Page 1

spring C O U RS E S 2013

SPRING

R E G I S T R A T I O N

LIBERAL ARTS

BUSINESS CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R2.indd 1

B E G I N S

F ebr u ar y

2 5

SCIENCES THE WRITER’S STUDIO 1/21/13 3:35 PM


Welcome to Stanford Continuing Studies

S

tanford Continuing Studies invites you to join our open learning community. Each year, approximately 13,000 Bay Area residents take our courses in Liberal Arts & Sciences, Creative Writing, and Professional & Personal Development. We have no formal application process, and all adults are welcome to attend. We are here to help you nourish your mind in the company of Stanford instructors and your fellow students.

W h y S ta n fo r d? Flexible

Work full-time? Our evening classes, weekend workshops, and online courses are scheduled to fit your busy lifestyle. Take courses for pleasure, personal enrichment, or professional development. Earn a grade or credit…or just come for the pleasure of learning. Open

We welcome all adult members of the community— working, retired, or somewhere in between. And it is easy to enroll. Engaging

Learn from the best. All courses are taught by notable Stanford faculty, experienced professionals, and leaders in their fields.

How to Enroll

There are four easy ways to register for Stanford Continuing Studies courses: This is the fastest and easiest way to register for courses. To get started, visit us at continuingstudies.stanford.edu.

Online:

Stanford Continuing Studies 365 Lasuen Street, Littlefield Center Mon–Fri; 8:30 am–12:00 pm; 1:00–5:00 pm I n P er so n:

Stanford Continuing Studies 365 Lasuen Street, Littlefield Center Stanford, CA 94305

B y Ma il:

B y Fa x :

2

S ta n f o r d

We’ve Moved!

Stanford Continuing Studies has a new address on campus. Our office is located at 365 Lasuen Street, Littlefield Center, Stanford, CA 94305. Please visit our website at continuingstudies.stanford.edu to find directions and a map for our new location.

650-725-4248 C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 2

S t u d i es es

1/16/13 6:26 PM


Spring 2013

Featured Courses philosophy

The Art of Living: Presented by the Hosts of Philosophy Talk  All of us must make fundamental life choices and decide what is most valuable to us. Our lives are not just given to us. They need to be made. This groundbreaking course presented by the national radio show Philosophy Talk will examine the art of living. Part traditional lecture, part multimedia broadcast experience, the course will be led by the hosts of Philosophy Talk, Stanford philosophers John Perry and Ken Taylor, and it will also feature distinguished guests. (See page 27) current events

Demystifying American Intelligence  America’s global intelligence capacity has been generally considered essential to defending our national security. In this course, Thomas Fingar and Barry Schutz will explain how the American intelligence community is organized; what it does; and, to the extent possible, how it works. In addition, internationally recognized guest speakers (Ambassador Karl Eikenberry, David Holloway, Amy Zegart, and others) will look at how American intelligence is dealing with pressing questions in hotspots around the world, including Pakistan and North Korea. (See page 18) art & architecture

The Art of Renaissance Venice  During the Renaissance, Venice became one of Europe’s richest cities and cultivated the extraordinary accomplishments of its artists, including the Bellinis, Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese. We will explore Venice’s remarkably diverse and unique achievements in painting and architecture, including a stunning selection of painted masterpieces from the Venice Gallerie dell’Accademia such as Giovanni Bellini’s San Giobbe altarpiece, Giorgione’s Tempest, Titian’s Pietà, and Paolo Veronese’s controversial The Feast in the House of Levi. (See page 9) business

The Company Is the Content: Marketing in a Social World  No aspects of business have been more disrupted by the social media revolution than marketing and communications. Companies of all sizes are now struggling to get their messages out to a highly fragmented customer base. Aimed at students who are new to marketing or social media, this course will demystify the myriad of social tools available to businesses. Along the way, students will explore how companies can create their own social brands, and will learn how to measure the success of a social marketing campaign. (See page 51) science

A Glimpse into the World of Surgery  Did you ever wonder what goes on in an operating room? In this team-taught course, leading Stanford surgeons will endeavor to explain (in language accessible to those without medical training) how and why they perform surgical procedures such as open heart surgery, brain tumor removal, joint replacement, and face lifts. The distinguished faculty includes department chairs and division chiefs at Stanford’s School of Medicine. (See page 30)

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 3

3

1/16/13 6:26 PM


Spring 2013

Featured Series ARCHAEOLOGY

Cradles of Civilization  Human civilization emerged over the past seven millennia. This academic year, a sequence of Stanford Continuing Studies courses has been charting the rise of three epicenters of civilization. Fall quarter examined Mesopotamian history and archaeology, covering civilizations emerging in the Fertile Crescent and Egypt; Winter quarter focused on the Greeks and Romans; and Spring quarter will introduce students to Mesoamerican civilizations, exploring the Olmec, Teotihuacán, Oaxacan, Maya, and Mexica-Aztec cultures. (See page 8) PSYCHOLOGY

The Science of the Healthy Mind  Modern science has started to investigate the qualities of the mind that contribute to wisdom, health, happiness, and success. This three-quarter sequence explores the latest findings from psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral economics to shed light on the evolutionary basis of these human strengths, why we often struggle to realize them, and how we can cultivate these qualities to improve well-being. Fall quarter started with “The Science of Mindfulness,” Winter quarter moved to “The Science of Willpower,” and Spring quarter will cover “The Science of the Compassionate Mind.” (See page 28) BUSINESS

The Entrepreneur’s Toolkit  This course sequence gives aspiring entrepreneurs the set of tools they need to achieve success. Fall quarter started with “Getting from an Early Idea to a Real Business” and “Finance for Entrepreneurship.” Winter quarter covered “Designing Breakthrough Innovations” and “The Financial Underpinnings of a Startup.” In Spring, “Creating Executable Strategies for Entrepreneurs” will look at strategic management of entrepreneurial efforts using a framework that results in an executable business, while a revisit of “Getting from an Early Idea to a Real Business” will offer an overview of the entire startup process. (See page 48) SCIENCE

Modern Physics: The Theoretical Minimum  This ongoing sequence of courses gives students an introduction to the essential theoretical foundations of modern physics. During the first year of the sequence (2011–2012), students were introduced to Newtonian mechanics, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. During 2012–2013, the series has continued with courses on Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity (Fall), cosmology (Winter), and statistical mechanics (Spring). Both individually and collectively, these courses let students attain the “theoretical minimum” for thinking intelligently about modern physics. (See page 32) PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

Positive Psychology and the Keys to Sustainable Happiness  Positive psychology has demonstrated that sustainable happiness is based on a skill set that can be learned. This fourcourse sequence introduces students to these valuable life skills. The first course, “Choosing Happiness” (Fall), provided a science-based action plan for enhancing sustainable happiness. “Enhancing Emotional Intelligence” (Winter) focused on building fundamental personal skills for happiness and success. “Enhancing Social Intelligence” (Spring) will strengthen interpersonal skills that contribute to strong relationships. “Strategic Happiness at Work” (Summer) will apply the skills of positive psychology to the workplace. (See page 65) 4

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 4

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:26 PM


PUBLIC Programs calendar Tuesday, April 2

Saturday, May 4

Tuesday, May 14

Creative Writing at Stanford: A History with Eavan Boland, Nancy Packer, Philip Levine, and Scott Turow

Stanford Saturday University at Hopkins Marine Station, Monterey

Life and Shadow: Photographer Robert Buelteman’s Exploration of Plant Life at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve

See page 34

See page 70

See page 74 Tuesday, May 7

Thursday, April 18

SMMMASH: “Language”

See page 71

Medieval Matters: Scotland and England in the Middle Ages and the 21st Century

See page 73

Saturday, May 18

Buddhist Compassion Workshop with Norman Fischer and Spring Washam

See page 75

Saturday, April 20

A Company of Authors

Thursday, May 9

See page 72

Reviving the Science/Statecraft Dialogue

Wednesday, April 24

See page 74

How I Write: A Conversation with Clarence B. Jones

Friday, May 10

Friday, May 24

Haydn on Trial ! An Evening with the Saint Michael Trio

See page 76

See page 72

Live Broadcast of National Public Radio’s Science Friday

Wednesday, May 29

Wednesday, May 1

See page 74

See page 76

The Symphonic Body

The Other Bagpipes: Exotic and Lesser-Known Piping Traditions of the World

Ongoing

See page 73

See page 77

The Ethics of Wealth 

Featured Artwork Joel Simon has two passions: photography and marine biology. At the age of eleven, investigations into the content of Southern California tide pools motivated him to build his own scuba gear out of a soda bottle, surgical tubing, and the gas valve from an old stove. Not long afterward, he began taking his camera underwater. Simon is a seasoned travel operator, freelance photographer, marine biologist, and writer. With more than thirty years of experience leading group tours, he has designed and directed educational travel programs on all seven continents, and is a veteran of land-, ship-, train-, and plane-based journeys in more than 100 countries. Simon’s clients include the World Wildlife Fund, the Smithsonian, the Harvard Museum of Natural History, and the Stanford Alumni Association. His portfolio includes tens of thousands of images of Stanford’s campus taken over forty years. His work has done so much to celebrate and honor the University that Bill Stone, former president of the Alumni Association, proposed that Simon be designated “Stanford Photographer Laureate.” For more information on his Spring quarter courses, please see pages 13 and 16. More of his work can be viewed on his website: joelsimonimages.com.

Above:

Tulip Detail; Photograph by Joel Simon

Front cover: Back cover:

Tulip Tree and Hoover Tower; Photograph by Joel Simon

Cherry Tree and Daffodils; Photograph by Joel Simon

5

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 5

1/16/13 6:26 PM


Courses offered

Register online at continuingstudies.stanford.edu

L i b er a l Arts a n d S c ie n c es

Liter ature

A Terrible Beauty: Cultural Revival and Political Rebellion in Ireland  lit 200

Archaeology

Cradles of Civilization: Mesoamerica  arc 33

8

Art & Architecture

The Art of Renaissance Venice  arth 08

9

24

Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov  lit 24

24

Music

An Introduction to Opera  mus 24

25

We Will Rock You: Rock History from the 1950s through the 1970s  mus 158

25

Sing Well, Be Well  mus 176

26

11

The Elements of Jazz  mus 165

26

Basic Painting  art 01

11

Philosophy

The Art of Chinese Landscape Painting  art 228

12

Advanced Painting: Exploring the Modern and Abstract  art 214

The Art of Living: Presented by the Hosts of Philosophy Talk  phi 92

12

Psychology

Modernist Artists in the South of France: From Renoir to Late Picasso  arth 222

10

Postwar Paris: French Art at Midcentury  arth 250

10

Art Studio

An Introduction to Figure Drawing  art 36

Art Studio: Photography

Landscape Photography in Yosemite: A Field Workshop  art 56

13

Travel Photography: Around the Corner and Around the World  art 226

13

Digital Photography, Photoshop, and Digital Printmaking  art 35

14

Photography as Art: Intermediate Photography  art 33

14

Developing Your Photographic Vision  art 237

15

California Coastal Photography: From the Monterey Peninsula to Big Sur  wsp 190

16

Cl a s s i c s

Sex, Lies, and Politics: The Comedies of Aristophanes  cla 42 16 Crossroads

Trecento: Marco Polo’s Travels and Boccaccio’s Decameron  crd 52 North Africa in the 14th Century: Ibn Batutah and The Thousand and One Nights  crd 53

17

27

The Science of the Healthy Mind: The Science of the Compassionate Mind  psy 212

28

The Culture of Guilt  psy 213

29

Religious studies

The Historical Jesus and the Origins of Christianity  rel 15

29

Vatican II: Catholicism Meets Modernity  rel 82

30

Science

A Glimpse into the World of Surgery  med 114

30

The Ten Greatest Experiments in Physics  phy 35

31

Modern Physics: The Theoretical Minimum: Statistical Mechanics  phy 29

32

The History of Food and Nutrition  sci 36

32

Nutrition and Exercise Design for Performance and Healthy Weight Loss  sci 45

33

A User’s Guide to the Brain  bio 31

33

Geologic Gems of Northern California  geo 130

34

STAN F ORD SATURDAY u n i v e r s i t y

17

Current events

Stanford Saturday University at Hopkins Marine Station, Monterey  ssu 105

34

theater & Performance Studies

Social Democracy: Achieving Prosperity and Justice in the US, Europe, China, Bhutan, and Beyond  pol 32

18

Demystifying American Intelligence  pol 181

18

Great Monologues: An Acting Intensive  wsp 192

35

T H E W R I T ER’S ST U DIO

Dance

19

ON - CA M P US W RITING COURSES

An Introduction to Creative Nonfiction  cnf 03

36

The Golden Age of French and Italian Cinema  flm 94

19

Bad Guys We Love: America’s Romance with the Movie Gangster  flm 95

The Writing Habit: Tools for Learning to Write Every Day  egl 61

37

20

Writing the Memoir: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants  cnf 09

37

Brazilian Dance  wsp 51 F i lm

History

San Francisco History  his 14

20

Fiction Writing: Developing Original and Superb Surprises  fict 19

Global Women Leaders  his 15

21

An Introduction to Screenwriting  egl 126

38

Magazine and Feature Writing  wsp 184

39

21

39

Languages

Beginning Chinese III  chn 03

6

23

Shakespeare and His Elizabethan World  lit 23

38

Beginning French III  frn 03

22

Fiction Basics: Writing and Managing Tension and Conflict  wsp 33

Beginning Italian III  ita 03

22

The Character’s Journey  wsp 32

40

Beginning Spanish III  spa 03

22

The Next Draft: Rewriting 101  wsp 235

40

Self-Publishing Workshop: A Roadmap to Success  wsp 31

41

Vivid Stories, Vivid Voices: Writing Middle Grade and Young Adult Characters  wsp 210

41

S ta n f or d

Co n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 6

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Spring 2013 Registration begins Monday, february 25

ONLINE WRITING COURSES

Incorporating Storytelling into Public Speaking   com 29

62

Building Interpersonal Skills: An Experiential Workshop  com 19

62

43

Managing Crisis: Lessons Learned from the Miracle on the Hudson  wsp 196

63

What Happens Next? Secrets of the Short Story  fict 17 w

43

Effective Nonverbal Communication  wsp 75

63

The Art of the Short Story  fict 18 w

44

I N F O R MA T I O N & W E B T E C H N O L O G I E S

The Forest and the Trees: A Great Start on the Book-Length Memoir  cnf 20 w

Beginning Website Design  cs 21 a/b

64

44

Enhanced Website Design  cs 22

64

Creative Nonfiction: Telling the Truth  cnf 21 w

45

Beginning Programming: PHP  cs 41

65

Magazine Writing  egl 254 w

45

Revision Line by Line: A Three-Week Intensive  egl 250 w

46

Young Adult Novel Writing: Building Your Own World   fict 20 w

46

Poetry: The Image and the Line  poet 06 w

47

Facing the Void: An Introduction to Creative Writing  egl 60 w

42

Inspiration and Invention in Creative Writing  egl 15 w

42

Novel Writing: Inventing Reality  nvl 10 w

online certi f ic a te p rogr a m in no v el writing 47

Prof e ssiona l a n d Personal Development BUSINESS

The Entrepreneur’s Toolkit: Creating Executable Strategies for Entrepreneurs  bus 226

48

P E R S O N A L D E V E L O PM E N T

Positive Psychology and the Keys to Sustainable Happiness: Enhancing Social Intelligence  pdv 78

65

Compass Journey: A Personal Career and Life Strategizing Course  pdv 58

66

Resilient Aging: An Integrated Approach to Achieving Longevity  pdv 88

67

Writing Through Illness: Finding Strength in Storytelling  pdv 26

68

Looking In and Reaching Out: Relationship Skills That Work  wsp 143

69

Managing Perfectionism and Procrastination  wsp 165

69

Getting from an Early Idea to a Real Business  bus 217

49

Pu bl ic Progr a ms

Leadership and Decision-Making  bus 53

50

Building a Brand  bus 116

50

Creative Writing at Stanford: A History with Eavan Boland, Nancy Packer, Philip Levine, and Scott Turow

70

The Company Is the Content: Marketing in a Social World  bus 94

SMMMASH: “Language”

71

51

A Company of Authors

72

Building Innovative Subscription-Based Businesses  bus 185

51

How I Write: A Conversation with Clarence B. Jones

72

Cloud Computing: Selling and Marketing SaaS Solutions to the Enterprise  bus 105

52

The Other Bagpipes: Exotic and Lesser-Known Piping Traditions of the World

73

Lead with Business Intelligence: Mine Your Data for Faster, Better Decisions  bus 96

52

Competing in Global Markets with New Entrants (Like China)  bus 187

53

Medieval Matters: “We Fight For Liberty Alone”: Scotland and England in the Middle Ages and the 21st Century

73

Jasper Ridge’s 40th Anniversary: A Celebration:

Angel Investing for the Serious Investor  bus 204

53

Managing Innovation  bus 205

54

Strategic Marketing of High Tech and Clean Tech  bus 47

54

Persuasive Face-to-Face Business Communication  bus 112

55

Develop an Authentic Leadership Presence  wsp 194

55

Negotiation Mastery: Achieving Outstanding Results and Relationships  wsp 19 a/b

Buddhist Compassion Workshop with Norman Fischer and Spring Washam:

56

Coaching Skills for Leaders and Managers  wsp 97

56

Training in Compassion: Zen Teachings on the Practice of Lojong

75

How Much? Valuing Business and Investment Opportunities  wsp 195

Wisdom and Compassion: The Wings of Awakening

75

57

Haydn on Trial! An Evening with the Saint Michael Trio

76

Financial Planning for Parents  wsp 193

57

The Symphonic Body

76

Planning for 21st-Century Retirement  wsp 164

58

The Ethics of Wealth

77

Public Speaking  com 01

58

M ast er of Li ber a l A rts

Improvisationally Speaking  com 42

59

A Graduate Degree Program Designed for Working Adults

C O MM U N I C A T I O N

Professional English for Non-Native Speakers: The Art of Conversation  com 34

60

Presenting in English  com 23

60

Accent Reduction for Non-Native Speakers of English  com 39 a/b

61

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 7

Reviving the Science/Statecraft Dialogue Live Broadcast of National Public Radio’s Science Friday

74 74

Life and Shadow: Photographer Robert Buelteman’s Exploration of Plant Life at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve 74

78

G e n e r a l I n f o r m at i on Program Policies and Registration Form

80

7

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal arts and sciences

Liberal Arts and Sciences Archaeology 8

Art & Architecture Art Studio

9 11

A r t S t u d i o : P h o t o g r ap h y 1 3

CL A S S IC S 1 6 CRO S S RO A D S 1 7 C u r r e n t e v e n t s s

18

Da n c e 1 9

Fi lm 19

History 20 La n g u a g e s s 2 1 L i t e r at u r e 23 Music 25

Philosophy 27

Archaeology

C r a d l e s o f C i v i l i z at i o n : M e s o p o ta m i a n , M e d i t e r r a n e a n , a n d M e s oa m e r i c a n A rc h a e o l o g y

H

uman civilization emerged over the past seven millennia. This academic year, a sequence of Stanford Continuing Studies courses is charting the rise of three epicenters of civilization, each of which contributed to the full flourishing of humanity. The sequence started with Mesopotamian history and archaeology, covering civilizations emerging in the Fertile Crescent and Egypt; Winter quarter moved to Mediterranean history and archaeology; and Spring quarter will introduce students to Mesoamerican history and archaeology, exploring the Olmec, Teotihuacán, Oaxacan, Maya, and Mexica-Aztec cultures. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well.

