.4080 scottdillardrealtor@gmail.com

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4 Water/Sewer Taps Paid 4 High Speed Internet 4 Great Mid-Valley Location

4 Convenient to HWY 82 4 Low HOA Dues 4 Options to Purchase Homes or Vacant Lots

Diligent. Honest. Professional. “We have bought and sold several houses over the years with many different Realtors, and by far we found Scott to be the most helpful, upfront, and professional Realtor we have ever worked with. The sale of our home was complex and Scott went over and above numerous times to make sure we got to closing. - Gina Betley�

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Publisher’s Letter

A Great Moment in Living History

W

e all recently lived through a great historical moment: the solar eclipse of August 21, 2017. I’m sure I am not the only person in the country who ran around early on that Monday morning trying to find those stylish cardboard eclipse glasses, which I never did procure. You’d think there would have been sidewalk hawkers selling them for $20 a pair, right? As each minute passed, in the final hour before the moon slowly began covering the sun, they could have hiked the price up 50 cents a minute and I still might have bought a pair; there was money to be made on saps like myself who hadn’t planned ahead. While I certainly found the event exciting, there was no way I was going to hop in my car and drive 300 miles to Wyoming to experience the 100 percent path of totality when 92 percent in my own back yard seemed just fine. I do, however, know people who undertook that long drive for those two minutes of total darkness—and kudos to them. If you are a total eclipse chaser and somehow missed it, do not be disheartened. I did a little homework, and found that you can hop on a plane and head for Chile or Argentina on July 2, 2019 for the next

big blackout. Or, if you’re not so picky about the type of eclipse you want to see, your cup runneth over with choices: this decade, there are 24 eclipses and although 18 have already passed, you still have six to look forward to. You can still see annular and partial eclipses in this queue. Then, catch your breath because the 2020s will have 22 more with one total eclipse in the U.S. that will be seen from Texas to New England on April 8, 2024. Whether or not you’re an eclipse chaser, just remember that there is money to be made here. Order 5,000 of those cardboard eclipse sunglasses, stand on a street corner with a sign and a goofy outfit, and sell them at $20 a pop until just before the lights go out—then increase the price and watch the desperate latecomers line up and pay out. They will be able to stare at the sun while you laugh all the way to the bank. A great moment in history will be even greater with a little extra cash padding your pockets.

Rick French, Publisher RFrench@LifestylePubs.com

WATER RIGHTS • BUSINESS • REAL ESTATE

“the Chorus” by mary noone

THE NOONE LAW FIRM

The Tamarack Building 1001 Grand Av. Suite 207 Glenwood springs, Colorado 81601 10

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

www.noonelaw.com Since 1982

970 945-4500 Fax 970 945-5570 rnoone@noonelaw.com


T H E R O TA RY C LUB O F GLE NW O O D SP RINGS

PR ESENT S TH E 3 RD A N N U A L

SATURDAY • O CTO BER 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 FROM 6 PM TO 10 PM | DEVEREUX BALL ROOM IN THE HOTEL COLORADO Advance Tickets: $100/ea. At The Door: $120/ea. Tickets available at gsrotary.org or Kristine Wood 970 355-9951 All proceeds raised will be used locally for the rotary scholarship fund, grants and community projects

October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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Good Times

Dance, Sculpture, and Sound: "Nature in Translation"

Nature In Translation, a new work commissioned by Wilderness Workshop and choreographed by Alya Howe, premiered at the home of artists James Surls and Charmaine Locke on September 15. The cast performed to a soundscape by Mateo Sandate, David Starbear Avalos, David Alderdice, and Olivia Pevec. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALYA HOWE.

Dancer Gabriela Alvarez.

Dancer Lynn Aliya.

A pARTy at the Art Base

The Art Base's phenomenal 2017 pARTy and 10x10 Name Unseen silent auction raised funds in August for a new Art as Healing program, Colorado-based artist exhibitions, arts in the schools, community outreach programs for the at-risk and underserved, and scholarships for kids' and adults' education programs. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEREMY SWANSON.

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017


Coming to the Roa ring Fork Valley 2018...

Basalt Regional Health Center Coming to the Roaring Fork Valley 2018, a fully integrated health center. Located just off Hwy 82 in Basalt, Mountain Family Health Centers will provide integrated primary, dental and behavioral health care all located in a single health center. This new health center will serve more than 3500 patients each year. These patients are individuals who may otherwise go without health services and Mountain Family is committed to serving those patients regardless of their ability to pay. Those same individuals are at the very foundation of the Roaring Fork Valley’s economy. Make a difference in the future health of our communities, support this capital project.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call Garry Schalla 970-945-2840 x7290 Email gschalla@mountainfamily.org or visit www.mountainfamily.org/give

Ou r Fa mily, Ca ring For Y ou rs


Around Town

AROUND TOWN

ROARING FORK BRAIN TRAIN EXPANDS UNDER MY COMMUNITY HEALTH FOUNDATION

The schedule change comes as a direct result of data collection over the past eight months, staff input, and public survey comments. For a complete listing of all open hours for each branch, visit GCPLD.org.

RIVER CENTER SEEKS BOARD MEMBERS New Castle's non-profit River Center, consisting of 12 community outreach programs and hundreds of volunteers, is seeking applicants for its board of directors to help with strategic planning, fundraising, and other duties. "We're looking for a few talented and conscientious volunteer board members to lead and strengthen our programs for families in our area," said Executive Director Heather Paulson. "If you can

The Roaring Fork Brain Train (RFBT) has recently partnered with

contribute your time, thoughtfulness, and leadership one evening

Basalt-based My Community Health Foundation (MCHF) to expand

a month, please contact us to find out whether it is right for you."

its reach throughout the valley. RFBT launched in 2016 as a program

Interested individuals can reach Paulson at 970.404.0545 or email

of Senior Matters, but will officially transition next month as a new

Heather@RiverCenterNewCastle.org.

program of MCHF. It is the only enrolled support program of its kind on the Western Slope, serving individuals experiencing memory loss due to early-stage Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia.

SKI FREE IN JAPAN WITH SUNLIGHT SEASON PASS

RFBT will remain at its current home in Carbondale's Third

Sunlight Season Pass holders with plans to travel to Japan can now

Street Center and will retain its staff members and volunteers.

enjoy three free days of skiing at the island nation's Kiroro ski area,

Program founder and Carbondale resident Diane Darling plans

just a short flight from Tokyo. Kiroro features 21 designated runs on

to hand over program leadership to MCHF, but will remain in an

2,000 vertical feet and an abundance of off-piste skiing, plus average

advisory role. The program is seeking volunteers and accept-

annual snowfalls topping 750 inches.

ing applications for potential participants. Find more information at MyCommunityHealthFoundation.org. 

NEW HOURS FOR GARFIELD COUNTY LIBRARIES As of September 5, all Garfield County library branches adopted new operating hours in response to a decrease in revenue for 2017. “Given the

Other free ski days can be had at Wyoming's Snow King Mountain, Alaska's Eaglecrest Ski Area, Idaho's Lookout Pass Ski Area, and Spain's Alp 2500. Sunlight Season Pass holders can also take advantage of special discounts on food, gear, and services right here in the valley during the 2017-2018 season.

22ND ANNUAL TASTE OF BASALT

continued demand for library services in our communities, we do not have

The Basalt Education Foundation invites the community to save the

the resources to maintain our current schedule. We have managed to stay

date for this year's Taste of Basalt, taking place on Saturday, November

open due exclusively to the dedication and hard work of library staff, but

4 from 6-11 p.m. at the Roaring Fork Club. The affair features food sam-

we’ve reached the limit of what we can do sustainably,” said Executive

ples from area restaurants; wine, beer, and cocktail tasting; DJ danc-

Director Jesse Henning. “This new schedule will allow your libraries to

ing; and a silent auction and raffle. The midvalley’s most anticipated

provide more consistent service without making any changes to staff.”

autumn social event raises more than $100,000 annually to support the arts, technology, hands-on science programs, outdoor education, CONTINUED >

Guests enjoy food and drink at last year's Taste of Basalt.

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017


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Around Town

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teacher training, and college counseling at Basalt elementary, middle, and high schools. The event’s title sponsor for the fifth year in a row is Alpine Bank, which has pledged $10,000 to support “the Taste.” “We are so grateful for Alpine Bank and all of our new and returning sponsors for believing in our mission to enhance local public educa-

Roaring Fork Lifestyle is the valley’s most professional luxury venue to brand and build your business. Our Direct Mail distribution places your company on affluent homeowners coffee tables throughout the valley each and every month.

tion,” said Basalt Education Foundation Board President Erika Leavitt. Event sponsorships are still available; for more information, contact Kristen Maley at KMaley@BasaltEdu.org. Individual Taste of Basalt tickets are $125 per person and are available at BasaltEdu.org. Last year tickets sold out a week prior to the event.

