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Roanoke RoanokeLifestyle.com

NOVEMBER 2017

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Laying Out the Perfect Living Room Essential Pieces and Where to Put Them

Pillows &Throws:

Give your living room a design flair while making it cozier with throws and pillows that complement your design and encourage guests to make themselves at home.

Seating:

A loveseat or couch and a couple of armchairs arranged in a circle creates a social atmosphere that spurs conversation, whereas seating arranged in a semicircle around a television puts the focus on entertainment

Rugs:

These aren’t necessary if your living room is carpeted, but if you have a hardwood or tiled floor, rugs can make the room look and feel more welcoming.


making you happy TANGLEWOOD 4235 Electric Road, SW VALLEY VIEW 1945 Valley View Blvd. www.grandhomefurnishings.com

Tables:

Having a coffee table in the middle of the room is more formal and provides a surface for people’s food and drinks. For a more laid back atmosphere, consider using end tables rather than a large centerpiece.

Lighting:

Comfort is the key in the living room, so opt for soft overhead lighting or lamps with dark shades. Lamps present the perfect opportunity to stylize the room, so look for fixtures that enhance the ambiance you want to establish.


Lifestyle Letter

In Their Shoes

S

ometime in 1607, Christopher Jones and several business partners purchased the ship Mayflower. It was purchased to make several voyages to France, Spain and Germany to pick up cargo: fish, lumber, tar, wine from France and more. The Mayflower could freight up to 180 tons of cargo. Many voyages to other countries, in turn, proved the ship’s stability; by May 1620, Jones and his crew were hired to take the pilgrims to Northern Virginia. This was the first trans-Atlantic voyage for the Mayflower and its captain, Jones, with the experience of John Clarke and Robert Coppin who had been to the New World on previous voyages. The Speedwell was to accompany the voyage to America but proved to be too leaky. The Mayflower set sail alone on September 6, 1620, and was at sea for 66 days arriving on November 9, 1620. Below is a list of passengers who boarded the Mayflower, setting sail to the unknown. I can’t imagine their thoughts, their fears and their excitement. Imagine 410 years ago walking in their shoes.  Isaac and Mary (Norris) Allerton and children Bartholomew, Remember and Mary

 Edmund Margesson  Christopher and Mary (Prower) Martin  Ellen, Jasper, Richard and Mary More

 William and Mary Brewster and children Love

 William and Alice Mullins and children Priscilla and Joseph

 Richard Britteridge

 Degory Priest

 Peter Browne

 Solomon Prower

 William Butten

 John and Alice Rigsdale

 Robert Carter

 Thomas Rogers and son Joseph

 John and Katherine (White) Carver

 Henry Samson

 James and Mrs. Chilton and daughter Mary

 George Soule  Myles and Rose Standish  Elias Story

 Humility Cooper

 Edward Thompson

 John Crackstone and son John

 Edward and Agnes (Cooper) Tilley

 Edward Doty

 John and Joan (Hurst) Tilley

 William Trevore

 Edward and Mrs. Fuller and son Samuel

 John Turner and two sons

 Samuel Fuller

 Richard Warren

| Matthew Perry

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

OPERATIONS DIRECTOR

| DeLand Shore | Brad Broockerd

| Sara Minor | Janeane Thompson | Nicolette Martin

| Victoria Perry, Lindsey Howard

AD MANAGER AD COORDINATORS

and daughter Elizabeth

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PUBLISHER SUPPORT

| Melanie Carlisle

EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTANT

 Richard Gardiner

 William and Susanna White and son

 John Goodman

Resolved; son Peregrine was born shipboard in

 William Holbeck

Provincetown Harbor after arrival

 John Hooke

 Roger Wilder

APPLICATION ARCHITECT WEB DEVELOPERS

| Randa Makeen

| Michael O’Connell

| Hanna Park, Scott Lavigne

 Thomas Williams

dren Constance, Giles and Damaris; son Oceanus was

 Edward and Elizabeth (Barker) Winslow

born during the voyage

 Gilbert Winslow

 John Howland

 "Mr. Ely"

 John Langmore

 Dorothy, John Carver's maidservant

Happy November!

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Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017

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ART DIRECTOR

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Stephanie Scordas, Publisher

Nicolette Martin, Anne Piedmont, Sarah Wolcott

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

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 Stephen and Elizabeth (Fisher) Hopkins and chil-

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

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EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Victoria Perry | Tori.Perry@LifestylePubs.com

 Edward Leister

 John and Eleanor Billington and sons John

and Wrestling

PUBLISHER

Stephanie Scordas | Stephanie.Scordas@LifestylePubs.com

 William Latham

 John Allerton and Francis

NOVEMBER 2017

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Proverbs 3:5-6 Roanoke Lifestyle™ is published monthly by Lifestyle Publications LLC. It is distributed via the US Postal Service to some of Roanoke’s most affluent neighborhoods. Articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect Lifestyle Publications’ opinions. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Lifestyle Publications does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Information in Roanoke Lifestyle™ is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed.


