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Roanoke RoanokeLifestyle.com

DECEMBER 2017

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Lifestyle Letter

A Tribute

C

hristmas snow globes have been around for centuries—their exact debut is unknown, but traditional snow globes can be traced back to France as early as the 19th century. Snow globes appeared at the Universal Expo of 1878 and, a year later, at least five companies manufactured snow globes and sold them throughout Europe. In 1889, a snow globe was created with a tiny model of the newly built Eiffel Tower in Paris, marking the 100-year anniversary of the French Revolution. From that time, the popularity of snow globes grew, especially in England during the Victorian Era; they then crossed the pond to America. Snow globes became a popular collector’s item during the Roaring '20s. Many of these Christmas snow globes were crafted by the Atlas Crystal Works Company which had factories in Germany and America. Most finely crafted Christmas snow globes still come from Germany today. The first snow globe related U.S. patent was granted to Joseph Garaja of Pittsburgh in 1929. He wanted to manufacture a snow globe model that showed a fish underwater and other styles of snow globes. During the 1940s, the Atlas Crystal Works Company manufactured military-themed snow globes which are some of the most sought-after snow globes by collectors today. By the 1970s, several American novelty and gift manufacturers decided to upgrade the production and quality of snow globes as gift items; their production often including beautifully modeled landscapes, internal batteries that automatically churned the snow and musical boxes into their designs. Christopher Radko, a famous handmade Christmas decorator and novelty gift designer, contributed to the manufacture of high-quality Christmas decorations including Christmas snow globes. I chose the Christmas snow globe for this month’s cover, naturally for the holidays, but also as a tribute to my brother who gave me a Christmas snow globe every Christmas. Unfortunately, 2008 was the last globe I received. It took a couple of Christmases to put them out, but today when the season rolls around, I carefully clean each glass globe and place them throughout my home with a smile and in memory of my brother. The first globe he gave me resides on my dresser year-round. There is something special about the globes–they are timeless, lovely to look at and each globe has its own theme for the holidays: characters carefully placed in a round glass object that sits on a base, wheedling the child in me that still want to believe in the magic of Christmas.

DECEMBER 2017 PUBLISHER

Stephanie Scordas | Stephanie.Scordas@LifestylePubs.com EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Victoria Perry | Tori.Perry@LifestylePubs.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Cathy Barnhardt, Sue G. Collins, Eugene M. Elliott, Nicolette Martin, Anne Piedmont, Nicole Winsor CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Sue G. Collins, Anne Piedmont

CORPORATE TEAM | Steven Schowengerdt

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

CHIEF SALES OFFICER

| Matthew Perry

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DIRECTOR OF MARKETING ART DIRECTOR OPERATIONS DIRECTOR

| Sara Minor | Janeane Thompson

EDITORIAL MANAGER EDITORIAL

| DeLand Shore | Brad Broockerd

| Nicolette Martin

| Victoria Perry, Lindsey Howard

AD MANAGER AD COORDINATORS

| Chad Jensen

| Cyndi Harrington, Alicia Huff, Adella Wrisinger

| Cyndi King, Jessica Sharky, Dana Rudolph, Emily Stout

LAYOUT DESIGNERS

PUBLISHER SUPPORT

| Melanie Carlisle

EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTANT APPLICATION ARCHITECT WEB DEVELOPERS

| Randa Makeen

| Michael O’Connell

| Hanna Park, Scott Lavigne

Happy holidays!

Stephanie Scordas, Publisher Stephanie.Scordas@LifestylePubs.com

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Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017

TALK TO US

514 W 26th St, Kansas City, MO 64108 Proverbs 3:5-6 Roanoke Lifestyle™ is published monthly by Lifestyle Publications LLC. It is distributed via the US Postal Service to some of Roanoke’s most affluent neighborhoods. Articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect Lifestyle Publications’ opinions. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Lifestyle Publications does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Information in Roanoke Lifestyle™ is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed.