SUNSENSE SOLAR RECEIVES HONOR Carbondale's Sunsense Solar was recently named one of the top solar contractors in the U.S. by Solar Power World magazine. The

Mason Morse Real Estate 970.309.1027

888.354.7500 | www.masonmorse.com

My experience with the Roaring Fork Lifestyle magazine and their employees has been nothing but outstanding. This publication has been a big part of my success in getting my Real Estate listings out to the public and they always give me such great service, even when I need to get something in last minute or make any changes. -Becky Ciani-Broker Associate

team achieved a rank of 259 out of the top 500 companies nationwide, and 10th of 219 contractors in the state of Colorado. “Now in our 28th year of providing solar electric solutions throughout Western Colorado and adjoining states, Sunsense Solar is proud to be recognized for our achievements," said owner Scott Ely. "The Sunsense goal is to proactively build a long-term, sustainable business based on quality, consistency, credibility, and service to our clients.” Sunsense Solar employs 24 workers and installed 2.1 MW (megawatts) of solar in 2016. Since its founding in 1990,  the company has installed 12.6 MW of solar. The company is an Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) contractor and provides solar solutions for homeowners as well as municipalities, counties, school districts, and commercial industrial customers. The company

When Roaring Fork Lifestyle has also built over 6.6 MW of capacity in community solar gardens EIKLOR FLAMES Magazine first came out, we were so excited as it gave our www.eiklorfl ames.comthe Western Slope. throughout Community and our Valley an identifiable presence in a beautiful, upscale glossy form. We thought we would try an ad or two to see how it went - and then realized that our marketing Basalt's Rock Bottom Ranch (an operation of the Aspen Center for dollars were reaching the entire valley – and we saw a definite Environmental Studies, or ACES) is currently accepting bookings for increase in our Business. Having Rick French the Publisher take 2018 event rentals. Weddings and other events can be scheduled any such time with his Clients and time outside of June 15-August 15, 2018. The ranch has an open-air provide that personal touch and care, has made our experience lighted pole barn for receptions, and the facility can accommodate up to with Roaring Fork Magazine – a Hwy 82 remarkable one. 150 guests. The site also has a variety of outdoor spaces for ceremony

The Fireplace Company 970.963.3598

Network Interiors 970.984.9100

Sincerely - Patricia Blick

Hwy 133

ROCK BOTTOM RANCH AVAILABLE FOR 2018 EVENT RENTALS

We were novices when it came to knowing how to design an ad and Rick gave us ideas how to keep changing our ads to get reader’s attention. The ad designers are great helping bring your ad to vision. These ads have helped us improve our customer base by almost 15 percent. If you are looking for a good way to get local people in your place, Roaring Fork Lifestyles is a great publication to help you.

Fork Lifestyle | October 2017 T JUST16 ARoaring FLOORING STORE

LVT • Cabinets • Doors • Hardwood • Laminate

-Jody Maloley

Cowen Dr. For full details, email Rock Bottom Ranch Program Manager locations.

Chris Cohen at CCohen@AspenNature.org.

FIREPLACE COMPANY • 935 Cowen Dr.

CONTINUED >

Book a picture-perfect farm wedding at Rock Bottom Ranch in 2018. Photo: Malissa Ahlin Photography


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October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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Around Town

Removing rotten wood from leaky roof. After removing fascia boards it was discovered that the leak has extended into the beams and decking.

Ace Roofing Company

(CON TI N UED)

THUNDER RIVER THEATRE OPENS "DEAD MAN'S CELLPHONE" September 29 marked the grand opening of Dead Man's Cell Phone at Thunder River Theatre. The play asks what happens if every time we make a decision, we create a new but parallel universe? Billions of universes side by side where we, but not we exactly, live coincidental lives that are each a consequence of the multitudes of choices we have made. The production, directed by Corey Simpson, features Brian McIsaac, Chloe Conger, Sonya Meyer, Wendy Perkins, Gerald DeLisser, and choreographer Alya Howe. Written by Sarah Ruhl, Dead Man's Cell Phone will be performed on October 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, and 14. Details and tickets at ThunderRiverTheatre.com. Cast of "Dead Man's Cellphone" at Thunder River Theatre.

The Company That Cares If you see potential roof rot please call 945-53 6 6 for a FREE inspection!

OOD FLOO W D R A H RIN E T I G EL

ROTARY SEEKS MASQUERADE SPONSORSHIPS The Glenwood Springs Noon Rotary Club will host its Third Annual Masquerade Ball fundraiser on Saturday, October 28, at 5:30 p.m. at the Hotel Colorado. Event proceeds benefit Rotary's scholarships, grants, and community projects. The club is currently seeking event sponsors. Perks for Gold Sponsors ($5,000) include 10 tickets, a private table, title sponsorship in marketing materials, a co-named Glenwood Springs High School scholarship, and logo placement in event photos. Silver ($2,500) and Bronze ($1,200) Sponsors also receive some benefits. For full details, email Peter Jaycox at PJMarketing97@gmail.com. 

SOL THEATRE AUDITIONS SALES INSTALL SAND AND FINISH REPAIRS RE-FINISH FREE ESTIMATES OWNER OPERATED

970• 366• 1676

YOUR HARDWOOD FLOORING SPECIALIST

18

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

Auditions for A Christmas Story at Stage of Life Theatre Company will be held Friday, October 13 (3:30-5:30 p.m.) and Saturday, October 14 (10 a.m. to 1 p.m., with callbacks 2-4 p.m.) Rehearsals begin October 17. Performances are December 14-17 at the Third Street Center in Carbondale. The story we have all loved for years of a boy named Ralphie in 1940s Indiana comes to the stage with all the heart, mischief, and "major awards" you could dream of! Students ages 7-13 are invited to prepare a comedic monologue that shows off their sense of humor and good, old-fashioned, wholesome charm (favorite pieces from the  movie are encouraged). To sign up for an audition, visit SoLTheatreCompany.org or email SoLTheatreCompany@gmail.com.


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WE AL WA YS WE LC OM EN TS

WE ARE BLESSED TO HAVE SUCH WONDERFUL PEOPLE IN OUR LIVES.

TI

A S PAC E T HAT I S CO M FO RTA BL E A N D I N V I T I N G .

PA

TEC H NOLOGY T HAT M A K E S A P P O I N T M E N TS EAS IER AND M O R E CO N V E N I E N T.

EW E N

A DEDICATED TEAM WHO ARE COMPASSIONATE AND GOOD L I ST E N E R S.

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1 1 9 9 Vi l l a g e Ro a d , S u i te 1 0 0, Carbondale, CO 81623 (970) 963-3010

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v e r h e u l f a m i l y d e n t i s t r y. c o m October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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Artist’s Palette

"MARBLE/MARBLE" LAUNCHES CAREERS AND CHANGES LIVES ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY NICOLETTE TOUSSAINT

1.

2.

CARVING COLORADO’S “I

owe the sculptor I am to this place and this woman,” says Nathan Slape, gesturing to Madeline Wiener. A slender, silver-haired bolt of energy, Wiener has momentarily come to rest, settling like the marble dust coating all the aspens in camp. There’s emotion in Slape’s voice as he stands before the wrap-up meeting of the annual marble symposium in Marble. “I first came here 13 years ago on a college scholarship. I didn’t know what it was going to be. I just went to this crazy place and they taught me to sculpt stone. Fast, efficiently.” Marveling that this marble salon has completed its 29th summer, Wiener reflects, “I love seeing all the old folks—many people here have been coming for years. But I love seeing the young folks; they are our future.” This gathering, affectionately called “Marble/marble,” has launched careers, drawn artists the world around, sparked romances and marriages, even led to second-generation sculptors. Wiener’s son Joshua is one of those. He now lives in Boulder, has instructed at the Art Students League in Denver, and has taught workshops at the Denver Art Museum and the Colorado Academy. He also teaches here at Marble/marble. “This place attracts sculptors and facilitates them doing this for a career,” he says. “Everyone who comes here leaves further along their trajectory as an artist, wherever they were to start. Mother’s stripped-down approach to teaching is a model for sharing freely. There are no secrets, no competition. It’s a supportive community, not everyone fighting over one piece of cheese.” Among the features that make Marble/marble so special, in addition to its spectacular Crystal River setting, are the open sharing, the camaraderie, and the opportunity to learn alongside world-class sculptors drawn from countries across the globe: Japan, England, India, Mexico, and Israel, among other places. Marble/marble offers a fully-equipped outdoor carving site, daily classes, and unlimited use of symposium tools. Participants receive a block of beautiful Colorado Yule marble, donated by R.E.D. Graniti, the Italian company that now operates the historic quarries in Marble.

