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FEBRUARY 2017

Boise BoiseLifestylePubs.com

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HOMEGROWN AND LOCALLY MADE CLEAN AND EASY COOKING GEMS IN THE GEM STATE


Lifestyle Letter

28 Days of Local

FEBRUARY 2017

S

o here we are: February.

PUBLISHER

We survived the holiday season, we rang in the New Year and now we get to celebrate the shortest month of the year, the month of love and the knowledge that spring is just a hop, skip and a jump away. A lot happens in February. This month, we celebrate historically and culturally significant events such as Black History Month, President's Day, Valentine's Day and both Abraham Lincoln and George Washington's birthdays.

Some people also celebrate more, ahem, insignificant "holidays," such as National Drink Wine Day, Walk the Dog Day (shouldn't this be every day?) and Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day—don't miss it; it's apparently the first Saturday of the month.  While there are already so many exciting things to look forward to for the next 28 days, we're bringing you more. That's because February is also our Homegrown and Locally Made issue here at  Boise Lifestyle,  in which we get to celebrate the things that are being created right here in Boise. From local restaurants to locally-crafted goods, from entrepreneurs to successful business owners, this issue is about what— and who—makes Boise run.  So pull up a chair—and maybe a bowl of ice cream—and get inspired by the local creations all around you. Venture down the street, try a new restaurant and explore everything Boise has to offer. We promise it will be worth it. 

Matthew Perry | Matthew@LifestylePubs.com EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Tori Perry | Tori.Perry@LifestylePubs.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Christina Lords, Lisa Florenzen, Elena Tomorowitz, Nicolette Martin, Debra Laizure, Amy Appleton Dreyer CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Lisa Florenzen, Elena Tomorowitz, Paul Versluis

CORPORATE TEAM | Steven Schowengerdt

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

CHIEF SALES OFFICER

| Matthew Perry

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER DIRECTOR OF MARKETING ART DIRECTOR EDITORIAL MANAGERS

| Brad Broockerd

| Sara Minor

| Nicole Sylvester, Nicolette Martin

OPERATIONS MANAGER AD COORDINATORS

| DeLand Shore

| Janeane Thompson

| Cyndi Harrington, Chelsi Hornbaker, Megan Seymour, Chad Jensen

LAYOUT DESIGNERS

| Cyndi King, Jessica Sharky, Dana Rudolph

DESIGN SPECIALIST

| Ashleigh Thomson

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

| Melanie Carlisle

EXECUTIVE ACCOUNTANT APPLICATION ARCHITECT WEB DEVELOPER

| Randa Makeen

| Michael O’Connell | Hanna Park

Tori Perry, Editorial Coordinator Tori.Perry@LifestylePubs.com

by Community ™

BoiseLifestylePubs.com JOIN US

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Boise Lifestyle | February 2017

TALK TO US

P.O. Box 12608 Overland Park, KS 66282-3214 Proverbs 3:5-6 Boise Lifestyle™ is published monthly by Lifestyle Publications LLC. It is distributed via the US Postal Service to some of Boise’s most affluent neighborhoods. Articles and advertisements do not necessarily reflect Lifestyle Publications’ opinions. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form without written consent. Lifestyle Publications does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. Information in Boise Lifestyle™ is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed.


February 2017

Departments

26

8

Good Times

10

Around Town

14

Hot Spot

21

Locals Only

24

Culinary Creations

26

Local’s Choice

28

Food & Wine

32

Lifestyle Calendar

34

Parting Thoughts

16 Gems In The Gem State

Local Entrepreneurs

24 Clean And Easy Cooking

A Recipe With Organic Ingredients

26 The Science And Artistry Of Coffee Roasting

Coffee At Its Finest

14

16

Lifestyle Publications Arizona | California | Colorado | Florida | Georgia | Idaho | Illinois | Kansas | Minnesota | Missouri Montana | North Carolina | Ohio | Oklahoma | South Carolina | Tennessee | Texas | Utah

24


TLF ! THIN K LOCAL F I RST

WHEN YOU SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES IN BOISE LIFESTYLE, YOU GET TO:

Shop Businesses Conveniently Located Near You Enjoy Special Offers Only Available to Our Readers Support Our Local Economy

CHECK OUT THE

BUSINESS

DIRECTORY!


Good Times

Junior Achievement's Inspire To Hire

Junior Achievement's Inspire to Hire is a day that introduces ninth through twelfth grade students to career opportunities. Students interact with business representatives and see displays from hundreds of Idaho companies. The event was held at Boise State University, as well as Idaho State University and the College of Southern Idaho.

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9


Around Town

AROUND TOWN

ST. LUKE'S ADDS THREE NEW BOARD MEMBERS With growing health care needs across Idaho and complexities in the industry, St. Luke's Health System added three new members to its board of directors. Lisa Grow, Dr. Allan Korn and Andrew Scoggin officially joined the board. Along with 13 other members, they will provide guidance for St. Luke's policy, development and service enhancement, and determination of how health system revenues will be reinvested back into local healthcare services, facilities and equipment. Grow is senior vice president of operations for Idaho Power and earned a bachelor's degree in engineering from the University of Idaho and a master's degree in business administration from Boise State University.