P S YCHOLOGY YCHOLOGY 2 8 R e l i g i o u s s t u d i e s s

29

Science 30

S ta n f o r d S at u r d ay Universit y 34

T h e at e r & p e r fo r m a n c e s t u d i e s s 3 5

Mesoamerica

I

n our third course in the “Cradles of Civilization” sequence, Mesoamerica and the New World will stand out as great foundations of culture. Our look at South American civilizations will start out 3,000 years ago with the Olmec, followed by the Teotihuacán, Zapotec, Maya, and Mexica-Aztec, as well as the Wari and Inca. In some chronological sequence, we will examine important Olmec sites such as San Lorenzo and La Venta, along with Monte Alban in Oaxaca. The Maya sites of Tikal, Copan, and Palenque will be included along with Teotihuacán and Cuicuilco, and Aztec-Nahuatl sites such as Tenochtitlan. In the Andean South American region, we will examine the representative sites of Tiwanaku, Piquillacta, Cuzco, and Machu Picchu, among others. Inevitably, the course will cover the devastating impact of the Spanish Conquest on indigenous peoples and their cultural heritages by examining

Field of Wild Mustard; Photograph by Joel Simon

8

S ta n fo r d

Co n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 8

S t u d ie s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Archaeology

The instructor will discuss the date of the field trip on the first night of class. pat r i c k h u n t

Director, Stanford Alpine Archaeology Project; Visiting Scholar, Stanford Center for African Studies; Research Associate in Archeoethnobotany, Institute for EthnoMedicine

Patrick Hunt has taught at Stanford since 1993 and is also an associate at the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. His articles have appeared in World Archaeology, Journal of Roman Archaeology, and numerous other publications. He is the author of twelve books, including Ten Discoveries That Rewrote History, Myth and Art in Ekphrasis, and Critical Insights: The Inferno. Hunt is former director of the National Geographic Society Hannibal Expedition. He received a PhD from the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, University of London. ARC 3 3

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 2 units, $365

Art & Architecture

The Art of Renaissance Venice

V

enice is a city famous for its exotic, decaying, and seemingly dreamlike physical characteristics. During the Renaissance, Venice became one of Europe’s richest cities and cultivated the extraordinary accomplishments of the artists of its time, including the Bellinis, Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese. We will explore Venice’s remarkably diverse and unique achievements in painting and architecture, including a stunning selection of painted masterpieces from the Venice Gallerie dell’Accademia such as Giovanni Bellini’s San Giobbe altarpiece, Giorgione’s Tempest, Titian’s Pietà, and Paolo Veronese’s controversial The Feast in the House of Levi. Along the way, students will come to understand Venice as an international hub between the Eastern Mediterranean and Western Europe for the movement of both goods and ideas. The art of Renaissance Venice will be scrutinized with the city’s location in mind as a historic center of early globalization. We will explore how, as a result, the material culture absorbed, transformed, and transmitted antiquity, eastern culture, and its own very distinctive notions of the Renaissance to the rest of Europe and beyond. Contemporary accounts, traditional scholarship and connoisseurship, as well as recent critical perspectives will lead students to gain their own understanding of Venetian art from the 14th through the late 16th century.

art & Architecture

the ethnography of the time. Finally, we will cap off the course with a visit to the de Young Museum where we will see firsthand the great monuments and artifacts that survive the demise of pre-Columbian cultures.

e l i z a b e t h c a r ro l l c o n s ava r i

Lecturer in Art History and Visual Culture, San Jose State

Elizabeth Carroll Consavari has written articles for The Burlington Magazine and Arte Documento. Her forthcoming essay, “Tintoretto’s Holy Hermits at the Scuola Grande di San Rocco,” will appear in the anthology Mary Magdalene: Studies from the Middle Ages to the Baroque, Leiden. She has taught for the Colgate Venice Study Group and the Venice International University in Italy, and at Stanford and San Jose State. Consavari received a PhD from Indiana University.

Tulip; Photograph by Joel Simon

ARTH 08

Thursdays, 7:00 – 9:05 pm 9 weeks, April 11 – June 6 2 units, $365

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 9

9

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Modernist Artists in the South of France: From Renoir to Late Picasso

G

enerations of French modernists from the late 19th century to the era after World War II focused their artistic attention on the south of France, particularly on Provence and the Côte d’Azur. Cézanne, Renoir, Matisse, Bonnard, Leger, and Picasso spent many years there, while others such as Van Gogh and Vuillard came for shorter stays. The Fauve movement was born in the south, not in Provence but to the west of the Loire. This course will introduce students to the region and these artists, exploring how each responded to the climate and culture of the south. Issues of proximity to the exotic North African countries of Tunisia and Morocco and a fascination with “orientalism,” traditions of the bullfight, the Roman past and its ancient ruins, the obvious allure of the light and color of the south, as well as the cult of youth all played a part in drawing these major Modernists to this complex and sensuous area. Every class session will include original photographs taken on site.

Postwar Paris: French Art at Midcentury

F

rench art after World War II conveys expressions of irony, anxiety, humor, lyricism, and a new humanism, as responses to the war and its aftermath. Against the historical background of economic hardship, intellectual ferment, and artistic experimentation, this course will explore art of the 1940s and 1950s beginning with Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and the divergent moods in their art. We will then focus on the following topics: the new abstract art and its claim to “start from zero” (Jean Fautrier); the discovery and emulation of children’s and outsider art (Jean Dubuffet); inner and outer journeys to “other shores” of art (Antonin Artaud and insanity, Henri Michaux and Asia); existentialist meaning in the work of Alberto Giacometti; and surrealist and psychological aspects of the art of this period. Finally, we will consider the beginnings of conceptual art and installations that were to continue in subsequent developments in contemporary art (Christo and others). cla r k poli ng

br ig i d ba rton

Professor Emeritus of Art History, Emory University

Professor of Art History, Emerita, Santa Clara University

Clark Poling taught for thirty-three years at Emory University, serving as chair of the Art History department, director of the Michael C. Carlos Museum, and faculty curator of Works of Art on Paper. He has published books and articles on the Bauhaus and on Surrealism and has organized exhibitions of modern and contemporary art. He has taught courses at California College of the Arts, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute of UC Berkeley, University of San Francisco, and Stanford Continuing Studies. Poling has also taught summer courses in France for Emory and frequently lectures for museum audiences. He received a PhD from Columbia.

Brigid Barton teaches outreach courses for Santa Clara University and Stanford, and lectures in the Art Focus Lecture Program at the Cantor Arts Center. She also lectures at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, and she has taught at the Stanford in Berlin campus. Barton received a PhD in modern European art history from UC Berkeley. A R TH 2 22

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, May 7 – June 4 1 unit, $200

ART H 250

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 6 weeks, April 3 – May 8 1 unit, $240

10

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 10

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


A

nyone can draw the figure well. This course demystifies the process of creating an accurate, representational drawing of the human figure. Using tools and tricks of the trade, this course introduces various techniques and approaches used by famous artists, from the Old Masters to the Impressionists and Expressionists. We will work from the faithful rendering of da Vinci to the emotive gesture of Toulouse-Lautrec and Rodin to the dramatic distortion of Egon Schiele. Working from the live model, students will gain an understanding of basic human anatomy and develop their observational skills to create compelling compositions. We will incorporate a variety of materials, from the classic charcoal and conté to India ink, Chinese brush, and bamboo pen. Drawing the figure is an excellent way to explore the fundamentals of composition: negative/positive space, value, light, line variation, and the use of line and contrast to guide expressive response. In this intensive course, we will move from high-speed, thirty-second gestures, to longer in-depth observations, with exercises to unlock different ways of seeing and build confidence. All levels of experience are welcome.

y vette deas

Artist

Yvette Deas has shown work regionally and nationally across the US. Primarily a realist, figurative painter, her work focuses on the idiosyncratic and personal. Deas’ recent work explores human dissections through a micro lens, transforming them into terrain and texture. She received an MFA from Stanford, where she won the Centennial Teaching Award.

T

his course is designed for beginners who want to learn the basics of painting in acrylics. Students will develop a greater understanding of composition and develop their paint-handling skills. As the course progresses, students will paint from still life, photographic references, and finally, live models. Through a series of demonstrations, in-class painting, group critiques, and individual assistance from the instructor, students will develop their ability to mix and apply paint to achieve their desired effect. Focus topics include mixing acrylic paint, handling paint and media, color theory, value relationships, composition, proportion, depth, and paint application. Abstraction will also be discussed.

art studio

An Introduction to Figure Drawing

Art & Architecture

Basic Painting

Art Studio

m ich a el a zgou r

Artist

Michael Azgour’s work has been shown in galleries across the country, and his paintings are in several public and private collections in the United States and Europe. Specializing in abstract figurative painting, Azgour focuses on expressive and geometric abstractions of the figure. He received an MFA in studio art from Academy of Art University. ART 01

Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 6 2 units, $485 Limit: 17 Non-refundable model fee: $20

ART 3 6

Mondays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm 10 weeks, April 1 – June 10 2 units, $485 Limit: 17 Non-refundable model fee: $30 (No class on May 27)

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 11

11

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

The Art of Chinese Landscape Painting

C

hinese brush painting is one of the oldest living art forms in the world. Rooted in a rich tradition of more than 5,000 years, it is a fascinating and unusual art form. Each brush stroke is a defining move that cannot be corrected. More often than not, the simplicity of a Chinese painting belies the complex and demanding process that the artist went through to produce it. Among all the subjects of Chinese brush painting, perhaps one of the most awe-inspiring is the landscape. Chinese landscape artwork often captures the artist’s expressions of the heart, mind, and soul through their renditions of scenery in China. This course introduces students to the philosophy, concepts, fundamental techniques, materials, and basic composition of Chinese landscape painting. There will be a group art exhibit at the end of the course.

felix chan lim

Artist

Felix Lim has participated in more than 100 art exhibits and has conducted more than eighty lectures and painting workshops on Chinese brush painting over the past three decades. He was an associate professorial lecturer in painting for ten years, and his paintings are in private collections around the world. bet t y

“bobbi”

makani-lim

E

xpanding on the ideas and techniques explored in the instructor’s Winter course, “Painting: Exploring the Modern and Abstract,” and other related courses, students will work on developing a stronger sense of their own voices within the creative process. As painters gain proficiency, they often work on a series of paintings in order to explore an idea beyond a single attempt. This allows for a concentration that helps build a body of work. During this course, students will work on their own series, and they will be encouraged to keep a painting journal to help document their visual thoughts. Class time will be dedicated to slide lectures of art (from ancient times to contemporary), individual and group critique, and actual painting. Students will be encouraged to visit galleries and museums to see paintings in person and deepen their knowledge of making and exhibiting artwork. The course will culminate in the completion of a body of work and a group exhibit. Prior painting, drawing, or collage experience is expected. While this course builds upon the instructor’s Winter course, each course can be taken independently as well. k at i e h aw k i n s o n

Artist

Lecturer, College of Environmental Design, UC Berkeley

Bobbi Makani-Lim has co-taught Chinese brush painting with Felix Chan Lim for many years, and has assisted in the organization of several Chinese painting exhibits. She has been actively involved in developing teaching methods and courses related to Chinese culture and the arts, as well as other courses related to Chinese business studies.

Katie Hawkinson has worked in a range of media and processes, including oil painting, egg tempera, drawing, and printmaking, in order to respond to the richness of the environment that inspires her. She received an MFA in painting from the University of Washington.

ART 228

Saturdays, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm 8 weeks, April 6 – May 25 2 units, $485 Limit: 17

12

Advanced Painting: Exploring the Modern and Abstract

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 12

ART 214

Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm 9 weeks, April 3 – May 29 2 units, $485 Limit: 17

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Landscape Photography in Yosemite: A Field Workshop

J

oin us for a hands-on field photography workshop in Yosemite National Park in late April. This workshop will explore four different areas of the park with group shoots in the morning and afternoon. There will also be ample free time to explore other areas of the park with our cameras. Before the Yosemite excursion, we will have two prep meetings on campus to cover the basics of landscape photography, drawing inspiration from the classical black-and-white works of Ansel Adams and the color photography of Galen Rowell. After the trip, we will meet twice again in the classroom to review the student work from the weekend excursion. This course is open to beginning- and intermediatelevel photographers looking to expand their shooting skills and broaden their vision. Students must own and be familiar with their cameras to take full advantage of this course. The field shoots in Yosemite will take place on April 27 and 28. Transportation, lodging, meals, and park entry costs will be the responsibility of the student. joh n todd

Photographer

John Todd has been the team photographer for Major League Soccer’s San Jose Earthquakes since the team’s inception in 1996. He also owns and operates Interna­tional Sports Images, the official photography supplier to the US men’s and women’s soccer teams, Stanford Athletics, UC Berkeley, and the Mavericks International surf contest. Todd’s work has appeared in Sports Illustrated, ESPN The Magazine, Time, and The New York Times, and has been shown at the Smithsonian Institution. ART 5 6

Classroom sessions: 4 Wednesdays, April 17, April 24, May 8, and May 22, 7:00 – 8:50 pm Yosemite field shoots: Saturday and Sunday, April 27 and 28 2 units, $525 Limit: 15 Special refund deadline: April 10

Travel Photography: Around the Corner and Around the World

T

his course will explore how to translate the fundamentals of photography in a way that conveys a sense of place. We will discuss how to create expressive landscapes, environmental portraiture, and photographic essays that reveal your unique impression of a destination. You will learn how to do preparatory research; select and pack equipment appropriate for your destination; improvise on the road; anticipate action; and apply familiar rules of composition to unfamiliar scenes. Additionally, you will explore how different focal lenses portray scenes in different ways and how shutter speeds and apertures can be used to create your unique interpretation of time and space. You will learn how to use people or other elements to show scale; photograph in low light; capture action and activity; and make images from different perspectives. Integrating digital tools, we will cover how to store content while traveling as well as editing, archiving, and sharing photographs once you return home. Through carefully chosen nearby field assignments and completion of a personal project, we will work to develop your unique photographic vision whether you plan to travel around the corner or around the world. This course is for students of all levels although some prior experience with photography and computers is expected.

Art studio Side bar no rule/bottom rule Art studio: photography

Art Studio: Photography

This course includes a one-on-one field-shooting session with the instructor where students will exercise, explore, and evolve their skills. The field shoots will take place on May 11 and 12, and students will schedule an appointment with the instructor after the course begins. joel si mon

Photographer; Stanford Photographer Laureate

Joel Simon studied photography with Leo Holub at Stanford and was the photography instructor and photo-documentarian with Stanford Travel/Study for twelve years. He has been involved in more than 100 travel programs with Stanford, the Smithsonian, the World Wildlife Fund, the Harvard Museum of Natural History, and elsewhere. He maintains a studio and stock photography agency in Menlo Park. ART 226

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 8 weeks, April 2 – May 21 1 unit, $425 Limit: 20 R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 13

13

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Digital Photography, Photoshop, and Digital Printmaking

I

n this course, students will learn how to take better digital pictures, improve the photos they take through editing in Photoshop, and make successful digital prints. This course is open to photographers of all levels. A basic overview of digital photography will be provided, enabling students to improve the photos they take with whatever camera they have. Topics covered will include lighting (natural and flash), lens choices, composition, and depth of field. We will go over portraiture, still life, event photography, action photography, and landscape photography. We will then move to the computer where we will learn how to effectively and efficiently process and edit photos using Adobe Photoshop. Topics covered will include color correction, cropping, retouching (“airbrushing”), cloning (object removal), Camera RAW processing, preparing images for the web, and resizing. Using Photo­shop, we will learn the steps to take to ensure that our prints come out looking as good as we see them on our screens. The course will culminate in each student preparing either a series of photographic digital prints or a custom-bound photo book. Students must bring their own laptop to class, with Photoshop installed (most recent version is not necessary). er i n gleeson

Photographer

Erin Gleeson has been working for the last ten years in New York and San Francisco. She taught photography at the Fashion Institute of Technology for four years and at The Art Institute in Sunnyvale. She primarily photographs food, and her work has appeared in numerous newspapers, magazines, and cookbooks including The New York Times, Gourmet, Wine Spectator, and Edible magazine. She writes the food blog The Forest Feast, from which she is developing a cookbook. Gleeson received an MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts.

P hotogr a ph y

as

A rt

I

n this three-course sequence, students will become well-versed in the technical aspects of picture making (from camera control to fine printing) and the arc of photo history from past to present. Students will finish with a portfolio of photographs centered on a coherent theme. The sequence started with an introduction for those with no experience in photography; Spring quarter’s course will center on further technical exploration as students develop a personal style of picture making with frequent group critiques; and the Summer quarter course will be project-driven and geared toward building a strong analogue or digital portfolio. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well. Intermediate Photography

T

his course is a hands-on exploration of both analogue and digital photography as contemporary art, focusing on strengthening your personal portfolio of images, as well as your photographic voice. After a quick review of basic camera operation and darkroom techniques, we will focus on refining your image-making process and revisit darkroom printing intensively. In addition to the analogue darkroom, we will also review digital photographic technologies, including digital capture and film scanning as well as inkjet printing. As you expose and print new photographs, we will discuss the technical, compositional, and conceptual aspects of your work in a series of group critiques. These discussions, in addition to readings, lectures, and screenings, will deepen your knowledge of photography’s history, as well as its

ART 35

Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 6 2 units, $465 Limit: 20

14

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 14

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Students will shoot 35mm film and can use digital on some projects. A 35mm camera is required. a da m c l i f f o r d k at s e f f

Photographer

Adam Katseff’s work has been shown across the US and is in both public and private collections. He has worked as a master printer and exhibition consultant, specializing in large-scale analogue and digital prints for museums and galleries, including MoMA, the Smithsonian, and the Louvre. He received a BFA in photography from Massachusetts College of Art and an MFA in studio art practice from Stanford. ART 3 3

Mondays, 6:00 – 9:00 pm 10 weeks, April 1 – June 10 2 units, $465 Limit: 20 Non-refundable lab fee: $50 (No class on May 27)

Developing Your Photographic Vision

T

his course is for photographers wanting to go beyond the simple “taking” of photographs, and move to the next level where creative intention drives individual picture making, and selective editing leads to a manageable and clearly defined body of images. Through a series of progressive exercises, discussions, and evaluation of works in progress, we will investigate what makes a well-formed image, and how to edit photographs to form coherent groups. We will focus on refining photographic techniques for predetermined outcomes; develop critical tools to explore the narrative, aesthetic, and emotional aspects of photographs; and view slides and original prints of historically significant photographers for comparison. The goals are to understand how artistic and technical decisions lead to successful images; to build a dialogue with your creative process; and to produce a finished selection of work that reflects your personal style and concerns. This course is intended for intermediate- to advanced-level students. Prior experience with photography and computers is expected.

Art studio: photography

trajectory within the context of contemporary art. A prior understanding of basic camera operation and black-and-white darkroom printing is recommended for those taking this course.