November 2017

Departments

14

10

Artist’s Palette

14

Travel Destination

18

Food & Wine

21 DIY 22

Hops & Vine

24

Renovate & Refine

28

Culinary Creations

30

Healthy Lifestyle

32

Driver’s Notebook

34

Local’s Choice

10 Local Artist Annie Waldrop

Painter Currently Working on "Gestation Series"

14 Oregon’s Sea Sentinels

One More Reason to Visit the Oregon Coast

21 Ale-8-One

Enjoy Cocktails with the 91-year-old Southern Craft Soda

34 The Virginia Room

The Place to Find the Information You're Looking For

10

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Lifestyle Publications Alabama | Arizona | California | Colorado | Florida | Georgia | Idaho | Illinois | Kansas | Maryland | Michigan | Minnesota | Missouri Montana | Nevada | North Carolina | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | South Carolina | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Virginia | Washington

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Artist’s Palette

LOCAL ARTIST Annie Waldrop PAINTER CURRENTLY WORKING ON "GESTATION SERIES" ARTICLE ANNE PIEDMONT

A

nnie Waldrop’s goal is to live an art-

Annie went to the Parsons School of Design

ful life. She sees art in cooking, gar-

in New York City to study graphic arts but was

dening and the furniture and accessories

not inspired. A teacher told her to do what she

that surround her.

loved, which at the time was fashion.

The Roanoke native traces her career back to a “scribble” she did when she was

10

"The 1980s were a good time to be in New York City,” she says.

3 years old. Her aunt saw it and proclaimed

She designed hats that became so well-

to her mother: “Margaret, your daughter is

known she appeared twice on national TV—

an artist.” Annie says other “symptoms”

on "The John Davidson Show" and the "The

of her artistic nature were evident in ele-

Tomorrow Show" hosted by Tom Snyder.

mentary school. One of her paintings was

She said she was supposed to be on Johnny

always up in the hall at Crystal Spring

Carson, but remembers that “Angie Dickenson

Elementary School in South Roanoke, or

talked too long.” Her hats were sold in Macy’s,

she was decorating the Christmas doors.

Bloomingdale’s and Henri Bendel.

When she was at James Madison Middle

During that time, she says, she hung

School, her mother bought her a camel hair

out with fine artists and spent a lot of time

coat, but Annie wanted a “more progressive

in museums. Eventually, she realized she

coat," so she embroidered “I hate this coat”

wanted a “deeper mode of expression.”

on the back of it as a protest and wore it for

So she moved back to the South where

a year. Her mother eventually caved in and

she taught and earned a master ’s degree

bought the coat she wanted, she recalls.

at the Maryland Institute College of Art.

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


Annie Waldrop CONTINUED >

November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

11


Artist’s Palette

(CON TI N U ED)

One of Annie Waldrop's "Gestation Series" paintings.

Seedpod sculpture

12

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


“I have had a lot of time in art school, A landscape of Douthat State Park.

which for me was fabulous,” she says. She returned to Roanoke in 2009 to “complete what I started in New York City 40 years ago—to be the artist I want to be," she says. Annie is a painter—exclusively in oils—but she also does sculpture and creates other artful accessories. A visit to her home is like a trip to an art gallery. Not only are there paintings on the walls and sculptures on many surfaces but the furniture, and even a few appliances, have been customized by her. Currently, she’s working on the 26-painting “Gestation Series.” Each painting is assigned a letter: C is for Clutch, R is for Roux, T is for Transformation and so on. The series reflects, she says, her place as a “late mid-career artist. Where I’ve been and the integration of the different facets of what I’ve done.” The paintings draw on her interest in Buddhism and Buddhist philosophy, as well as the study of the feminine from graduate school. There’s even a bit of the typographic background she learned at Parsons. Add in “an encyclopedic esthetic because I want them to feel like school,” she says. “Life is for learning.” The series celebrates “birth, creation, inheritance and existentialism,” she says. “ The

stream-of-consciousness

aspect

in the layering quality of the paintings evokes the beat poets like Jack Kerouac and Alan Ginsburg." Several of the paintings were on view at The Artful Lawyer in Blacksburg earlier this year, and a larger show is planned for February at the Alexander Heath Gallery in Roanoke. Included in the Blacksburg show was a series of rubber seedpod sculptures. Annie created them based on close-up photos of actual seed pods. They complement the gestation theme. Annie also enjoys painting landscapes and is always on the lookout for undiscovered vistas. When she moved back to Virginia, she concentrated on landscapes but says she moved away from them in graduate school. Her landscapes are characterized by heightened colors and are reminiscent of the Fauvist movement of the early part of the last century.

