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V Working Out Exercise instructor____________________ Gym _____________________________ Personal Trainer _____________________ Pilates teacher ______________________ Yoga Instructor ______________________

V When You Need a Pro‌ Accountant_________________________ Architect __________________________ Attorney __________________________ Cleaners __________________________ Financial Institution ___________________ Financial Planner ____________________ General Contractor ___________________ Insurance Broker_____________________ Interior Designer_____________________ Investment Advisor ___________________

V Looking & Feeling Good Acupuncturist _______________________ Barber ____________________________ Beauty Salon _______________________ Chiropractor ________________________ Foot Reflexologist ____________________ Esthetician _________________________ Hairdresser ________________________ Hair Colorist ________________________ Hotel Spa __________________________ Spa (outside a hotel) __________________ Manicurist _________________________ Massage Therapist ___________________

34 Coronado Lifestyle • Spring 2010

Mortgage Broker _____________________ Pet Sitter __________________________ Photographer _______________________ Plumber___________________________ Real Estate Agent ____________________ Tailor _____________________________ Travel Agent ________________________


Another something to look forward to in your old age! by Kris Grant After experiencing the miracle of Lasik surgery in 2005, I must admit I had been remiss in not scheduling annual eye exams. Why should I, I reasoned, since I now had near perfect distance and up-close vision; although I did need to get reading glasses in 2007 as my vision changed a bit. Then last October, those reading glasses broke plumb in two, the result of my wearing them draped around my neck and yanking them up to my face once too often.

checked before we ordered new frames, and luckily, Dr. Jim Owen, an optometrist who works with Dr. Cook, was available. Soon I was in the exam room, covering one eye and proudly rattling off the letters of the eye chart like a champ. Then we covered my left eye and Dr. Owen again asked me to read the smallest line on the chart that I could. “I can’t see the chart,” said I, chagrined at my fall from grace. And that’s when the good doc’s jaw dropped and in a snap we were nose to

So, after wearing one of the lenses as a monocle as I worked through my deadline editing, I made an appointment with George Grant, the optician who works in ophthalmologist Dr. Glenn Cook’s office, to order new frames. Good old George was none too pleased with my eyeglass “necklace,” and it wasn’t just that he didn’t care for my fashion statement. He said the foul things should be outlawed, as they caused more damage to glasses than just about anything, causing them to be cast hither and yon, so that adjustments were soon thrown out of kilter. He wisely suggested I get my eyes

nose in the exam chair. “Wo!” he whistled, quite impressed. “You’ve got a big cataract in that eye.” Couldn’t be, I protested. This wasn’t some old lady he was dealing with; I was a mere 57 years. “It happens,” he said. “While the norm tends to be older, we see quite a few people who have cataracts at your age. Sometimes it’s heredity.” Come to think of it, both my parents had had cataract surgery. A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s natural lens and symptoms can include blurry or clouded vision, poor night vision and sometimes halos around

50 Coronado Lifestyle • Spring 2010

lights. Cataracts are the leading cause of loss of vision in adults 55 and older; by age 65 years, more than 50 percent of humans worldwide have cataracts, and by age 75 nearly everyone has a cataract. Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide. I had noticed in recent weeks how blurry my vision was in my right eye. As I was driving, I’d sometimes cover my left eye for a second or two and be amazed that I couldn’t see the cars on the road ahead. (Don’t tell the CHP). But vision changes tend to build day by day so you don’t really notice them. I convinced myself that my distance vision had always been that bad in that eye, and that I hadn’t noticed it because the Lasik surgery in my left eye did all the distance work. (Funny how the brain works – it just flips over to whatever eye has the better vision and ignores the other guy.) Okay, so I’ve got myself a cataract. Now what? Fortunately, cataracts are highly treatable with surgery and with today’s intraocular lenses, vision can be nearly fully restored. Dr. Owen then referred me to Dr. Cook for surgical consultation. In my pre-operative meeting, Dr. Cook explained that cataract surgery would be an outpatient procedure, taking only a few minutes for the surgery, and that I’d have no pain whatsoever. Dr. Cook, who performs about 700 cataract surgeries a year, explained that after he removed the cataract, he could insert a lens to correct my nearsightedness in that eye. Did I want that? Well, yeah! Once again, my vision would be 20-20 and those reading glasses would be history. Cataract surgery runs about $3,300, although some of the cost will be covered by insurance, the amount varying by the insurance policy you have in effect.

So, fast forward to surgery day. I arrived at 6:20 a.m. at Grossmont Surgical Center. (Dr. Cook also does a lot of cataract surgery right at Sharp Coronado Hospital.) By 7 a.m. I was lying down in the operating room, wearing a delightful gown and booties.