Students may work in a black-and-white, color, film, or digital format. (Students will not have access to the Stanford darkroom.) t hom se m per e

Executive Director, PhotoAlliance

Dogwood; Photograph by Joel Simon

Thom Sempere has been actively involved with the photography community in the Bay Area since 1977. He is the executive director of PhotoAlliance, an organization dedicated to supporting contemporary photography. He teaches courses on the history of photography and digital photography at the San Francisco Art Institute, and has been a visiting faculty member in the Stanford Department of Art & Art History. Sempere received an MFA from the University of Washington. ART 237

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $425 Limit: 22

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 15

15

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

California Coastal Photography: From the Monterey Peninsula to Big Sur

T

he California coastline stretching from Monterey to Big Sur is a natural collage of bold headlands and beaches strewn with rugged stone, brightly colored aquatic plants, and sand. For decades, the natural beauty of this place has played an important role in the evolution of modern photography, inspiring such masters as Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, and Imogen Cunningham. This workshop begins with a full-day class session on the Stanford campus where we will cover topics related to outdoor photography, including understanding light, modifying light with reflectors and flash, lens selection from wide-angle to telephoto to macro, effective composition, and how digital tools can expand our photographic repertoire. In the field on the Monterey Peninsula on days two and three, we will sharpen our photographic skills at the famed tide pools of Point Lobos and spots along the dramatic Highway 1 coastline between Carmel and Big Sur. With a thoughtful blend of guided and independent photographic shoots carefully choreographed with the low tides to allow for macro and wide-angle opportunities, this workshop will offer valuable resources for the novice and experienced photographer alike. After the field sessions, there will be a final class meeting to review student work. This workshop is for students of all levels although some prior experience with photography and computers is expected. Transportation, lodging, meals, and park entry costs will be the responsibility of the student. joel si mon

Photographer; Stanford Photographer Laureate

Joel Simon studied photography with Leo Holub at Stanford and was the photography instructor and photo-documentarian with Stanford Travel/Study for twelve years. He has been involved in more than 100 travel programs with Stanford, the Smithsonian, the World Wildlife Fund, the Harvard Museum of Natural History, and elsewhere. WSP 190

Classroom sessions: Friday, May 17, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm, and Thursday, May 23, 6:30 – 8:50 pm Field shoots: Saturday and Sunday, May 18 and 19 2 units, $495 Limit: 20 Special refund deadline: May 10

16

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 16

C l a ss i cs

Sex, Lies, and Politics: The Comedies of Aristophanes

T

his course will introduce students to the comedies of the Athenian comic playwright Aristophanes. Like tragedy, comedy traces its origins back to the ancient Greeks. However, of the earliest Greek comedies only eleven complete plays survive, all by Aristophanes. We will read six of them: Wasps, Clouds, Birds, Lysistrata, Women at the Thesmophoria, and Assemblywomen. To readers of today, these plays often seem strikingly modern in their approach to humor. They are characterized by biting political satire, a fearless use of obscenity, imaginative plots brilliantly conceived, and outrageous gender-bending. At the same time, Aristophanes’ comedies remain firmly embedded in their historical and cultural context. Exploring this context reveals the darker side of ancient Greek comedy. The comedies of Aristophanes were written in the last decades of the 5th century and the first decade or so of the 4th century bce. During this period, the long Peloponnesian War had taken its toll on Athenian citizens as well as their democratic institutions. Students will find that behind the exuberance of Aristophanic humor a somber picture of Athens emerges, and it is through the lens of comedy that Aristophanes confronted some of the most serious issues of his day. b a r b a r a c l ay t o n

Visiting Scholar in Classics; Lecturer, Stanford’s Thinking Matters Program

Barbara Clayton has taught Classics at Oberlin College, Santa Clara University, and Stanford, where she also taught in the Introduction to the Humanities program. Her academic interests include ancient epic poetry, ancient comedy, mythology, and the relationship between Classics and popular culture. She is the author of A Penelopean Poetics: Reweaving the Feminine in Homer’s Odyssey, and most recently, an article that offers a new reading of the Cyclops episode in the Odyssey, Book 9. Clayton received an MA from Princeton in French literature and a PhD from Stanford in Classics, specializing in the poetry of Homer. C LA 42

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 8 weeks, April 4 – May 23 1 unit, $305

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


h .

C

rossroads is a comparative journey that will take you to a pinnacle moment of Western culture for five weeks, and then to a paired episode from a contemporaneous non-Western culture for another four weeks. Every course will be richly illustrated with slides of art, architecture, and archaeology; and books from the world’s best literature, philosophy, or religious thought will be the primary reading for each segment. We invite you to join us.

Trecento: Marco Polo’s Travels and Boccaccio’s Decameron

T

he Trecento (the 14th century) was a pivotal period for Italy. Although the first half of the century had witnessed Dante’s Commedia and the frescoes of Giotto, the plague of 1348 cast a dark shadow over the remainder of the century. The northern cities of Italy lost half their population. Trade was drastically reduced, and foreign armies threatened many citystates. Nevertheless, the spirit that had dominated these cities before the plague never completely disappeared. Ancient customs did fade away and new ones replaced them, but the aspirations of the people remained. Marco Polo (1254–1324) fired their imagination with tales of distant lands, promising adventure, romance, and extraordinary profits. Boccaccio (1313–1375), likewise, composed stories that both entertained readers and encouraged them to experience the world around them. Both Polo’s Travels and Boccaccio’s Decameron, the two works we will examine in the course, underscored the delights that the secular world could offer, and perhaps more importantly, reinforced the spirit that was to generate the Renaissance.

North Africa in the 14th Century: Ibn Batutah and The Thousand and One Nights

I

n the 14th century, North Africa was divided into several powerful states. In the west, Morocco thrived under the Marinid dynasty (1244–1465). In the east, the Mamluks (1250–1517) governed Egypt and enhanced the prestige of Cairo as Islam’s greatest city. Pilgrims, traders, and artists flocked to Cairo. The earliest version of The Thousand and One Nights was assembled there. Although its stories originated in India, Persia, and Byzantium, it was Egypt’s great metropolis that inspired their unique urban settings. It was also in these western regions, from Nasrid Granada to Seljuk Egypt, that great scholars and explorers emerged. A Moroccan, Ibn Batutah (1304–1369), was foremost among these. His Rihla (1354–1355) describes his journeys from one end of Eurasia to the other. This fascination with distant horizons so amply illustrated in the Rihla and in the Nights, both of which we will read for the course, mirrors that of the merchants, scholars, and explorers who forged one of North Africa’s most fascinating periods.

crossroads

-

Crossroads

classics

n y

R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

Art studio: photography

. ,

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m .

e dwa r d s t e i d l e

Lecturer in Continuing Studies, Stanford

Edward Steidle’s area of specialization is medieval art and literature. He is currently working on comparative approaches to the study of ancient European, Asian, and Central American cultures. Steidle also leads travel groups to historic sites in western Europe and the Mediterranean. He received a PhD from UC Berkeley. CRD 53

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 9:15 pm 4 weeks, May 7 – May 28 1 unit, $200

e dwa r d s t e i d l e

Lecturer in Continuing Studies, Stanford

Edward Steidle’s area of specialization is medieval art and literature. He is currently working on comparative approaches to the study of ancient European, Asian, and Central American cultures. Steidle also leads travel groups to historic sites in western Europe and the Mediterranean. He received a PhD from UC Berkeley. CRD 5 2

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 2 – April 30 1 unit, $200 17

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 17

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Current events

Social Democracy: Achieving Prosperity and Justice in the US, Europe, China, Bhutan, and Beyond

M

ost of us were brought up in a world divided between two overwhelming choices: Capitalism and Democracy versus Communism and Dictatorship. But since the collapse of Communism in 1989, we have begun living in a radically different world. Our choices are no longer between good and evil, between one system and another. Our world is characterized by many problems and potential decisions that are not of the “either/or” variety. We have seemingly lost our way, become confused between the competing demands for democracy and justice on the one hand, and the workings of the “market” on the other. This course will explore Social Democracy as a third system, viewing it as a social, economic, and political system in its own right, and as a radical critique of contemporary capitalism and of Communism. We will look at its historical roots and at the ways in which Social Democracy today is experimenting in various parts of the world with ways to rebalance our societies, economies, and politics, and to respond to globalization and to the environmental crisis. We will pay particular attention to the US, Scandinavia, and Canada. We will also focus on China, where a vigorous school of thought and experiment (rarely heard about in the West) is seeking a “way out,” and on Bhutan, which is proposing a“new paradigm” based partly on Buddhist values. Several films will be screened as part of the course.

m a r k m a nca ll

Professor of History, Emeritus, Stanford

Mark Mancall is interested in alternative European and non-Western political, social, and economic theories as well as practical policies and politics. A citizen of both Bhutan and the US, he has served as an official in the Bhutanese government and is currently on the Steering Committee of the Bhutanese government’s project to develop practical policies to realize a Gross National Happiness society. He received a PhD from Harvard. POL 32

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 18

A

merica’s global intelligence capacity has been generally considered essential to defending our national security; sometimes dismissed as bloated and redundant in carrying out its mission; or even called subversive by a public that often has little understanding of its objectives and methods. In this course, Thomas Fingar and Barry Schutz will apply their experience, knowledge, and insight in explaining how the American intelligence community is organized; what it does; and, to the extent possible, how it works. The instructors will illustrate their analyses with examples from Fingar’s expertise in China and North Korea and Schutz’s experience in Southern and Eastern Africa. Internationally recognized guest speakers will augment the course. Ambassador Karl Eikenberry will look at both civilian and military intelligence in Afghanistan and Pakistan; David Holloway will describe and analyze the role of American intelligence in dealing with nuclear development and disarmament in Russia and other nuclear powers such as Israel, Pakistan, and North Korea; and Amy Zegart, a national security expert, will focus on the political, social, and economic dimensions of American intelligence.

b a r ry s c h u t z

Visiting Scholar, Center for African Studies, Stanford

Barry Schutz has been a senior analyst in the Africa Office of the US State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research, a course manager at the US Foreign Service Institute, and a professor of strategic intelligence at the National Intelligence University. Schutz has taught at Georgetown University, the Naval Postgraduate School, and overseas. He received a PhD in political science from UCLA. t hom a s f i nga r

The Inaugural Oksenberg-Rohlen Distinguished Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford

Thomas Fingar served as the first deputy director of US national intelligence for analysis. He also served as assistant secretary of the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research. He is the author of Reducing Uncertainty: Intelligence Analysis and National Security. Fingar received a PhD in political science from Stanford. P O L 181

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $365 18

Demystifying American Intelligence

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 8 weeks, April 2 – May 21 1 unit, $305 S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


t

g . .

Brazilian Dance

The Golden Age of French and Italian Cinema

S

S

Due to its short format, this workshop may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade.

l au r a w i t t m a n

ome of the best-known dances in the world ori- ginated in Brazil. Brazilian dances range from energetic, gracious, sensual, and reverential, to comic. The samba is the most universally recognized dance genre, but even within samba sub-varieties reflect dichotomies: urban vs. rural, nightclub vs. street, or improvised vs. structured. This one-day workshop introduces several Brazilian dances in the context of their origins and how sociopolitical shifts have altered and reshaped the dances over time. The history of Brazilian dance reflects the mosaic of influences from West Africa, Portugal, and indigenous races of the Americas. Afro-Brazilian cultural identity represents itself through samba, carnival dances of Rio de Janeiro and Salvador, and devotional dances of the Candomblé religion. Portuguese cultural roots are experienced through Gaúcho dances of the south and contradanças from the northeast. Video examples will show the dances in their cultural settings. The workshop will emphasize the power of dance as cultural representation. Creating community through dance, and expressing joy, reverence, flirtation, and pride are all aspects of this short introduction to Brazilian dance.

ome of the best filmmakers of France and Italy worked in the decades from the 1940s to the 1960s—what is now fondly remembered as the Golden Age of French and Italian cinema. The directors include Jean Renoir, Roberto Rossellini, Marcel Carné, Vittorio de Sica, Alain Resnais, Federico Fellini, Jean-Luc Godard, Pietro Germi, Bernardo Bertolucci, and Lina Wertmüller. Each developed a style, technical innovations, humor, and a vision of life that have become legend. For each, we will look at one iconic film, and examine its social and historical context, and its reception and influence, in order to explain its symbolism, evaluate its emotional and intellectual power, and elucidate its technical features. Key questions to discuss will be: What makes a film become a classic, whose ability to affect us persists to this day, even as cinema has changed so drastically? What is the role of World War II— a traumatic time for Europe—in these films, as they often seek sources of laughter or hope within desperate situations? How do they reflect major social changes that are still with us, concerning sexual liberation, politics, and religion? Among the films studied will be Renoir’s The Rules of the Game, Rosellini’s Open City, Godard’s Breathless, and Fellini’s La Dolce Vita.

Senior Lecturer in Dance, Emerita, Stanford

Associate Professor of French and Italian Literature and Culture, Stanford

Susan Cashion taught Mexican, Latin American, and modern dance for thirty-five years at Stanford. She is the founder of the Cashion Cultural Legacy, whose mission is to research, preserve, and create materials related to Mexican dance and expressive culture. Cashion has choreographed for TheatreWorks, been a panelist for the San Francisco Ethnic Dance Festival, and has received several CAC and NEA grants for her work in multicultural arts and education. She received a PhD in education from Stanford.

Laura Wittman grew up in Europe and West Africa, developing an early passion for comparing cultures. She is the author of a book on the literature and film of World War I, The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Modern Mourning, and the Reinvention of Mystical Body, which received the Marraro Award of the Society for Italian Historical Studies. Wittman is currently working on a book entitled Lazarus’ Silence: Near-Death Experiences in Fiction, Science, and Popular Culture. She received a PhD from Yale.

WS P 5 1

FLM 94

susa n cashion

Saturday, June 1 10:00 am – 4:00 pm $135 Special refund deadline: May 25

do a tntcoem friul lme Sci u dr e rbeanrt neov ernutlse / b

e d

Film

Dance

Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 2 units, $365

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 19

19

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Bad Guys We Love: America’s Romance with the Movie Gangster

A

merica’s relationship with the screen gangster has always been complicated. They’re criminals, but they’re smart—organized for one thing—and they take big risks for high rewards. They have colorful lives, friendships, loyalties, and rituals, and at varying times they’ve been portrayed on screen as symbols of societal decay and as emblems of American business, both good and bad. For more than eighty years, the gangster movie is where Americans have confronted both their romantic attraction for rugged individualism and their moral uneasiness with cutthroat business practices. With a mix of clips and features, we begin where it all began in the early 1930s, when the early depictions of gangster villains soon gave way to gangster heroes— from an ambitious Edward G. Robinson in Little Caesar, to a sociopathic but cuddly James Cagney in The Public Enemy. From there it’s on to the modern era, from The Godfather films through the 1983 Scarface and on to Goodfellas and The Sopranos. If these guys are really so bad, why do we root for them? And what does that say about us and about America in the years since 1930?

m ick lasa lle

San Francisco History

T

he very name “San Francisco” can conjure up a kaleidoscope of historic images, including Spanish and Mexican settlers, the Gold Rush, the Barbary Coast, Chinatown, Emperor Norton, the Great Earthquake of 1906, the 1934 Waterfront Strike, Fillmore jazz, the Beats, Jim Jones, the Summer of Love, Harvey Milk, and so many more. This course explores these familiar elements, but also digs deeper to consider the city’s changes from the time of the original native Ohlone settlers to the turn of the 21st century. Themes to be explored include immigration; housing; labor and business; recreation and the arts; the city as both natural and built environment; political protest and community organizing; and the changing role of local government. How has San Francisco inspired people to pursue such seemingly divergent goals as wealth or pleasure or justice? How have San Franciscans repeatedly sought to transform themselves and their communities? Can lessons from the past help us imagine the city’s future? Students will do readings and watch films on their own time. The final class meeting will be a field trip to San Francisco, the greatest city on the West Coast, on June 8.

Film Critic, San Francisco Chronicle

dr ew bou r n

Mick LaSalle is the author of three books: Complicated Women: Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood; Dangerous Men: Pre-Code Hollywood and the Birth of Modern Man; and The Beauty of the Real: What Hollywood Can Learn from Contemporary French Actresses. He was the co-author and associate producer of the Complicated Women documentary, which debuted on Turner Classic Movies in 2003. LaSalle has written more than 1,500 reviews for the San Francisco Chronicle.

Historical Curator, Lane Medical Library, Stanford School of Medicine

FL M 9 5

Thursdays, 6:30 – 9:00 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 6 2 units, $365

20

History

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 20

Drew Bourn’s research interests center on San Francisco. He served as archivist at Harvard Medical School before coming to Stanford, where he has overseen the Stanford Medical History Center since 2007. He is the founder and facilitator of Stanford Archivists. Bourn serves on the board of the Stanford Historical Society, and volunteers as a consultant to the GLBT Historical Society in San Francisco. He received a PhD from UC Santa Barbara and an MLIS in archives management from Simmons College. HIS 14

Classroom sessions: 9 Wednesdays, April 3 – May 29, 7:00 – 8:50 pm San Francisco field trip: Saturday, June 8 2 units, $365

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


W

hat conditions have led women to emerge as political leaders in the 20th century across the globe, allowing them to make distinctive contributions as heads of state and political activists? This course introduces students to women’s history in a global context and focuses on a series of important women leaders in the 20th century. We will begin the course by outlining the history of patriarchy around the world and then consider the growth of feminist politics. We will then look at movements for women’s self-determination that emerged in the 19th and 20th centuries— movements that set the stage for the emergence of women as national political leaders and activists in the 20th century. Finally, we will focus on a series of global women leaders who have made a mark on their time— Eleanor Roosevelt, Golda Meir, Margaret Thatcher, Benazir Bhutto, Hillary Clinton, and Aung San Suu Kyi. Along the way, as we explore their biographies and historical impact, we will consider the distinctive contribution women leaders are making to our world. m a rg o h o r n

Lecturer in History, Stanford

Margo Horn is a social historian specializing in the history of women, the history of family, and the social history of medicine and psychiatry. She is the author of Before It’s Too Late: The Child Guidance Movement in the United States, 1922–1945. She received an MA and a PhD from Tufts.