November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

13


Travel Destination

One More Reason to Visit the Oregon Coast

OREGON’S SEA SENTINELS ARTICLE SARAH WOLCOTT | PHOTOGRAPHY STEVE GIARDINI

T

he simple joy of taking a morning walk on a sandy beach is reason enough for me to hop in the car and head to the Oregon Coast. For those who require a more structured reason to visit Oregon’s bountiful coastline, consider taking a trip to see Oregon’s original lighthouses. These coastal workhorses—still providing light and safety to sea travelers today—are historical treasures not to be missed and offer up the perfect excuse to get away for the weekend.

Heceta Head Lighthouse 14

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


HECETA HEAD LIGHTHOUSE There are 11 lighthouses lining Oregon’s coastline, seven of which are open to the public. Heceta Head Lighthouse, pronounced “He-see-tah,” is named after Portuguese explorer Don Bruno Heceta—sailing for the Royal Spanish Navy—who is credited with exploring much of the Pacific Northwest coastline. Today, Heceta Head Lighthouse—sandwiched between Yachats and Florence—is one of the most visited lighthouses along the Pacific coast. Open to the public seven days a week, Heceta Head Lighthouse offers daily tours and the grounds include a seven mile hiking trail system. For visitors keen on an out-of-this-world lighthouse experience, the Heceta Lighthouse Bed & Breakfast offers 15 rooms set in the historic assistant lighthouse keeper’s house. “The lighthouse shines 21 miles out to sea,” says Inn Manager Misty Anderson. “(Stay for) the famous seven course breakfast of food sourced from local Oregon artisans and the ocean views during the nightly wine socials.”

UMPQUA RIVER LIGHTHOUSE The Umpqua River Lighthouse, a “sea sentinel” guarding the convergence of the Umpqua River with the mighty Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay, was the first lighthouse built in the Oregon Territory. Commissioned in 1857, the original lighthouse suffered a number of hardships, including massive winter flooding damage from the thundering waters of the Umpqua River, that required a rebuild. Resurrected in 1894, the present-day Umpqua River Lighthouse towers over the sometimes treacherous entrance to Winchester Bay. The Umpqua River Lighthouse’s signature light—each lighthouse has one—operates with a French “1st Order Fresnel Lens” that emits a red glow, followed by two white flashes. The lighthouse is one of only two containing a Fresnel Lens that visitors can climb into and experience first hand.  The Umpqua River Lighthouse—a two hour drive from Eugene—offers daily lighthouse tours for a nominal fee, as well as the occasional nighttime tour. The Lighthouse Museum, a “lovingly restored Coast Guard barracks,” offers historical disCONTINUED > plays and memorabilia and is open seasonally.

Devil's Churn

Umpqua River Lighthouse

These coastal workhorses—still providing light and safety to sea travelers today—are historical treasures not to be missed and offer up the perfect excuse to get away for the weekend.

November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

15


SEA SENTINELS (CON TI N U ED)

Yaquina Head Lighthouse

YAQUINA HEAD LIGHTHOUSE The Yaquina Head Lighthouse, Oregon’s tallest lighthouse with a 93-foot tall perch above the Pacific Ocean, encapsulates Oregon’s pioneer spirit. At the time of its construction in the 1870’s, there were no accessible mainland roads and all materials were transported via the Pacific Ocean. Located just four miles north of Newport, the modern-day visit to Yaquina Head Lighthouse mirrors times past and can be combined with other coastal hot spots like the Oregon Coast Aquarium. Visitors may tour the Yaquina Head Lighthouse via ranger-led tours offered by the Bureau of Land Management, the operating arm of the lighthouse. Tours are offered daily during the summer and can be reserved in advance.

Yaquina Head Lighthouse

HecetaHeadLighthouse.com FriendsOfUmpquaRiverLight.weebly.com Blm.gov 16

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


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Food & Wine

ARTICLE LARRY BLY

Shining a Light on Roanoke’s Restaurant Scene RONAOKE OFFERS CULINARY DELIGHTS FOR E VERYONE he Star City of the South shines like a beacon in the

T

the distant past, only a handful of real honest-to-good-

culinary world, beckoning you to head out for another

ness trained chefs plied their trade here—usually at the

dining experience—some unique, some not so much—but

hotel or various country clubs. Now we have a plethora

each with its own attraction.

of highly trained and very inventive chefs working kitch-

What makes the list of Roanoke natives' favorite restaurants so interesting is that it’s a veritable cornucopia of

ens all over, offering an astonishing selection of fresh entrees and sides.