December 2017

Departments

32

10

Around Town

12

Artist’s Palette

14

Legal Compass

22

Travel Destination

24

Driver’s Notebook

26

Tech Savvy

30

Culinary Creations

32 DIY 34

Local’s Choice

18 The Front Door of the Community

History of Woodrum Field

24 Audi 2018 Q5

Progress is Never Blending In

32 How to Make a Ribbon Wreath

Biltmore's Floral Displays Manager Cathy Barnhardt Shows Us How

18

22

Lifestyle Publications Alabama | Arizona | California | Colorado | Florida | Georgia | Idaho | Illinois | Kansas | Maryland | Minnesota | Missouri Montana | Nevada | North Carolina | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | South Carolina | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Virginia | Washington

24


Around Town

AROUND TOWN

jewelry, collectibles, furnishings, home accessories and even bridal gowns. Many items are donated with the original manufacturer tags still attached. It has also been recognized as one of the premier shops in the nation, competing against those in California, Georgia, Ohio and elsewhere. It has also been awarded numerous area

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY DISCOVERY SHOP

"best of " awards including those for resale shops and

The cure for cancer could be in your closet … or your jewelry box,

the best place to volunteer.

attic ... or a Discovery Shop shopping bag. The Roanoke and Smith

Shoppers delight in the

Mountain Lake Discovery Shops, sponsored by and for the benefit of

beautiful clothing, unusual

the local American Cancer Society, are upscale resale shops.

and vintage jewelry and

Twenty-two years ago, three community leaders put their

fine collectibles, even the

heads, hearts and entrepreneurial skills together to create the

occasional highly valuable antique. Delightful treasures are to be

Roanoke Discovery Shop, the first in Virginia. They studied the

found daily. Every item sold helps fund the important programs of the

concept, recruited volunteers and donors, developed policies on

American Cancer Society.

pricing, merchandising, accounting and more. The doors opened

The heart of the Discovery Shops is the volunteers—they've

at Townside Festival on Franklin Road in October 1995. In 2005,

discovered the joy that comes from giving their time to an import-

a sister store opened at Smith Mountain Lake. Together, the two

ant cause. Store volunteers work various daytime shifts and

shops—thanks to hundreds of volunteers, thousands of donors

have

and a countless number of very happy shoppers—have raised

friendships

more than $8 million to fund cancer research, education, advo-

process. Many have

cacy and services for patients and their families.

experienced

made

lifelong in

the

cancer

Tax-deductible merchandise is donated, evaluated, priced, dis-

firsthand, whether it

played and sold much like in any boutique. However, all the work

has affected a family

is done by vol-

member or friend, as

unteers; all pro-

well as the miracles

ceeds then go to

made possible by the

cancer

work of the American

research

and patient services. Customers

Ta x - d e d u c t i b l e

love the quality of

donations are welcome

the merchandise,

any time the shops

friendly

atmo-

are open. Hours are 10

sphere,

variety,

a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-

value and good

Saturday and 10 a.m. to

feeling it brings

5 p.m. Saturday (The

when

Smith Mountain Lake

shopping

for a cause. The

one hour earlier.) If you

focuses

would like to volunteer,

on

call the Roanoke shop

name

at 540.345.2572 or the

designer

Smith Mountain shop

primarily brand and

clothing, Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017

Discovery Shops closes

Roanoke

shop

10

Cancer Society.

shoes,

at 540.721.0050.


What is your home worth ?


Artist’s Palette

Beth Shively

Beth Shively with two works in progress, representing a 1960s mom and dad.

ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY ANNE PIEDMONT

12

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


Martini Girl. Note the painted frame.

Cats are a recurring theme in Beth Shively's work.

B

Frames do not contain Beth Shively's paintings.

eth Shively has been an artist for most

The first impression upon entering the

She paints in oils on birch plywood, a

of her life. A Rocky Mount native, she

studio is one of the color and lots of it.

practice she started as an undergraduate

moved to Kansas as a child and grew up

Her paintings are more than just bright

at Bethany.

there. When she was in junior high school in

colors; they carry humor and emotion and

“Wood doesn’t wiggle and move,” she explains.

Wichita, Beth felt her art class was “talking

require the viewer to look carefully at each

Before she starts a painting, she picks out

to me.” She went on to major in art at

element for hidden—and not so hidden—

the molding that will frame it, and a local

Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas. She

meaning. The viewer also may notice the

woodworker makes it for her. Unlike a tra-

returned to Virginia to pursue a master’s in

recurring theme of cats.

ditional frame, the molding doesn’t contain

fine arts at James Madison University, and has “been painting ever since.” Beth is married to fellow artist Bill

“Cats are my go-to animal,” she says.

the painting, but, rather allows it to expand.