Languages

Beginning Chinese III

F

or those starting to move toward proficiency in the world’s most spoken language, Beginning Chinese III is designed to increase your confidence in Mandarin and your knowledge of Chinese writing. The third course in a three-quarter sequence of introductory Mandarin Chinese, this course is geared for students who know approximately 300 words and have some rudimentary knowledge of conversational Mandarin. We will finish the textbook Integrated Chinese Book I, and also use some supplementary materials. Students will improve their Chinese and have a lot of fun in the process.

ou r lye /lbaontgt u es S i dfei lbma rhni sot r oamg r ule

Global Women Leaders

x i ao fa n g z h o u

Lecturer in Chinese, Stanford

Xiaofang Zhou has taught Mandarin Chinese at all levels at NYU, the China Institute, Beijing Language and Culture University, Princeton, and Columbia. She specializes in 20th-century Chinese literature. Zhou received an MA from Beijing Language and Culture University. C HN 03

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $395 Limit: 27

HIS 1 5

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 6 weeks, April 4 – May 9 1 unit, $240

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 21

21

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Beginning French III

T

his course is designed for students who have completed Beginning French II or who have had basic exposure to French communication skills. The course also provides an appropriate review for students with travel plans to French-speaking countries. Topics covered will include accepting or declining invitations, expressing what you want to do, asking questions, and explaining what happened (past narration). Students will develop linguistic strategies enabling them to negotiate travel-related situations, describe past events and memories, and offer suggestions and advice. Discussion will focus on practices and traditions in French and francophone contexts. The textbook will be supplemented by video, short expository texts, and film clips. Instruction will be in French.
 h e at h e r h owa r d

Lecturer in French, Stanford

Heather Howard is the coordinator for French at the Stanford Language Center. She received a PhD in 18th-century French literature from UCLA. Her publications include articles on 18th-century theater and the female performer. Howard has taught French at several institutions, including Stanford, UCLA, USC, and Scripps College. FR N 0 3

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 2 units, $395 Limit: 27

Beginning Italian III

T

his is the last course of a three-quarter sequence in Beginning Italian, but it is also open to anyone with previous exposure to the language. The objective of this course is to enable students to progress in written and oral language while improving their conversational fluency with essential grammar and vocabulary. Media in Italian, such as videos, cassettes, newspapers, and magazines, will be used in the classroom. The course textbook offers students an interactive approach to learning Italian and uses a “building block” method to help students quickly understand both dialogue and narrative. Since the class will be small, students will receive a great deal of individualized attention, tailored to their learning goals.

22

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 22

g i ova n n i t e m p e s ta

Lecturer in Italian, Stanford

Giovanni Tempesta has been at Stanford since 1983 and has taught at all levels of language instruction. He is the author of the Italian grammar book Questa bellissima lingua italiana, impariamola insieme! and an Italian translation of Robert Service’s The Cremation of Sam McGee and Other Verses. His collection of poetry, Acque, lutulente e chiare (Waters, Muddy and Clear), was published in 2009. ITA 03

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $395 Limit: 27

Beginning Spanish III

¡V

en a charlar y explorar con nosotros! This is the last course in a three-quarter sequence of Beginning Spanish, but newcomers with previous exposure to Spanish are welcome. During the past two quarters, students have learned to meet and mingle with others, talk about their interests and activities past and present, and ask others about theirs. This quarter, we will learn to interact on a more sophisticated level, expressing opinions, describing our professional plans, and narrating past events. Through video and reading materials, students will learn to effectively interpret Spanish and interact with native speakers to fulfill basic needs. Students should find this course both useful and fun, whether they are traveling to a Spanish-speaking country this summer, or staying right here in the US — the world’s fifth-largest Spanish-speaking country.

m a r í a - c r i s t i n a u r ru e l a

Lecturer in Spanish, Stanford

María-Cristina Urruela specializes in 19th-century Iberian Peninsular literature and has taught at Harvard, Middlebury, Texas A&M International, and Stanford since receiving a PhD from the University of Texas. Her translations of short stories by Emilia Pardo Bazán and María del Pilar Sinués have been published by the Modern Language Association. SPA 03

Mondays, 7:00 – 9:05 pm 9 weeks, April 1 – June 3 2 units, $395 Limit: 27 (No class on May 27)

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


g

charles junkerman

Associate Provost and Dean of Stanford Continuing Studies

A Terrible Beauty: Cultural Revival and Political Rebellion in Ireland

T

his ten-week course aims to introduce those who are strongly interested in pursuing a degree in the Master of Liberal Arts program to the kind of seminar they would likely encounter in the program. Students will face the same kind of intellectual challenges, the same kind of opportunities to engage in weekly discussion, and the same kind of stimulus to write persuasive research essays. In the last decades of the 19th century, Ireland experienced a dramatic cultural renaissance that saw the revival of the Gaelic language, the reinvention of Irish sports, the establishment of a national theater, the recovery of thousands of folksongs and tales, and the emergence of some of the greatest poets and playwrights of modern times. Alongside this cultural activity, political associations such as the Irish Republican Brotherhood and Sinn Fein gained momentum. Together, they gave definition to Ireland’s smoldering opposition to British colonialism, which culminated in the Easter Rising of 1916, followed by the War of Independence and the Irish Civil War that ended only in 1923. In this seminar, we will read the work of poets and playwrights of the Irish Revival (Wilde, Yeats, Synge, and O’Casey, among others) and study the historical events that made the names of political actors as celebrated in Irish memory as the poets, including Michael Collins, Patrick Pearse, Big Jim Larkin, Maud Gonne, and James Connolly. We will also find time to read Brian Friel’s brilliant play Translations; Roddy Doyle’s novel A Star Called Henry; and watch Neil Jordan’s great film Michael Collins.

Charles Junkerman received a PhD in comparative literature from UC Berkeley, and has been at Stanford since 1983. He teaches courses on American literature (especially Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman), Irish literature, and European cultural history from the Enlightenment to the present. In 2009, he received the Kenneth M. Cuthbertson Award for exceptional contributions to Stanford. In September 2013, he will be the faculty lecturer on a walking tour around the Irish Sea with Stanford Travel/Study.

g unaog e S i d el a bn ar rs u l el/i tbeortattoumr er u l e

l

Liter ature

LIT 200

Mondays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 1 – June 10 2 units, $445 Limit: 18 (No class on May 27)

Iceland Poppies; Photograph by Joel Simon

Students are required to take this course for Credit, submit written work, and contribute to class discussions, as happens in all MLA seminars. However, this course may not be taken for a Letter Grade, though students’ written work will receive extensive feedback from the instructor. For more information on the MLA Program, please see page 78.

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 23

23

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Shakespeare and His Elizabethan World

Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov

T

T

his course explores Shakespeare in the context of the society that shaped him. Shakespeare’s plays are usually experienced outside of their historical context, watched onstage or read from an anthology. In this course, we will put Shakespeare in his historical moment, the rich tapestry of Elizabethan England. It was a world that witnessed the “end of the old and the start of the new,” as inherited ideas clashed with new thinking and new discoveries, upending familiar ideas and institutions. Together, we will look at Shakespeare’s plays alongside these historical and cultural shifts. For example, we will read The Taming of the Shrew alongside a 16th-century marriage manual, exploring the relationship between men and women at a time when England’s rigidly patriarchal society was ruled by an indomitable Queen. We will also read The Merchant of Venice, tracking Shakespeare’s sense of the difference between Christians and Jews at a time when the Reformation had divided English Christianity against itself. Othello will give us the opportunity to examine how Islam and the world to the East were objects of fascination and revulsion for European audiences, as the two were brought together in voyages of discovery and growing international trade. And The Tempest, read with stories of the New World, will provide a window into a continent on the verge of discovery. No prior experience with Shakespeare is required, just a desire to understand the real historical context in which the Bard wrote his plays.
 a biga il heald

Lecturer in Literature, UC Santa Cruz

Abigail Heald received a PhD from Princeton, where she studied Shakespeare and Renaissance literature. After a three-year fellowship teaching in Stanford’s Introduction to the Humanities program, she currently teaches courses on drama and the Renaissance at UC Santa Cruz. She is writing a book on the relationship between art and emotion in Shakespeare’s work. Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 8 weeks, April 4 – May 23 1 unit, $305 Limit: 40

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 24

a n n e h ru s k a

Independent Scholar

Anne Hruska received a PhD in Slavic literature from UC Berkeley. She has taught at UC Berkeley and the University of Missouri, and was a fellow in the Introduction to the Humanities program at Stanford. She has published articles on 19th-century Russian literature in The Russian Review, Christianity and Literature, Slavic and East European Journal, and Tolstoy Studies Journal. Hruska is currently working on a book exploring the meaning of emancipation in 19th-century Russian prose. LIT 24

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $365

LIT 23

24

he novel The Brothers Karamazov is widely recognized as Dostoevsky’s masterpiece. Written at the end of his life, as Dostoevsky was mourning his beloved three-year-old son Alyosha, The Brothers Karamazov is both a gripping story of murder and revenge, and also a profound exploration of faith, freedom, love, and loss. The Brothers Karamazov was ferociously popular among the Russian reading public when it was first published in 1879–1880. In part, that was because The Brothers Karamazov is such tremendous fun to read, with a melodramatic plot filled with twists and turns, a murder mystery, lust, violence, jealousy, and multiple crises of faith. The novel also hit at the heart of some of the most burning social issues of the day: political repression and radical violence, child abuse, and the possibility of constructing a new social world in the wake of the emancipation of the serfs. But Dostoevsky gives these concrete social issues a timeless philosophical weight by tying them to larger ideas of faith and atheism, sin, and redemption, and the distant, almost impossible, hope for brotherhood on earth. In this course, we will read The Brothers Karamazov in the context of its historical times, and the philosophical and religious arguments at its heart.

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


F

or the past four centuries, opera (or music drama) has stood as the hallmark of high culture in the West. Rulers and princes expended enormous sums to cultivate the genre; composers reserved their most creative resources for it; and social reformers often condemned it as a public gate to immorality. Swinging between art and entertainment, operas could reflect their contemporary social conditions or project aspirations of artistic and national regeneration in modern Europe. This introductory course will examine the history and development of opera from its genesis around 1600 to its late-19th-century peak in the masterpieces of Wagner and Verdi. Beginning with Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo, we will follow the dissemination of the genre to the main European capitals and its thematic shift from antiquity (Handel’s Giulio Cesare) to modernity (Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro). We will also cover the genre’s exploration of human psychology (Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Verdi’s Otello), political upheaval (Beethoven’s Fidelio), and nationalism (Wagner’s Meistersinger, Verdi’s Nabucco). Previous exposure to music drama is not required, but students are expected to listen to at least one opera in its entirety by the end of the course. ili as chrissochoidis

Research Associate, Department of Music, Stanford

Ilias Chrissochoidis studied piano, music theory, and musicology in Greece and the UK, and received a PhD from Stanford. The author of dozens of research articles, he has held numerous fellowships from Stanford, Harvard, Yale, UCLA, University of Texas–Austin, McGill, University of London, the Huntington, and the Folger Shakespeare Library. In 2010–2011, he was a fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies and a resident scholar at the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. He is also an active pianist and composer. MUS 2 4

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 6 weeks, April 3 – May 8 1 unit, $240

A

dd one part blues, one part R&B, a healthy dollop of country, a splash of gospel, a dash of Tin Pan Alley, and what do you get? Early rock history. This course will explore some of the artists, history, development, and characteristics of rock music from its origins in the 1950s to its fragmentation in the 1970s. Among the artists to be discussed are Big Mama Thornton, Hank Williams, Little Richard, Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, girl groups such as the Ronettes, Motown acts (including Smokey Robinson, the Supremes, and Stevie Wonder), The Beach Boys, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Jefferson Airplane, Cream, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, the Allman Brothers, Yes, David Bowie, and The Clash. Did economics, politics, race relations, and societal mores push the music’s development, and did the artists and their music push back against society? We will answer these questions and also touch upon the more technical nature of the work— musical elements, lyrics, technology, and the recording process—and begin to develop a vocabulary that hopefully leads to a deeper, more active listening experience. Musical literacy is not a requirement for this course.

music

An Introduction to Opera

We Will Rock You : Rock History from the 1950s through the 1970s

l i t e r at u r e

Music

joel ph i ll i p f r i e dm a n

Lecturer in Music, Santa Clara University and Notre Dame de Namur University

Joel Friedman is a composer whose concert and theater music has been performed at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center, on London’s West End, and in OffBroadway theater. He was the consulting editor for critical editions of Gershwin’s Strike Up the Band! and Pardon My English. Friedman received a DMA in composition from Columbia, where he was a President’s fellow. Among his recent compositional projects are the score to the independent feature film Red Ice, the musical theater piece Fallings, and a series of solo string pieces commissioned by the 2013 Irving M. Klein International String Competition. MUS 158

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 6 2 units, $365 Limit: 40

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 25

25

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Sing Well, Be Well

The Elements of Jazz

J

I

oin Anonymous 4 co-founder Marsha Genensky in an intensive exploration of group singing and well-being. We will discuss research on sound making, singing, and wellness. And we will sing! Together, we will practice sound making and we will sing chants, rounds, and partsongs from a wide range of musical traditions. During Anonymous 4’s twenty-five years as an ensemble, the group has spent many hundreds of hours in rehearsal together, focusing deeply on group sound, singing, and song. From the beginning, the members were surprised to find themselves highly energized during and after their group sessions. Early on, they discovered that the benefits of their ensemble singing seemed to extend beyond the four of them; soon after their first recordings were released, their listeners began to tell them stories about using the sound of their singing to ease childbirth or to soothe during the last moments of a loved one’s life, and to support and heal during illness and traumatic life changes. Several recent studies support what they have learned anecdotally: sounds (whether sung or heard) can apparently influence brain wave frequencies, promoting well-being in a variety of ways. Like aerobic exercise, singing can improve circulation and increase lung capacity. Group singing in particular may reduce stress, improve mood, self-esteem, and confidence, and create a sense of community. Beyond all that, it’s fun! No previous singing experience is necessary.

n this course for the general listener, we will explore the relationships among jazz’s textures, rhythm, melody, harmony, and form and discuss how these elements inform the interactive improvisation that breathes beauty and life into the music. By listening to and discussing the musical contributions of some of the greatest artists in jazz (including Louis Armstrong, Lester Young, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, Sonny Rollins, and Charlie Parker), we will discover how the music can make more sense and the listener’s experience can be enhanced with an awareness of the principles that organize and define jazz’s musical conversations—traditional jazz, blues, swing, bebop, and beyond. j i m na del

Founding Director, Stanford Jazz Workshop

Jim Nadel has been at Stanford for more than forty years. He has been a lecturer in jazz studies for the Stanford Department of Music for more than twentyfive years. He received an MA from the University of San Francisco and a BA from Stanford. Nadel plays the saxophone professionally, and is also a composer and arranger. MUS 165

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 17 – May 15 1 unit, $200 Limit: 40

marsha genensky

Founding Member of Anonymous 4

Marsha Genensky and her Anonymous 4 colleagues have been exploring medieval, contemporary, and American music for more than twenty-five years. She is the main force behind Anonymous 4’s American music projects; she is also responsible for language and historical research for the group’s medieval programs. Genensky received an MA in folklore and folklife from the University of Pennsylvania. MUS 176

Mondays, 7:00 – 9:05 pm 9 weeks, April 8 – June 10 2 units, $365 (No class on May 27)

26

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 26

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


j o h n r . p e r ry

The Art of Living: Presented by the Hosts of Philosophy Talk

A

ll of us must make fundamental life choices and decide what is most valuable to us. We may opt for a life of reason and knowledge; one of faith and discipline; one of nature and freedom; one of community and altruism; or one of originality and style. We may even choose to live our lives as though they were works of art. In every case, hard work is required: Our lives are not just given to us, but need to be made. To live well is, in fact, to practice an art of living. In this course, we will explore the various ways in which it is possible to live well and beautifully, what it takes to implement our values, and what happens when they come under pressure from inside and out. Part traditional lecture, part multimedia broadcast experience, this groundbreaking course is brought to you by the popular radio program Philosophy Talk, “the program that questions everything, except your intelligence.” In each session, the radio show’s hosts, Stanford philosophers John Perry and Ken Taylor, will tackle a different set of questions in thought-provoking conversation. Each session will start with a lecture and discussion, which will introduce students to the topic of the week and prepare them to be active participants in an episode of Philosophy Talk, featuring a distinguished guest from the field, reports from the Roving Philosophical Reporter, songs by the musical troupe, The Platones, a comedic interlude from Ian Shoales, the Sixty-Second Philosopher, and questions from the live student audience. Each episode will be recorded and edited for broadcast on more than 100 affiliate stations around the country. Join us for this exciting opportunity to participate in a truly unique course that combines a first-class educational experience with innovative broadcasting.

Henry Waldgrave Stuart Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus, Stanford

John R. Perry has made significant contributions to many areas of philosophy, including philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind. He has served as chair of the Stanford Philosophy Department and director of the Center for the Study of Language and Information. He is also the author of more than 100 articles and books, including A Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality; Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness; and Reference and Reflexivity. Perry received the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contributions to Undergraduate Education in 1990. He is the co-host, with Ken Taylor, of the radio program Philosophy Talk. He received a PhD from Cornell.

u sni o c rpuhl iel/obsootpthoym r u l e S i d e bm ar

e

Philosophy

k e n n e t h tay l o r

Henry Waldgrave Stuart Professor of Philosophy, Stanford

Ken Taylor’s work lies at the intersection of the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind, with an occasional foray into the history of philosophy. He is the author of Truth and Meaning: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language, Reference and the Rational Mind, and Referring to the World: An Introduction to the Theory of Reference. He is the co-host, with John Perry, of the radio program Philosophy Talk. Taylor received a PhD from the University of Chicago. PHI 92

Mondays, 7:00 – 9:15 pm 5 weeks, April 8, April 22, May 6, May 20, and June 3 1 unit, $250

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 27

27

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Psychology

Th e S c i e n c e

of the

H e a lt h y M i n d

M

odern science is beginning to investigate the qualities of the mind that contribute to wisdom, health, happiness, and success. This threecourse sequence explores the latest findings from psychology, neuroscience, and behavioral economics to shed light on the evolutionary basis of these human strengths, why we often struggle to fully realize them, and how we can cultivate these qualities to improve well-being and reduce suffering. The series started with “The Science of Mindfulness” (Fall) and “The Science of Willpower” (Winter). Spring quarter will cover “The Science of the Compassionate Mind.” While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well. The Science of the Compassionate Mind

T

his course will follow the Compassion Cultivation Training curriculum developed by the Stanford Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE). CCARE is striving to create a community of scholars and researchers, including neuroscientists, psychologists, neuroeconomists, and contemplative scholars, to undertake a rigorous scientific study of the neural, mental, and social bases of compassion and altruistic behavior through a wide spectrum of disciplines. In this course, we will explore the latest scientific research on the evolutionary basis of compassion, what compassion looks like in the brain and body, how culture shapes who and what we feel empathy for, and whether compassion can be trained. A major component of the course will be your own daily practice of formal meditation techniques for cultivating compassion. We will also discuss the importance of self-compassion, how to avoid compassion fatigue, and how to translate compassion into everyday action. This course is part of the educational mission of CCARE, which sponsored the 2010 visit to Stanford

28

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 28

by the Dalai Lama, and will be taught by one of the core developers of the Compassion Cultivation Training curriculum. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. k e l ly m c g o n i g a l

Senior Teacher, Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education; Lecturer, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Kelly McGonigal is a health psychologist who specializes in the mind-body relationship. She provides continuing education about the mind-body relationship to mental health and medical professionals, and teaches for a wide range of programs at Stanford, including the School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Business. She has received the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching and numerous other teaching awards. She is the author of The Neuroscience of Change; The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It; and Yoga for Pain Relief. McGonigal received a PhD in psychology from Stanford. PSY 212

Mondays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 8 weeks, April 1 – May 20 1 unit, $305