YULE MARBLE WITH FRIENDS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

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1. "I love stone," says Marble/marble founder and Executive Director Madeline Wiener. "It comes out from under the earth looking so exquisite. I want to enhance its idiosyncracies and make it stand proud above the earth." 2. Judy Fox-Perry transfers measurements from her ram's horn model to her marble block. 3. Fox-Perry's maquette for the ram's horn. 4. At 86, Margaret Tange is this session’s oldest participant. She now lives in New Mexico, and is scultping a polar bear and cub. 5. Marble/marble provides tools and instruction to participants of all skill levels.


“I LOVE SEEING ALL THE OLD FOLKS— MANY PEOPLE HERE HAVE BEEN COMING FOR YEARS. BUT I LOVE SEEING THE YOUNG FOLKS; THEY ARE OUR FUTURE.”

3.

4. 5.

Judy Fox-Perry, a rancher who lives near Carbondale, has been coming to Marble/marble for roughly 10 years. Reviewing small foam model, a "maquette" she has constructed, she weighs whether to include the interior antler ridges characteristic of mountain sheep. Fox-Perry notes that those rings are added annually, like tree rings. “I took a trip to the Department of Wildlife to check out the horns. I have mostly chosen the marble and created the horn the way it is now because I like the stone’s veins and colors. But the horn has a double curve that has got my mind in a kind of knot.” Fox-Perry needn't face that double curve alone. Six accomplished sculptors—Madeline and Josh Wiener, Scott Owens, Petro Hul, Rex Branson, and Berndt Savig—are on hand this summer to provide one-on-one coaching. “Artists really can’t be alone in the studio all the time,” explains Wiener. “We need feedback from other artists. When push comes to shove, I need the energy I get from all these people. The original premise was to carve with friends. Sometimes I get so busy I can’t do that, but I benefit from meeting all these people, the food, the music, the cultural diversity.” The spark for Marble/marble was lit during Marble's Fourth of July celebration in 1977 when Wiener watched Scott Owens, Frank Swanson, and Gregory Tonozzi carving a single marble block together. Years later, when Weiner was waxing nostalgic about sculpting in community, a friend challenged her to “make it happen.” She did. In 1989, the Art Students League of Denver, where Weiner was an instructor, agreed to lend its name to a summer workshop she developed along with fellow sculptors Greg Tonozzi and Scott Owens. Gerald Balciar was a guest instructor that first year. Thinking the single-session gathering was a onetime experience, Weiner cried when it was over. But the fire had been lit. Participants wanted more: a second year, a third. One session became two, then three. Every year, Marble/ marble holds three sessions on the same dates in July and August. Next summer, Marble/marble will mark its 30th anniversary of creativity, community, and changing lives. As Marble/marble 29 participant Kristyn Kloeckner wrote on the institute's Facebook reviews, "You will always find great food, amazing art, and the most beautiful people you could have in your company…This isn't just a place to carve stone for the summer—get ready to fall in love and have your life changed forever!” October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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Local Limelight

Giving It a Wurl(itzer)

By the late 1920s, photoplayers quickly became obsolete as silent films were replaced by those with sound.

GLENWOOD VAUDEVILLE'S RARE PHOTOPLAYER BRINGS BACK THE SOUNDS OF ANOTHER ERA ARTICLE SUZANNE W. KIRCH PHOTOGRAPHY OLIVIA SAVARD

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Life is one grand, sweet song, so start the music.” When former U.S. President Ronald Regan made this statement, he could very well have been recalling the days of his childhood, when silent films were brought to life by the accompaniment of instruments such as a photoplayer. Built between 19101928, there are very few left in the United States, but a painstakingly restored one sits perched above the stage at Glenwood Springs’ very own Vaudeville Revue. Ever since acquiring this particular photoplayer, Artistic and Managing Director John Goss has been able to add to the charm and fun of the shows by using not only the instrument’s literal bells and whistles, but also its levers, switches, and pull cords. The photoplayer can create a variety of sound effects which are regularly incorporated into the Vaudeville’s various acts, simulating an old-fashioned car horn, racing hoof-beats, or even the chirp of a bird. Weighing 2,000 pounds and manufactured by Wurlitzer, this three-piece hybrid between a player piano and an organ has had a long trek.

Purchased in Oregon, renovated in Washington, and then shipped to Colorado, the photoplayer at the Vaudeville is a dream come true for Goss, who, 30 years ago, acted in shows in the Old West mining town of Virginia City, Montana. During this time, he experienced the sounds of some of the other old-fashioned instruments of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. One was the steam-powered calliope: think carousel, riverboat, or circus to imagine the happy, attention-getting music. Goss characterizes the calliope,  photoplayer, and their ilk as “…obnoxious, loud, and fun. They make people smile.” Over the last several years, some of these smiling people have included members of the Hassel family. Paul and Carrie Hassel, along with their two children Will and Eva, enjoy  Vaudeville performances  so much that going to a show has become an annual tradition— one they share with the kids’ grandparents around Christmastime. When asked about the Wurlitzer, Will, a  seventh  grader


John Goss sits at the Vaudeville's authentic photoplayer, one of only a handful that remain in playing condition today.

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at Glenwood Springs Middle School, remarked that “I thought it was cool that it needed such a big instrument back in the old days to make those sounds. It was astonishing how many sound effects the guy could produce at one time.” When extended families come to shows, the appeal of the music, its technological history, and the secrets of how sounds have been reproduced throughout the decades can be shared across the generations, creating fond memories and fun in the process. Goss notes that many parents have come up to him after shows to not only thank him, but to let him know that their children didn’t even glance at their digital devices. The fast pace of the shows keep  everyone interested, and the photoplayer is  a gem from the past that allows contemporary audiences to be transported in time via sound.  If you and yours would like to join in the fun and hear the grand old Wurlitzer live, information is available at GVRShow.com. October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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A LIVING LEGEND Robert "Doc" Boyle Ignites the Spark of History Through Holliday

The real Doc Holliday, who died of tuberculosis in Glenwood Springs in 1887.

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Boyle has spent decades cultivating his knowledge of Holliday and the American West.

ARTICLE GENEVIÈVE JOËLLE VILLAMIZAR

T

he door to the new Doc Holliday Museum whispers open. A gentleman, worn black ball cap pulled low over his dark 1970s aviators, ghosts through. Silver sideburns edge the valleys of his lean face; a gunmetal gray horseshoe ‘stache emphasizes his square chin and pursed full lips. A beat-up suede vest slides over a pinstriped collared shirt, seemingly from another era. Altogether, he’s a man you’ll look at. Twice. At 76, Robert W. Boyle commands attention. A true westerner and historian, Boyle is notorious as Glenwood Springs’ gambling gunslinger, Doc Holliday. While Boyle has a blast portraying Doc, his truest love is history; his life’s work is

his website, OldWestDailyReader.com. On it, he hosts a weekly radio show exploring the “fascinating story of the American Old West.” It’s also a membership reference site, with access to more than 3,000 pages all penned by Boyle. “I’ve always been tangled up in cowboy stuff,” he explains, starting with a stint at a theme park. There he recalls getting “shot down in the street three times a day all summer. I was young enough to fall down back then,” he chuckles. Boyle genuinely cowboyed years later, “pushing cattle for a fella over in the North Fork Valley. I was never a ‘real’ cowboy—in the sense that, yes, I could ride and shoot, but I couldn’t rope worth a hoot.” Cowboys, gunslingers, and history are inseparable for Boyle. “I’ve always—I can’t remember when I didn’t read history. It’s always been with me,” he says. You can hear it in his voice, his accent, his cadence. The ghosts of two centuries seep from Boyle—the culture and mannerisms of the educated, the southerner, the banker, the gunslinger. Boyle has become his fascination. As an adopted child, Boyle was long inspired by his sister Betty, 16 years his senior. “She had a high IQ ,” he stage-whispers in awe. Betty retained much of the oral history of their family and brought it to life for her little brother. “One uncle had been a bit of a ‘town tamer’ out in Western Kansas, and had worked one time, allegedly, with Wyatt Earp,” he intones quietly, as though either Betty or Wyatt might hear. What were "town tamers"? Moving into his rancher’s drawl, “Back then, a group of rowdies might take over a

town—say, cowboys in town for payday and the weekend. If the town couldn’t deal with it, there were men who did deal with it, up to and including killing the group of necessary people. Usually, the scenario was, they were asked to move on.” “The story is so good,” says present-day Boyle, “that it hooks you so bad—that some of us can’t lay it down. It becomes a lifelong attraction.” And what does that look like for Boyle? “I tend to follow Western history, and that’s how I became involved here. Years ago, Michael Chamber [patron/contributor to the Doc Holliday Museum] recruited me for the gunfight at 9th and Grand that he had put on at Pioneer Park. I played Morgan Earp, brother to Wyatt." As Boyle puts it, “there’d be a thousand people in downtown Glenwood, I mean, this place would be packed. The cowboys’d be to the Holliday Saloon and there’d be this pushing and shoving match, grabbing at guns. 'I’ ll see you at the O.K.!'" Back in those days, Boyle played it up, pulling crazy stunts with fellow reenactors. “We’d greet the Amtrak train,” he says, boarding with pistols and shotguns, pulling passengers off and threatening to string ‘em up. Soon enough, portraying gunslingers became a career for Boyle. When the Doc Holliday Saloon hired him to impersonate Doc Holliday, he never looked back. So began Doc Boyle. A highlight of his Doc years? “One day,” Boyle’s voice drops, capturing the audience: “One day, Marty [owner of the saloon] had that round table up front, just inside the door. And there were about a half dozen Japanese tourists sitting CONTINUED >