Debra Brown was singled out for specific recognition to acknowledge her many contributions to the school and the ESP community. “Education Support Professionals are an integral component to the successful education of students in Idaho, and they frequently fly under the radar in terms of recognition,” says BEA President Stephanie Myers. National ESP Day ensures these vastly underappreciated educators are recognized. Also receiving special recognition was classroom teacher Brenda Shrauger, who was honored for increasing collaboration between teachers and ESPs. “I have a severe self-contained classroom with between three and six ESPs in my room at all times,” Shrauger says. “I couldn’t do my job nearly as well without the experience and dedication of these terrific people.”

BOGUS BASIN ASSOCIATION NAMES NEW MEMBERS FOR BOARD Bogus Basin Recreational Association, Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides year-round mountain recreation and education, announced two new members have been selected to serve on the organization’s board of directors. Michel Bourgeau is an account executive in corporate health

Korn is an internal medicine physician and nationally known expert

services at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. Bourgeau is

in managed care initiatives. As a principal with Illinois-based Carriage

responsible for developing collaborative relationships with small

Way Associates, Korn has provided consulting services in patient

businesses, corporations, school districts and other community

safety and healthcare affordability.

organizations in areas of occupational medicine, corporate well-

Scoggin is the executive vice president of human resources,

ness and value health networks. He is a former coach for the Bogus

labor relations, public affairs and government relations for

Basin Ski Education Foundation and has enjoyed the slopes at

Albertsons Companies Inc.

Bogus Basin with his family for many years. Ross Borden is the finance director at Capital City Development Corporation where he directs the agency’s financial and contracting affairs. Prior to joining CCDC in 2013, Ross served as director of intergovernmental affairs for the city of Boise Mayor’s Office. He is an Idaho native with undergraduate and master’s degrees from the University of Idaho. Ross has enjoyed many wonderful days and nights at Bogus Basin with his wife and three children.

ITD DIRECTOR BRIAN NESS WINS NATIONAL AWARD Idaho Transportation Department Director Brian Ness has won the 2016 Navigator Award from the national organization Route Fifty. The award, in the “Agency and Department Chiefs” category, is based on his citizen-focused approach to government and a transformative style. Ness and several other winners from across the country representDebra Brown and Brenda Shrauger

EDUCATION SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS RECOGNIZED BY BOISE DISTRICT

ing different categories were honored in Pittsburgh. “Brian’s inclusive management style and commitment to constant innovation and improvement have made the Idaho Transportation Department not only one of our most successful state agencies but

The Idaho Education Association and the Boise Education Association

also one of the best places to work and build a career,” says Gov.

observed National ESP Day by presenting small gifts to Education

Butch Otter. “I’m proud of Brian’s leadership at ITD, which has done

Support Professionals around the Boise School District, including a spe-

wonders to build public trust in its operations, the confidence of Idaho

cial ceremony at Horizon Elementary School. Longtime ESP member

motorists, and ensure that all citizens are getting their money’s worth.”

10

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


Ness won in a category honoring “individuals across state, county

financial literacy curriculum is evidence-based, specifically devel-

and municipal governments who have demonstrated the ability to

oped to empower women to achieve economic self-sufficiency

implement innovative ideas to solve problems and improve pub-

through personal financial and money management education,

lic-sector services in the communities they serve.”

thus assisting women to move toward greater economic and per-

BOISE RESIDENT SELECTED FOR BOARD OF HUMANITIES COUNCIL The Idaho Humanities Council, the nonprofit, state-based partner of

sonal autonomy and to move away from abuser dependency. The Financial Literacy Educator generally provides the classes on-site at the participating agency. More than 1,240 women have participated in the classes and 1,071 have graduated.

the National Endowment for the Humanities, recently welcomed four

“The financial literacy program empowers participants by providing

new members to its 18-member Board of Directors, including one from

strategies and conversations that highlight economic independence and

Boise. The four new members will serve three-year terms on the board.

stability in the areas of budgeting, credit, banking, saving, and goal-set-

Garry Wenske, of Boise, is an adjunct professor and executive director of the Frank Church Institute at Boise State University. He also serves as the president of the Boise Committee on Foreign Relations, and on the board of directors of the Idaho Council for International

ting,” says Deborah DeSousa, certified financial educator and coach.

UI RECOGNIZES BOISE-AREA STUDENTS WITH AWARDS

Visitors. He is a graduate of George Washington University’s Elliott

The University of Idaho Office of Alumni Relations honored 55

School of International Relations and the Foreign Service Institute

students during its annual Awards for Excellence, including students

and holds a law degree from the University of Idaho.

from the Treasure Valley.

The other three new members include Rocky Owens and Andrea Partington of Coeur d'Alene and Tim Hopkins of Idaho Falls.

DARRIN HARRIS APPOINTED TO LEAD BOISE'S DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Students are selected based on outstanding academic success, leadership and have demonstrated career and professional preparation. Leadership may be demonstrated in the classroom, laboratory, campus and in the community. The awards are presented to undergraduate seniors, third-year law students and graduate students. Award recipients from Boise include: Undergraduate Erica

Mayor David Bieter recently appointed Darrin Harris, a technology

Albertson, interior design, College of Art and Architecture,

professional with 25 years of leadership and technical experience, to

Boise Kylie George, Psychology, College of Letters, Arts, and

lead the City of Boise’s Department of Information Technology.