S t u d i es

1/16/13 6:27 PM


W

e usually think of guilt as a painful individual experience that we feel when we do what we should not have done, or fail to do what we should have. However, the emotion of guilt is also embedded in a cultural context with strong religious and philosophical associations. The course will start with a general consideration of guilt and culture from an anthropological perspective. It will then move on to a discussion of the relationship between guilt and religion, focusing on the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. We will then shift to a secular perspective by examining the role of guilt in the moral philosophy of Aristotle, Kant, J.S. Mill, and Nietzsche. The last class will address the personal experiences of participants with respect to their own cultural perspectives on guilt. The Spring 2012 Continuing Studies course “The Psychology of Guilt” dealt with the individual and interpersonal aspects of guilt. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. h e r a n t k at c h a d o u r i a n

Professor of Psychiatry and Human Biology, Emeritus, Stanford

Herant Katchadourian joined the Stanford faculty in 1966 and has served as Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Katchadourian received the Dinkelspiel, Lyman, and ASSU awards and has been selected seven times as Outstanding Professor and Class Day speaker. More than 20,000 students have enrolled in his classes. He is the author of numerous publications and is past president of the Flora Family Foundation. His book, Guilt: The Bite of Conscience, will be the principal textbook for this course. His recently published memoir, The Way It Turned Out, which addresses his own personal experiences with guilt, will be an additional resource for the course. PSY 2 1 3

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 2 – April 30 1 unit, $200

R e l i g i o u s STUDIES

The Historical Jesus and the Origins of Christianity

W

ho was the historical Jesus? What did he actually say and do, as contrasted with what early Christians (such as Paul and the authors of the Gospels) believed that he said and did? These questions have fascinated scholars and laypersons alike since the emergence in modern times of the historical and comparative study of religion. This course will explore the evidence, and the methods of interpreting that evidence, necessary for disentangling the person Jesus from the extraordinary web of myth and symbol that the ancient imagination spun around him. This is a course about history, culture, and psychology—not about faith or theology. It will examine the best available literary and historical evidence about Jesus and the origins of the religious movement that his life catalyzed, and will discuss the approaches that scholars have used to make sense of that evidence, in order to help participants make their own judgments and draw their own conclusions. Readings for the course will include key selections from the Gospels and the Letters of Paul, as well as brief excerpts from background material such as the Hebrew books of Genesis and Exodus, the Mesopo­tamian Epic of Gilgamesh, Hesiod’s Theogony, and Jewish apocalyptic texts.

pSsi d yc go y rruellei/gbi o t ut s osmt urduilees e hboalro n

p s

The Culture of Guilt

dav i d u l a n s e y

Visiting Professor of Religious Studies, UC Berkeley; Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion, California Institute of Integral Studies

David Ulansey has taught at Boston University, Columbia, the University of Vermont, Princeton, California Institute of Integral Studies, and UC Berkeley. He is the author of The Origins of the Mithraic Mysteries and numerous articles in publications ranging from the Journal of Biblical Literature to Scientific American. He received a PhD in religion from Princeton. REL 15

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 6 weeks, April 2 – May 7 1 unit, $240

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 29

29

1/16/13 6:27 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Vatican II : Catholicism Meets Modernity

T

he Second Vatican Ecumenical Council (1962– 1965) has been described as the single most important event in modern Catholicism. It signaled a more positive relationship with modernity for Catholicism, and also reset the relationship between Catholicism and Judaism, Islam, and other world religions. Yet it has become an object of controversy and its meaning has been contested by forces from the right and the left. Was it meant to bring about real and lasting change, or was it meant merely to tweak older models of religion? The answer to this question has implications for the survival of Christianity in the West. This course aims for a critical understanding and appraisal of Vatican II, situating it within its historical context and analyzing its significance, unfinished agenda, and points of controversy. Scheduled guest speakers include Stephen Schloesser of Loyola University Chicago; Catherine Cornille, chair of the Boston College Department of Theology; and Stanford professors David Kennedy (History), Steven Weitzman (Religious Studies), Al Gelpi (English), and others. Readings will include G. Alberigo’s A Brief History of Vatican II and Vatican II: Did Anything Happen?, edited by David Schultenover. No previous knowledge of religion, Catholicism, or Vatican II is required. This course is designed for the entire Stanford community, and Continuing Studies students will be joined in the classroom by Stanford undergraduates. pau l g . c row l e y

Santa Clara Jesuit Community Professor in Religious Studies, Santa Clara University; Visiting Professor, Stanford

Paul Crowley is the author of Unwanted Wisdom: Suffering, the Cross, and Hope, and of the forthcoming Robert McAfee Brown: Spiritual and Prophetic Writings. He received a BA from Stanford, an MA in the philosophy of religion from Columbia and Union Theological Seminary, and a PhD in philosophical theology from the Graduate Theological Union. Crowley, a Jesuit priest, teaches at Santa Clara University’s Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley. REL 82

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 30

A Glimpse into the World of Surgery

D

id you ever wonder what goes on in an operating room? In this team-taught course, leading Stanford surgeons will endeavor to explain (in a language accessible to those without medical training) how and why they perform surgical procedures such as open heart surgery, brain tumor removal, joint replacement, and face lifts. The distinguished faculty includes department chairs and division chiefs at Stanford’s School of Medicine. The surgeons will describe the craft of their own specialties using photos, illustrations, and videos. Emphasis will be placed on explaining the technology used to make surgery minimally invasive such as microscopes, endoscopes, lasers, and image guidance. The faculty also will discuss the thought processes they use in planning complex surgeries and the steps they take to maximize the safety and effectiveness of their operations. Each session will include both a lecture and a discussion period. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. Visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu for up-to-date information and a full list of speakers.

Topics and faculty include: Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgery ro b e r t k . j ac k l e r

Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in Otorhinolaryngology and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and Surgery, Stanford

Pediatric Surgery t h o m a s k ru m m e l

Emile Holman Professor and Chair of Surgery; Susan B. Ford Surgeon-in-Chief at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; Professor, by courtesy, of Cardiothoracic Surgery and Bioengineering, Stanford

Cardiothoracic Surgery frank hanley

Lawrence Crowley, MD, Endowed Professor in Child Health and Professor of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford

Eye Surgery m a r k blum e n k r a nz

H.J. Smead Professor and Chair of Ophthalmology, Stanford

Gynecological Surgery j o n at h a n b e r e k

Mondays, 7:00 – 9:05 pm 9 weeks, April 1 – June 3 2 units, $300 (No class on May 27)

30

S cie n ce

Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor and Chair of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Stanford

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:27 PM


s e

.

The Ten Greatest Experiments in Physics

w illi a m m aloney

W

Elsbach-Richards Professor in Surgery and Chair of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford

Neurosurgery g a ry s t e i n b e rg

Lacroute-Hearst Professor and Chair of Neurosurgery, Stanford

Urological Surgery eila skinner

Professor and Chair of Urology, Stanford

Anesthesia ro n a l d p e a r l

Richard K. and Erika N. Richards Professor and Chair of Anesthesia, Stanford

Reconstructive Plastic Surgery ja m es ch a ng

Chief, Division of Plastic Surgery; Professor of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery) at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford

Cosmetic Surgery sa m most

Professor of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford ro b e rt k . j ac k l e r , c o u r s e d i r e c t o r

Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in Otorhinolaryngology and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and Surgery, Stanford

Robert K. Jackler’s area of expertise includes both microsurgery of the ear and innovative approaches to inaccessible intracranial tumors through the cranial base. He is the author of more than 200 publications and three books, including a surgical atlas containing more than 1,000 original color drawings. He leads the Stanford Initiative to Cure Hearing Loss, an interdisciplinary effort to restore the damaged inner ear through regenerative means. Jackler received an MD from Boston University. M ED 1 1 4

Mondays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 1 – June 10 2 units, $365 (No class on May 27)

hat are the ten most beautiful, elegant, moving, historically significant, paradigm-shifting experiments in physics? In this course, we will find out together. We will begin with Aristotle, who famously proved that we live on a giant sphere and laid the groundwork for Erathosthenes to actually measure the size of our globe. This is often considered the single greatest observation in the history of humankind. Next, we will move fifteen centuries forward to when an unknown monk measured raindrops in the 12th or 13th century, and then to Torricelli, who invented the barometer and produced the first vacuum. Of course, we will encounter Galileo, who, using Torricelli’s results, revised Aristotle and rewrote the laws of mechanics. We will spend time with Isaac Newton, who, as a fifteen-year-old, made a simple set of measurements that fundamentally revised our understanding of light. Another highlight will be the positively brilliant experiment performed by a Mr. Benjamin Franklin in 1765. Finally, we will conclude with two sets of experiments that confirmed Albert Einstein’s two theories of relativity. During this lecture-based course, the instructor will conduct some of these great experiments right in the classroom.

e nrcuel e S ir d eelbi ga iro u n so srtuuldei/ebso tstcoim

d

Orthopaedic Surgery

gerald fisher

Consulting Professor of Physics, Stanford; Professor of Physics, Emeritus, San Francisco State

Gerald Fisher received a PhD in nuclear physics from Stanford in 1970 and has taught regularly at Stanford ever since. He is the former chair of the Physics Department at San Francisco State, author of Good Ones, and co-author of Strategic Entrepreneurism. PH Y 35

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 3 – May 1 1 unit, $200

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 31

31

1/16/13 6:28 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

M o d e r n P h y s i c s : Th e Th e o r e t i c a l Minimum

T

his course is the last in a six-quarter sequence that explores the essential theoretical foundations of modern physics. The topics covered in this course sequence have included classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, the general and special theories of relativity, electromagnetism, cosmology, and black holes. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well. Both individually and collectively, they let students attain the “theoretical minimum” for thinking intelligently about modern physics.

Statistical Mechanics

T

he Spring 2013 quarter course of the Modern Physics series will concentrate on classical and quantum statistical mechanics, the meaning of entropy temper­ature, and the crisis in physics that was called the “ultraviolet catastrophe”—which ultimately led to quantum mechanics. We will also cover superconductors and models of ferromagnetism, if time permits. To appreciate the material covered in this course, students should understand basic calculus and algebra. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. leona r d sussk i n d

Felix Bloch Professor of Physics, Stanford

Lenny Susskind pioneered the idea that elementary particles might be represented by a relativistic string, the so-called string theory. His research interests have stretched from quantum field theory to quantum cosmology. He is the author of The Cosmic Landscape: String Theory and the Illusion of Intelligent Design and The Black Hole War—My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics.

The History of Food and Nutrition

T

he history of food is the history of life. Starting with an introductory discussion of the history of life and the evolution of Homo sapiens and its diet, the lectures in this course will cover the history of human food consumption from the time of hunter-gatherers to the development of agriculture, continuing with the great civilizations of Western antiquity—Mesopotamia, Egypt, Classical Greece, Rome—and moving into the Middle Ages. It will continue with the dramatic changes that took place in the world’s diet as a result of the Columbian Exchange, and then explore shifts in eating habits after the Renaissance, the development of recipe books, the appearance of restaurants, and the industrialization of food in modern times. Finally, we will explore the recent origin and development of the science of nutrition, and the gigantic advances it made in the 20th century. Students will learn the difference between omega-3 fatty acids and trans fatty acids, what the necessary minerals and vitamins are, how they were discovered, why vitamin D is a very important hormone and not a vitamin, and more.

c a r l o s a . c a m a rg o

Clinical Professor of Medicine, Emeritus, Division of Endocrinology, Stanford

Carlos A. Camargo has been on the Stanford faculty since 1967 and has taught courses on medical history since 1973. He received the Kaiser Award for Excellence in Teaching three times. Camargo is interested in the interaction of medicine with art, religion, and magic through history. He received an MD from the National University in Bogotá. SCI 36

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 9:05 pm 9 weeks, April 2 – May 28 2 units, $365

PHY 29

Mondays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 1 – June 3 2 units, $365

32

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 32

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:28 PM


s

e

e

C

oordinating your nutrition with exercise produces significantly greater health, performance, and weight-loss results. This course begins with the theory and application of the core components of exercise (cardiovascular, interval, and strengthening) plus the three “W”s of nutrition (What you eat, When you eat, and Water). We will then discuss the fundamental concepts of how to adjust exercise and nutrition for specific quality-of-life goals, guiding you in designing and coordinating your exercise and nutrition so that they are mutually supportive. This approach avoids the potential irony of having exercise actually reduce your health, performance, or ability to lose weight. You will learn a simple system of estimating caloric expenditure and macronutrient needs in order to lose weight, increase health, or drive performance. This course is designed for anyone wondering why their exercise has hit a plateau sooner than they expected, why they can’t lose weight in spite of exercising more and eating fewer calories, or why some aspects of their health have declined as they have exercised more. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. c ly d e w i l s o n

Instructor, Departments of Medicine and Athletics, Stanford

Clyde Wilson teaches nutrition and human movement in Stanford’s Department of Athletics, and food pharmacology in the Stanford and UCSF medical schools. He is a director at the Sports Medicine Institute, a nonprofit in Palo Alto. Wilson conducted postdoctoral research at the UCSF Cardiovascular Research Institute on muscle metabolism and fatigue. His interests target a theoretical understanding of human quality of life. He received a PhD in chemistry from Stanford.

A User’s Guide to the Brain

S

erving as our body’s “chairman of the board,” the brain is responsible for coordinating and executing a vast range of functions, from our ability to perceive and attend, to our processing of emotion and thought. This course will serve as a broad introduction to the human central nervous system. How is the human brain functionally organized and where does the brain store memory? Where in the brain might emotions such as happiness or sadness reside? Can the field of neuroscience make sense of disorders such as attention-deficit disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression? Through a combination of lectures and interactive case discussions, we will address these topics and others. The goal of this course is to equip the student with an ability to understand and think critically about the mind and brain. This course does not require previous coursework in biology and is designed to challenge and pique the interest of anyone curious about the field.

S i d e b a r n osrcui el n e/ cb eo t t o m r u l e

,

Nutrition and Exercise Design for Performance and Healthy Weight Loss

s i m o n ta n

Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences (Affiliated), Stanford

Simon Tan’s teaching and research interests are in the field of behavioral neurology, specifically dementiaassociated disorders. He completed an internship in clinical psychology and two postdoctoral fellowships in clinical neuropsychology at Harvard Medical School. Earlier, he was a clinical neuropsychologist at NYU Medical Center. He received a PhD in clinical psychology from Yeshiva University. BI O 31

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 4 – May 2 1 unit, $200

SCI 4 5

Thursdays, 7:00 – 9:15 pm 8 weeks, April 4 – May 30 2 units, $365 Limit: 40 (No class on May 2)

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 33

33

1/16/13 6:28 PM


Liberal Arts and Sciences

Geologic Gems of Northern California

N

orthern California contains a rich tapestry of scenic landscapes and fascinating geology. Magnificent hidden beaches form our western boundary with the Pacific, volcanic peaks and parks lie to the north, Sierran gold and Yosemite tempt us to the east, and an interesting mix of varied geologic sites and landforms lie to the south. With mines and marshes ringing the Bay, all are adjacent to our well known plate-tectonic boundary, the San Andreas Fault. We will explore these easily accessible sites, acquiring the basic geologic knowledge necessary to understand and appreciate their significance and enjoy their beauty. In this course, we will look at, among other sites, the geology of such places as Mount Lassen and Mount Shasta, Point Reyes and Point Lobos, Malakoff Diggins State Historic Park and Yosemite, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, Pinnacles, and the New Almaden and Black Diamond mines around San Jose and Mount Diablo. This course will include a field trip to a site determined by the class.

r ay m o n d p e s t ro n g

Professor of Geology, Emeritus, San Francisco State

Ray Pestrong received a PhD in geology from Stanford. He has co-authored two scientific texts and two art books and has written numerous articles for professional journals and science magazines. Pestrong travels extensively, investigating the processes responsible for shaping unusual landscapes. He is especially interested in the integration of geosciences and the arts and ways to use that connection to enhance geoscience education. GE O 1 3 0

Classroom sessions: 6 Wednesdays, April 3 – May 8, 7:00 – 8:50 pm Field trip: Saturday, May 4, 10:00 am – 3:00 pm 1 unit, $305

S T A N F O R D S A T U R D A Y un i v ers i ty

Stanford Saturday University at Hopkins Marine Station, Monterey

S

tarting in the Fall of 2010, we began sponsoring periodic “one-day universities” on a Saturday, during which a number of classes by distinguished Stanford faculty are offered. Each one has been a complete pleasure, for presenters and attendees, and we are happy to accommodate everybody’s request to “do it again!” Last Spring, we hosted our first Saturday University at the dramatically beautiful Hopkins Marine Station in Monterey, and we are delighted that they want us to return this Spring. As with past Saturday Universities, we will begin the morning with coffee and muffins, break at midday for an informal lunch, and wrap up the afternoon with a reception overlooking the Pacific. In between, your mind will be challenged and stimulated by discussions of ocean ecology, sharks, the wisdom of King Solomon, natural and unnatural cycles of extinction, and the ethics of new military technology such as drones. The day will be hosted by Stephen Palumbi, Director of the Hopkins Marine Station. If you live in the Monterey or Carmel area, we extend a hearty invitation for you to join us in your hometown. If you live in the Bay Area—consider making a weekend out of it, combined with the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Point Lobos, and historic sites in Monterey. The auditorium at Hopkins is lovely, but has a limited capacity (and we filled last year)—please enroll early so as not to be disappointed. We look forward to seeing you there. Due to its short format, this course may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade. For more information on the speakers and their presentations, please visit: continuingstudies.stanford.edu. SSU 105

Saturday, May 4 8:45 am – 6:00 pm $150 Limit: 120 Special refund deadline: April 27

34

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 34

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:28 PM


o

Session 1: 9:30 – 10:40 am Next Generation Ocean Observatories Chris Scholin President and CEO, Monterey Aquarium Research Institute Session 2: 10:50 am – 12:00 pm Where the Wild Things Used to Be: The Stories We Tell About Endangered Species and Why They Mat ter Ursula Heise Professor of English, Stanford; Fellow, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, UCLA Lunch and Informal Tour of Hopkins Marine Station : 12:00 – 1:00 pm Session 3: 1:10 – 2:20 pm War and Moralit y: The Ethical Challenges Raised by New and Emerging Military Technology Bradley Strawser Assistant Professor of Philosophy in the Defense Analysis Department, Naval Postgraduate School Session 4: 2:30 – 3:40 pm Shark and Awe: The Extreme Life of the Sea and What It Tells Us About the Ocean’s Future Stephen Palumbi Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor in Marine Sciences, Stanford; Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment; Director, Hopkins Marine Station Session 5: 3:50 – 5:00 pm Searching for King Solomon : A Real Life Adventure on the Seven Seas Steven Weitzman Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and Religion, Stanford Reception : 5:00 – 6:00 pm

Great Monologues: An Acting Intensive

H

ave you ever viewed a great scene in a black-andwhite film from the 1940s, 1950s, or 1960s, and thought, “I would love to do that!” In this acting workshop we will traverse the landscape of the American monologue. There has been a resurgence of classic American realism in contemporary productions featuring the works of Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Clifford Odets, William Inge, Lillian Hellman, and more. These playwrights provided texts for the actors of the famous Group Theater (James Dean, Shelley Winters, Marlon Brando, Paul Newman). To this day, members of The Actors Studio (Al Pacino, Meryl Streep, Sean Penn, Sidney Poitier) continue the tradition. The emphasis will be on material from the mid 20th century, in the areas of acting (including method acting), voice, and speech. Students will develop an awareness of the demands of the acting experience in a safe and supportive environment. In week one, with the assistance of the instructor, we will introduce script material to the class; and in week two, we will refine the monologue choices, resulting in an excellent solo piece for the actor. The focus of this workshop will be on process rather than result. It will give new students a substantial introduction to the craft of acting, and reinforce basic concepts for the returning student. All levels are welcome.

s ta n f o r d s at u r d ay u n i v e r s i t y

g

Opening Remarks: 9:20 am Stephen Palumbi Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor in Marine Sciences, Stanford; Senior Fellow, Woods Institute for the Environment; Director, Hopkins Marine Station

t h e at e r & p e r fo r m a n c e s t u d i e s

,

Welcome and Check-in: 8:45 – 9:15 am

science

g

the ater & Performance Studies

SCHEDU L E

k ay ko s t o p o u l o s

Lecturer in Theater and Performance Studies, Stanford

Kay Kostopoulos is a professional actor who directs and teaches acting, acting pedagogy, voice, and speech. She also teaches at the Graduate School of Business, and has taught private seminars for Genentech, Cisco, the National Speakers Association, Stanford’s Executive Program for Women Leaders and Women in Entrepre­ neurship Program, and the eBay Women’s Initiative Network. Her work has been featured in O, The Oprah Magazine. WSP 192

Saturdays, April 6 and April 13 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $240 Limit: 22 Special refund deadline: March 30

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_001-035_CS5.5_R1.indd 35

35

1/16/13 6:28 PM


THE WRITER’S STUDIO

The Writer’s Studio ON-CAMPUS WRITING COURSES 36

ONLINE WRITING COURSES

42

O N L I N E certi f icate program in N O V E L writing writing 4 7

T h e W r i t e r ’ s S t u d i o T e ac h i n g S ta f f

M

ost of the instructors in our program have established careers as novelists, journalists, playwrights, and screenwriters. Many of them come to the Studio after serving as fellows in Stanford’s prestigious Stegner Creative Writing Program. The Stegner Program is rigorously competitive—each year only 10 fellows are selected out of an applicant pool of more than 1,600—so Stegner Fellows are widely considered some of the most gifted young writers and teachers in the country.