restaurants, featuring fare from simple to gourmet, the

So how then to explain our love of more ordinary

mundane to the exotic and also ethnic. I can recall in the

restaurants, the ones without frills or fancy fare? Well,

early '70s when we had but two Chinese restaurants. That

good food is good food, whether it’s served on a fancy

was the extent of our ethnic options, except, perhaps, a

platter or a big slab of pizza pie on a paper plate.

few Italian places. In the last few decades, our fair city has

Sometimes the experience is half the fun. Many of our

emerged as a gastronomic wonder of sorts.

favorites have withstood the test of time—exemplary

What it does show by nature of its infinite variety of

considering the rigors of the restaurant business—so

restaurants is that the cuisines of Southwest Virginia

you have to admire them. Others are just now coming

and the tastes of our readers cover a vast and ever-in-

on the scene, forging their own niche in the hopes of

creasing—and often ever sophisticated—palate. Yes,

being embraced by the public.

it’s true that we’re not just a potatoes and gravy town

Yes, a fancy meal is mighty nice sometimes, but so is

anymore. Not that there’s anything wrong with that—I

a simple breakfast or a nice steak. Years ago, the famous

grew up on a Shenandoah Valley farm where gravy was

food critic for The New York Times, Craig Claiborne, offered

considered a beverage!

this advice to me, “The dining experience is not just what’s

Our culinary landscape is still steeped in tradition (the grand Regency Room), the historical (The Coffee

on your plate.” It turns out that variety really is the spice of life!

Pot), the upscale (Frankie Rowland’s Steakhouse) and

Larry Bly has enjoyed a long career in radio, TV and advertising.

the whimsical (The Texas Tavern). People are passion-

He was co-host of the comedy cooking show, Cookin' Cheap,

ate about them for different reasons, often memorable

seen on stations all over the country. Now semi-retired, he stays

moments they savor along with the food. At some time in

busy with freelance writing, voice work and cooking at home.

18

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


HERE’S A PARTIAL LIST—IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER—OF THE PLACES WHERE ROANOKERS LOVE TO EAT. IT’S RATHER ECLECTIC AND WORTHY OF A GLANCE:

• Local Roots • Hollywood's Restaurant & Bakery • Billy's • The Regency Room • Cedars Lebanese Restaurant • Jack Brown's Beer and Burger Joint • Lucky • Scrambled • Carlos Brazilian International Cuisine • Cafe Asia • Viet Sub • Montano's International • The River and Rail • Alexander's • Wildflour Restaurant and Bakery • Blue 5 • Athens Corner Grill • Nawab Indian Cuisine • Table 50 • Cafe Asia 2  • Cuban Island • Frankie Rowland's Steakhouse • Wall Street Tavern • Fortunato • Fork in the Alley • Village Grill • Tuco's Taqueria Garaje • Lews Restaurant • City Corner 2  • The Pine Room Pub • New Yorker Delicatessen • The Green Goat • Firefly Fare • Luigi’s Italian Gourmet Restaurant • The Roanoke Wiener Stand • Texas Tavern • Brambleton Deli • Our Daily Bread Bakery & Bistro • Wasena City Tap Room & Grill  • Veranda Bistro • The Roanoker Restaurant • Leonore Restaurant • The Quarter • Benny Marconi's • Coach & Four • Beamer’s 25 • The Coffee Pot • Founder's Tavern

November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

19


Montano’s Restaurant

3733 Franklin Road, Roanoke

The Quarter For almost 50 years, Montano’s has been serving high-quality, madefrom-scratch, locally sourced food. And now we offer a gluten-free menu!

Appetizers - Peel & Eat Shrimp - Oysters (Steamed, Rockefeller, Fried, Raw) - Crab Beignets - Alligator Bites - Assortment of Salads Entrees

- Jambalaya - Gumbo - Shrimp & Grits - Bourbon Glazed Salmon -

 

Desserts - Bread Pudding - Pecan Pie -

Plus Traditional Southern Creole Food

Fresh, hand-cut steaks Sustainable, fresh seafood Hand-cut salads with homemade dressings Deli sandwiches and homemade sides Homemade desserts

We have Southwest Virginia’s largest selection of craft and imported beer. And a 108-bottle wine list! “Alligator Bites, Jambalaya, Shrimp & Grits, and other Southern Creole Favorites are only minutes away in the heart of Downtown Roanoke. Visit us today!”

- Evan Patterson CHEF

19 Salem Avenue TheQuarterRestaurant.com 540-342-2990

20

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017

Montano’s offers something for everyone: truly fine dining in a relaxed atmosphere.