Social Sciences, Boise Alaina Heuring, international studies and

Harris assumes a key role in the city of Boise’s citizen experience initiative, an organization-wide effort to improve customer service in all areas of interaction between Boise’s residents and their city government. This “high-touch meets high-tech” effort relies significantly on the employment of technology to give city leaders and staff the information, skills and systems to better, more effectively engage and serve residents through daily interactions. Harris will oversee a department with an $8.6 million budget and 56

Spanish, College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences, Boise Law Christopher Ogden, Boise BSU.

TEAM ADVANCES IN INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION The Hult Prize recently announced that a team from Boise State University has advanced to the competition’s eighth annual regional finals, where they will have a chance to win $1 million in seed capital.

employees charged with application, website and geographic infor-

Team Cultivate won a Hult Prize competition at Boise State in

mation system development, technology infrastructure management,

November. The team built a solution to create sustainable, scalable,

technology project coordination, technology system implementation,

fast-growing social enterprises that restore the rights and dignity of

and internal network and computer customer support.

10 million involuntary migrants forced to leave their native countries

Harris comes to the city from Kordata, a Boise-based software

due to economic pressures, environmental conditions and conflict.

company that provides adaptive mobile solutions for a broad base

Team Cultivate recognized three disparate problems that exist

of industries, where he served as the chief executive officer and

within refugee camps: camp cleanliness, safety and access to food.

chief operating officer.

Their solution was to introduce the P.O.T.T (portable one-time toilet).

$10,000 GRANT AWARDED TO WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S ALLIANCE

The P.O.T.T. promotes safety and privacy for individuals using the restroom, removes the build-up of sewage that pollutes water and can even help generate food.

The Allstate Foundation has awarded the Women’s and Children’s

The team will now move on to the Hult Prize regional finals in

Alliance a grant for $10,000 to support the Treasure Valley Economic

March 2017 in Dubai, one of Hult International Business School’s

Action Program that provides financial literacy education.

five campuses.

The alliance is the lead agency for the action program, which began in 2010 as a collaborative effort of six valley agencies. The February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

11


1843 W COLCHESTER DRIVE, EAGLE ID Custom, maintenance free, golf course community property. This executive home offers a Main Level Master Suite, Travertine, Granite, a Gas Cook Top, Double Ovens, 14’ Vaulted Great Room, and a Zen Garden featuring a Timbered Pergola.

Call Casey Wilson for details! (208) 484-5301

21817 BLESSINGER RD, STAR ID Exclusive. Private. 151 Pristine Acres Gated & Nestled along the Boise River. This Luxurious 10,000 sq. ft home boasts 5 beds, 7 baths, Barns, Loafing Sheds, Fenced Pastures and Century Old Water Rights.

Call Matt Bauscher for details! (208) 631-3870

2277 N. LONGVIEW PLACE, BOISE ID A rare opportunity to live in this single level home just minutes from all that Downtown Boise has to offer while having your own private retreat. Almost an acre lot beautifully landscaped. Walking paths, private pool, tennis court, are all amenities SOMERSET RIDGE offers. Elegantly designed, this home has room for formal and casual living. A must see!

Call Karla Gardner for Details! (208) 891-8020

7049 W AVIGNON LANE, EAGLE ID Avignon offers a breathtaking Lifestyle Experience in an unforgettable setting which is unmistakably, quintessential, Eagle, Idaho. While Privacy and Luxury abound on the 1-Acre premises, the property is also extraordinarily livable and features some of the finest entertaining space available in the market, today. The Amenities start with a custom, tiled and heated swimming pool, supplied natural gas fire table, stamped and colored concrete, full service stainless outdoor kitchen, and expansive entertainment deck with a variety of shade and cover options. Oh, and don’t forget about the private dock, beach, and family of swans! A bridge over private ponds to the two-residence circle on the Private Avignon Lane is revealing of the privacy awaiting a new homeowner. The exclusivity of this waterfront setting on a private lake, only steps from the meandering Boise River, is gracefully matched with the elegant artisan touches and rich finish quality of this French Country, Executive Home. This fine home was custom built by Tom Ahlquist as his personal residence, and an eye to detail is evident around every corner.

Call Nikele Wood for details! (208) 871-8564 www. A

M H E R S T M A D I S O N L E G A C Y .com


AMHERST MADISON Neighborhood

# Acres

# Beds

# Baths

Apx Sq. Feet

Brookside Place

5

3

2.5

3620

1

$615,000

$615,000

Brookwood

0.41

4

3

3983

136

$629,900

$615,000

El Paseo

0.359

4

3.5

4017

78

$699,900

$657,000

Harris Ranch

0.247

4

3.5

3653

33

$619,900

$600,000

Highlands

0.86

5

5.5

4799

138

$950,000

$915,000

Lakemoor

0.32

4

3.5

2923

312

$639,900

$635,000

North Mountain

0.28

3

2.5

2577

559

$649,000

$639,500

Not Applicable

0.54

3

3.5

3048

100

$689,500

$660,000

Not Applicable

0.957

4

3.5

3070

79

$729,000

$685,000

Not Applicable

0.35

3

3.5

4105

88

$989,900

$945,500

One Nineteen

0

3

2.5

2344

83

$947,000

$947,000

River Heights

0.25

5

3.5

3535

0

$652,698

$652,698

Rivers End

0.314

3

2.5

3168

31

$649,000

$649,000

Royal Plaza

0

2

2

2080

0

$630,000

$630,000

Stilwell Estates

5.25

4

3

2900

48

$674,000

$625,000

Tahoe Ridge

1.8

5

4

5096

32

$789,000

$750,000

The Shores

0.5

3

3.5

4730

5

$899,000

$890,000

Two Rivers Eagle

0.42

4

3.5

5297

41

$870,000

$860,000

2

3

2.5

3799

115

$799,900

$767,250

0.24

3

3.5

2871

90

$674,900

$627,450

Venice Warm Springs

DOM*

Asking Price

Sold Price

Information compiled from IMLS dates 11/29/16 - 12/29/16. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed and not a complete list of all activity. *Days on Market

What are homes near you selling for? CALL today to find out!