ON-CAMPUS WRITING COURSES

An Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

C

Freesia Alba; Photograph by Joel Simon

reative nonfiction is one of the most exciting and swiftly expanding genres of creative writing. In creative nonfiction, writers can unite elements of factual reporting and journalism with the imaginative reach and narrative power of fiction writing, storytelling, and even poetry. This course will serve as an introduction to a variety of approaches to creative essay writing, including personal narrative, portrait, and lyric essay. The course will also emphasize prose style, allowing students to explore their narrative voice through lively in-class writing exercises and structured out-of-class assignments. Each student will submit writing for class consideration in a supportive workshop setting, and will learn from some of the best authors of contemporary nonfiction, including Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, Tom Wolfe, and David Foster Wallace. Students will emerge from the course with a substantial body of new material, a sense of the myriad possibilities of creative nonfiction, and a better understanding of the life and practices of a writer. peter kline

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Peter Kline’s work has appeared in Ploughshares, Tin House, and The Antioch Review. He has taught at Stanford, the University of San Francisco, the University of Virginia, and James Madison University. Kline received an MFA from the University of Virginia. CN F 03

Tuesdays, 6:30 – 9:20 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 3 units, $555 Limit: 21 36

S ta n fo r d

Co n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 36

S t u d ie s

1/16/13 6:24 PM


The Writing Habit : Tools for Learning to Write Every Day

Writing the Memoir: Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

I

I

s t e p h a n i e s o i l e au

Marsh McCall Lecturer in Continuing Studies; Former Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer, Stanford

Stephanie Soileau’s work has appeared in Glimmer Train, Ecotone, Tin House, Gulf Coast, StoryQuarterly, Nimrod International Journal, three volumes of New Stories from the South, and Best of the South: The Best of the Second Decade. She received a 2012 literature fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Soileau is working on a novel and nonfiction essays about fishermen, family, oil, and erosion in her home state of Louisiana. EG L 6 1

Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:20 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 3 units, $555 Limit: 21

n this course, we will practice the art and craft of writing memoir: works of prose inspired by the memory of personal experiences and history. Since Augustine published his Confessions nearly 1,600 years ago, the memoir as a literary genre has undertaken a dizzying array of forms, styles, content, and reader expectations. From spiritual salvation to secular redemption, egalitarian bonhomie to Freudian taboo, the memoirists have, in that time, negotiated new expectations about how best to project their reality onto the page. We will make a fresh twist in our study of memoir by imitating many diverse historical models of the genre. We will read works of memoir by Augustine, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Walt Whitman, Theodore Roosevelt, Orhan Pamuk, Joan Didion, Joyce Carol Oates, and Eavan Boland. About half of our class time will be devoted to the discussion of student work. The course will address issues ranging from how we select events from our personal lives, to the authentic and moral obligations of memoirists. All students will have the opportunity to present for workshop two shorter writing sketches, and also one longer draft of a memoir chapter or essay. Writers at all levels of experience and comfort with creative writing are welcome. Energetic and committed participation is a must.

on-campus writing courses

t’s hard finding time to write. But even harder may be actually using that time to write. Conventional wisdom says it takes three weeks to form a habit, but in this course we’re going to take ten weeks to make writing a daily, permanent, and enjoyable part of our daily lives. We will remind ourselves that making time for writing every day is good for our imagination, creativity, and (dare we say it?) our souls. For guidance, we will look at a smattering of material about the psychology of habits (e.g., The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg) and the habit of creativity (e.g., Julia Cameron’s The Right to Write). Then we will apply new strategies week by week to change our writing habits for the better. Through the use of a class blog and inclass workshops, we will also give and receive critique on the fiction, nonfiction, and poetry we produce. Weekly selections from The New Yorker will be fodder for discussion and writing exercises. By the end of the course, each student will have several new pieces of writing and, more important, the tools to make writing a habit.

j o h n e va n s

Jones Lecturer in Creative Writing; Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

John Evans’ work has appeared in Best American Essays 2012 (Notable Essay), The Rumpus, Slate, The Missouri Review, Boston Review, The Southern Review, The Gettysburg Review, ZYZZYVA, and elsewhere. He is the author of the chapbooks No Season and Zugzwang. His memoir, Young Widower, recently won the 2013 River Teeth Nonfiction Prize, and will be published in 2014. Evans received an MFA from Florida International University. CN F 09

Mondays, 6:30 – 9:20 pm 10 weeks, April 1 – June 10 3 units, $555 Limit: 21 (No class on May 27)

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 37

37

1/16/13 6:24 PM


The writer’s studio

Fiction Writing: Developing Original and Superb Surprises

E

mily Dickinson’s advice, “Tell all the Truth but tell it slant,” offers us a compelling and exciting framework for reading and writing fiction. In this course, we will examine the moments when a story or novel takes a turn toward the dramatic, original, and even the delightfully strange. By examining where these turns happen (in the character’s psychology, dialogue, or the story’s plot, structure, or point of view) we begin to understand how authors employ their essential fictional components. We will search for the “slant” in works by the likes of Hawthorne, Nabokov, Lorrie Moore, and Junot Díaz. What we learn will nurture students’ creativity, and our weekly practice of reading and writing will help students establish an enduring writerly routine. Local authors will also visit our class to share insight into their creative process with us. In-class writing and weekly homework exercises will provide students with the foundation for a longer piece (either a short story or novel excerpt) that students will then present to the class in a workshop—a supportive, in-depth discussion in which class participants all read and comment on each other’s work-in-progress. Near the end of the course, we will address issues related to publishing (querying agents, submitting to magazines) and give a public reading, during which students will present five minutes of their favorite writing from the past quarter.

sa r a hough t eli ng

Nancy Packer Lecturer in Continuing Studies, Stanford

Sara Houghteling is the author of Pictures at an Exhibition, a New York Times Editors’ Choice, San Francisco Chronicle Best of 2009 Book, and a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award. She has received a Fulbright scholarship, a Camargo Fellowship, the Ribalow Prize, and the Wallant Award. Her writing has also appeared in The New York Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. Houghteling received a BA from Harvard and an MFA from the University of Michigan.

An Introduction to Screenwriting

L

ong before becoming an Oscar-winning feature film, even the best movie begins with a basic screenplay. But there is rarely anything simple about effective, entertaining screenplays, and they all start with strong concepts, characters, structure, outlining, and scene work. In this course, we will learn what it takes to lay that essential groundwork for a great script. We will start with simple exercises to identify core ideas and scenes, and then we will progress to character development, act structure, basic scene writing, and sequences of script material. Viewing of such films as North by Northwest, Double Indemnity, and Toy Story will help us demystify “high concept,” “three-act structure,” and other industry terms. Meanwhile, students will workshop sequences of scripted material and develop an outline they can use to complete a feature-length script after the course has ended. Whether you are an experienced writer or just a film fanatic, this course will help you grapple with the building blocks of your own blockbuster screenplay. a da m t o b i n

Lecturer, Film and Media Studies Program, Stanford

Adam Tobin is a screenwriter and an actor. He created the sitcom About a Girl and the reality show Best Friend’s Date for Viacom’s TeenNick and has written for ABC, ESPN, Discovery Channel, and the National Basketball Association. Tobin was a story analyst for Jim Henson Pictures and has taught story and pitching seminars at Twentieth Century Fox/Blue Sky Studios and Aardman Animations. He was a founding member of the Stanford Improvisors (SImps) and the Los Angeles performance group The But Franklies. He received an MFA in screenwriting from USC. EGL 126

Mondays, 6:30 – 9:20 pm 10 weeks, April 1 – June 10 3 units, $555 Limit: 21 (No class on May 27)

FI C T 1 9

Wednesdays, 6:30 – 9:20 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 3 units, $555 Limit: 21

38

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 38

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:24 PM


Magazine and Feature Writing

I

I

n this two-day workshop, we will look at how tension—in scenes, in sentences, in structure—can ignite your readers’ curiosity, engage their empathy, trigger their judgment, and turn your material into a complete, coherent, and compelling experience. We will study and steal the methods by which Grace Paley brings conflict into dialogue, Philip Roth arouses aggression within characters, and Tim O’Brien evokes urgency in scene. We will look at how enmity and affection bring to life the surreal worlds of Aimee Bender and the harsh realism of Richard Ford. How does James Baldwin use conflicts between characters to generate the structure for his stories? How does Kate Braverman alternate rhythms and sentence styles to bring tension to her paragraphs? Students will learn to locate, conjure, and deepen tension within their own characters, plots, and prose. You can expect to leave this course with new ideas for how pieces can begin, progress, and culminate. Most of all, you will leave with a renewed interest in your own material and a renewed investment in seeing it through.

maria finn

harriet clark

Author

Jones Lecturer in Creative Writing; Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Maria Finn is a regular contributor to Sunset and Gardenista. She also writes for The Wall Street Journal, Afar, The New York Times, Wine Spectator, Saveur, and Gastronomica, among others. She is the author of The Whole Fish, Hold Me Tight and Tango Me Home, and A Little Piece of Earth: How to Grow Your Own Food in Small Spaces. Her essays have been anthologized in The Best Food Writing 2006 and The Best Women’s Travel Writing 2007. She has taught at Hunter College, CUNY, and St. Francis College. Finn received an MFA from Sarah Lawrence College.

on-campus writing courses

n this course, we will learn how to land the magazine and feature writing assignments that we most want. Key elements will include focusing on the most compelling and timely topics, designing great ledes, and crafting and polishing our strongest prose. We will look at profile-writing techniques in the manner of Susan Orlean and Malcolm Gladwell, and we will work toward researching and writing queries that will get our work noticed by top publications. Looking at the editorial needs of recently launched magazines such as Lucky Peach and Afar, we will assess their desire to cover the newest topics or create a fresh angle on a classic story. (Together, we will ask such questions as: What will be the new sustainable food trend of 2013? Or, what’s an original angle on a great destination for travel?) We will read and analyze articles, brainstorm and research topics, and then find new and creative angles on these subjects. Writing exercises will help students improve their writing skills, craft a query letter, and then research and write a polished article. Tips and resources for getting published will be essential elements of the course as well.

Fiction Basics: Writing and Managing Tension and Conflict

Harriet Clark has been a Truman Capote Fellow, a MacDowell Fellow, and an NEA Writer-in-the-Schools Fellow. She received a BA from Stanford and an MFA from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a Teaching-Writing Fellow. She is at work on a novel. WSP 33

Saturday and Sunday, May 18 and May 19 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $230 Limit: 21 Special refund deadline: May 11

WSP 1 8 4

Saturdays, May 4 and May 11 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $230 Limit: 21 Special refund deadline: April 27

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u rs e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 39

39

1/16/13 6:24 PM


The writer’s studio

The Character’s Journey

The Next Draft : Rewriting 101

F

Y

rom Harry Potter to Odysseus, Darth Vader to the Wicked Witch of the West, epic heroes and villains have a memorable impact on readers and viewers because of their ordeals, journeys, and transformations, as chronicled in Joseph Campbell’s Hero with a Thousand Faces. In this workshop, we will examine Campbell’s work, explore the character-development techniques of writers and filmmakers who have followed the Hero’s Journey with great success, and experience creating and developing our own original yet archetypal characters and stories. Through freewrite prompts, guided exercises, and fieldwork, we will answer the call to adventure— crossing the threshold, meeting our allies, encountering ordeals, gaining reward, and returning home—as we discover the heroes, mentors, tricksters, shape-shifters, and shadows in our world and our writing. This workshop is for writers of all backgrounds and experience who want to better understand their characters’ (and their own) creative journeys.

cheri steinkellner

Writer; Producer

Cheri Steinkellner has received four Emmy Awards, two Golden Globes, and the People’s Choice, BAFTA, Writers Guild, and TV Land Legend awards for cowriting and producing Cheers and Disney’s acclaimed animated series and feature film Teacher’s Pet. A 2011 Tony nominee for Broadway’s Sister Act, she has co-written the stage musicals Princesses, Mosaic, and Hello! My Baby, and television series including The Jeffersons, Who’s the Boss, The Facts of Life, and others. Steinkellner teaches writing at UC Santa Barbara, and leads a popular course featuring dialogues with guest speakers from across the Hollywood entertainment industry.

ou’ve finished a draft of your short story or novel. You know that it takes many drafts to reach a final product. But how do you move from one draft to the next? How do you dig deeper, flesh out your characters, and discover new scenes? How do you improve the quality of your prose? Is it possible to consider major changes—in structure or in point of view? In this one-day workshop, you will work through a series of exercises designed to help you polish your fiction and to teach you rewriting skills. Bring an early draft of a story or novel chapter that you know needs work—you’ll dive in and, through hands-on work in class, you’ll discover how to turn it into a stronger piece of fiction. And you’ll learn how to apply these skills to all of your writing in the future. Due to its short format, this workshop may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade. ellen sussm a n

Author

Ellen Sussman is the author of the New York Times bestselling novel French Lessons and the San Francisco Chronicle bestseller On a Night Like This. She is also the editor of two anthologies, Dirty Words: A Literary Encyclopedia of Sex and Bad Girls: 26 Writers Misbehave, which was a New York Times Editors’ Choice and a San Francisco Chronicle bestseller. Her new novel, The Paradise Guest House, will be published this Spring. She has taught at Pepperdine, UCLA, and Rutgers. Sussman received an MA from Johns Hopkins. WSP 235

Saturday, April 27 10:00 am – 4:00 pm $150 Limit: 21 Special refund deadline: April 20

WSP 32

Saturdays, April 13 and April 20 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $200 Special refund deadline: April 6

40

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 40

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:24 PM


R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u rs e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

Self-Publishing Workshop: A Roadmap to Success

Vivid Stories, Vivid Voices: Writing Middle Grade and Young Adult Characters

E

I

sh i r i n y i m br i dges

Author

Shirin Yim Bridges has made the successful transition from author (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, HarperCollins/ Greenwillow, Chronicle Books) to self-publisher, to award-winning publisher (Goosebottom Books). She is the author of Ruby’s Wish, one of Publishers Weekly’s Best Children’s Books of 2002; The Umbrella Queen, one of TIME magazine’s Best Children’s Books of 2008; and the series The Thinking Girl’s Treasury of Dastardly Dames. She has taught and discussed self publishing at the Mendocino Coast Writers’ Conference, the Book Passage Children’s Writers and Illustrators Conference, San Francisco State University, Illinois State University, and the College of San Mateo. WSP 31

Saturdays, April 27 and May 4 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $200 Non-refundable materials fee: $5 Special refund deadline: April 20

n this two-day writing workshop, we will examine how successful writers use voice, dialogue, and specific characterization techniques to engage and resonate with their middle grade readers (ages 8–12) and young adult audience (12 and over). We will investigate strategies for creating a compelling voice that reveals a distinct and memorable character, builds tension, and rockets a story forward. Engaging in-class exercises will focus on creating dialogue that will leap off the page and bring characters to life. We will cover humorous and incisive dialogue, dialogue tags, white space, and inner monologue. We will examine the work of award-winning authors such as Gary Schmidt, Jack Gantos, Markus Zusak, John Green, Laurie Halse Anderson, and newcomer R.J. Palacio, as well as the students’ own favorite authors. The course is open to aspiring as well as experienced writers. Students may bring one to three pages (optional) of their own work-in-progress for group workshop.

on-campus writing courses

very week seems to bring a new story about selfpublishing success. Once stigmatized as follies of vanity, self-published books are hitting bestseller lists and being bought and re-released by major publishers. In 2012, HarperCollins paid six figures for The Dark Heroine: Dinner with a Vampire, first self-published on the online writers’ platform Wattpad. Fifty Shades of Grey, originally self-published as fan fiction, is now the fastest-selling paperback of all time. In addition to the prospect of commercial success, self-publishing offers the benefits of immediacy and control. But how does one start? What should you watch out for? How can you maximize your chances of creative and commercial success? This intensive two-day workshop will give you a step-by-step roadmap to becoming self-published, as well as a toolbox full of useful resources such as editing checklists; overviews of the vanity press, print-on-demand, and e-book options; and worksheets with useful contacts for preparing effective promotional campaigns. Come armed with questions and a notepad. Leave knowing exactly what you’ll have to do, and how you’re going to do it.

ly n n h a z e n

Author

Lynn Hazen is the author of the young adult novel, Shifty, which was named on VOYA’s Top Shelf Fiction list and was a CCBC Choice and a Smithsonian Notable. Her other books include Mermaid Mary Margaret, Cinder Rabbit, The Amazing Trail of Seymour Snail, and Buzz Bumble to the Rescue. She received an MA in education from San Francisco State and an MFA in writing for children and young adults from Vermont College. elissa haden guest

Author

Elissa Haden Guest is the author of numerous children’s books. Books in her early reader series, Iris and Walter, have been named Junior Library Guild Selections, an ALA Notable Book, and a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, and received a PEN Center USA West Literary Award. Her most recent picture book, Bella’s Rules, will be published this Spring. Guest received an MFA in children’s literature from Hollins University. WSP 210

Saturdays, May 4 and May 11 10:00 am – 3:30 pm 1 unit, $230 Limit: 21 Special refund deadline: April 27

41

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 41

1/16/13 6:24 PM


The writer’s studio

Inspiration and Invention in Creative Writing

ONLINE WRITING COURSES

D

Facing the Void : An Introduction to Creative Writing

F

acing a blank document on your computer screen (or an empty page in your notebook) is like peering into a very deep well. You don’t know how far down it goes—it’s too dark to see. Part of you doesn’t even want to know; another part of you insists. These feelings are known as fear and ambition, the two essential poles this course will help you navigate between to reach the goal of breaking through and really getting started in your writing. This course will explore fiction, poetry, personal essay, and forms that do not fit into any particular genre, while remaining very flexible to accommodate the needs of any writer looking to be inspired and to produce. We will read various texts on the creative process from artists ranging from Rainer Maria Rilke to Elizabeth Gilbert, and Virginia Woolf to Henry Louis Gates Jr., with many writers in between. Students will engage with a variety of writing prompts and exercises designed to help them generate fresh new work, including writing from photographs and mementos and responding creatively to other forms of art such as modern dance and music. This course will examine how we can turn the blank page into a window, and from there see the world. This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting.

