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MARINE LIFE

Bahamas Nature has created a textbook environment for coral growth in the Bahamas, with the gulf stream bringing clear, nutrient-rich, warm water to a broad, shallow plateau, allowing an abundance of light to penetrate all the way to the sandy bottom. Bimini, sitting on the edge of a trench, scores both for shallow diving and snorkeling over lush, healthy reefs, and for scuba trips along the precipice. Shark feeds are popular out of Nassau, but at this point in time, no cruise line is offering them as an excursion. U.S. Virgin Islands For snorkelers, most of the action takes place in the St. John National Park. The highly irregular northern coast of St. John creates numerous sheltered bays with calm, clear shallows and decent numbers and varieties of coral and sea life to keep snorkelers’ interest. Though Trunk Bay is the best known, it is also the most visited and shows the most coral damage. Further afield are St. John’s many small cays, or islets, many of which have the feel of deserted islands, with pint-sized beaches you can snorkel to or from. For divers, the points of land that form the borders of the bays continue offshore as underwater ridges, ideal for leisurely exploration. In the pass between St. John and the British Virgin Islands’ Norman Island, it’s not uncommon to see large pelagic fish, including tuna and shark. British Virgin Islands (Tortola) The small islands across the Sir Francis Drake Channel south of Tortola offer an incredible wealth of dive sites including

“Drake Channel south of Tortola offer an incredible wealth of dive sites including wrecks, reefs, walls and canyons” 8 OCEAN VIEW

P OV AUGUST marine.indd 8

19/08/2013 15:40

Ocean View Magazine 2013  

Ocean View - Issue 5 2013

Ocean View Magazine 2013  

Ocean View - Issue 5 2013

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