208.391.2391

www. A

M H E R S T M A D I S O N L E G A C Y .com

YTD 2016 (as of 9/29/16) AMHERST MADISON LEGACY average Days on Market is 32 days, while the local industry average is 51 days! Professional photos, design studio brochures, superior signage, elite syndication, sleek virtual tours, the best in web marketing, and professional services all add up to superior performance and lower days on market for our clients.

4165 W. Emerald Street Boise, ID 83706

208.391.2391


Hot Spot

EUREKA

BRINGS NEW TASTES TO DOWNTOWN

ARTICLE CHRISTINA LORDS

G

eneral Manager Bryan Forcina — and his new downtown bar and restaurant, Eureka — doesn't take the easy way out.

Not on service, and not on ingredients. “When we have a choice to do something the right way or the easy

way,” he says, “we do the right way.” Eureka, which opened in Downtown Boise in October, features locally-sourced brews and bourbon, regional grass-fed beef from a rancher in Colorado and cocktails inspired by Boise's farmers market. “We pride ourselves on our eat-drink American concept which is all about local ingredients, local drinks and events including live music highlighting all that Boise has to offer,” said CO-CEO, Justin Nedelman. “Our commitment to quality at an approachable atmosphere makes our restaurant the perfect dining destination for all Boise residents.” The buns and bread featured at the restaurant come from Boisefavorite Gaston's Bakery, which features breads with no additives, preservatives or artificial colors or flavors. Eureka features 19 permanent beers on tap — 15 of which are brewed right here in the Treasure Valley. An additional 21 beers are on tap on a rotating basis, including at least one cider, but even the majority of those come from craft brewers in the West. Forcina said Eureka proudly dubs itself a brown bar, featuring about 40 whiskeys at any given time, many of them distilled in Idaho, Utah, Oregon and Montana. To round out its craft cocktails, the bar selects only American-made liquor except for its tequila, which isn't produced in the United States. 14

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


That dedication to sourcing locally-made products even transcends the bar itself. Local artists featured in Downtown's Freak Alley created the murals and art on the walls. The restaurant also highlights locally sourced reclaimed wood; an expansive graffiti mural made by local artists Sarah Terrell and Julie Pegan, and large sliding glass doors leading to the al fresco patio to enjoy an outdoor dining experience when the weather permits. All of the mix-in ingredients found along the bar — down to the bitters — are made in-house. Even the orange juice in Eureka's mimosas come from handsqueezed juice on site. “We think about everyone; we think about everything,” Forcina said. “One of my favorite things is going over to a customer's table, and they are smiling. They are always saying, 'this is the best burger I've ever had.'” That attention to detail doesn't stop when it comes to the bar's grub and brews. It can also be found in the people pouring the beer and cocktails, Forcina said.

Each staff member has been certified as a cicerone. Much like a sommelier is a trained and knowledgeable wine professional; a cicerone is certified and educated in the ways of beer to offer a better experience for customers. Forcina said while that extra training and certification was important, the 85 people that work at Eureka were required to meet another intrinsic hiring standard: kindness. “You can't teach caring,” he says. “They came with that.” EVENTS:

• Daily “Hoppy” Hour from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-close Tuesday: Half-off Wine • Wednesday: Steal The Glass (Customers keep the glassware provided by a featured brewery) • Saturday & Sunday: Brunch (11 a.m.-3 p.m.) and $5 Bloody Mary’s and Mimosas

IF YOU GO: HOURS: 11 a.m. to Midnight Sunday through

Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday ADDRESS: Downtown Boise, 800 W. Idaho St. PHONE: 208.286.4410 WEBSITE: EurekaRestaurantGroup.com

February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

15


s m e G

in the Gem State

ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY LISA FLORENZEN

S

ome people have natural talent in most everything they touch. Others may need to cultivate and develop it, and still there are

those who have raw talent but have no idea they do. Sisters Dee Dee Emery and Holly Curry claim they were never crafty types, even though Curry to date has been knitting for over 30 years now. In their home state of Nevada, their older sister Lorrie was the craft maker, eventually turning little sisters Emery, and Curry on to the DIY bandwagon. “Once I moved to Idaho,” says Emery, “Holly and I started a tradition 17 years ago of meeting two weeks before Christmas to make each other stuff, hang out and then always going shopping afterward.” Where did they get their inspiration from? “We would see things in magazines and put our own twist on them” chimes, Emery. Her crafts soon landed in The Willow Tree store in Kuna. Beginning with simple storage, decorative boxes, picture frames, and items with an old-world feel, soon she was selling goods in The Country Sampler magazine as well. Though nowadays Emery has turned to Facebook to sell her goods, she basically still makes things she likes, but are also well-liked by the market she caters to.

