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Packaging management council Presented by: Connie Birdsall/Lippincott


Introduction:

Icons and new favorites


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A history of working with the world’s leading consumer brands

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A range of consumer packaging design experience

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Deep expertise, across categories, in retail experience design

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Lippincott and brand

Promise, touchpoints/experience and possibility


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The complexity of building a strong brand Brand image is the sum of all information about a product, service, or company that is conveyed through communications and experience. Research & development Environmental policies

Intellectual leadership

Financial performance

Partnerships/alliances

Culture/Employee behavior

Community relations

Brand communications Brand environments

Brand image

Customer service Sales/marketing policies

Promotions

Distribution channels

Public relations

Web sites (Information and E-commerce)

Recruiting & training

Intranets and extranets

Third party opinion Press coverage

Products and services

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Implications now affect the whole corporation

Brand > Marketing

Brand = Customer experience CMO + COO, CHRO, CIO, CFO, CEO

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Brand is possibility


When beginning a packaging assignment, don’t just ask: ―What should your packaging look like?‖ RATHER: ―What can your packaging accomplish for your brand?‖

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So, some guiding questions for branding and packaging: • What is the promise behind the product?

• How does the promise come through across all touchpoints? • How does packaging fit into that? • How does packaging help add to the total brand experience?


Lippincott

Brand cues


Ingredients for a great brand

Authentic stories

& + Signature Cues

Inspiring experiences


Brand cues Engaging all the senses

typography, color, imagery, secondary graphics

sound signature, music & sound palette

BRAND

materials, textures & finishes

signature scent 24


A sensory branding initiative seeks to enrich the ways in which we communicate through our brand and to build stronger, more emotional bonds with our customer.


95% of human communication is unconscious; 80% is nonverbal


Why Sensory Branding?

Sense of smell is the slowest of senses‌ but memories evoked by smell are more emotional — no other sense is as directly/intensely linked to brain’s emotion and memory centers.

Melody is easier to remember than other sonic stimuli (e.g., voice, ambient sounds)

People associate the textures of fabrics and other surfaces with product qualities

Studies show that people overwhelmingly (80%) choose products accompanied by music they like and tend to attribute their product preference to the product qualities rather than the music.

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Brand cues do not appear overnight

Frequency

Uniqueness

Consistency

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Stop


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Sean Connery

George Lazenby

Roger Moore

1962-67 & 1971

1969

1973-85

Timothy Dalton

Pierce Brosnan

Daniel Craig

1987-89

1995-2002

2006 - present

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Do you recognize these brands?


Name that sound‌

Stop


VISUAL BRAND CUES

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RITUAL

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SHAPE

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COLOR

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TOUCH

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SMELL

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Legendary brands fuse all these elements

Authentic stories Inspiring experiences Signature cues


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Louis Vuitton Geometric pattern as dominant architectural element

Bold material contrasts

Gold and brown

Distinctive monogram and petal repeat pattern

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Ikea Strict type palette

Blue and Yellow

Silhouette photography

Clear and fun instruction icons

Straight-forward language, with a touch of humor

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Google Irreverent, fun nomenclature

Bright, primary color palette (blue, red, yellow, green)

Humorous and personalized logo treatment (not corporate)

Cheeky (friendly) tone of voice

Humorous (creative) events

Simple, illustrative icons

Lots of white space

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Case study

Walmart


The Story of The Servant Leader

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“I’m sure this initiative will drive some new advertising… …but what I really want it to do, is be a blueprint for my people to know what to do.” - Lee Scott, CEO


Walmart

• Slowing growth in traditional markets • Growing negative perceptions • Attenuation of original mission Objective To refresh the brand positioning and create renewed consumer connection to the brand while also driving increased store traffic and enhanced economic performance 65


Our comprehensive approach

1. Brand story (Who you are) The story that explains the fundamental character of the brand in a compelling way, developing an authentic character to the brand • Conflict • Character • Context

Vision The central statement that articulates and brings to life the core elements of a company's brand. It provides the basis for translating strategy into communications and experiences. It distinguishes the company's offerings from those of the competition. It describes why customers and other stakeholders should care about the brand, and it drives customer demand.

