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that, on average, the young have more qualifications than the old, although the Conservatives still have a “graduate problem” even after accounting for this. There was only a small gender gap between men and women, with women being equally split between Labour and the Conservatives, and men slightly more likely to have backed the Tories. With regards to employment status, Labour was in fact ahead amongst those in work; 4 points ahead amongst those working part-time and 6 points ahead amongst those working full time, showing how the Conservatives are increasingly relying on the retired vote. Of course, we could go on in explaining the votes made by different groups and demographics, but now that it’s all over and done with, the element at the top of everyone’s minds is the result – a Hung Parliament. But what does this mean? For those who need some clarification on what a Hung Parliament actually is, it’s when a General Election results in no single political party winning an overall majority in the House of Commons. In our situation, the Conservatives failed to acquire enough seats to be victorious in winning the majority, losing 32 seats in total. As a result of this, it was unclear as to whether or not Theresa May would remain as the UK’s Prime Minister, however the Prime Minister only has to resign if it is clear that they cannot command a majority of the House of Commons on votes of confidence or supply. We all know May is a very determined lady, and she has since ensured that she will remain as PM, much to the annoyance of some people. And what does this result mean for Brexit? Because of the resulting Hung Parliament, Britain’s exit from the EU has been plunged into further uncertainty – a feeling that’s been in the air since the vote to leave in June last year. If the Conservatives form a minority government, Theresa May could start negotiations but she might have to water down her plans if she wanted to get any Brexit-related legislation through the House of Commons, where she will need the support of other parties. This is Sussex Business Times after all, and what we’re really interested to know is how the results of this year’s General Election will affect UK businesses, big and small…

Creative Commons - UK Home Office: Theresa May, Prime minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland ©

General Election 2017

James Pitman, Managing Director, Higher Education UK & Europe, Study Group: “We’re look forward to working collaboratively with the new government to create a visa regime for international students that is robust, clear and free from abuse. “Despite government threats, there have been no further damaging restrictions this year aimed towards international students. The Conservatives did however include a pledge in their manifesto to “toughen the visa requirements for students”. We hope that the new government will base any new policies on accurate data, and work with the Office for National Statistics (ONS) and the sector to establish the true number of student overstayers. UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI), part of the Home Office, has acknowledged that students are essentially ‘one in, one out’, and

“Because of the resulting Hung Parliament, Britain’s exit from the EU has been plunged into further uncertainty – a feeling that’s been in the air since the vote to leave in June last year”

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Sussex Business Times - Issue 414  

Sussex Business Times - Issue 414 - July 2017

Sussex Business Times - Issue 414  

Sussex Business Times - Issue 414 - July 2017

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