O


Ale-8 DIY

Ale-8-One

One E N J O Y C O C K TA I L S W I T H THE 91-YE AR-OLD SOU THERN CR AF T SODA

M

ade in Winchester, Kentucky, Ale-8-One recently made its debut in Roanoke—and other Virginia cities—at various Kroger stores. Developed during Prohibition, the popular 91-year-

old Southern craft soda is often considered bourbon’s original mixer. Its real ginger and smooth citrus flavor profile makes it an ideal mixer for a variety of spirits—perfect for entertaining! The

company still uses a handwritten secret formula, mixed by the current CEO Fielding Rogers,

fourth-generation family owner, to achieve its signature taste. Ale-8-One is the oldest independent soda company in the United States still owned and operated by the founding family. Ale8One.com

BRACING SPRITZ

JUBIL8

Yields 1 cocktail

Yields 1 cocktail

ALE-8-ONE AND GINGER-INFUSED SIMPLE SYRUP

1 ½ cups water

2 teaspoons Ale-8 simple syrup

½ cup of Ale-8-One

INGREDIENTS

(recipe below)

½ cup sugar

1 ½ ounces Aperol

6 to 8 mint leaves

2 teaspoons minced ginger (More or less de-

Ale-8-One

Crushed ice

pending on taste.)

Orange slice

1 ½ ounces bourbon

Prosecco or Champagne, if desired

Ale-8-One

INSTRUCTIONS

1. In a small pot, add water, Ale-8-One, sugar,

INSTRUCTIONS

INSTRUCTIONS

minced ginger and place on stove burner on

1. Fill a rocks or Collins glass with ice. Add

1. Gently muddle simple syrup and mint

medium heat. Simmer gently for 5 to 10 minutes

Aperol and fill glass with Ale-8-One. Gar-

leaves in a silver julep cup. Fill cup with

until desired consistency is reached. Add more

nish with an orange slice. Add prosecco or

crushed ice. Add bourbon and fill cup with

or less water or sugar to reach your desired syr-

Champagne if a stronger cocktail is desired.

Ale-8-One. Garnish with a sprig of mint.

up consistency. Syrup should be thick, not runny.

Bracing Spritz

November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

21


Hops & Vine

HOLIDAY

WINE pairings PERFECT PALATES FROM JENNIFER INGELLIS, DIRECTOR OF PROCUREMENT AT TASTING ROOM + PAIRINGS FOR YOUR CLASSIC FAMILY HOLIDAY DISHES ARTICLE NICOLETTE MARTIN

WHITES

ROSÉS

REDS

“Rich, full-bodied whites like

“Pinot Noir, Beaujolais and lighter

“In years past, most people wouldn’t

Chardonnay, Viognier, Gewürztraminer

bodied Cabernet Franc from the Loire

think to pull out their favorite rosé to

and Rhône White Blends pair delightfully

Valley make excellent companions to

pair with Thanksgiving dinner, but

with many of the dishes found on the

the savory, herb-inflected dishes at a

it’s actually a fantastic wine to have

Thanksgiving table. For example, pump-

typical Thanksgiving feast. The ele-

handy this time of year. Fuller-bodied

kin soup or butternut squash with brown

vated acidity, as well as the nuances

rosé made with Grenache, Syrah and

butter and sage is a delicious match for a

of mushroom and dried herbs, make

Cabernet Franc are excellent matches

richly textured Chardonnay. The warmer

these wines stellar accompaniments,

for the richer foods that make their way

spices of autumn, like nutmeg, cinnamon

keeping your palate refreshed while

to the holiday table, the juicy acidity

and clove, are complementary to this

elevating the complementary notes

keeping your palate from becoming

style of wine, as many have similar notes

found in the food.”

tired and overwhelmed from all the

interwoven with toasted oak nuances.”

sumptuous dishes.”

Tasting Room is the world’s first personalized wine club. Rather than just ask you questions about the kinds of wines you prefer, Tasting Room starts by sending you a selection of fine wines in miniature bottles, then guides you through a quick, fun, interactive tasting. This allows you— and them—to discover what type of wine you love. After completing your tasting you’ll receive regular shipments of full-size bottles of wine selected to match your preferences—all at substantial savings.TastingRoom.com. 22

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


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Renovate & Refine

Color Your Style Your Home’s Palette is More About Personality than Psychology ARTICLE HOLLY COWAN

T

he meaning behind different colors and how they affect mood and behavior is an often debated topic, particularly when it

comes to decorating a home. Baylor Anne Bone and Gail C. Hancock, the award-winning design duo behind Baylor Bone Interiors, believe color choice should be based on your personality and lifestyle, not the psychology behind a particular palette. 24