“They can represent emotions and are

She paints them and makes them part of

more of a mystery.”

the work. She says she tried a few paintings

Rutherfoord and the two have side-by-side

She and Bill share their home with a cou-

studios on the lower level of their home in

ple of cats, and the cats in her paintings rep-

Roanoke’s Deyerle neighborhood. He paints

resent actual pets that have been in her life.

without the frames, but didn’t like effect and went back to her own method. One large work in the studio features

during the day, and she paints in the eve-

Her paintings frequently contain pop culture

two framed pieces joined together, with

nings and on weekends. She says that while

images, as well as recent nostalgia. In fact, the

the subject cat’s legs and tail extending

she paints, “Bill is upstairs making dinner.”

same leopard-patterned pillbox hat appears in

beyond them.

Her spacious, uncluttered studio is filled with

more than one. It is a prominent feature on a

Beth sells her work through her website,

paintings, both finished and in progress. She likes

1960s mom she’s currently painting, along with

BethShively.com, and through word of

to layer ideas and thoughts on to her works as

the accompanying dad. Neither is finished, she

mouth. It seems to be a successful way to

she finishes them. One painting took her nine

says, but even at this stage, they draw in the

market her work since that’s how one of her

months to complete, she says.

eye and welcome interpretation.

paintings ended up in Italy. December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

13


Legal Compass

The Digital Catch-22

in Estate Planning I

ARTICLE EUGENE M. ELLIOTT

f your wills, trusts, powers of attorney or

online services and every one of them has

advanced medical directives are more

a service agreement, the thing you don’t

than two or three years old, you have prob-

14

read, but click “I accept.”

ably created a nightmare for your spouse

Estate planning at one time or another is

or loved one. Life has changed. Many

important to most of us. Whether you are

things you do now are online—you bank

worth millions or are of modest means, peo-

online, you shop online with credit cards

ple want control of where their money goes.

that you manage online, you make your

Most work a lifetime to acquire their assets

medical appointments online, order your

and have strong preferences about where the

prescriptions online and are told when to

assets go when they die.

pick them up online. Over the years you

Wills and trusts are used to control assets

have signed up for an incredible number of

in death situations. Trusts can also be used

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


during a person’s lifetime to administer assets for them in an orderly way or can be used to benefit others, such as children or charities. If a trust is not used, powers of attorney are needed to empower others to handle your business matters when you are disabled by sickness or are unable to make decisions personally. Advanced medical directives are used to appoint people to make medical decisions for you when you are incapacitated. There is one common thread related to all of these legal instruments—they require a person or entity (spouse, child, friend, bank or trust company) to act on your behalf when you are unable to act for yourself. People often choose their loved ones to act for them because they trust them implicitly. Some may have served in such capacity for their parents or others and know that performing such tasks can consume a great deal of their time and effort. All want to make it as simple as possible. Going online  has made life convenient; it brings the world to your doorstep. You are there and in charge. When you are not there because of disability or death, your agent—the person acting for you as executor, administrator, trustee, etc.—has to meet the requirements of the service agreements. Most service agreements will only accept legal instruments which have provisions in them regarding digital property. If your wills, trusts, powers of attorney or advance medical directives do not contain such digital property provisions, then your agent may likely have to go through onerous procedures to gain access to your accounts. Passwords, data, pictures, videos, anything stored in the cloud, your Facebook account, Twitter account and much more are all digital property. Some service agreements require you to designate in the service agreement who shall have access when you cannot act for yourself. Read the service agreement! If you are a particularly organized person, keeping all your passwords in a password program and always keeping it up to date, and your wife of 50 years or child, who is your power of attorney, is good with computers  and have the passwords, then access may not be a problem. But if a problem arises, they have to contact a real person about the account. When it becomes clear that they are not the account holder, then your education of them about your passwords and where they can find your information on the computer, tablet or handheld device is all for naught. The real person may very well deny access for failure to comply with the service agreement. The problem was not fixed—you have just delayed your agent’s nightmare. Call your attorney and by a codicil to your will and/or amendment to your trust, add the digital property provisions. It is not hard to do. You do not need to redo the whole will or trust. For powers of attorney and advanced medical directives, which are simpler documents, it is easier for the attorney just to rewrite them. Don’t do it for yourself, do it for the one whom you have asked to help you when you cannot help yourself. Eugene M. Elliott  Jr. is an experienced attorney, who is a solo practitioner in Roanoke. Currently, he serves on the Virginia State Bar Executive Committee and Council. December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

15


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The Front

Door of the Community

HISTORY OF WOODRUM FIELD ARTICLE ANNE PIEDMONT

A Delta jet takes off. Photo courtesy of Captured by Corey Photography. 18

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


Not all planes are outside the terminal. This 1937 Waco biplane is suspended above the rental car and baggage claim area. Bradley Boettcher, director of marketing and air service development. Photo courtesy of Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport.