16

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


Curry also sold some of her items in Kuna as well, but initially, selling wasn’t her motivation for knitting. “Originally, I wanted to learn how to do it so I could make hats and stuff for my kids when they were little. Then it turned into something that is a meditation type thing where I love to do it.” Curry claims her and Emery, in earlier days, had a little online store called The Hobbit Shed, but due to some name infringement issues from the entity which owns the rights to the name “The Hobbit” they needed to cease using the moniker. Though Curry decided to pull back on trying to sell her items, her love for making and giving homemade gifts is only part of her motivation. She just loves crafting things to make her home, well, homey. Now throw into the mix Curry’s husband, Chan, who apparently Curry had no idea how handy he was, nor did he know she was crafty as well, until after they were married. Chan who had a background in construction remodeled and built their home in Houston, Idaho practically from the ground up. If he didn’t know how to do something he read up on it. “I have always been a do-it-yourselfer,” states Chan. “I don’t like paying someone to do things I know I can do.” From the floors to countertops, cabinetry and even the custom dresser he built, his workmanship is stunning. Coupled with the fact Chan had inherited turquoise from his father and thus another entity Sky Stone Creations was born. Though Chan got away from the stones to concentrate his efforts on redoing the house, he has been back at it steadily for about three years. Creating elegant, yet bold, sterling silver and turquoise rings, necklaces, and earrings to which he always evolves his technique. Though exclusively sold through word of mouth and his Facebook page, Chan hopes to expand Sky Stone Creations. February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

17


UNIQUE VALENTINE’S DAY GIFTS FOR HIM & HER Flowers, chocolate and jewelry: They’re the tried-and-true staple gifts for the celebratory day of love, but instead of the traditional present, here are a few ways to think out of the box this year and give something they’ll really remember.

ARTICLE NICOLETTE MARTIN

18

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


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February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

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Boise Lifestyle | February 2017

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Locals Only

e s u o H s r e w o l F of ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY ELENA TOMOROWITZ

R

on Rankin, owner and florist at House of Flowers, has seen lots of changes in the 46 years he’s been working with flowers, but one thing remains consistent – people

rarely stray from the classic dozen red roses when it comes to Valentine’s Day. Perhaps the more adventurous types will consider pink or yellow roses, but the red rose persists as the ultimate symbol of romance. The red rose has a long history of representing love and war, but in Greek mythology, it is said that it was created from the tears and blood of Aphrodite, the Goddess of Love. Then, of course, William Shakespeare famously uses this image of a rose throughout his poetic work. This representation of love contin-

ues to be a strong symbol of love and is the go-to gift for lovers seeking to demonstrate their love (or apologies) to their significant other. Though the tradition of buying flowers has changed, some flowers hold onto their stigmas. For example, the gladiola is typically seen in funeral arrangements, so Rankin often gets requests for “no gladiolas” when the order is for a more celebratory affair. And yet, gladiolas are beautiful, hearty flowers that will last a long time. Carnations are another flower with a bad reputation, but Rankin notes that for a while, carnations were one of the few flowers available to florists – perhaps the reason why they could be found in almost every bouquet. Now, your arrangement might display flowers picked from around the world. And with more growing technologies, flowers like tulips, which were once only available during the spring season, can be found year-round. Despite these shifts in traditions, Rankin has remained busy in his shop conveniently located across the street from St. Luke’s Hospital. Flowers will never go out of style, even if styles change. An occasion doesn't have to be particularly celebratory or somber to have a reason to buy flowers; maybe you can grab a bouquet during this snowy winter to add a little color and life to your dining room table!

February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

21


OF EAGLE The Oak Barrel snuck into the Eagle restaurant scene in March of 2016, but is quickly growing as diners discover their ambitious menu and offerings. Located just off of State St., the restaurant’s menu includes something for everyone – including their popular grilled rack (or half rack) of lamb, served with a mint cabernet reduction. Those seeking lighter fare might try the Plato de Tapas, filled with tasty veggies and meats, or perhaps their signature salad. Of course, head in any day of the week for one of their hand pressed burgers and a cold brew. The restaurant features a relaxed, yet classy, lounge with big televisions and a pool table on one side, and a bright, modern restaurant on the other side. Both sides serve the full menu and have a full bar. Make sure to check out the lounge on the evenings for a cucumber martini while enjoying one of their live music nights. They have a live band or performer every Saturday night as well as a jam, or open mic, night every first and third Sunday. This is a great chance for the musically inclined to invite their friends and family out to hear a new piece in a fun space. Be sure to check out their Facebook page for the most up-to-date calendar. On top of their staff working hard seven days a week to serve their regular restaurant customers, they also provide catering services, which include hosting in-house parties for any size, from five to 200 people. They’ll shut the restaurant down for the bigger parties, so you’ll have the whole place to yourselves! They say Oak Barrel is “where you can eat great and come as you are!” and their welcoming atmosphere echoes that sentiment. So come as you are, whether seeking a casual night out away from the kids, or a night of special celebration.