October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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A LIVING LEGEND (CON TI N U ED)

Boyle (right) and a costumed Kid Curry (far left) have both appeared in the annual Ghost Walk for many years.

at that table and the bar was full. I came through the doors, double-barrel shotgun and hide quirt. Harv came through behind me, mounted on a black horse, and the horse came right into that space, wheeled around, and I shouted 'He ain’t here!' Harv went back out the door, and I went back out the door and those Japanese looked like they had just—gone to God! Gone to heaven, ‘cause they are so cowboy-crazy it’s unreal! Marty says, 'That was fantastic! Don’t ever do it again!'” Bill Kight, executive director of the Glenwood Springs Historical Society and longtime friend of Boyle's, is the force behind the new Doc Holliday Museum and a veteran of the  Society's annual Ghost Walk with Boyle for 18 years. “When you’re seriously in character like Bob is with Doc,” says Kight, “you’re shining a light on parts of a person and parts of history that don’t normally get a light shined on. If that spark can ignite for other people in that moment, you’ve done your job.” “You will not find this word in the dictionary,” Boyle says, “but I am a ‘portrayalist.’ I’m not a reenactor. There’s a real difference. My intent is to have people suspend judgment. At the end of the Ghost Walk, after a 15-minute performance, standing in front of that grave—people say to me,” (Boyle's voice going sweet and submissive), 'Doc, can we take your picture?'” “I don’t work from a script. I work from a character in my head,” he adds. As Boyle

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Off-duty Doc: Boyle poses here as simply himself. "I've always been tangled up in cowboy stuff," he says.

dove into portraying Doc—everywhere from Telluride to Durango, Vail to Glenwood, New Mexico to Mexico—he realized he needed context. “And so I run a timeline. I have a loose leaf notebook that’s this big, thick timeline to me. I answer questions as Doc, not about Doc.” Boyle’s comprehension of history is far from a timeline though. It’s become three-dimensional and dynamic, as interwoven with people and stories and as alive as your own history and memories are to you. “Here’s the thing. Sure the cowboys and shootouts are a great come-on. We are a violent culture. Look at our television and our children—raised on a thousand killings before they’re 10. But the trick is to show the world behind it; show the relationship of that world to this one. How did we get our perceptions of the West? And how did that happen?” Boyle is still working at that, and not only through his website. With cancer and housing economics a looming reality for Boyle, he hopes to make it to his 20th Ghost Walk before finding greener pastures, whatever and wherever those may be. He hopes to mentor a replacement Holliday understudy. He’s also committed to helping the Historical Society secure a new, expanded home in the downtown historic core of Glenwood Springs, increasing the value of history as an economic engine. “I have a lot to do still.” So says Doc Boyle.

Despite the unknown location of Holliday’s exact resting place, thousands of tourists flock to his memorial in Linwood Cemetery each year. It is here where Boyle has delivered his Ghost Walk portrayal of the outlaw each October. Photo: Hunter Causey

DOC HOLLIDAY MUSEUM AND ANNUAL GHOST WALK • Museum in the basement of Bullock's in Glenwood Springs. Open every day, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $7/adults, $5/seniors. Society members and kids under 12 are free. • The Ghost Walk in Linwood Cemetery runs the last three Fridays and Saturdays in October. For tickets and information, call 970.945.4448.


October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY TRINA ORTEGA

WHAT’S OLD IS NEW ON THE RIO GRANDE The Community's Great Rail-to-Trail Project Keeps Valley Culture on Track

T

here’s a spot along the Rio Grande Trail that smells of sweet sage after a rainstorm. Rugged red cliffs dominate the eastern skyline and the view south toward Mt. Sopris stretches wide open. Adjacent grassy fields — once filled with potatoes — speak to the valley’s agricultural history. During quiet moments on her 32-mile bicycle commute on the Rio Grande, Carbondale resident Rebecca Binion can hear the faint rush of the Roaring Fork River. Binion sometimes pedals briskly past this spot between Aspen Glen and Cattle Creek; other times she’ll stop and have dinner with her husband under the picnic pavilion. “My morning commute allows me to get energized, and the ride home gives me the opportunity to process the work day and decompress,” Binion says. “When I see other people enjoying the Rio Grande, it just makes me happy.” Although the last train churned along the Rio Grande corridor in January 1991, the Denver & Rio Grande Western railroad’s Aspen Branch corridor still serves as a major artery for residents and visitors. Lined with iconic scenery and soon to be decorated with local history and art, the trail not only ties together the past and the present but also people from different communities, cultures, and backgrounds. An estimated 85,000 people per year access the 42-mile Rio Grande Trail, which is mostly owned by the Roaring Fork Transportation Authority (RFTA). Pitkin County owns the 8.6-mile section from Woody Creek to Aspen. Angela Henderson, RFTA’s assistant director in charge of project management and facilities operations, calls the trail “the spine that connects all of the valley’s jurisdictions.” She notes that in addition to giving locals “a safe and alternative transportation option,” it provides access to some of the nation’s most spectacular open space, connects to other trail systems, and provides access to all three of the valley’s rivers and Rock Bottom Ranch. Additionally, the Rio Grande corridor gives elk, deer, bear, mountain lion, coyote, bald eagle, heron, and other wildlife room to roam, particularly between Carbondale and Basalt where special wildlife restrictions allow animals to thrive, according to Henderson. Finally, the Rio Grande Trail connects to the valley’s railroad history, which many say was key to the area’s economic growth. The first train rolled into this valley in 1887; the last one on standard gauge rails chugged to Orrison Distribution in October 1995. But because the Rio Grande corridor was purchased for “railbanking” — defined in the National Trail Systems Act as preserving a railroad corridor for future rail use — the life of trains in the Roaring Fork Valley may not be over. In the late 1800s, Aspen, then called “Ute City,” was the desired destination. Two railroads — the Colorado Midland and Denver & Rio Grande Western (D&RGW) CONTINUED >

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WHAT’S OLD IS NEW ON THE RIO GRANDE (CON TI N U ED)

— were competing to get there. Despite a tumultuous financial history and the fact that D&RGW had been established to provide a north-south link on Colorado’s Front Range, it beat out Colorado Midland, bringing the first trains to Glenwood Springs and Aspen in 1887. “It was the beginning of Glenwood Springs becoming a resort area because people could actually get here,” commented Patsy Stark, archivist for the Glenwood Springs Historical Society. Railroads led to other infrastructure, including depots and hotels. In addition to delivering newcomers, trains were essential in the transportation of coal, silver, and agricultural products. That included potatoes from Carbondale, which was once “the potato capital of the country,” says Beth White, executive director of the Mt. Sopris Historical Society. Remnants of the valley’s locomotive glory days are visible along the Rio Grande Trail. Carbondale’s train depot, sitting roughly 100 yards south of the bike path near Third Street and Colorado Avenue, now houses the American Legion’s Post 100. When cruising along, a hiker or biker will spy red circular lights and railroad crossing signs stamped with the word “EXEMPT.” Rusty railroad tracks, old spikes and crossties, numbered metal posts, and circuit boxes festoon the bike route. In some locations, a hot day brings the scent of engine oil wafting up from the defunct wooden ties. “The Rio Grande Trail pays homage to the railroad corridor responsible for originally bringing the settlers to the valley,” says RFTA’s Henderson. “If you forget that this railroad corridor is the reason that all of the towns came to be, then you forget how important it is to protect its historic integrity, and its value as a future transportation corridor for the valley.” Although Pitkin County acquired the railroad corridor segment from Woody Creek to Aspen in 1969, two years after the last train ran to Aspen, the merger of Southern Pacific and Union Pacific prompted the purchase of the remainder of the corridor. In September 1991, eight local governments agreed to acquire D&RGW’s Aspen Branch right-of-way to preserve it as a public asset. They purchased the corridor in 1997 from the Southern Pacific Transportation Company with additional funding from Great Outdoors Colorado, Colorado Department of Transportation and Pitkin County Open Space. “With the dissolution of Southern Pacific, Union Pacific could have abandoned the rail corridor and the land reverted to possible residential and commercial development. The result would have been the loss of the corridor and any opportunity to preserve it for recreational and transportation use,” states RFTA’s historical documents. In 2001, RFTA took on the task of building the Rio Grande Trail, which was completed in 2008. But local leaders are treating it as the living history it is, and developing it further.