T

he Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport is “the front door to the community, the first thing visitors see,”

Bradley Boettcher, director of marketing and air service development at the airport, says. He spends his days work-

ing to ensure that it’s a positive first impression. From his sunny, model plane-filled office–with a view of the real thing out the window—he acknowledges that his job, and that of the airport staff, can be challenging. After all, everyone has an opinion of the airport, down to its name which was changed to the Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport a few years ago. But, he says, things are “in a very good position,” with passenger traffic up, more jets flying in and out, and the airport becoming more active in the community. The airport has been in the same spot, under various names, since 1929 when Roanoke leased 136 acres of an old dairy farm owned by the Cannaday family. The city bought the land in 1934, and the first passengers arrived on American Airlines. In 1941, as part of a national defense project, it was dedicated as Woodrum Field. With World War II looming, Boettcher says, the young airport qualified for federal funds for such things as pilot training. Roanoke owned the airport until 1987 when the Roanoke Regional Airport Commission was formed. The commission consists of three members appointed by the city, and two by Roanoke County. In 1989, the current terminal was opened. The site of the old one, Boettcher says, is a bare pad that airport staff uses for training on snow removal equipment.  While the commission runs the airport, its operating budget comes from landing fees, parking fees and rent, as well as federal and state grants. A recent $3.5 million federal capital improvement, for example, allowed the airport to replace its jet bridges. The airport currently is served by four carriers: American, Delta, United and Allegiant, which offer almost 50 flights a day to eight nonstop destinations. American flies to Charlotte, Philadelphia and New York City/La Guardia.

The airport's baggage claim. The advertisements on the walls reflect the airport's branding efforts. Photo courtesy of Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport.

CONTINUED >

December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

19


THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COMMUNITY (CON TI N U ED)

The old terminal. Photo courtesy of Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport.

The interior of the old terminal. Photo courtesy of Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport. 20

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


Delta flies nonstop to Atlanta, United flies to Chicago and Washington, D.C.; and Allegiant flies to Orlando via Sanford and Tampa through Clearwater. Boettcher notes most flights are on jets, with Delta now flying two full-sized jets to Atlanta each day, an option that increases the number of seats to and from that destination. Boettcher calls the American flight to Philadelphia “one of the best sightseeing flights,” as it offers views of Mill Mountain, then flies over Richmond and Washington, D.C. and its iconic monuments. He says there are six more flights per week and 1,100 more seats than this time last year. Traffic has increased by 10 percent over the year and has been up 11 out of the last 12 months. The one down month, he notes, was during a period when Atlanta had a series of strong storms. Boettcher says Roanoke is “lucky to have the connectivity we have; the service we have,” but acknowledges that he’s frequently asked about new destinations and carriers. On his wish list are Dallas on American (a large hub for that airline), Denver on United and restoring nonstop service to Detroit on Delta. The subject of Southwest Airlines also is a recurring one. He says the question is “how they would serve us.” He notes they offer flights to Baltimore, as well as to Denver and Love Field in Dallas. Jet Blue would increase service to the Northeast and Fort Lauderdale. Florida. The increase in traffic in Roanoke will make the airport more attractive to new carriers, he says. Other issues Boettcher often answers include reliability and cost. He says two of the carriers, Delta and United, have improved their reliability and the others are actively working on it. He acknowledges that Roanoke ticket prices tend to be more expensive, which he says is partly because, historically, the airport has had a lot of business travel, which can be less price-sensitive. Attracting a low-cost carrier would lower the overall fare structure. He’s hopeful that will happen within the next two or three years. He also notes that when he and his family took a trip to Europe recently, they got a very good ticket price. The terminal has undergone some changes since it opened 28 years ago. Among the most notable is the revamped food service, he says, with

Aurora, an abstract steel sculpture by New York artist Albert Paley, was installed in October 1990. Photo courtesy of Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport. Charging stations throughout the terminal are sponsored by local company, TMEIC. Photo courtesy of Roanoke-Blacksburg Regional Airport.