CONTINUED >

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

25


Renovate & Refine (CON TI N U ED)

nd they should know, having designed hundreds of homes across the United States over the last 30 years. “Different colors truly mean different things to different people. For example, gray is supposed to be a cool and relaxing color, but for some people it’s depressing,” Bone says. “It depends on the person and their background, where they came from, their experiences, what they love and want to be around.” Hancock feels the same. “Everyone that walks in our door has a different story and perspective. That’s why we start by listening; trying to get the whole picture of your lifestyle, family and needs before we talk design.” To determine what colors to use for a design project, the duo says it’s often based on whether you’re starting from a clean slate or whether you have things you need to work around. But at the heart of it, the color you choose should be something that makes you feel good. “One of my classic questions,” Bone says, “is if you could wake up to one color every morning in your room, what would that color be?” “We also look at what colors a person loves to wear because generally whatever color you feel good in, is something you’ll feel comfortable with in your home,” Hancock says. But can you have too much color? The duo says not necessarily, however, there are things you need to take into consideration.

“A lot of floor plans now are so open," Hancock says. "You have to make sure when you’re standing in one room and seeing three others that the colors flow together, so it doesn’t seem disjointed. You don’t have to stick to one color for the walls, but they all need to work together.” 26

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017

“People used to think you pick three colors and take them through the whole house—we don’t do that," Bone adds. "And you don’t have to do that, although your painter may want you to.”


When it’s all said and done, Bone and Hancock believe the most important thing is to do what you think is beautiful.

Design Tips • Pick your fabrics first and your wall color last. Wall color should come from fabrics such as your upholstery and window cover-

As to why builders often use a neutral palette throughout, “Sometimes neutral colors are chosen simply to not make a mistake in color choice. Because with these universal colors the thought is that no one will hate it,” Bone says. “But then again, that’s why most people absolutely love the model houses— they don’t take just three colors. And that’s why they’re interesting.” When it comes to trends, Baylor Bone Interiors stays on the cutting edge “Grassy greenery is the color you’ll hear about for the next 12 months; it’s a green with a yellow tinge. Gray is starting to go out, with the trend going to more of a taupe color. Also, gold is coming back, particularly for bathroom fixtures.” However, the duo says trends are not for everybody.

ings so everything pulls together more cohesively. • Ceilings are a good way to bring in a special touch by using different textures. • If you have a neutral palette but want to bring in color, you can easily incorporate it through the use of art, pillows and accents that pull the color throughout the room. • Instead of having a number of projects going, start and finish in one area. It’s less stressful and gives you more satisfaction to see a beautiful, completed space before moving to your next project.

“It’s not always easy to just pop one of these colors into your house as is,” Hancock says. When it’s all said and done, Bone and Hancock believe the most important thing is to do what you think is beautiful. “It’s not about us or the trend; it’s about making it work for you,” Hancock says. “We give advice, we’ll do as little or as much as you want, giving the biggest impact for your budget, but it’s your home, and we want you to love it,” Bone adds. And with the style and colors that best fit you and your family, love it you will. November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

27


Culinary Creations ARTICLE GIA LUCIANO

APPLE PIE Organic All American

Filling

6-8 Granny Smith apples (depending on size) ½ cup of organic coconut sugar 2-4 tablespoons of organic unbleached flour 1 tablespoon of cinnamon 2 tablespoons of freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 tablespoons of organic butter finely chopped Peel and cut the apples into thick slices, place in a bowl and toss with lemon juice.  Add coconut sugar, organic butter, cinnamon and organic unbleached flour and mix.  You should see the apples starting to sweat and form a coating.  Let sit while you make the crust

Crust

2 ½  cups organic unbleached flour 10 tablespoons organic butter (very chilled and cut into tiny cubes) ½ cup organic all vegetable shortening 4-6 tablespoons cold water (I usually put ice cubes in a small bowl of water and let it sit) 1 pinch of organic pink salt Place flour in a food processor with cutting metal blade, add butter and shortening, slowly pulse your processor to cut up butter and shortening.  Add two tablespoon of water at a time and pulse a few more times.  After four tablespoons of water, check to see if the flour holds together.  The dough should look crumbly if it does not add two more tablespoons of water and pulse again.  I find I usually use six tablespoons, be sure that it does not get wet and sticky if it is too wet add a little flour and pulse.  Pour out dough onto a cutting board that is floured and press together to form a ball and knead the dough. Divide the dough in half and roll out each half of the dough and cut two circles that are 2 inches wider than you pie dish.  I use a 9-inch pie dish.  Grease and flour the pie dish and place the one circle on the bottom. Poke several holes with a fork.  Pour apples into the pie dish and cover with the other dough circle.  Press the edges together with a fork.  Cut several slits around the pie. Bake pie at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes.  5 minutes before it's done you can brush melted butter and sprinkle organic coconut sugar on top, pop back in the oven for remaining 5 minutes to form a glaze.