The Carbondale station, circa 1910. Image courtesy of the Mount Sopris Historical Society. 32

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Whether commuting to work or riding for pleasure, the Rio Grande trail accommodates thousands of bikers each year.

Currently, Carbondale Arts is developing the Rio Grande ARTway, a one-mile section that will include three zones: the Roll Zone, the Stroll Zone, and the Ol’ Zone. Designed to showcase the town’s creative arts and history, the ARTway’s master plan describes it as a “creative place-making project that reflects the cultural diversity of the community, inspires greater use of non-motorized transportation, preserves our heritage, and strengthens our core creative community.” On the north end, the ARTway will be marked with an entryway sculpture that incorporates the Carbondale Creative District logo of a cowgirl on a bicycle. “We want people to get a sense of what Carbondale is about when you reach this section,” says Carbondale Arts Executive Director Amy Kimberly. The ARTway plan includes Derail Park, which will feature railroad artifacts and history; a volunteer-built, single-track trail for two-wheeled fun; a Latino folk art garden; public sculptures; a youth art garden giving a nod to renewable energy; and town history projects. Kimberly explained that the ARTway blossomed from the idea of building a Latino folk art garden and it “just keeps growing.” The Latino folk art garden, which will include hammocks, tables, gardens, and art, will feature a story sculpture detailing the neglected history of Latinos in the valley. Carbondale Arts is currently compiling historical info and data to include in a report to local historical societies. A “creative place-making project,” the ArtWay is about bringing different cultures and people together to meet, mingle, and learn. That’s just what the railroad did in its heyday, so what’s old is new again.

Sculpture and other art projects along the path have blossomed in the spirit of community togetherness.


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Where Fires

STILL N R U B

New Castle's Burning Mountain Festival and Memorials Recall Coal Mining History ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY NICOLETTE TOUSSAINT

I

n September, New Castle celebrated its annual Burning Mountain Festival with music, a pancake breakfast, and a 5K run. The festival, which has been running for 44 years, was named for underground coal mines that still flame inside nearby hillsides. Burning Mountain itself—covered in sagebrush except for a scalded patch the size of a football field—has been smoldering since at least 1899 when the Consolidated Mine caught fire. Another underground fire ignited in 1910 at the South Canyon Mine  continues to burn to this day. As recently as 2009, locals saw smoke and fumes venting through two holes in the earth and discovered still another underground coal fire near Silt. In 2002, fire from the Consolidated Mine, which had been sealed, broke out and set surface vegetation alight and grew into a major conflagration. It jumped across I-70 near Glenwood Springs, disabling the interstate. It shut down the railroad, consumed 29 homes and 12,000-plus acres, and caused thousands of people from West Glenwood and Four Mile Canyon to evacuate.

LOCAL SETTLEMENT WAS POWERED BY KING COAL

Between 2004 and 2016, Colorado's coal production dropped 50 percent. As technological changes have withered the coal industry, it has become easy to forget the role coal played in the founding of local towns. Today, near the forlorn town of Somerset on Highway 133, around 200 miners still work the West Elk Mine, which recently recovered 34

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from bankruptcy. The Bowie #2 mine also still operates in the vicinity. But miners in these two pits number fewer than students at the nearby Solar Energy International training facility in Paonia. (Each year, SEI hosts 500 students and teaches 3,000 more online.) Some decades ago, six mines operated around Somerset in the North Fork Valley. A century ago, coal mines dotted this entire region. John Osgood, the owner of the Colorado Fuel Company, founded Redstone to mine coal. To fuel the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad, the Redstone Coal Baron (as Osgood became known) built a huge operation just south of Glenwood Springs at Cardiff, lighting the coal-coking ovens there in 1888. The iconic beehive coke ovens that mark the entrance to Redstone were also built by Osgood. Carbondale, founded as a potato-growing town, gradually transitioned to mining, and many Carbondale residents worked in the Mid-Continent coal mines west of Redstone. Until the late 1980s, Carbondale's economy depended largely on coal operations in the Crystal River Valley. Nowhere was coal more important, though, than in New Castle. Although the area’s first resident to settle along the Colorado River came to farm in 1883, by 1888, when New Castle was incorporated, the area was hopping with coal miners. Many were immigrants from Italy and the United Kingdom. They dug deep into the dense coal deposits along the Grand Hogback ridge that crosses the Colorado River near New Castle. The coal they mined fueled the railroads that delivered the harvests and kept Aspen's silver mines running.


The Vulcan Memorial stands in honor of miners killed in its three explosions.

The results of local mining, as noted by memorials scattered around the Colorado and Roaring Fork Valleys, were sometimes explosive. In late 19th and early 20th centuries, the vicissitudes of coal mining included not only the dangers of cave-ins, fires, and explosions but also long-term health hazards such as crushing, maiming, and developing black lung. Colorado miners fighting their bosses for fair pay were killed in major labor uprisings, such as the Ludlow Massacre of 1918, which led to roughly two dozen deaths. All considered, from 1884-1912, Colorado miners died at nearly double the rate of the national average, according to the University of Denver's Coal Field War Project. Although Redstone's John Osgood was known for “welfare capitalism”—providing decent housing, schools, and reasonable pay—most mine owners were, in the words of the Denver Public Library's Western History Resources website, “rarely held accountable for the atrocious conditions of their mines." That was certainly true in the case of New Castle's Vulcan Mine. MINE EXPLOSIONS AROUND NEW CASTLE

On February 18, 1896, New Castle “was shaken as if by an earthquake," according to a contemporary news report in the Colorado Springs Gazette.

The explosion marked one of Colorado's most deadly mining disasters, causing the deaths of 49 miners. About half of them were Italian immigrants, and among the dead were the mine's foreman, its assistant foreman, its fire boss, and two teenage boys. The cause of the Vulcan's 1896 explosion remains a mystery to this day. A 1913 report, written by State Inspector of Coal Mines James Dalrymple, remains in the archives of the Colorado State Publications Library  and  can be viewed online. Dalrymple wrote that he thought the cause was not gas. “I believe the explosion originated in the west side of the mine, and was caused by [open] flame and dust,” with dust possibly coming from “a fall of the roof or a rush of coal from one of the rooms." He wrote, "I believe the mine was fully equipped to take care of any reasonable condition that might arise, but part of the equipment was not used as often as necessary to obtain the best results.” The explosion was an indictment not only of the mine's poor safety procedures, but also the State of Colorado's inspection process. State Inspector of Coal Mines David Griffiths had visited the Vulcan just 10 days before the explosion. He pronounced it in fine condition. His report, which is also in the Colorado State Publications Library, states, "I did not visit all the working faces, but

Headline from July 2002. After visiting Glenwood during the Coal Seam fire, Colorado Governor Bill Owens made this statement.

CONTINUED >

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WHERE FIRES STILL BURN

(CON TI N UED)

was satisfied from what I had seen that the local management was doing everything for the safety of life and property.” The explosion caused so much debris that the miners’ bodies could not be recovered until four weeks later. The mine was closed, then opened again under new management. But that wasn't the final tragedy. A memorial, erected in a park along New Castle’s Main Street, stands framed with pink roses and red-leafed Canada chokecherry. It commemorates the victims of Vulcan's three mine explosions: in 1896, in 1913, and again in 1918. The third and final explosion caused three deaths and ultimately led to the mine’s closing. But smoke from the Grand Hogback coal seam where the Vulcan mine operated still smolders beneath Burning Mountain today. ECHOES OF OTHER LOCAL COAL EXPLOSIONS

Dreaming OF YOUR

OWN BUSINESS?

Like the Colorado River Valley, the Roaring Fork and Crystal River valleys too hold memories of coal mine explosions. In September 1897, a coal dust explosion in the Sunshine coal mine, owned by John Osgood and located about 16 miles southeast of Glenwood Springs, killed 11 miners. On April 15, 1981, the Dutch Creek No. 1 mine, located in Coal Basin about eight miles west of Redstone exploded after sparks ignited underground methane gas. That tragedy, memorialized by a marker in Carbondale’s Miners Park, took 15 lives: six miners from Glenwood Springs, four from Carbondale, and one each from Marble, El Jebel, Silt, Rifle, and New Castle. Though miners' deaths have decreased substantially since the early days, coal mining remains the second most dangerous job in America. As Merle Haggard sang, "it's dark as a dungeon and damp as the dew, the danger is double, the pleasures are few..."