McAllister’s Deli operating a full-service restaurant before security and a limited one on the other side of it. The Hudson store also has been revamped and has two locations, one on either side of security. Visually, the inside of the terminal is being rebranded, Boettcher says. Clear Channel handles all of the advertising and has been partnering with local stakeholders “to bring the region’s natural beauty inside.” Also new is “Art in the Airport,” which features local artists and changes quarterly. Boettcher says they contacted arts organizations in the 19 jurisdictions primarily served by the airport to participate and will highlight each one. The project is in its second quarter. Outside, construction is underway for a covered walkway from the parking lot to the terminal. The newest addition to the terminal is another airplane: a 1937 Waco biplane suspended above the rental car and baggage claim area. Boettcher says it was owned by the set designer of the original "Star Trek" TV series and had been at the Virginia Aviation Museum. When the museum closed, it found a home here. And, no, it wasn’t flown to Roanoke. It came by truck and was reassembled. Boettcher says he’d like to see another antique plane hung on the other side of the terminal. December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

21


Antigua

Travel Destination

ARTICLE SUE G. COLLINS PHOTOGRAPHY SUE G. COLLINS AND PROVIDED

Dreaming

Weeks after I returned from four fast days in Antigua, I could close my eyes and still feel the warm embrace of the long stretches of quiet beaches that hug the curvy Caribbean coastline and the clear blue sea. Oh, that blue. A blue that beckons, constant and seductive, promising and encouraging. A lens to another world. And, isn’t that what a real vacation is about? We travelled in January when daily temperatures lingered around 81, with the sea nearly as warm. With Delta’s new direct flights, you can have breakfast at home and find yourself sipping a Wadadli beer at one of the islands many intimate luxury hotels, sprawling all-inclusive resorts or budget friendly family properties by noon. The 100 square-mile island of Antigua and its

in tandem, traffic congestion and construction

sleek newly renovated airport. With 13

baby sister Barbuda sit perched at the eastern

managed. More important, Antiguans are

restaurants, six pools, wide white beach

edge of the Caribbean’s chain of gems, the

happy and fiercely proud, not jaded or hot and

and 373 rooms served by 700 “team mem-

Leeward Islands. Independent for 36 years now,

bothered by the eager American shoppers,

bers,” the sprawling property includes a

after being a British dependent since Admiral

rum punch-drinking Europeans and dozy hon-

“Caribbean” and “Mediterranean” themed

Horatio Nelson arrived with his squadron in

eymooners who visit their island. When the

community, with room choices ranging

1784, the island is experiencing a growth spurt,

100,000th visitor landed at the end of last year

from lovely king rooms in a 5-story tower

with docks for more mammoth cruise ships

(an annual record), the tourism board celebrated

(the Med) to adorable thatched bungalows

under construction in the bustling main port

and gave gifts to everyone on board that flight.

and balconied courtyard apartments dot-

and capital of St. John’s. The tourism industry

We stayed at the Sandals Grande

ting winding paths between pools and hot

and commercial growth seem to be growing

Antigua Resort, just 10 minutes from the

22

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017

tubs and private cabanas.


While I was at first skeptical of couples-only, all-inclusive properties, I left promising to visit another Sandals property soon. There are 19 in the Caribbean with one planned for Mexico by the end of the year. If you stay at the Sandals Grande Antigua, you should indulge by reserving a Butler Suite, where you meet your very own butler when you check in (seamlessly) and are presented a cell phone that connects you immediately with your new best friend who can unpack, bring you drinks, snacks and just about anything else you need during your stay and arrange excursions like zip-lining through the nearby rainforest canopy or dining by candlelight on the beach at a table for two. Your suite, a

Here and below, Sandals Grande Antigua Resort. Right, a cruise on the resort's sailboat offers more adventure.

bungalow steps from the beach, will be decked out with Egyptian cotton linens and your brands of top shelf bar choices, a private pool and patio. Do venture off property, where ever you stay, however. The main roads are pretty smooth and in good condition. Head to the northwest side of the island and meet up with Sun Fire (that’s his name) and his sons who own 38 good looking horses. They will take you on a trail ride, passing an estate owned by a government official who likes to give rollicking parties, and ending on a pretty beach where your blood pressure will surely drop even further. In a good way. Grab lunch at the beach-front Beach Limerz Bar and order the Johnny Oink-slices of jerk pork on lettuce, tomatoes and onions piled on a LimerZ