208.938.3010 | BOISEOAKBARREL.COM | 1065 E WINDING CREEK DR. EAGLE, ID 83616


Brought to you by Supporting Local Restaurants


Culinary Creations

CLEAN & EASY COOKING W

ith the new year here, a popular resolution for many of us tends to be eating healthier. Though this may mean different things to

different people, a majority of us want to eat foods with higher nutritional content, without being processed, artificial or fake. If you're not growing your food already, then to the grocery store it is, where more outlets are carrying local, farm raised, eco-friendly products. Notice how I did not use the "O" word (organic). Some people can get intimidated, associating organic food with flavorless or alien-like substances they've never heard of but akin to eating, say, rocks or tree bark. Not so! The following recipe is one you can make with all organic items, or, if not, at least choose locally-produced ingredients, which helps your local economy and still produce a highly-quality result. This little number is not just for appetizers, but partnered with fresh, cooked pasta, and chicken, pork or beef, or on top of fish or seafood, it packs a delectable wallop. Freeze extras, and you will have a staple which gets you out of the dreaded "what's for dinner" dilemma. Not only is this recipe versatile, but the contents add some solid nutritional street cred. The tomatoes provide lycopene, nature's sunscreen in humans and plants; the garlic and onions have essential vitamins and minerals; the basil has immunity-boosting properties, and this bruschetta is down right delicious!

24

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


O T A M O T H S FRE A T T E H C S U BR sy of Courte Recipe .net dTaste Inspire

• PREP 15 mins • COOK 5 mins • TOTAL 20 mins This simple bruschetta recipe with tomato and fresh basil is best when you use fresh, room temperature tomatoes. It’s also important to set aside a little time to allow the tomatoes to sit with salt. As the tomatoes sit, they become extra flavorful. They also release some of their juices, which is perfect for spooning onto the bread later. Makes two servings, three bruschettas each

YOU WILL NEED 1/2 pound ripe tomatoes, at room temperature (3 to 4 medium) Salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 6 basil leaves, thinly sliced 6 1/2-inch thick slices Italian or French bread 2 cloves garlic, peeled and left whole

DIRECTIONS Halve tomatoes then remove and discard the majority of the seeds. Chop tomatoes into 1/4-inch chunks then add to a medium bowl with a generous pinch of salt, a small pinch of black pepper, one tablespoon of the olive oil and the basil. Stir and let sit 10 minutes. Meanwhile, heat a grill pan over medium heat or prepare an outdoor grill for medium heat. Drizzle bread slices with remaining tablespoon of oil and grill 2 to 3 minutes on each side until warmed through and grill marks appear. Rub one side of the bread while still warm with garlic — two to three strokes per bread slice should do it. Stir the tomatoes one more time; taste then adjust with more salt or pepper as needed. Spoon a generous amount onto each bread slice. Drizzle a little of the juice remaining at the bottom of the bowl over tomatoes and enjoy.

February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

25


Local’s Choice

THE

SCIENCE &

Artistry

of Coffee Roasting ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHY ELENA TOMOROWITZ

C

olin Seeley will tell you that coffee doesn’t have to taste like salted caramel

or vanilla beans. In fact, he’ll insist that coffee is best enjoyed in its purest form. Started in June of 2015, Seeley’s company, Ironside Coffee Roasters, set out to bring high-quality coffee to Boise. With a background in food science, he approaches coffee roasting on a scientific level but with an artistic touch. The beans are sourced in the most ethical way, and sometimes even come from a single farm to achieve a unique and specific flavor.

26

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


Coffee derives from a delicate process, and few extra seconds in the roaster could affect the final taste of the bean. Like winemaking, the nuances of a coffee flavor come from both the product and how you treat the product. A great coffee bean can be ruined if not roasted properly, and Ironside takes great care in creating a distinct roast. From there, it’s left to the brewing process to achieve the perfect cup, and every drinker may define that differently. In addition to roasting and selling beans, Ironside serves shoppers a fresh pour-over at the Capital Market in downtown Boise and also provides personal delivery to homes and offices. For some small offices around town, Seeley helps its coffee drinkers achieve the best possible coffee experience by suggesting top notch brewing equipment based on a price point, setting the grinder to the ideal grind, and he will even come back periodically to make sure everything is up to speed. Seeley realized that “office coffee” has never had a good reputation, but slugging down that brown water and powdered cream may be the only option when you need a little caffeine to get you through the afternoon. He believes that coffee should be enjoyable, whether at the office or home and is helping to educate the Treasure Valley in tasting the difference. Finding the right roast that suits your personality will change how you think about coffee. For retail purchase, find bags of Ironside Coffee at stores including the Boise Co-op and the Boise Bench Market, or through food delivery services such as Brown Box Organics. February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

27


his A S

O f h ni c T

A t a P h T

Food & Wine

Tips for Cooking with Wine

ARTICLE DEBRA LAIZURE | PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED

U

sing wine in cooking intensifies flavor and adds another

level of uniqueness to your recipe. It gives a dish that extra

something special to turn great-grandma's pasta sauce recipe into your own (and make your sister-in-law jealous). So grab that secret ingredient from the wine cellar and head to the kitchen. 