Memorial in Carbondale's Miners Memorial Park recalls the 15 miners killed in the Dutch Creek Mine explosion.

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Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

Detail of memorial to miners killed in Dutch Creek Mine explosion in 1981.


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Equal Housing Lender. This is not a commitment to lend or extend credit. Restrictions may apply. Rates may not be available at time of application. Information and/or data are subject to change without notice. All loans are subject to credit approval. Not all loans or products are available in all states. Bay Equity LLC, 100 California Street Suite 1100, San Francisco, CA 94111-4561; NMLS ID#76988. Colorado Mortgage Company Registration #76988. Regulated by the Division of Real Estate. NMLS consumer access: www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org BEKG-170807-2.0 October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

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970-987-5216 // www.jamierothlaw.com 38

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

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Loan approval is subject to credit approval and program guidelines. Not all loan programs are available in all states for all loan amounts. Interest rates and program EQUAL HOUSING terms are subject to change without notice.Visit usbank.com to learn more about U.S. Bank products and services. Mortgage, Home Equity and Credit products are offered by U.S. Bank National Association. Deposit products are offered by U.S. Bank National Association. Member FDIC. ©2017 U.S. Bank 160035 7/17

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Carbondale, CO 970.963.9195 Cabinetry Designed to Fit Your Personality.... Customized to Fit Your Needs

Making Your Dreams a Reality Fall is just around the corner, it’s true... However, it’s never to late or too early start that kitchen and /or bath project you have been putting off. Whether this is a new construction or you’re remodeling, I will be there from concept to the completion. With over 30 years experience in the building industry working with homeowners and contractors, I know just where to start. I have many beautiful high quality lines to choose from, so selections and options are never a problem here.

I would also like to introduce and welcome my newest addition: DEWILS FINE CABINETRY

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39


Open House

PRINCE CREEK PERFECTION SOPRIS VIEWS AND SPACIOUS VALLEY LIVING

R

egal Mt. Sopris is the crown jewel of the Roaring Fork Valley, and in this extraordinary home tucked away near Carbondale you can take in magnificent views of the mountain from just about any angle on the property—and with more than 29 acres of land to call your own, there are plenty of angles to enjoy. This high country haven includes a freshly remodeled one-level main home, an eight-stall barn with feed and tack rooms, and a four-bedroom second home. The main house is a lovely ranch home updated to suit modern tastes and features an open floor plan, five bedrooms, four baths, and 4,402 square feet of space to stretch out in. Recent updates have transformed the property into a treasure chest of thoughtful custom touches including a gorgeous stone fireplace in the living room, hardwood floors, new windows, fabulous kitchen finishings, a private patio adjoining the master suite, and much more. All that’s needed is your own design aesthetic to round out the interior with furnishings, and this comfortable home with its incredible Sopris views will do the rest. Outside, take in the fresh air from your wooden deck or stone patio with its cupola, fire pit, and relaxing hot tub. Stroll the grounds and enjoy specially planned gardens that provide season-long color,

ARTICLE BRIDGET GREY PHOTOGRAPHY MOUNTAIN HOME PHOTO

40

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017


pick ingredients for supper from the vegetable gardens, or head over to the darling country horse barn to saddle up and trot around the property’s riding arena. Although these features might make this fabulous mountain escape feel secluded, the convenience of town is only a few minutes away. Dine, shop, and play in nearby colorful Carbondale as often as you wish. If you’ve dreamt of living the classic Colorado horse ranch life but still desire the comforts of a modern home, this property fits the bill. Contact listing agents Sherry Rubin or Jack Pretti of Coldwell Banker Mason Morse Real Estate, or visit MasonMorse.com. Sherry can be reached at 970.704.3216, and Jack at 970.704.3221.

October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

41


Renovate & Refine

FALL: HOME Renovation SEASON TOM ROACH HARDWOOD FLOORS OFFERS TIPS ON CHOOSING AND MAINTAINING BEAUTIFUL FLOORING ARTICLE CAITLIN CAUSEY

N

ow that fall has officially arrived, are you dreaming of that home renovation project you put off all summer? Jacob Koski of Tom Roach Hardwood Floors in Carbondale says fall is the perfect season to check a big house project off your list—especially before the holidays. Roaring Fork Lifestyle recently sat down with him to learn more about the ins and outs of his professional specialty, hardwood flooring. Roaring Fork Lifestyle: What’s the most popular type of hardwood flooring in the valley? Koski: Right now the trend seems to be pre-finished, wide plank European white oak. We also install a lot of reclaimed floors salvaged from old barns and similar structures, milled into tongue and groove flooring and installed normally. We have partnered with Distinguished Boards and Beams in Carbondale for this product. Other popular options include American red and white oak, maple, and hickory. Some people love the old solid wood floors and others go the engineered route, which is a veneer of wood on a plywood core. We love solid wood floors. Roaring Fork Lifestyle: How does the local climate affect hardwood floors? Koski: Colorado is very dry. Wood floors do best with approximate humidity of 35 to 50 percent and we simply don't get that high naturally. Low humidity can cause cracking in wood floors, and seasonal humidity changes cause expansion and contraction. This means wood floors can develop small gaps at the seams in the winter that usually tighten up in the summer. We try very hard to combat this by acclimating the wood properly in the house before installing it, and we also guide people through proper care of their floors. We can also help people with humidification systems for long-term care of the wood. Roaring Fork Lifestyle: How long should hardwoods last? Koski: That depends on the quality of the product installed. We like to assist people in choosing a floor that, with proper maintenance and care, can last indefinitely. That may sound like a tall order but let me explain: A floor’s first defense against damage and wear is its finish coat of sealer. If we rejuvenate this sealer periodically, a floor can last a very long time. Of course deeper scratches, dings, and water damage are a reality that may shorten a floor’s lifespan, but a properly maintained solid wood floor can last a hundred years or more. Roaring Fork Lifestyle: Do you have some advice on caring for floors? Koski: Simply dilute white vinegar in water at a ratio of 1:10. Then spray the floors sparingly and wipe up with a cloth. Alternatively, we highly recommend the Bona brand cleaners and microfiber mop. The key is to not use too much water; NEVER wet mop a wood floor. Also, don’t use any type of wax or "wood floor polish" like Murphy's Oil. While these products may give a floor a shiny look, they cause many problems.

42

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017


NEW & REMODELS

The wax in them builds up, causing the floor to become slippery and preventing any new coats of finish from bonding to the existing finish. This means the floor can not be recoated or refinished like we discussed earlier without completely resanding it! This drastically shortens the lifespan of the floor. Roaring Fork Lifestyle: What is your business story? Koski: Tom Roach Flooring started in 1993. It is currently owned by my brother Steven Koski, and I run the day-to-day operations. Although Tom is no longer directly involved in the company (we bought him out many years ago) we maintain his legacy of solid, friendly service at reasonable prices. Many people remember how well he treated them 20 years ago and we are proud to continue in the same way. Roaring Fork Lifestyle: What is your customer service philosophy? Koski: We believe that good communication is key. We try to start a relationship with quick initial call-backs and honest, easy answers to questions. Most people don't understand every step of the process so we try very hard to help them with complete information regarding timing, cost, maintenance, and other concerns. We have many happy customers in the valley and this is partly because we would prefer to go the extra mile—possibly costing us a bit more in labor or materials—than to cut corners. That said, sometimes mistakes are made; when this happens our policy is to respond immediately, stay calm, stay on the same team, and attack the problem. We fix our mistakes and come back if something isn't living up the customer’s expectations.

BEFORE & AFTER 3G Construction, LLc is locally owned & has over 30 yrs experience. We offer a wide variety of home improvement & general contracting services and ensure exceptional craftsmanship & customer service for all of your residential, commercial & agricultural needs. Dedicated to serving you with excellence and helping your dreams become reality.

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CALL TODAY FOR A FREE GARAGE CONSULTATION 970.989. 2225 www.spacethis.com randy@spacethis.com

October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

43


Lifestyle Calendar

October OCTOBER 1-31

OCTOBER 7 GET YOUR MANUSCRIPT READY FOR THE WORLD THIRD STREET CENTER Aspen Words hosts guest instructor and Colorado Book Award finalist Tiffany Quay Tyson for a morning workshop to help local writers refine their work. Participants are asked to bring almost-there manuscripts and a willingness to look at their work with a fresh and

PUMPKIN PICKING

critical gaze. Cost is $75. Call 970.925.3122 or visit AspenWords.org for

OSAGE GARDENS

details and registration info.