Details:

johnny cake… and if you dare, the Burgers ’n Cream - a scoop of vanilla ice cream and pickles in your burger. Ask if they have saltfish and ducana, a sort of sweet potato dumpling made with sweet potato and carrots, grated coconut, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger served with a saltfish lollipop. Wash it down with a local Wadadli Lager. Wadadli is the island’s original name, though some dispute this. And

Where to eat, play and stay in Antigua

COCONUT GROVE

SUN FIRE HORSE RIDING

Dickenson Bay

sunfirehorseriding@hotmail.com

CoconutGroveAntigua.com

268.770.6305

TURNER’S BEACH BAR

ANTIGUA RAINFOREST ZIP LINE CANOPY TOUR, CHALLENGE COURSE

Johnson’s Point

that’s about all under dispute on this lovely,

268.462.9133

welcoming island. When I asked my guide, Sun

Ask for the frozen coconut drink (spiked or virgin)

Fire’s teen-aged son, Jamail, if he liked living on the island of Antigua, there wasn’t a hint of teen angst. “I love this island,” he said squinting toward the horizon like a true cowboy. “Antigua has everything I need—good music, good food, fresh fruit, so much to do, all my family to love me and all this,” he nodded to the setting sun, the clear sea, the 90 miles of beach and the warm scented air of Antigua.

BEACH LIMERZ Fort James Beach BeachLimerz.com

SOUTH COAST HORIZONS Kayak, snorkeling tours SouthCoastHorizons.com

AntiguaRainforest.com VisitAntiguaBarbuda.com

SANDALS GRANDE ANTIGUA RESORT AND SPA Dickenson Bay Sandals.com/main/antigua/an-home #SeeSueGo December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

23


Driver’s Notebook

Audi 2018 Q5 PROGRESS IS NEVER BLENDING IN

R

edesigned and reimagined from the outside in, the Audi Q5 exudes style and refinement everywhere you look. From the flowing exterior shoulder line to the luxurious amenities within, you’ll see Audi is

redefining how an SUV looks—and feels. The Audi Q5 features an all-new design with forward thinking both inside and out. Just when you thought you knew what to expect in a luxury SUV, the Q5 comes along with unrivaled craftsmanship and unparalleled style, creating a class all its own.

24

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


Technology • AUDI VIRTUAL COCKPIT: Appointed with

• MMI ALL-IN-TOUCH: Newly available on

rich infotainment systems, the all-new Audi

the 2018 Audi Q5, MMI all-in-touch with

Q5 lets you live the good life. The available

handwriting-recognition technology allows

Audi virtual cockpit is a fully digital, 12.3-inch

the driver to “write” their entry rather than

instrument cluster that allows the driver to

selecting letters or numbers and more

customize information such as navigation

easily navigate maps by moving a finger

and audio, offering classic and infotainment

across the touchpad.

modes as well as Google Earth or Google Street View screen options.

• 252-horsepower turbocharged engine • Cargo capacity • Audi pre sense city • quattro with ultra technology

December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

25


Tech Savvy

“There’s no place like home,” and, there’s really no place like home when it comes to 2017 technology. With the modernization of technology and automation of homes, who wants to leave? We’ve compiled a list of some of the coolest modern “home” gadgets you won’t know what you ever did without.

26

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


MEVO: We have countless ways to document our lives—social media,

photo sharing sites and live streaming, to name a few. However, Mevo is taking it a step further, allowing you to “share the events that matter most in your life with the production value these events deserve,” with professional-quality and sophisticated storytelling. GetMevo.com

THE LIGHT PHONE: This “phone away from

your phone” is a slim, credit card-sized phone that works with your existing phone, designed to encourage you to “go light,” allowing you to maintain a peace of mind by still being reachable, but leaving behind the distractions from walking around with a computer in your pocket. With numerous specifications and customizations, The Light Phone will help you unplug—without feeling like you’re too far from home. TheLightPhone.com

CONTINUED >

December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

27


Tech Savvy (CON TI N U ED)

PLANTY: For those who weren’t born with a green thumb, be happy you were

born in today’s vast world of technology. Gone are the days of killing plants and here are the days of staying connected with nature. Connected with a mobile app and sensors, Planty measures temperature, soil moisture and illuminance, allows you to water your plant remotely, alerts you to when the growth environment for your plant becomes unsuitable and offers you gardening tips for indoor plants. NThing.net