plash Of

28

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


As Julia Child says, "I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." Wine should be added to food early enough in the cooking process that it has time to simmer. As  wine cooks down, the alcohol evaporates away and the flavors begin to concentrate. Use a light hand at first until you get familiar with cooking with wine. Typically, white wines impart their delicate flavor to seafood, and dishes like chicken piccata and vegetable risotto. Red wine adds depth to bolder dishes like beef bourguignon, mushroom  steak sauce, and of course, great-grandma's famous pasta sauce. Using wine in a reduction or to deglaze a pan creates an intense and complex sauce. It easily picks up those coveted brown bits that elevate the flavor of any dish. But be careful—light and  overly fruity wines can ruin a sauce. The fruitiness is lost during the cooking process and will  leave the sauce too acidic, ensuring those lovely brown bits have gone to waste.  Red or White? Let's be clear about what is considered a good cooking wine. The so-called "Cooking Wine" found in your local grocery store next to the fancy vinegars and Worcestershire sauce is a poor excuse for a cooking ingredient. They are low in alcohol content, highly acidic, and contain a massive amount of salt. Instead, choose a wine you would pair with the meal. Use one that is fruity, medium or full-bodied, and with little or no oak flavor. Wine aged in oak barrels tends to turn bitter and harsh when cooked in food. For red wines, Pinot Noir and blends such as Côtes du Rhône will produce consistent results. Again, avoid wines aged in oak such as the robust Cabernet Sauvignon.  White wines should also be dry and full-bodied. Try a Sauvignon Blanc, unoaked Chardonnay, or even a French Vermouth.

CONTINUED >

As Julia Child says, "I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

29


Let's Talk Price Does

an

expensive

wine

produce a better sauce than a wine picked from the bargain bin? Well, maybe.  America's Test Kitchen tested sauces made

from

similar

wines

in the $5, $10, $20 and $30 price points. They discovered that the $5 wines cooked down to sweet, syrupy sauces, while the $10,  $20 and $30 bottles were smoother,

making

sauces

with

multiple layers of flavor. Although tasters favored wines in the two more expensive price ranges, none thought the difference justified spending an extra $10 or $20. They found that limiting the price to $10 left cooks with plenty of good shopping options.

Cooking Tips:

• Add a light, dry white wine

to melted butter and baste grilled, broiled, or baked fish. • Mix wine with different herbs and olive oil to make a delicious salad dressing. • Stir in a couple tablespoons of red wine into brown gravy. Slowly simmer to create a luscious sauce for beef. • Freeze leftover drinking wine in ice cube trays for future cooking use. • Use a wine-based marinade to help keep meat, poultry or seafood moist while it cooks.

30

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


RED WINE REDUCTION FOR SAUCES

Makes about 2 tablespoons Two tablespoons of this potent wine reduction can be substituted in a recipe, such as a pan sauce, tomato sauce, or roast beef jus, that calls for one-half to three-quarters cup of wine. Add this  reduction near the end of the cooking time—the way you might finiswh a sauce by swirling in some butter. The reduction can be kept for up to two weeks in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 1 small carrot, chopped fine (about 2 tablespoons) 1 medium shallot, minced (about 2 tablespoons) 2 button mushrooms, chopped fine (about 3 tablespoons) 1 small bay leaf 3 sprigs fresh parsley 1 cup fruity, smooth, medium-bodied red wine blend Heat all ingredients in 12-inch nonstick skillet over low heat; cook, without simmering (liquid  should be steaming but not bubbling), until mixture reduces to 1 cup, 15 to 20 minutes. Pour  through strainer and return liquid (about 1/2 cup) to clean skillet. Continue to cook over low heat, without simmering, until liquid is reduced to 2 tablespoons, 15 to 20 minutes. From America's Test Kitchen Season 2

February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

31


Lifestyle Calendar

February FEBRUARY 1

FEBRUARY 17

AN EVENING WITH JUDY COLLINS

ELVIS LIVES!

VELMA V. MORRISON CENTER

VELMA V. MORRISON CENTER

Judy Collins has inspired audiences with sublime vocals, boldly

Elvis Lives! is a journey across

vulnerable personal life triumphs, and a firm commitment to social

Elvis' life featuring winners and

activism since the 1960s. For tickets, go to MorrisonCenter.com. 

finalists from Elvis Presley Enterprise's annual worldwide Ul-

FEBRUARY 2

timate Elvis Tribute Artist Con-

POET LAUREATE JUAN FELIPE HERRERA

test, each representing Elvis

EGYPTIAN THEATRE

during different stages of his

Juan Felipe Herrera is the 21st Poet Laureate of the United States

career. The tour marks the third

(2015-16) and is the first Latino to hold the position. From 2012-14,

time in the production's six-

Herrera served as California State Poet Laureate. He will speak as a

year history that all three Elvis

part of The Cabin's Readings and Conversations series. For tickets,

tribute artists are top winners

go to TheCabinIdaho.org.

of the contest. For tickets, go to MorrisonCenter.com.

FEBRUARY 5

FEBRUARY 18

FREE BOISE DEPOT GUIDED TOUR

IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN:

THE BOISE DEPOT

RETHINKING IDAHO LANDSCAPES

The Boise Depot is offering tours of the facility to highlight the

SPECIAL EVENTS CENTER AT BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

history of the iconic building and to take guests through the pro-

The Idaho Botanical Garden and the University of Idaho will offer a

gression of local rail service, from the railroad's arrival in Boise

horticulture symposium to address principles for growing landscapes

and the construction of the depot. The tour will also discuss the

while working within the constraints of the Treasure Valley’s soils and

depot's years of operation and renovation.

climate. For information, go to IdahoBotanicalGarden.org.