Bring the family to Osage Gardens in New Castle during the month of October for pumpkin-picking fun! Organic pumpkins of all shapes and sizes

OCTOBER 7

will be available: pumpkins for carving or pies, white Cinderella pumpkins,

POTATO DAY PARADE & CELEBRATION

gourds, and more. Kids can also enjoy the straw bale maze or climb the

DOWNTOWN CARBONDALE

straw bale mountain. Visit OsageGardens.com for more information.

Carbondale's longest-standing annual community event returns!

OCTOBER 3-8 39TH ANNUAL ASPEN FILMFEST WHEELER OPERA HOUSE

Come for a festive parade along Main Street before heading to Sopris Park for BBQ, coffee, vendors, potato sack races, and more fun activities for the whole family. A tradition since 1909. See Carbondale.com. 

Aspen Film’s flagship event is a non-competitive festival showcasing

OCTOBER 7

narrative and documentary features, a dynamic mix of award-worthy fall

ART HEIST & SPEAKEASY

previews, and acclaimed independent films from the international festival

THE LAUNCHPAD AND BATCH

circuit. Visit AspenFilm.org for complete details and ticket information.

The Launchpad's annual fundraiser will no doubt be a thrilling evening of

WEEKENDS IN OCTOBER

high jinks and thievery all in the name of love for this space for the arts. In addition to a "heist," guests will enjoy cocktails, hors d'oeuvres, alluring

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS

entertainment, a speakeasy at Batch and a touch of '40s glamour. Tickets

GLENWOOD VAUDEVILLE REVUE

are $35-$110 and available at LaunchpadCarbondale.com. 

"Feed me, Seymour!" Little Shop of Horrors continues this month at the Glenwood Vaudeville Revue. Rated PG-13. Every Friday, Saturday, and

OCTOBER 11

Sunday in October (except Bronco Sundays). Admission is $30, doors

RIVER BRIDGE PRESENTS MARILYN VAN DERBUR

open at 6:30 p.m. for dinner and drinks with the show beginning at 7:30

TIMBERHEARTH AT CORDILLERA

p.m. For reservations call 970.945.9699 or visit GVRShow.com. 

Glenwood's River Bridge Regional Center presents speaker and child-

OCTOBER 6-8 & 12-14

hood incest survivor Marilyn Van Derbur. The evening includes her inspirational presentation, book signing, dinner, and a cash bar. All

DEAD MAN'S CELL PHONE

proceeds benefit local child sexual assault survivors. Tickets are $75.

THUNDER RIVER THEATRE

Visit RiverBridgeRC.org to purchase, or call 970.945.5195 for details.

Thunder River Theatre's production of Sarah Ruhl's surrealist romantic comedy Dead Man's Cell Phone, directed by Corey Simpson, con-

OCTOBER 13-28 (FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS)

tinues this month in Carbondale. All performances are at 7:30 p.m.

18TH ANNUAL GHOST WALK

except the matinee on October 8, which begins at 2 p.m. Tickets and

LINWOOD CEMETERY

information are available at ThunderRiverTheatre.com. 

Join the Glenwood Springs Historical Society for another year of

OCTOBER 7

ghostly tales in the town's pioneer cemetery! Meet Doc Holliday, Kid Curry, and others. Tours depart at 7 p.m., 7:45 p.m., and 8:30 p.m. on

WESTERN SLOPE RODEO ROYALTY CLINIC

the last three Fridays and Saturdays of the month. Tickets: $20/adult,

GRAND VALLEY RECREATION CENTER

$18/senior, $12/members. To reserve, call 970.945.4448 or purchase

This affordable rodeo royalty clinic is hosted by Miss Rodeo Colorado

in person at the Frontier Museum.

2018 Lady-in-Waiting, Alex Hyland. Open to all current and/or aspiring rodeo royalty. Learn etiquette, interview skills, social media, speaking,

OCTOBER 13

and more. Lunch provided. Cost: $45/participant, $35/parents and coor-

LISA CAPLAN: OPENING RECEPTION

dinators. Contact organizer Lyndsay Jo Smith at 970.222.7231, email po-

THE ART BASE

lochic17@hotmail.com or visit WesternSlopeRodeoRoyalty.com for

Come to the Art Base in Basalt for the opening reception for this

more information. Pre-registration is required.

site-specific installation. With Lisa’s interest in planetary healing, CONTINUED >

44

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017


Quality Equipment Quality Service

REBATES ON HIGH EFFICIENCY AIR CONDITIONING MAY BE AVAILABLE.

ASK US!

6560 COUNTY ROAD 335 NEW CASTLE, COLORADO 81601 I (970) 984-0579 I AJAXMECHANICAL.COM

October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

45


Lifestyle Calendar

(CON TI N U ED)

watershed conservation, and art, this installation will be exciting to

stern Are Dead. Performances are held in the New Space Theatre

see unfold! LisaCaplan.com

at the Spring Valley Campus at 7 p.m. on October 20-21 and 2628, and at 2 p.m. on October 22 and 29. Adult tickets are $18, stu-

OCTOBER 14

dents/seniors are $13. Call 970.947.8177 or email svticketsales@

HARVEST PARTY

coloradomtn.edu to reserve.

ROCK BOTTOM RANCH Join ACES to celebrate fall at the 16th annual Harvest Party! This fam-

OCTOBER 26-28

ily-friendly event features BBQ lunch, live music, pumpkin carving, ap-

MUSICAL COMEDY MURDERS OF 1940

ple cider pressing, hay rides, farm tours, face painting, traditional ranch

THIRD STREET CENTER

games, and more. Day-of admission is $20/adults and $10/kids, but

Carbondale's SoL Theatre Company is proud to present John Bish-

discounted tickets are available beforehand at AspenNature.org.

op's wickedly hilarious Musical Comedy Murders of 1940  just in time for Halloween! The audience will be treated to a side-split-

OCTOBER 14

tingly good time and a generous serving of the author's refresh-

FIESTA DE TAMALES

ingly irreverent wit. Shows begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are available

EAGLE CREST NURSERY

at SoLTheatreCompany.org or at the door. 

English in Action’s annual fundraiser puts the people it serves in the spotlight. The Fiesta, held from 5-8 p.m., includes a performance by

OCTOBER 28

Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s Folklórico dancers, Mexican folk singers,

GLENWOOD ROTARY MASQUERADE BALL

piñatas, dancing, a prize drawing and more than 1,200 homemade

HOTEL COLORADO

tamales and pupusas. Visit EnglishInAction.org for further details.

The Glenwood Springs Noon Rotary Club hosts its Third Annual Masquerade Ball, featuring live swing music from Symphony of the Valley,

OCTOBER 20-29

dancing, food, cash bar, live and silent auctions, and an evening of fun

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD

at the majestic Hotel Colorado! Proceeds benefit the club's scholar-

NEW SPACE THEATRE

ships, grants, and community projects. Dress up, or come as you are!

Colorado Mountain College's Sopris Theatre Company presents

Tickets at GSRotary.org.

Tom Stoppard's inventive masterpiece Rosencrantz and Guilden-

y o u! k n a Th

970-963-2371 alpinehospital.com 17776 Hwy 82 Carbondale, CO 81623

46

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

Alpine Animal Staff is honored to be nominated by members of the community as “Best Veterinarian” in RFLM 2017 Readers’ Choice Awards. Our sincere gratitude goes out to the community, the magazine and to all of the PEOPLE AND PETS who support us. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you.


Think outside the Big Box. Think of BIG JOHN’S ACE HARDWARE, "Where we remember you by name."

Thanks for nominating us as the BEST HARDWARE STORE in the Roaring Fork Valley.

2602 South Glen Ave. | Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 | (970) 945-5345

L O C A L O W N E R / L O C A L S TA F F / L O C A L P R I D E

Experience the warmth and beauty of Ortal gas fireplaces at trueNorth hearth & home, the Roaring Fork Valley’s favored provider of high-quality fireplaces and best-in-class start-to-finish project support.