Enjoy

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Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

29


Healthy Lifestyle

WHAT’S

BREWING? DISCOVERING THE ART OF TEA

30

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


BLACK TEA

GREEN TEA

• Made from fully fermented Camellia sinen-

• Made from unfermented Camellia

sis leaves

sinensis leaves

• Retains its flavor for several years.

• Different varieties of green tea are produced

• Black tea is processed using either the or-

depending on the variety of Camellia sinensis

thodox method or CTC (crush, tear, curl). The

used, growing conditions, horticultural meth-

CTC method involves the mincing of weath-

ods and time of harvest.

ered tea leaves.

• Processing starts by soaking green tea

• Black tea is often blended with other plants

leaves in an alcohol solution.

to create different varities. Earl Grey tea is

• Higher-quality green teas are steeped at

black tea blended with bergamot oil.

cooler temperatures and for a shorter amount

• Suggested health benefits of black tea in-

of time than lower-quality green teas.

clude reducing atherosclerosis (clogged ar-

• Traditional Chinese and Indian medicines

teries), lowering the risk of heart attack and

use green tea extracts for a variety of health

cardiovascular disease and may also aid in

benefits: as a stimulant, a diuretic, an astrin-

lowering the risk for diabetes, high cholester-

gent and to improve heart health.

ol and kidney stones. SUGGESTED STEEPING TIME

SUGGESTED STEEPING TIME

3-5 minutes at 206 F

3 minutes at 180-185 F

WHITE TEA

OOLONG TEA

• There isn’t a universally-accepted definition

• Made from partially fermented leaves, buds

of what white tea is, but it is essentially young

and stems of the Camellia sinensis plant

or unprocessed tea.

• Different styles vary widely in flavor—flavors

• Produces very pale green or yellow-

range from sweet and fruit to woody to green

colored liquor.

and fresh.

• No processing occurs—white tea is general-

• The process involves withering the plant

ly just plucked and allowed to wither dry.

under the sun and allowing it to oxidize.

• There are different classifications of white

• Leaves are formed into two distinct styles:

tea including Bai Hao Yi Zhen (Silver Nee-

rolled into long curly leaves or wrap-curled

dle), Bai Mudan (White Peony), Gong Mei

into small beads with tails.

(Tribute Eyebrow) and Shoumei (Noble,

• Suggested health benefits of oolong tea

Long Life Eyebrow).

include boosting metabolism, lowering

• A study suggests white tea acts as an an-

cholesterol, increasing mental awareness,

tioxidant agent and may reduce the risk of

aiding digestion, preventing osteoporosis

premature aging.

and more.

SUGGESTED STEEPING TIME

SUGGESTED STEEPING TIME

1-3 minutes at 175-185 F

3-5 minutes at 185-206 F

Steeping times and water temperatures from ArtOfTea.com November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

31


Driver’s Notebook

Farm-To-Table Delivery 2017 FORD RAPTOR

Raptor on the Farm

32

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017


ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY JASON GILMORE

T

Raptor Meaty Tires

Raptor Giant Grill

here are very few trucks that can claim that title of "beast" but this is definitely one of them. The 2017 Ford Raptor now offers a 3.5L twin turbo V-6 motor, putting out 450 HP and 510 lb-ft of torque. The 0-60 time is estimated at the low 5 second range. For a truck weighing close to 6,000 pounds, that is a very impressive number. The 3.5L twin turbo is a very capable engine. The twin turbo set-up works really well, we found little to no turbo lag due to the new cooling technology. When you  mix it  with the smooth shifting 10-speed automatic transmission, the new Raptor gains  more numbers in the gas mileage market. The marketed range is 18 mpg on the freeway and 15 in the city. We averaged 15 mpg, and this was with driving it pretty hard. But you don’t buy a Ford Raptor for the gas mileage, you buy a Ford Raptor for it’s off-road capabilities. We did discover the 107 mph speed limitations, but how often do you really need to go over 100 mph? Most people have a hard time getting the uniqueness of a Raptor, but if you have ever driven one, you know exactly what we are talking about. The Ford Raptor is an offroad truck, and we don’t mean hopping a curb, we mean driving through desert sand dunes at 40 mph and still remain in one piece. This is one capable truck. With the 3” Fox racing shocks, it certainly pushes the truck's capabilities above and beyond. The ride quality was impressive and the interior cabin was equipped with very roomy and comfortable seats. The dash styling was very nice with the carbon fiber and leather detail mix. Inside the truck, features several car charging ports and an actual 110 volt outlet for additional devices. Some of the other notable features we quickly became fans of, were the side lights, which send a