FEBRUARY 10

FEBRUARY 18 - 28

BALLET IDAHO'S WINTER REPERTORY

BOISE ART MUSEUM'S 2017 IDAHO TRIENNIAL

VELMA V. MORRISON CENTER

BOISE ART MUSEUM

Ballet Idaho's Winter Repertory will feature live music by the Boise

The Idaho Triennial is a juried exhibition bringing together exem-

Baroque Chamber Orchestra and Del Parkinson. It will feature works

plary works of art created by a broad selection of Idaho artists.

such as Concerto Barocco, Night Crawlers and The Monster and the

For the last 80 years, BAM has celebrated the creativity of artists

Gift. To purchase tickets, go to BalletIdaho.org.

living and working in Idaho, and the Museum’s series of biennial

FEBRUARY 14 ROMANCING THE PEN

and triennial exhibitions has become a respected and treasured tradition. For information, go to BoiseArtMuseum.org.

IDAHO PENITENTIARY

FEBRUARY 24 AND 26

The Old Idaho Penitentiary is offering a unique alternative for the

OPERA IDAHO'S TOSCA

day devoted to love. Snuggle up with your Valentine or find the

VELMA V. MORRISON CENTER

true meaning of “ball and chain.” Visitors can read through exhibits

Giacomo Puccini’s melodrama about a volatile diva, a sadistic police

“Romancing the Pen: ‘Love’ Stories from the Penitentiary” and "In

chief and an idealistic artist contains many famous arias, including

the Name of Love." For information, go to History.Idaho.Gov.

“Vissi d’arte” (Tosca) and “E lucevan le stele” (Cavaradossi). Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 24 and at 2:30 p.m. Feb. 26. For information, go to OperaIdaho.org.

32

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017


business directory

in great company

HOME BUILDERS & REMODELERS Wood Windows Inc. (208) 376-2200 woodwindowsinc.com

HOME DESIGN & FURNISHINGS

Cornerstone Design (208) 384-1422 cornerstoneinteriordesign.com Dillabaugh's Flooring America and Design (208) 287-2487 dillabaughsflooringamerica.com   Model Home Furnishing (208) 939-2699 modelhomefurnishings.com  

INSURANCE

Health Benefits of Boise, LLC (208) 288-0681 healthbenefitsofboise.com

LUXURY AUTOMOTIVE

Peterson BMW of Boise (888) 295-8415 petersonbmw.com

OTHER

The Springs Hot Springs Retreat (208) 392-9500 thespringsid.com

MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS LOGO FILES

REAL ESTATE

Amherst Madison Legacy Real Estate (208) 391-2391 amherstmadisonlegacy.com/

RESTAURANTS, FOOD & BEVERAGE Sysco - Idaho (208) 345-9500 syscoidaho.com

SALONS & SPAS

Foothills Med Spa (208) 286-2327 foothillsmedspaboise.com

monday

- saturday 11am-5pm

1041 ancona ave. suite #100 eagle id 83616 on state st

(44) just west of home depot

modelhomefurnishings.com

| 939.2699

February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

33


Parting Thoughts

Sakaya Davis ring $108 finefolk.com

Phillip Lim Alix bag $895 Nordstrom.com

ARTICLE AMY APPLETON DREYER

NYC sunsets

PHOTOGRAPHY PAUL VERSLUIS Tanya Taylor knit $375 Anaphora at Prairie Fire

Steps of Style blogger, Amy Dreyer, brings a few local favorites along with her as she hits the streets of

turtleneck sweater By Malene Birger $95 Standard Style Leawood

ZO skin health available at Kansas City Wellness Center

New York CIty.

Jerome Dreyfuss shoulder bag $700 forzieri.com

Halston Heritage scarf $66 theoutnet.com

Slipdress $50 similar styles Dear Society KC Gold earrings $495 Tivol KC

Handmade Kimono jacket $189 zara.com

Dieppa Restrepo brogues $147 theoutnet.com Stuart Weitzman Urban Boots $798 Nordstrom.com

34

Boise Lifestyle | February 2017

A C C E S S O R I E S

Perverse sunglasses $45 Nordstrom

Cuyana Travel Bags$99 cuyana.com

Olympus Pen $349 Crick Camera KC Frends Headphones $150

Look your best while traveling in style with these chic essentials you won’t want to leave home without. 


My Vision...

is to let the original historic beauty of my home speak for itself.

© 2016 Kolbe & Kolbe Millwork Co., Inc. Photo courtesy of Kass & Associates

Kolbe’s capacity to provide multiple types and styles of windows that work in both new construction and historical renovation allowed a mix of modern and historical design to be harmonized in my home. Custom options allowed the space to marry my home’s authenticity with modern solutions for energy efficiency.

Bringing your vision to life takes a higher level of creativity and expertise. Who you choose matters. Contact the experts at Wood Windows, Inc. for your personal design consultation. Our extensive showroom and knowledgeable staff will help you view, operate, and choose the right Kolbe products for your home. Excellence that endures

Wood Windows, Inc. | 208.376.2200 www.woodwindowsinc.com

1005 E Park Blvd, Boise ID 83712 p 208 384 1422 c o r n e r s t o n e i n t e r i o r d e s i g n . c o m February 2017 | Boise Lifestyle

35


Boise February 2017  

February 2017 Issue of Boise Lifestyle

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