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting.

m at t h e w s i e g e l

otis haschemeyer

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Matthew Siegel received an MFA from the University of Houston, where he also taught literature and writing and was a writer-in-residence with Writers in the Schools. He teaches literature and creative writing at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, and he is a contributing editor at The Offending Adam. His writing has appeared in Indiana Review, The Journal, Mid-American Review, The Lumberyard, The Rumpus, and elsewhere. One of his poems was a special mention in the 2012 Pushcart Prize anthology. EGL 60 W

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

42

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 42

o you ever read something and wonder, how do they come up with this stuff? The most inventive writers find joy in their work, that feeling of going boldly where no writer has gone before. This course— designed both for people interested in trying their hand at writing and for more experienced writers who want a jolt—will set out to inspire our invention by harnessing joy, exhilaration, and inspiration as powerful creative forces in our writing. Bending genres, we will mix and match styles as we explore poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and even drama. We will play with time: past, present, and future; examine place; and discover people, animals, and objects by throwing ourselves into unusual points of view. We will explore the world: with a microscope, with a stethoscope, with a spoon, and with a shovel, and most of all with writing. As Picasso famously said, “It has taken me four years to paint like Raphael, but it has taken my whole life to learn to draw like a child.” We will take this same sentiment and apply it to our written work, returning to an original state, treating language not as a tool but as a toy, something to wonder at and enjoy as it lets us discover our richest world—our own imagination. Weekly prompts and exercises will receive feedback within a supportive community of the instructor and fellow students.

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Otis Haschemeyer received the Margolis Award in nonfiction and the 2007 Missouri Review Editor’s Prize. His work has appeared in Best New American Voices, Politically Inspired, The Sun, Alaska Quarterly Review, Fourteen Hills, Barrow Street, The Rumpus, Southern Indiana Review, The American Alpine Journal, and elsewhere. His collection, The Designated Marksman: Novella and Stories, was shortlisted for the Salt Prize. Haschemeyer received an MFA from the University of Arkansas. EGL 15 W

O nline course

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

O nline course

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:24 PM


o h

S

ometimes the impulse behind a novel comes from real people or events, reinvented as fiction, and sometimes from the writer’s imagination, starting from a haunting image, phrase, character, or situation. What persuades both writer and reader that this novel is telling the “truth” (whether or not anything like these events really happened)? In other words, what convinces us of the novel’s reality? This course, suitable for writers of all skill levels, will strengthen our ability to persuade readers of our novels’ realities through the ways we use character complexities, rich arcs and structures, time, pacing, narrative movement, point of view options, and the dramatic embodiment of thematic questions. We will read and discuss essays on craft, as well as novels by Alice Munro and Ernest J. Gaines. Students will also practice writing exercises designed to assist them in discovering their own novel’s unique shape, structure, and truths. As a community, we will give each writer supportive, helpful feedback on writing exercises and on a twenty-page selection of a novel in progress, working together to discover each novel’s largest possibilities.

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting.

W

e start telling stories as children and continue doing so every day of our lives—to our spouses, to our neighbors, even to our co-workers around the proverbial water cooler. So it might come as a surprise to discover how difficult it is to write a story. In other words, to actually get it down on paper. Questions and uncertainties crowd in, and the shapeless mass is often abandoned. No more. We know other people create memorable stories that endure for years—even centuries. In this course, we will unlock short stories by masters in the genre such as Anton Chekhov, Flannery O’Connor, and Edward P. Jones, examining the secrets of craft hidden below the surface. Then we will use those secrets to build our own memorable short stories. Students will turn in frequent written exercises, receiving detailed feedback. These exercises will build upon each other and culminate in a complete short story of fifteen to twenty pages by the end of the quarter. This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting. r i ta m a e r e e s e

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

sa r a h ston e

Faculty, Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers

Sarah Stone is the author of the novel The True Sources of the Nile and co-author of the textbook Deepening Fiction: A Practical Guide for Intermediate and Advanced Writers. Her stories and essays have appeared in Ploughshares; StoryQuarterly; The Writer’s Chronicle; Dedicated to the People of Darfur: Writings on Fear, Risk, and Hope; and A Kite in the Wind: Fiction Writers on Their Craft, among other places. She received an MFA in fiction from the University of Michigan. NVL 10 W

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

What Happens Next? Secrets of the Short Story

F ilci n t ieo w n r&i tni n og n fci o ct on u irosne s

g

Novel Writing: Inventing Reality

Rita Mae Reese received a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award for both poetry and fiction and a Discovery/The Nation award for poetry. Her work has appeared in more than a dozen journals and anthologies, including The Normal School, Imaginative Writing, From Where You Dream, Blackbird, New England Review, The Southern Review, and The Nation. Her first book, The Alphabet Conspiracy, was published in 2011. Reese is a former Marsh McCall Lecturer in Continuing Studies. FICT 17 W

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

On l i n e course

On li n e course

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 43

43

1/16/13 6:24 PM


The writer’s studio

The Art of the Short Story

L

iterary scholar Jonathan Gottschall says, “We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories.” But how can we best capitalize on the inherently human tendency toward fictionalizing? How can we take the memorable moments of our lives (both real and imaginary) and form these images and ideas into a coherent and fascinating whole? In other words, how can we turn our mental and physical experiences into narrative art? This course will reveal the skills and techniques essential to the short story. As we study the particular craft of short fiction, we will observe, analyze, and emulate the ways in which authors such as Alice Munro, Michael Chabon, and Junot Díaz have rendered the world of imagination so vividly real. We will look at the short story’s compression of time and space and its supposed moment of epiphany that contains within it, as Wallace Stegner says, the “whole of the world.” Our goal is to become expert readers, ever-improving literary analysts, and emerging writers. We will try our hands at producing a polished short story of our own, and we will come to know the joys and rigors—as every writer should!—of the writing workshop. This course is appropriate for writers of all experience levels. This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting.

A

nyone trying to write a book-length memoir is likely to feel overwhelmed. After all, a memoirist has to grapple with both the forest—the big picture—and the trees—all the individual details, scenes, narration, and choices that comprise the whole. In this course, we will go after both sides of the process, focusing on drafting, knowing what to put in and what to leave out, shaping and structuring the material, discovering and refining what the book is really about, making the story compelling, and—last but not least­—revising. With support and instruction, students will begin to grasp the overall gestalt of their book, as well as how to develop the craft skills necessary to bring it to life: voice; telling detail and imagery; characterization; structure; scenes and exposition; and reflection. We will read several memoirs as models, such as Swallow the Ocean by Laura Flynn and Let’s Take the Long Way Home by Gail Caldwell. Our group will explore important aspects of writing through exercises, readings, lectures, and discussion. The course is designed for students of all levels, from those who are well into a book-length memoir to those who want to get started on one.

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting. pau l e t t e a l d e n

Former Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer, Stanford

Valerie Brelinski’s writing has been published in The Rumpus, Fiction, Virginia Quarterly Review, Confrontation, and Green Mountains Review. She has received awards for her short fiction from The Boise Weekly, C-VILLE, and the San Francisco Chronicle. She has taught creative writing at Stanford and the University of Virginia. Brelinski received an MFA in fiction writing from the University of Virginia.

Paulette Alden is the author of the short story collection Feeding the Eagles, the memoir Crossing the Moon, and the forthcoming novel The Answer to Your Question. Her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Ploughshares, Stanford Magazine, the Antioch Review, and the Mississippi Review, among others. Alden has taught memoir and fiction writing at the University of Minnesota, Carleton College, St. Olaf College, and the Key West Literary Seminar. She received an MA from Stanford.

FI C T 1 8 W

C N F 20 W

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

va l e r i e b r e l i n s k i

Former Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer, Stanford

44

The Forest and the Trees: A Great Start on the Book-Length Memoir

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 44

On li n e co u r s e

On l i n e co u r s e

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:24 PM


d

t d -

n

h

Magazine Writing

I

M

t’s hard to tell the truth. Whether we’re writing about ourselves, our families, or the broader world, telling what really happened can be a challenge. In this course, we will practice applying the creative tools of fiction writing to nonfictional subjects, producing work that is both compelling and faithful to the truth. We will start on a small scale, writing from memory, and gradually turn our gaze outward to family, to community, and to the world at large. Through reading a wide variety of published essays, we will become familiar with the risks and strategies that make creative nonfiction work, as well as the practical and ethical problems that may arise when you choose to tell a true story. Every week, writing exercises will prompt your own explorations of self, family, and world, encouraging you to take risks in the telling of these stories. In-class workshops will help you to refine your approach and give you ideas for taking each piece through another draft. Readings will include the craft book Tell It Slant and selections from the Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction.

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting.

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting. m a l e n a wat ro u s

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford; Online Writer’s Studio Lead Instructor

s t e p h a n i e s o i l e au

Marsh McCall Lecturer in Continuing Studies; Former Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer, Stanford

Stephanie Soileau’s work has appeared in Glimmer Train, Ecotone, Tin House, Gulf Coast, StoryQuarterly, Nimrod International Journal, three volumes of New Stories from the South, and Best of the South: The Best of the Second Decade. She received a 2012 literature fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Soileau is working on a novel and nonfiction essays about fishermen, family, oil, and erosion in her home state of Louisiana. CN F 2 1 W

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

agazine writing seeks to inform, but also to entertain, to delight, to inspire. Successful magazine writers know how to recognize a fresh idea, develop a story arc, and incorporate research into their writing, while making every word “sing.” In this course, you will learn how to write the kind of article regularly featured in The New York Times Magazine, Salon, and in other magazines—both print and webbased. Along the way, you will write a review, conduct an interview, compose an edited Q&A, and write your own first-person essay. You will research and draft a 2,000-word feature story, receiving in-depth feedback in workshop, with the goal of submitting the final version to publications. You will also receive guidance on how to write a query letter that stands out in the slush pile and gets the attention of busy editors. Last but not least, you will have fun, learning how to be a stronger writer as you help your classmates do the same.

F ilci n t ieo w n r&i tni n og n fci o ct on u irosne s

-

Creative Nonfiction: Telling the Truth

Malena Watrous is the author of the novel If You Follow Me, which received a Michener-Copernicus award. She received an MFA from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a Truman Capote Fellow. Her work has been published in StoryQuarterly, Allure, Salon, The Believer, and Condé Nast Traveler. She has taught writing at the University of Iowa, Stanford, and the University of San Francisco. EGL 254 W

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

On li n e course

On li n e course

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 45

45

1/16/13 6:24 PM


The writer’s studio

Revision Line by Line: A Three-Week Intensive

L

ess is more. Show, don’t tell. Keep it simple. These maxims are fine, but how do we translate them to the page? How do we make our prose mean what it says and say what it means? Can we achieve transcendent beauty by way of obsessive precision? And what does George Orwell have to do with it all? Students will submit paragraphs and sentences; together we will burnish them into gems of language, heighten their potency and clarity, and give them a new and graceful depth. We will read essays and chapters by Orwell, Francine Prose, Flannery O’Connor, Lynne Truss, Frank Conroy, and Strunk and White, to name a few, on the complex relationship between clarity and meaning. Students will revise an opening, a key scene, and an ending with the goal of producing prose from which the reader cannot possibly turn away.

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting. Author

Shannon Cain’s first book, The Necessity of Certain Behaviors, received the Drue Heinz Literature Prize. Her work has been awarded two Pushcart Prizes and the O. Henry Prize. She received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Arizona Commission for the Arts. She was the summer 2011 Picador Guest Professor for Literature at the University of Leipzig, and now teaches in the MFA program at Bennington College. Cain received an MFA from Warren Wilson College.

an you still remember reading The Chronicles of Narnia with total clarity? Did you covertly “borrow” all the Harry Potter novels from your children? The worlds of young adult novels can enchant us for a lifetime. If you have ever dreamed of creating one of your own, this course is for you. We will study the novels The Hunger Games, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, and Feed to better understand what makes their fictional worlds so utterly tangible and compelling. In addition, we will do weekly exercises to help you hone in on the setting, character, and plot of your novel. The course will conclude with a constructive and supportive workshop of your first chapter (ten to twenty pages). Whether you are an experienced writer or a newbie, whether you have a set topic in mind or aren’t sure where to begin, this course will help you become an explorer of your own new world.

s tac e y s wa n n

William Chace Lecturer in Continuing Studies; Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Stacey Swann was editor of the literary quarterly American Short Fiction for three years and continues as a contributing editor. Her work has appeared in Epoch, Versal, Memorious, Freight Stories, The Good Men Project, and The Saint Ann’s Review. Her collection The Dead Zoo was a finalist for the 2010 Bakeless Literary Publication Prize. FI CT 20 W

E GL 2 5 0 W

3 weeks, April 22 – May 10 1 unit, $225 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 25

S ta n f o r d

C

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting.

sh a n non ca i n

46

Young Adult Novel Writing: Building Your Own World

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 46

O n li n e course

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

On li n e course

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:24 PM


?

ONLINE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN NOVEL WRITING

L

c a ro l i n e g o o dw i n

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Caroline Goodwin’s work has appeared in many literary journals, including The New Republic, Cimarron Review, Prism International, Puerto del Sol, and Junction Box. Her short collection, Text Me, Ishmael, was recently published in the UK, and her first full-length collection of poems, Trapline, will be published in 2013. She received an MFA from the University of British Columbia. POET 0 6 W

10 weeks, April 8 – June 14 3 units, $750 Limit: 17 Special refund deadline: April 11

On l i n e course

H

ave you always wanted to write a book? The Certificate Program in Novel Writing is designed to help you fulfill that dream. We have created a seven-course series that will show you the path from first glimmer to full manuscript. You will start with the habit of the art, move through a series of targeted workshops, produce a booklength manuscript (or at least a good part of one), and review that manuscript in a one-on-one tutorial with an accomplished fiction writer. Because the Certificate Program relies on a dedicated, dynamic cohort, admission is by application only. By studying and writing with a consistent group of students with similar commitment to their work, you will achieve a deeper sense of connection and thus a deeper level of learning. You will be involved in the creation and construction of many narratives—most notably your own. Best of all, this two-year Certificate Program retains the flexibility of our regular online writing courses. You can access your class from home or on your travels, at times of the day that suit your schedule. By the time you receive your Certificate, you will be well on your way to writing a booklength manuscript. Will it be finished and revised? That’s up to you. But along the way, your work will be read, critiqued, and supported by a group of dedicated instructors.

online

This is an online course. For more information about the online writing program, please visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu/onlinewriting.

APPLY T H IS SPRING AN D B EGIN IN T H E FALL !

online writing courses

et’s say there’s an image or a song that haunts you, or a phrase with a rhythm that just won’t let you go. Perhaps the view from your yard is filled with compelling sights that seem to contain deeper meaning, or you’ve just always wanted to try your hand at verse. Whatever your situation, an open mind is all you will need to get started here. In a lively, artistic atmosphere, we will focus on the practical development of the writing life, making poetry a daily habit. Exercises and instruction will aim to reawaken the pleasures of language, learn (or relearn) formal poetic techniques, and expand our sense of the possibilities of poetry. Mary Oliver’s A Poetry Handbook will serve as our primary text, along with The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms. Students will complete this course with a manuscript of ten to twenty-five pages and a concrete plan for future poetry projects.

c e r t i f i c at e p ro g r a m i n n ov e l w r i t i n g

s ,

Poetry: The Image and the Line

Applications for Fall 2013 admission will be available on April 15 and are due on June 7. For more information or to join our mailing list, please visit us online at continuingstudies.stanford.edu/writingcertificate.

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 47

47

1/16/13 6:24 PM


Professional and Personal Development

Professional and Personal Development B usiness usiness 4 8

C o m m unic a t i o n n 5 8 I n fo r m at i o n & w eb t ec h n o l o g ies ies

64

P e r s o n a l d e v e l o p m en t

65

Flowering Crab Apple; Photograph by Joel Simon

48

S ta n fo r d

Co n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 48

BUSINESS

T h e E n t r e p r e n e u r ’ s To o l k i t

A

spiring entrepreneurs often don’t have the breadth of knowledge required to launch a successful new company. This academic year, Stanford Continuing Studies is offering a series of in-depth courses designed to shore up your entrepreneurial toolkit. In Fall, “Getting from an Early Idea to a Real Business” offered an overview of the entire startup process, and “Finance for Entrepreneurship, Strategic Marketing, and Engineering” focused on securing and conserving resources in the early stages. A new Winter course, “Designing Breakthrough Innovations” presented proven innovative processes from Stanford’s d.school to ensure that your product or service effectively solves customers’ problems, and “The Financial Underpinnings of a Startup” focused on the strong quantitative skills you will need to complement your entrepreneurial vision. This Spring, “Creating Executable Strategies for Entrepreneurs” will cover strategic management of entrepreneurial efforts using a framework that results in an executable business, while a revisit of “Getting from an Early Idea to a Real Business” will offer an overview of the entire startup process. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well. Creating Executable Strategies for Entrepreneurs

W

hat are the strategies needed in order to successfully move from innovation to execution? In this course, we will cover strategic management of entrepreneurial efforts using a framework that results in an executable business. We will examine the steps of creating a strategy that moves an idea to market: defining a vision and roadmap; identifying the target customer and value; and determining the competencies, partners, and resources to align with the execution roadmap.

S t u d ie s

1/16/13 6:24 PM


,

s h e ry l ro o t

Founder, RootAnalysis; Software Management Consulting Professor, Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley

Sheryl Root is a strategy, marketing, and product management expert with more than eighteen years of experience at Hewlett-Packard and ten years of software systems experience in a leadership role for the financial and computing industries. She provides consultative leadership in business strategy development and execution, marketing operations, and software systems delivery, working across business units, functional areas, and geographic regions for leading high tech companies and startup organizations in Silicon Valley. She received a Sloan MS in business management from the Stanford Graduate School of Business. BUS 226

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 7 weeks, April 3 – May 15 1 unit, $345 Limit: 40

Getting from an Early Idea to a Real Business

D

o you have a business idea or an early-stage startup that you are ready to take to the next level? In this entrepreneurship course, we will look at the entire startup process—financing, marketing, operations, and especially barriers to scale—issues that often prevent a startup from reaching the critical mass required to succeed. This course will feature several guest speakers, from venture capitalists to startup marketing gurus. In discussion and exercises, you will apply this material to your particular venture. At the end of the course, students will give presentations to the class, with Silicon Valley executives and investors present to give feedback. The goal is for each student to leave the course with an actionable business plan for a sustainable and profitable enterprise. b r e t wat e r s

Founder and CEO, Tivix

Bret Waters has taken several companies from venturefunded startup through successful acquisition. He serves on the Advisory Council of Stanford’s School of Education, and works with social entrepreneurs from around the world as a mentor with the Global Social Benefit Incubator at Santa Clara University. Waters received an MBA from Northwestern.