2. Brand elements (How you express yourself)

Brand essence The core idea and emotional heart of the brand positioning strategy

Image attributes Descriptors that support the positioning statement, dimensionalize the brand and define its key personality and performance characteristics

Marketing communications

Brand cues

Channels

Product/ service offering

Employee engagement

Stakeholder

3. Experience activation (Where you do it) 66


We started by assessing the opportunities across customer groups and helping to determine the three “value driven” segments

Price value shopper 16% / 24%

Brand aspirationals 29% / 33%

Protect ―Help me make it to my next paycheck‖

Price sensitive affluents 11% / 4%

Secondary target

Primary target ―Help me trade down and trade up, with unbeatable prices on the brands I trust‖

―Help me stay true to my values, and not waste my money‖

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We identified an attractive positioning direction..

Functional

1) Low Prices

Emotional

2) Easy

3) Smart

4) Live Better 5) Empower 6) Welcome

7) Escape

Highly appealing and credible to all

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…that appealed to both sets of customers…

Emotional relationship ―By Shopping at Walmart I can Live Better‖

When I Shop at Walmart, I Feel Like a Smart Shopper

Functional relationship

Unbeatable Prices, Easy Shopping, Quality Products

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…and was brought to life through an emotional brand story Walmart is a “servant leader,” whose mission is to make the American Dream more accessible to everyone. From its earliest days as a small rural retailer, Walmart and its associates have pursued an intense competitive passion to win at all costs, to drive down costs and help all people save money so they can live better. As Walmart grows, it turns this intensity to tackle even larger ―opponents‖ such as healthcare and the environment.

Character

Caring yet driven personality, beginning with the founder.

Goal

Make the American Dream more accessible to all. Bring the value and selection available in urban areas to small towns.

Conflict

Serving people vs. Winning at all costs

Context

Walmart’s roots as a small rural retailer now grown into the largest company in the world means it has a need to reinvent its servant role to stay relevant.

Cues

Walmart is in the process of rebuilding the brand cues that show its role as the servant leader.

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We created a new identity system that transformed the brand from Always Low Prices Always‌

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‌to a consistent Save money. Live better. experience

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The brand drove integrated marketing communications‌

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…and advertising campaigns across both tactical and strategic campaign platforms

Savings Focused

Emotional 75


Within this new experience, we developed specific communications programs focused on health, wellness and sustainability issues

Better Health and Wellness

Quality Products

Common future – sustainability

Family and Home Solutions

Community Enrichment

New Products & Innovation

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Mainstays

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Home trends

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Best Occasions

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Low cost toys

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We enhanced the entire store experience‌

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‌with a total store approach to branding‌ Color

Signage Pricing

Systems & guidelines

Cornice

Service integration Trade-dress elements

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Before

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After

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Before

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After

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Before

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After

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Associate engagement and enthusiasm has been an important part of our efforts‌

Brand engagement

Brand champions

Brand book

Employee badge/recognition

Branded work environments

Brand masters training

Employee brand center 89


…built on three simple pillars…

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‌captured in an engaging and award winning brand book‌

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…performing better than competitors… Comparable sales for US End of each quarter

Index of monthly stock prices January 2007 through May 2009

6% Walmart Target 120%

4%

Walmart 2%

100%

0%

80%

-2%

60%

-4%

40%

-6%

20%

Target

-8% 1Q 2007 2Q 2007 3Q 2007 4Q 2007 1Q 20082Q 2008 3Q 2008 4Q 2008 1Q 2009

0% 1/3/07

7/3/07

1/3/08

7/3/08

1/3/09

Notes: Walmart fiscal year 2008 ended 1/31/08 and fiscal year 2009 ended 1/31/09. Target Fiscal Year 2007 ended 2/2/08 and fiscal year 2008 ended 2/2/09. Sam's Club comparable store sales excluded. Sources: Walmart Fiscal Year Quarter Earnings Archive: Releases (FY 2007 Q3,4; FY 2008 Q1-4; FY 2009 Q1-4; FY 2010 Q1); Target Investors web page: 10Q SEC filings (2006 Q3 2009 Q1); Financial News - Quarter Earnings Per Share Release (Nov-Dec 2008)

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‌and creating significant shareholder value growth Walmart’s Brand Value increased $3.6 Billion in 2008 to become the most valuable retail brand while others lost $67 Billion in value.

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If we work together, we’ll lower the cost of living for everyone…we’ll give the world an opportunity to see what it’s like to save and have a better life. Sam Walton

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