PRIZM SPEAKER: Is there a point

where your devices know you so well it becomes creepy? Prizm—a brain for your speakers—may toe that line. By identifying users in the room through Wi-Fi and Bluetooth signals and detecting the mood in order to play the best music without any help, Prizm analyzes your streaming playlists and remembers your preferences each time you interact with it, understanding what’s happening in the room and choosing music accordingly. MeetPrizm.com 28

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


DROP KITCHEN SCALE: They say the best way to someone’s heart

is through their stomach, and the connected Drop Scale and Recipe App is making it easier than ever before. Drop’s kitchen scale works with the Drop Recipe app, allowing you to choose from hundreds of top-quality recipes. With smart scaling, step-by-step instructions, recipe adjustments based on how much of an ingredient you have on hand and alternative ingredients to use when you left something off your list at the store, Drop takes the stress out of cooking. GetDrop.com

SENSORWAKE ALARM CLOCK: Have

you ever dreamed about waking up to the smell of toast or a nice, hot cup of espresso? It’s now possible with the SensorWake Alarm Clock—the first olfactory alarm clock. Gradually awaking you using scents like croissant, toast, chocolate and peppermint, the alarm clock uses carefully selected scents designed to awaken the most pleasant emotions and memories that connect you to the scents. Maybe that means Monday mornings won’t be so bad after all! SensorWake.com December 2017 | Roanoke Lifestyle

29


Culinary Creations

The Best

Apple Crumb Muffins

THE BEST APPLE CRUMB MUFFINS CRUMB MIX INGREDIENTS:

⅓ cup brown sugar 1 tb granulated sugar 1 tsp cinnamon ¼ cup unsalted butter (melted) ⅔ cup all-purpose flour MUFFIN INGREDIENTS:

½ cup unsalted butter (softened) ½ cup dark brown sugar ¼ cup granulated sugar 2 eggs, room temperature ½ cup sour cream 2 tsp vanilla extract 1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda 1 tsp baking powder ½ tsp salt ¼ cup milk 2 small apples, chopped INSTRUCTIONS:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees and grease muffin pan. In a small bowl, make the crumb topping. Combine both sugars, cinnamon and melted butter. Fold in the flour until it’s all coated. The mixture will be thick. Set aside. Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and cinnamon in a medium bowl. Set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, or with handheld beaters, beat the butter on high until smooth. Add the sugars and beat on high until combined. Add the eggs one at a time, the sour cream and vanilla extract. Beat on medium speed for one minute until the texture is smooth. With hopes for easy removal from the muffin tin, this recipe was baked in a Trudeau silicone muffin pan. It made baking so simple by eliminating paper liners and ensuring easy muffin removal. Simply push up the muffins under the pan and – voila! No more muffins that crumble or stick to the pan! The pan also cools off super quickly. 

Add the dry ingredients and beat on low speed, being careful not to over mix. Add the milk and combine on low speed. Gently fold in the apples. Spoon the muffin batter into the muffin pan’s cups, filling each cup to the top. Top with the crumb topping being sure to pat the topping down to ensure it stays on the muffin. Bake for 5 minutes and then turn the temperature down to 350 degrees and bake for another 20-25 minutes. The muffins should be golden on top, and a toothpick stuck in the middle should come out clean. Let cool off a bit and enjoy!

30

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017


feels good

to be home Home is where you feel relaxed, comfortable and safe. That’s why you should choose GEICO to be your home for all your insurance needs. Michael Craft at your GEICO Local Office could help you obtain coverage today for:

(540) 985-6550 geico.com/roanoke 4750 Valley View Boulevard Roanoke, VA

Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. Homeowners, renters and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image © 1999-2017. © 2017 GEICO


DIY

7. 6.

1.

2.

How to Make a Ribbon Wreath

3.

ARTICLE CATHY BARNHARDT

T

his is a great way to repurpose ribbons from past Christmases, making an elegant deco-

ration for your holiday celebration. Coordinate

colors with your Christmas theme or with your home’s interior design to create a festive and stylish seasonal design. Have fun and be creative!

5.

4.

YOU WILL NEED: • A 14” straw or Styrofoam wreath form found at floral and craft stores

Next, twist the chenille stem around the wreath to form a hanger (Fig. 3).