970-230-9363

www.TrueNorthFireplaces.com 120 Midland Ave, Suite 210 Glenwood Springs

October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

47


business directory AUTOMOTIVE Phil Long Honda (970) 404-3600 phillonghonda.com

BANKING

US Bank/ XMedia (646) 779-4852

DENTISTS & ORTHODONTICS

Murray Dental Group (970) 945-5112 murraydg.com Verheul Family Dentistry P.C. (970) 963-3010 verheulfamilydentistry.com  

FASHION & ACCESSORIES

Country Rose Boutique (970) 319-8894

HEALTH & WELLNESS Contour Body Spa (970) 355-4897 contourbodyspa.com/ Simply Massage (970) 306-0098 simplymassage.com  

HOME BUILDERS & REMODELERS

3 G Construction (970) 984-7046 Ace Roofing & Sheetmetal (970) 945-5366 aceroof.co  

HOME SERVICES

SkyLine Solar (970) 379-9502 skylinesolarpower.com Tom Roach Hardwood Floors (970) 274-0944 tomroachfloors.com   48

LEGAL

Balcomb & Green P.C. (970) 945-6546 balcombgreen.com Law Office of Jamie J. Roth (970) 987-5216 jamierothlaw.com   The Noone Law Firm PC (970) 945-4500 noonelaw.com  

MEDICAL CLINICS & FACILITIES

Glenwood Medical Associates (970) 945-8503 glenwoodmedical.com Mountain Family Health Centers (970) 945-2840 mountainfamily.org  

MORTGAGE

Bay Equity Home Loans (970) 330-5010 bayequityhomeloans.com/ glenwood-springs

OTHER

Ajax Mechanical Services (970) 984-0579 ajaxmechanical.com AV by Design (970) 945-6610 avbydesignllc.com   Big John's Ace Hardware (970) 945-5345   Delta Disaster Services (970) 712-5298 deltawesterncolorado.com   Elite Hardwood Floors (970) 366-1676   Gran Farnum Printing (970) 945-9605 printing4you.com  

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

Hurricane Relief Ad (970) 618-8981 Midland Shoe (970) 927-0902 midlandshoe.com   Network Interiors (970) 984-9100   Nieslanik Beef, LLC (970) 963-1644 nieslanikbeef.com   Osage Gardens. Inc. (970) 876-0668 osagegardens.com   pjmarketing97@gmail.com (970) 948-6226   Roaring Fork Valley COOP (970) 963-2220   Space This (970) 319-4335 spacethis.com   Spring Creek Land & Waterscapes (970) 963-9195 springcreeklandand waterscapes.com   Testimonial Ad (970) 618-8981 roaringforklifestyle.com   The Fireplace Company (970) 963-3598 thefpco.com   The Glass Guru (970) 456-6832 theglassguruof glenwoodsprings.com   True North Hearth & Home (970) 230-9363 truenorthfireplaces.com  

West Canyon Tree Farm (970) 305-7556 westcanyontreefarm.com

PET CARE

Alpine Animal Hospital (970) 963-2371 alpinehospital.com Carbondale Animal Hospital (970) 963-2826   Red Hill Animal Health Center (970) 704-0403 redhillvet.com  

REAL ESTATE

Coldwell Banker Mason Morse Real Estate (970) 963-3300 masonmorse.com INTEGRATED MOUNTAIN GROUP (970) 945-7653 integratedmountaingroup.com   RAD Development Glenwood, LLC (970) 366-6000   Roaring Fork Engel & Völkers (970) 927-9955 roaringfork.evusa.com  

SENIOR LIVING & SERVICES

Heritage Park- Life Care Center (970) 963-1500 heritageparkcarecenterco.com


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October 2017 | Roaring Fork Lifestyle

49


Parting Thoughts

Dusty Soccer Cleats and Life Lessons

S

ometimes, the full impact of a life lesson is not fully understood until many years later. For a group of local women aged 30-something, this became evident a few months ago when some unexpected news spread quickly. "How can it be?" we thought. "He’s healthy. He’s invincible. Cancer? No way. Not Coach Tom Sullivan." After the initial shock of the news set in, the former Glenwood Springs Purple Pride women’s soccer teams knew we needed to band together to support Tom and his family. Coach Tom provided hope for us when there was seemingly none. He always knew what to say, and his famous half-time speeches were the spark that set much-needed motivation ablaze. Imagine this: Purple Pride is down 3-0 in the first half, and our players slowly walk off the field exhausted, battered, and sweaty. Our eyes gaze down at the grass as we prepare for what is sure to be a loss. After all, Purple Pride is just a team from a small Western Slope town playing against a team from the big Front Range. The team gathers in a circle on the side of the field with our coaches Scott Fifer and Tom Sullivan. These two gentlemen are not only saints for working with 18 teenage girls, but they balance each other perfectly. Scott explains his well-planned strategy for success, and then Tom begins to work his magic half of the formula. Tom tells us about pride, about holding our heads up no matter what lies ahead. He reminds us that we work hard, we play as a team, and that we don’t give up. He fills us with hope that transcends rational thought. He sees everything that is positive. We believe in ourselves because he believes in us. Watching from the sidelines, one might have guessed that someone waved a magic wand inside the circle to shift the team’s attitude so significantly. Returning to the field, we are sprinting, jumping up and down, giving each other high fives and smiling. We are energized and ready to take on the second half of the game. For the next 45 minutes, we vow to leave everything we have on the field. Tom Sullivan’s motivational elixir is just what we needed.   Fast forward to June 10 of this year, when Purple Pride players dusted off our old cleats and took to 50

Roaring Fork Lifestyle | October 2017

the field once more. This wasn’t just any game of soccer; it was our turn to be an uplifting presence, to share our love and hope for Tom the way he had done so many times for us. Although some 20 years had passed since the team last played together, it appeared that nothing had changed except the new generation of kids spectating from the sidelines. This scrimmage and reunion was the team’s version of a pep talk for Tom. To say that Tom has had a positive impact on this community is an understatement. Tom began his soccer coaching career in Glenwood Springs in the 1980s. He was instrumental in the creation of the women’s soccer program at Glenwood Springs High School and coached Glenwood’s premier women’s U-16 through U-18 Purple Pride soccer team in the 1990s. More recently, Tom coached and participated with the Defiance Rugby Club. He has voluntarily mentored and trained several athletes during the offseason. Prior to coaching, Tom was also a standout football player himself in high school and at Ohio State University. When the request was made for support letters to rename the soccer/rugby field at Glenwood Park in Tom’s honor, letters representing 60 people came flooding through the door. Not only did Tom play a role in the creation of the field, but he lived adjacent to it for over 35 years. Appropriately referred to as the “keeper” of the field at Glenwood Park, Tom spent countless volunteer hours coaching and mentoring young men and women at that very place. Now it is named Sullivan Field at Glenwood Park, and an official dedication of this beloved space is forthcoming. On behalf of my teammates, thank you, Tom, for the valuable lessons you taught us. Little did we know that those lessons learned on a soccer field would be so important two decades later. Just like the half-time circle, this community surrounds Tom, his wife Mary Ann, his son Jeff, his daughter Emily, and his grandchildren at a time when they need us most.

A MEMBER OF GLENWOOD'S PURPLE PRIDE RECALLS THE 'MOTIVATIONAL ELIXIR' OF COACH TOM SULLIVAN ARTICLE ANGIE ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY MARC SCHUMAN A YouCaring site has been established at YouCaring.com/ TheSullivanFamily-805132.

nt as s p e llivan h al figure u S m To tion C o ach inspira s as an en's soccer. e d a c de l wom in loca


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$1,485,000 $1,400,000 $1,195,000 $1,195,000 $935,000 $1,095,000 $1,199,000 $850,000 $730,000 $649,000 $724,900 $675,000

$1,350,000 $1,265,000 $1,045,000 $985,000 $925,000 $925,000 $900,000 $850,000 $698,000 $649,000 $625,600 $620,000

GLENWOOD SPRINGS 4 Mile Ranch Cardiff Bridge

$865,000 $625,000

MISSOURI HEIGHTS Stirling Ranch Aspen Mountain View Panorama Ranch Mountain Meadoe

$1,565,000 $899,000 $890,000 $735,000

DAYS ON MARKET

BEDS

FULL BTH

HALF BTH

SOLD PRICE/ SQ. FT

143 63 100 39 75 83 477 899

3 3 5 4 3 4 3 3

3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3

1 2 1 0 1 0 1 1

1155.46 435.96 376.76 418.5 301.54 239.58 289.92 289.99

91% 90% 87% 82% 99% 84% 75% 100% 96% 100% 86% 92%

65 149 127 315 82 169 1542 77 80 54 324 123

4 6 5 5 5 5 7 3 4 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 2 2 2 3

1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1

394.62 235.79 217.44 185.12 202.81 226.49 189.71 281.27 291.32 283.04 281.55 281.95

$830,000 $610,000

96% 98%

79 28

5 3

6 2

0 1

154.1 241.01

$1,485,000 $815,000 $800,000 $705,500

95% 91% 90% 96%

102 335 287 51

4 4 3 4

3 3 3 2

1 0 1 0

368.53 291.18 283.89 284.36

(This data is a sampling of sold properties from 8/1/17 to 8/31/17, Source: Aspen Glenwood MLS)

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Roaring Fork October 2017  

October 2017 Issue of Roaring Fork Lifestyle

Roaring Fork October 2017  

October 2017 Issue of Roaring Fork Lifestyle