I took a pill for relaxation, had a few drops put in my eyes and said hello to Dr. Cook. Then, the next thing I knew, it was 8 a.m., and I’m awake and a bit groggy, with a bandage over the eye and wearing some charming wrap-around sunglasses. My friend and morning chauffeur, Trish, and I were soon on our way to breakfast at nearby D. Z. Akin’s. (Did I mention that there was no food or water the night before?) And despite the three cups of coffee I downed, the remainder of the day found me sawing logs. The next day, I removed the bandage, saw that my vision was back to normal and I dutifully began the regimen of applying eye drops (antibacterial, anti-inflammatory) two and three times a day. It constantly amazes me to realize the advances that have been made in eye care, dental care and overall health care. I’m quite glad I was born in the middle of the 20th century. Hmmm…wonder what they’ll be saying about today’s medical procedures a hundred years from now? Be sure to email me… Spring 2010 • Coronado Lifestyle 51


Another something to look forward to in your old age! by Kris Grant After experiencing the miracle of Lasik surgery in 2005, I must admit I had been remiss in not scheduling annual eye exams. Why should I, I reasoned, since I now had near perfect distance and up-close vision; although I did need to get reading glasses in 2007 as my vision changed a bit. Then last October, those reading glasses broke plumb in two, the result of my wearing them draped around my neck and yanking them up to my face once too often.

checked before we ordered new frames, and luckily, Dr. Jim Owen, an optometrist who works with Dr. Cook, was available. Soon I was in the exam room, covering one eye and proudly rattling off the letters of the eye chart like a champ. Then we covered my left eye and Dr. Owen again asked me to read the smallest line on the chart that I could. “I can’t see the chart,” said I, chagrined at my fall from grace. And that’s when the good doc’s jaw dropped and in a snap we were nose to

So, after wearing one of the lenses as a monocle as I worked through my deadline editing, I made an appointment with George Grant, the optician who works in ophthalmologist Dr. Glenn Cook’s office, to order new frames. Good old George was none too pleased with my eyeglass “necklace,” and it wasn’t just that he didn’t care for my fashion statement. He said the foul things should be outlawed, as they caused more damage to glasses than just about anything, causing them to be cast hither and yon, so that adjustments were soon thrown out of kilter. He wisely suggested I get my eyes

nose in the exam chair. “Wo!” he whistled, quite impressed. “You’ve got a big cataract in that eye.” Couldn’t be, I protested. This wasn’t some old lady he was dealing with; I was a mere 57 years. “It happens,” he said. “While the norm tends to be older, we see quite a few people who have cataracts at your age. Sometimes it’s heredity.” Come to think of it, both my parents had had cataract surgery. A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s natural lens and symptoms can include blurry or clouded vision, poor night vision and sometimes halos around

50 Coronado Lifestyle • Spring 2010

lights. Cataracts are the leading cause of loss of vision in adults 55 and older; by age 65 years, more than 50 percent of humans worldwide have cataracts, and by age 75 nearly everyone has a cataract. Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide. I had noticed in recent weeks how blurry my vision was in my right eye. As I was driving, I’d sometimes cover my left eye for a second or two and be amazed that I couldn’t see the cars on the road ahead. (Don’t tell the CHP). But vision changes tend to build day by day so you don’t really notice them. I convinced myself that my distance vision had always been that bad in that eye, and that I hadn’t noticed it because the Lasik surgery in my left eye did all the distance work. (Funny how the brain works – it just flips over to whatever eye has the better vision and ignores the other guy.) Okay, so I’ve got myself a cataract. Now what? Fortunately, cataracts are highly treatable with surgery and with today’s intraocular lenses, vision can be nearly fully restored. Dr. Owen then referred me to Dr. Cook for surgical consultation. In my pre-operative meeting, Dr. Cook explained that cataract surgery would be an outpatient procedure, taking only a few minutes for the surgery, and that I’d have no pain whatsoever. Dr. Cook, who performs about 700 cataract surgeries a year, explained that after he removed the cataract, he could insert a lens to correct my nearsightedness in that eye. Did I want that? Well, yeah! Once again, my vision would be 20-20 and those reading glasses would be history. Cataract surgery runs about $3,300, although some of the cost will be covered by insurance, the amount varying by the insurance policy you have in effect.

So, fast forward to surgery day. I arrived at 6:20 a.m. at Grossmont Surgical Center. (Dr. Cook also does a lot of cataract surgery right at Sharp Coronado Hospital.) By 7 a.m. I was lying down in the operating room, wearing a delightful gown and booties.

I took a pill for relaxation, had a few drops put in my eyes and said hello to Dr. Cook. Then, the next thing I knew, it was 8 a.m., and I’m awake and a bit groggy, with a bandage over the eye and wearing some charming wrap-around sunglasses. My friend and morning chauffeur, Trish, and I were soon on our way to breakfast at nearby D. Z. Akin’s. (Did I mention that there was no food or water the night before?) And despite the three cups of coffee I downed, the remainder of the day found me sawing logs. The next day, I removed the bandage, saw that my vision was back to normal and I dutifully began the regimen of applying eye drops (antibacterial, anti-inflammatory) two and three times a day. It constantly amazes me to realize the advances that have been made in eye care, dental care and overall health care. I’m quite glad I was born in the middle of the 20th century. Hmmm…wonder what they’ll be saying about today’s medical procedures a hundred years from now? Be sure to email me… Spring 2010 • Coronado Lifestyle 51


http://lifestylemags.com/stories/Cataracts