light to the side of the truck, so if you are stopped you get a clear idea of what is next to you. The LED lights in the truck bed are a very nice touch as well. Thumbing through the vehicle's driving menus you also come across a number of presets for how the engine performs, depending on the terrain you face. It even has a Baja mode! Our model featured remote start capabilities and a remote let down tail gate which was pretty cool, (although you still have to close it manually). Yes, the new 2017 Ford Raptor is an awesome truck. The base models start at $49,520 with our review truck just tipping over the $70,000 mark, whew! Our’s featured four full doors, with seating for five. The rear seats fold upward to expose a fully usable ground area in case you need additional storage. Navigation included the new Sync system with Apple Play & Android Auto. The sound system was very pleasing as well, the music had enough bass that wasn't overpowering with the overall sound winning a thumbs up, especially for an off-road truck. Another cool new feature is the panoramic sunroof which is an awesome feature for those nights you want to chill in the truck cabin with the windows up and still get a nice sky view. Although the new V6 system doesn’t have the same growl as the previous V8 models, it makes up for it by acceleration and gas mileage. As you can tell, I was a big fan of the new Raptor, and I am not typically a truck guy. I will choose an SUV over a truck any day, it’s way more useful and usable to me, but the Raptor did make me a believer. If I was going to purchase a truck, it would definitely, hands down be a Raptor. There is no other truck that really compares to the abilities, features, and the aggressive, yet stylish look of a Raptor, and it’s fun to drive!

Raptor Scale Vents

November 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

33


Local’s Choice

THE

VIRGINIA T H E P L A C E TO F I N D T H E I N F O R M AT I O N YO U ' R E LO O K I N G F O R

R O O M 34

Roanoke Lifestyle | November 2017

Some of the many books and publications available for research in the Virginia Room.

Archivist Dyron Knick looks in one of the map drawers.

ARTICLE ANNE PIEDMONT

A

re you looking for information about

properties and other materials, such as

your family’s genealogy? An old

publications and photos.

building in Roanoke? The Civil War? Victory Stadium? Or even famed horse Secretariat?

“Donations are one of the reasons we exist,” Dyron says.

The Virginia Room at the Roanoke’s Main Library has your answers.

When a collection like the Burton one comes in, he and the staff first go through

Located on the second floor, the Virginia

it to put it in order, then they deal with any

Room is Roanoke Public Library’s research

preservation issues and, finally, they cre-

and archives library. It is home to drawers

ate a “finding aid.” The latter is a catalog

of maps, more than 20,000 books, 15,000

of the contents, a paper trail, which lets

photographs and genealogical and historical

Dyron and his colleagues direct research-

records, archivist Dyron Knick says.

ers to the right place.

The Virginia Room also is where you’ll

People access the Virginia Room for

find microfilm of The Roanoke Times from its

many different reasons, he says. Some are

beginning in 1869 to the present, and “spotty

walk-ins. Others reach out from beyond the

smaller local publications,” Dyron says. The

area by phone or email—they’re looking for

Ancestry.com Library Edition is available

genealogy or doing specific research, often

at the Virginia Room and any branch of the

for a master’s thesis or dissertation. After

Roanoke Public Libraries. Collections are

a reference interview, a staff member will

digitized at VirginiaRoom.org.

point the visitor in the right direction.

Dyron says most of what’s in the

The

Virginia

indicate

its

Room

is

reach

so

named

Virginia Room has come to them as dona-

to

tions, other items, such as The George

Roanoke. Dyron  said they have records

beyond

just

Davis photo collection—photos from the

from every county in Virginia and rela-

early 1900s to the 1960s of Roanoke build-

tionships with similar facilities around

ings, streetscapes and churches—was

the state. The initiative to begin collecting

purchased at auction.

materials began in the late 1960s, he says.

The Charles Burton Collection is typical

The Lexington native says his favorite part

of the type of donations the Virginia Room

of the collections is the photographs. “Who

receives. Burton was a professional gene-

doesn’t love old photos?” He also enjoys the

alogist who lived in Botetourt County,

interaction with people who come to them

Dyron

for help. “We connect individuals with the

says.

The

collection

includes

genealogy, historical information about

information they are seeking.”


One look at our cemeteries and burial parks and you’ll understand our commitment to

Everlasting Care

A Century of Committment to Everlasing Care Evergreen Burial Park Forest Rest Natural Cemetery Roanoke Boones Mill Mountain View Cemetery Mountain View Memorial Park Vinton Boones Mill Green Hill Mausoleum Buena Vista

EvergreenMemorialTrust.com (540) 342-2593


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Roanoke November 2017  

November 2017 Issue of Roanoke Lifestyle