• Around 12 yards each of 4 different but coordinating ribbons of

Now, create several bows of various ribbons, with the loops being

varying widths and textures • A chenille stem to make the hanger, found at craft stores (looks like a pipe cleaner) • About 50 to 75 fern pins, found at floral and craft stores (looks like a long staple or hairpin)

INSTRUCTIONS:

about the same size. Leave the tie ends as single “tails” and cut the loose ends into a swallow tail. You may also create single loops and tails to fill in between bows (Fig. 4). Pin the bows and loops and tails onto the covered wreath form with the fern pins, pushing the pins through the center point of the bow or end of the loop and tail (Fig. 5).  

First wrap the entire wreath form with a wider and simpler length of

Continue adding bows and loops and tails until all but the back

ribbon. Attach one end of the ribbon to the back of the form with two

surface of the wreath form is covered. The closer the bows, the fuller

of the fern pins pushed at a slight angle through the ribbon and into

and fluffier the wreath will appear, but don’t crowd them so much that

the form to secure (Fig. 1). Then tightly spiral the ribbon, overlapping

the wreath looks stiff and tight (Fig. 6).

slightly, and continue to wrap the form to cover, attaching the end with two more of the fern pins, securing tightly (Fig. 2). 32

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017

Be sure to hang your wreath indoors unless you have used weatherproof ribbons (Fig. 7).


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Local’s Choice

Owner Rick Woods enjoys bicycling in his spare time.

Keeping Roanoke Homes Comfortable

WOODS FAMILY HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING HAS SERVED THE COMMUNITY'S HEATING, COOLING NEEDS SINCE 1985 ARTICLE ANNE PIEDMONT

T

he heating and air conditioning business

“We’ve made lifelong friends,” Rick says.

able to reach a customer with a heating or cooling issue in a reasonable amount of time.

is practically in Rick Woods’ DNA. Rick

Their work is almost exclusively resi-

is the owner, along with his brother, Gary, of

dential and includes all types of systems:

Rick offers some advice to homeowners

Woods Family Heating & Air Conditioning.

gas, oil, electric, heat pumps, hot water

on keeping their heating and cooling sys-

The two, along with their father, Frank,

boilers and air conditioning. Hot water

tems in good condition: air filters should

founded the company in 1985.

boilers, Rick says, are one of the most

be replaced monthly.

Frank, known fondly as Pappy, died this

reliable and efficient systems, but are not

“People don’t do that. We get a lot of ser-

fall. An Abingdon native, he had worked in

as popular as they once were. Installing a

vice calls involving dirty systems," he says.

the heating and air conditioning field since

complete new hot water boiler system is

"Sometimes it’s so bad the dirt has gotten

the 1950s starting in Baltimore. His work for

very involved—they haven’t done one in

into the ductwork.”

the Southland Corporation, which owned

about five years. They do, however, replace

the 7-Eleven stores, brought him back to

or upgrade many old boilers.

He also recommends having the system tuned up every six months to make sure

southwest Virginia, where he serviced their

Rick says they focus more on existing

heating and cooling needs. Rick and Gary

homes over new construction. They used to

When he’s not keeping his custom-

both worked for Johnson Controls, also in

do more new construction, but because it is

ers warm or cool, Rick enjoys bicycling.

the HVAC field. The company first opened

so wide open, “anyone can do it.” Older homes

His office is decorated with bicycles and

in Troutville, but now is located just north of

present more of a challenge and require more

cycling art. He rides for fun and also has

Hollins University on U.S. Route 11. Rick’s son

experience. And, “they’re more fun.”

done some racing. He says it is wonderful

and Gary’s two sons also work for Woods, which employs a total of 30 people. If the company is multigenerational, so are its customers. In their 35-year history, they’ve taken out systems they originally installed and put in new ones. 34

Roanoke Lifestyle | December 2017

everything is running well.

Rick says cooling is their busiest season.

to see the sport becoming popular in the

“People dislike living without air condition-

region for all ages. He remembers when

ing more than without heat," he says. "I guess

cyclists had to “sneak into Carvins Cove,

they can bundle up in the cooler weather.”

but now, we’re welcomed.”

Their service area extends about 30 miles from their office. Rick says they want to be

For more information on Woods Family Heating & Air Conditioning, visit WoodsAC.com .


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Roanoke, VA December 2017  

December 2017 Issue of Roanoke Lifestyle