BUSINESS

w

Students will gain knowledge and skills to apply strategic thinking toward their entrepreneurial efforts. We will examine how creating scenarios to identify alternative approaches enables us to remain adaptable in a dynamic environment. Guest speakers will include entrepreneurs who will discuss their experiences, the value received from strategic approaches, and the strategic elements of success. Students will work in teams to create a strategic approach to a group-selected opportunity. By the end of the course, students will know how to create new business strategies and to apply the models and processes seen in case studies.

BUS 217

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 8 weeks, April 2 – May 21 1 unit, $385

-

g

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R2.indd 49

49

1/21/13 3:30 PM


Professional and personal development

Leadership and Decision-Making

Building a Brand

T

I

his course begins with a comprehensive definition of leadership that includes motivation, influence, and specific resources that leaders can apply to engage and inspire followers. Values and vision are critical components of leadership, and students will learn how to translate these meaningfully into their groups and organizations. Students will also learn key elements of emotional intelligence as well as several styles of leadership and the types of situations in which they can be applied. We will look at various aspects of decision-making, including framing the problem, constructive conflict, the role of intuition, barriers and traps, engaging groups and integrating the experience of teams and experts, and managing change. We will also examine a process for highly effective decision-making applicable to small and large groups. Using lectures, film clips, and written exercises, this course is designed for entrepreneurs, executives, managers, and others aspiring to leadership roles in companies, nonprofit organizations, foundations, and public agencies. joh n s t e i n h a rt

Management Consultant

John Steinhart consults with corporations, venture and private equity firms, public agencies, and nonprofit organizations. He was managing director and chief administration officer of a private equity firm in San Francisco and vice president of administration at a Silicon Valley semiconductor company. At the Stanford Graduate School of Business, he directed both the Stanford Sloan Master’s Program and the Public Management Program, which applies business management skills to public sector and nonprofit problem solving. He received a BA from UC Berkeley and an MPA from the University of Pittsburgh.

n this course, students will learn how an idea becomes a brand through a creative process. Using proven models of brand building, and establishing the classroom as a working studio, students will move from ideas about products and services toward an understanding of what a brand actually is, how a brand ignites every part of a venture or organization, and how a brand moves through all areas of the organization. During the course, students will work on developing the next concrete steps for their entrepreneurial brand. They will leave the course with a clear understanding of what they need to do, in what order, and through what process to turn their brand concepts into practical reality. This course is for those with an interest in beginning, refreshing, or further developing a brand in either entrepreneurial or nonprofit ventures. e dwa r d l e a m a n

CEO, Growers and Nomads and The GN Studio

Edward Leaman leads a brand-building company using the concept of inside-out brand belief as the centerpiece of its work to develop brand promise into brand delivery and meaningful measurement. He has lived and worked for many years in Europe and Japan, and he received an MA from Cambridge. He was the founding Chair of Design (Fashion) at the California College of the Arts and has taught at Central Saint Martins College of Design and Art in London, as well as in the Green MBA program at Dominican University. BUS 116

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 13 2 units, $445 (No class on April 11)

BUS 53

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 6 weeks, April 4 – May 9 1 unit, $320 Limit: 75

50

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 50

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


The Company Is the Content : Marketing in a Social World

Building Innovative Subscription-Based Businesses

N

S

o aspects of business have been more disrupted by the social media revolution than marketing and communications. It used to be that a few clever marketing campaigns and some aggressive public relations would ensure that your message gets out to your target customer. This is no longer true. With the traditional media in decline and traditional marketing playbooks being rewritten, companies of all sizes now must struggle to get their message out to a highly fragmented customer base. This course is aimed at students who are new to marketing or social media. The course will define and demystify the myriad of social tools available, explore how companies can create their own social brands, and learn how to measure the success of a social marketing campaign. The goal is to provide a context and overview of general customer marketing principles and highlight how social media plays a role. Business Development Manager, Mozilla

Ron Piovesan leads business development for Mozilla’s app marketplace and is responsible for signing distribution deals with major content and games providers. His team has closed more than 200 distribution deals, including with EA, Evernote, Atlantic Records, Boston Globe, eBay, and Box, among others. He is also leading the content acquisition strategy for the new FirefoxOS phone in Brazil, in partnership with Telefónica. Previously, Piovesan was a marketing director with DataDirect Networks. He received a master’s in media and communications from Goldsmiths College, UK, and a Berkeley–Columbia Executive MBA.

m a rt i n w e s t h e a d

BUSINESS

ro n p i ov e s a n

ubscriptions are nothing new. People have been buying magazine subscriptions for decades. However, the web is enabling tools that allow customers control over their “subscription relationship.” New types of subscriptions are emerging—which allow people to purchase access to products as a service where previously they would have purchased the actual product. Zipcar is an example of such an offering; people can buy access to a car as a service instead of buying the car itself. The subscription model offers many advantages and challenges to both business and customer. For example, it offers recurring revenue instead of one-time sales, and it provides a service that can be continually improved. In this course, we will discuss the theory and practical mechanics of building a subscription business. We will also look at different financial and usage models and how to choose the right one. The course will include guest speakers from subscription businesses and vendors of SaaS Subscription support software.

Executive Director of Ning Engineering, Glam Media

Martin Westhead has worked extensively in technology transfer and has founded two Internet companies. He has been actively involved in subscription-based business from both a business and a technical point of view for several years. Westhead received a PhD in artificial intelligence from the University of Edinburgh. BUS 185

Thursdays, 7:00 – 9:00 pm 7 weeks, April 4 – May 16 1 unit, $385

BUS 94

Mondays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 8 – May 6 1 unit, $280 Limit: 65

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 51

51

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

Cloud Computing: Selling and Marketing SaaS Solutions to the Enterprise

Lead with Business Intelligence: Mine Your Data for Faster, Better Decisions

T

M

his course will focus on the critical success factors in selling and marketing cloud computing applications, also called Software as a Service (SaaS), to large enterprises. We will examine customer acquisition and retention issues, best practices in sales processes and marketing programs, sales compensation, channel issues, and pricing models. Comparisons to on-premise models will be explored. We will discuss the challenge of transitioning from an on-premise solution provider to a SaaS solution provider. Students will learn how SaaS practices are evolving from market leaders. Software industry executives will present their experiences in growing sales with SaaS solutions. Students will have the opportunity to explore SaaS sales and marketing alternatives with the instructor, visiting executives, and each other. Key elements of this highly interactive course will include SaaS value propositions and pricing models, sales and marketing approaches, and the role of services in a SaaS model. c h u c k d e v i ta

President, Growth Process Group

Chuck DeVita has more than thirty-five years of experience in technology sales and marketing management. He has worked with SaaS delivery models since 1999 and led the initial growth of two successful technology startups and the turnaround of a public software company. He has led sales and marketing for B2B software and SaaS solution companies throughout the US and Europe. DeVita is a frequent speaker at industry and venture forums on emerging-company sales and marketing issues. He received an MBA from Stanford and a BSEE from Santa Clara University. BUS 105

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 9:00 pm 6 weeks, April 17 – May 22 1 unit, $320 Limit: 55

anagers and leaders need fast, deep, and accurate insight to make key decisions, anticipate risks, and remain in compliance with laws and regulations. In less than a decade Business Intelligence (BI) has become a critical discipline in management where systems, data, people, and processes need to be aligned and integrated to bring the right information, at the right time, in the right format to the right decision-makers. As teams must do more with less and as competitive environments get riskier, BI enables the visibility and proactivity required to fully address challenges. In this course, students will acquire the complete Business Intelligence competence set: the extent of BI roles and impacts in business; the design of lean and sustainable solutions with the BI building blocks; efficient data management to capture, transform, organize, and visualize information with ease; project management, change management, and team dynamics assessment for successful BI initiatives; and insight into the impact of key technologies on BI from industry thought leaders in cloud computing, online analytical processing, Big Data, Unstructured Data, SaaS (Software as a Service) centers of excellence, and Mobile BI. The course will include case studies from leading BI organizations (IBM, Oracle, Google, and others), along with presentations from expert guest speakers to provide real-life examples.

g au t h i e r va s s e u r

Chief Operations Officer, Semarchy

Gauthier Vasseur is in charge of US and international development of Semarchy’s data integration, master data management, and data quality solutions. He is also senior advisor to Bix Software, an analytics and reporting software company. Prior to joining Semarchy, Vasseur led the strategy and the design of Business Intelligence and Performance Management systems at TriNet. He has also been the director of performance management at Google and senior director of enterprise performance management strategy at Oracle. He received MBAs from Nantes University and EDHEC Business School. BUS 96

52

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 52

S t u d i e s

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $445

1/16/13 6:25 PM


t

t

A

re you expanding into global markets and realizing that your usual Western approach is not likely to be successful? Is your market position being challenged by new competitors from emerging economies? In this course, you will gain an understanding of the growth strategies and unique approaches of new entrants, such as those from Asia, and how they seem to satisfy customer demands with “inferior” products. We will explore case studies and new business models to help develop effective localized product and customer strategies. Students will learn ways to circumvent new entrants by adopting innovative practices in product, pricing, and customer targeting to protect and grow their position. Innovation usually is a key differentiator for Western companies. However product superiority and premium positioning do not always win—“good enough” products and addressing customer needs often lead to greater success in some markets. This course is intended to provide business professionals with practical frameworks and strategy options that can be applied to their specific business situations, so as to strengthen their positions globally.

Angel Investing for the Serious Investor

M

aking an investment in an early stage startup is fun and easy to do, but making a profit from this type of investment is the focus of this course. Students will learn how to increase the probability of success by modifying the initial selection process, productively monitoring the investment’s progress, and monetizing their investment at the right point. In addition to the traditional topics of deal flow generation, deal screening, due diligence, and investment terms, the course will also cover portfolio management, techniques for identifying financially successful investments, and alternative exit points that typically are available only to early-stage investors. Since the real work of an investor starts after the check has been written, we will cover how to handle difficult situations from a minority shareholder’s perspective. All class sessions will have a lecture component along with guest speakers, but class participants are encouraged to bring real investment problems into the discussion (e.g., leadership, board of directors acting inappropriately, finding funding, competitors raiding the management team, and exit strategies). Beginning and experienced investors (please, no entrepreneurs) are invited to attend.

amy karam

c a ro l s a n d s

Competitive Strategy Consultant

Founder and Managing Partner, The Angels’ Forum and The Halo Funds

Amy Karam specializes in competitive strategy and sales enablement. She has worked in the high tech industry for almost twenty years at various companies such as Nortel and Cisco. She has held a spectrum of global roles such as leading a competitive sales strategy program and training cross-regional sales teams on how to position against Chinese competitors. Karam received an International MBA from the University of Ottawa and also completed the Innovation for Economic Development program at the Harvard Kennedy School. She also teaches at the Stanford Center for Professional Development. BUS 187

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 6 weeks, April 3 – May 8 1 unit, $320

BUSINESS

e

Competing in Global Markets with New Entrants (Like China)

Carol Sands started her career working for large companies but switched to owning and running startups in the 1980s. She founded The Angels’ Forum, a group of professional private equity investors, in 1997. The Halo Funds, a Silicon Valley-based venture capital fund, raised its first fund in 2000 and is currently investing from Halo III. Sands works with both commercial and nonprofit boards and received a BA in business administration from the University of Iowa. BUS 204

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 6 2 units, $465 Limit: 65

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 53

53

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

Managing Innovation

E

veryone knows that innovation is important to a company’s success, but how is it supposed to work as a business process? How should a company manage its resources more effectively to transform creative ideas into new value for the customer? Who and what make a company innovative? Is it just up to the engineers and scientists, or are other stakeholders also essential? This course offers a comprehensive overview of proven innovation management principles and describes in detail how they impact business success. New system models provide both quantitative and qualitative insights into the critical success factors that link innovation to financial growth. The universal principles and practices described are as important in a startup or small business as they are to a Fortune 500 company. Students will gain valuable new understanding and skills in managing the process of innovation, applicable both now and in the future as their careers unfold. m a rv i n pat t e r s o n

President, Dileab Group

Marvin Patterson’s career in product innovation includes twenty years with Hewlett-Packard where he was involved in new product innovation and R&D at various levels. In 1993, he founded Innovation Resultants International, a firm dedicated to helping clients improve the return on their new product investments. Patterson has published three books and numerous articles on managing innovation and currently provides leadership education and consulting in this field. He received an MSEE from the University of Washington. BUS 205

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $445

Strategic Marketing of High Tech and Clean Tech

H

ow do you develop a winning go-to-market strategy? How do you segment and target a market that does not yet exist? How do you go from idea or technology to broad market adoption? How do you build a strategy to create or sustain a winning product in new, fast-growth high tech or clean tech markets while innovation accelerates, industry boundaries disappear, and competition changes quickly and unpredictably? While technology development is critical, high tech and clean tech leaders usually win on the strength of timely execution of superior business and market strategies. In this course, you will discover the fundamental rules, tools, and frameworks that lay the groundwork for a winning market strategy. We will define the principles of new market dynamics and cover a range of crucial issues: prospect and customer analysis, segmentation and targeting, creating adoptable products, strategic positioning, value pricing, winning partnerships, effective promotions and communications, branding, distribution channels, and international expansion. Class sessions will be fast-paced and highly interactive, and will include lectures, visits by investors and executives, case studies, and discussions of real-life experiences. ton y se ba

Clean Energy Entrepreneur

Tony Seba is the author of Solar Trillions and Winners Take All. He has more than twenty years of experience in fast-growth tech companies, including business development and strategic planning at Cisco Systems and RSA Security. He was the founder and CEO of PrintNation. com, where he raised more than $30 million in venture capital. He received a BS in computer science and engineering from MIT and an MBA from Stanford. BUS 47

Mondays, 7:00 – 9:15 pm 8 weeks, April 1 – May 20 2 units, $445 Limit: 50

54

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 54

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


,

,

P

ersuasive face-to-face communication matters in business. Regardless of how innovative your product might be, or how important the new project is, if you cannot communicate effectively and persuasively with your colleagues and customers, you probably will not succeed. Ideal for those who are planning presentations, pitches, and discussions in order to build new business, sell creative ideas, or report internally, this course will focus on the crucial in-person communication skills you need to be persuasive in business. We will cover a wide range of tools including the Planning Path, a model for quickly constructing objective-driven and persuasive communication. Students will learn to choose from five different fundamental structures for building clear and compelling messages. Since adjusting to feedback is so critical, listening styles and their impact on communication will be discussed. This course will give students a toolkit of approaches that can offer increased confidence, gravitas, and the ability to communicate effectively face-to-face and deal with doubts, questions, or confrontations. Classes will involve a dynamic blend of mini-lecture, communication exercises, and hands-on practice. Students will be encouraged to address real issues they are personally facing so that they can apply the skills they have learned.

juli et er ickson

Communication Specialist

Juliet Erickson consults for international corporate executives and individuals who must communicate effectively in critical situations. As a founding partner of Rogen International (now rogenSi), a global communication consultancy, she was responsible for establishing offices for the firm in Sydney, Auckland, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Toronto, New York, and London. Erickson is the author of The Art of Persuasion and Nine Ways to Walk Around a Boulder. She received an MBA from Macquarie University. BUS 112

Mondays, 6:30 – 8:50 pm 8 weeks, April 1 – May 20 2 units, $445 Limit: 45

Develop an Authentic Leadership Presence

O

nce you reach a leadership level in any corporation, your effectiveness is determined by your success at managing people and implementing organizational initiatives. In this highly interactive two-day workshop, we will assess your personal communication style and provide coaching on how to develop your style to effectively lead groups toward a chosen goal. We will utilize the AEM-cube, a new, highly sophisticated human insight assessment tool, to gain insight into your personal leadership style. Combining this insight with presentation coaching, we will help you communicate with a powerful and authentic presence. The workshop will combine participatory exercises with the opportunity to give your own presentation to an audience. (Participants will receive a DVD of their presentation.) Preparation for the workshop includes bringing a prepared five-minute talk as well as completing the AEM-cube assessment test online before the beginning of the course.

den ise r a bi us

Facilitator, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Denise Rabius is an experienced facilitator, workshop leader, and coach. She facilitates the popular Interpersonal Dynamics course at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Her work focuses on leadership development and personal fulfillment. She received an MBA from Stanford.

BUSINESS

n

Persuasive Face-to-Face Business Communication

bob sa dler

Management Consultant

Bob Sadler has thirty-five years of experience consulting for numerous Fortune 500 companies in the US, Europe, and Asia. He played a key role in developing change leadership practices for KPMG, Ernst & Young, and Deloitte Consulting. He regularly designs and facilitates workshops to help organizations build a new vision and roadmap. WSP 194

Saturdays, May 4 and May 11 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $300 Limit: 30 Non-refundable AEM - cube assessment fee: $40 Special refund deadline: April 27

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 55

55

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

Negotiation Mastery: Achieving Outstanding Results and Relationships

N

egotiating well is critical to success in any field. We negotiate on a daily basis at work and home. Yet too often, people lacking strong negotiation skills damage relationships and reach suboptimal outcomes. This interactive workshop covers the fundamental principles for achieving excellent results in any negotiation, from colleagues and customers to friends and family members. Here we will explore the impact of trust, communication, and the balance between collaboration and assertiveness, as well as when to walk away in a negotiation. The workshop will incorporate a variety of activities, including simulations, role-playing, videos, and discussions, to create a highly engaging experience. Students will come away with practical tools and techniques for generating creative solutions in difficult situations. Due to its short format, this workshop may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade. jessica not i n i

Adjunct Professor of Negotiation and Mediation, Stanford Law School

Jessica Notini is a senior consultant with Accordence, teaches negotiation and mediation at the Stanford and UC Berkeley law schools, and leads many negotiation courses in California and internationally for private and public entities. She is principal of Notini Mediation & Facilitation Services, past chair of the California State Bar ADR (alternative dispute resolution) Committee, and former president of the Association for Dispute Resolution of Northern California. She received a JD from the University of Michigan.

Coaching Skills for Leaders and Managers

H

ow can we assist others in the process of improving themselves? It is the role of the coach to facilitate change and personal growth. In this workshop, we will explore the different ways in which you can be instrumental in illuminating a path to personal transformation for yourself and for others. We all want to achieve our potential, to become the best possible version of ourselves. In the role of the coach, you will open doors for others to realize their potential. As the day unfolds, we will review proven tools, processes, and maps to transition through the process of personal change. Learning will be applicable to ourselves as well as for coaching others. Due to its short format, this workshop may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade. g u s tavo r a b i n

Managing Partner, Skyline Group

Gustavo Rabin is a psychologist working with individuals and organizations. His work focuses on leadership, executive coaching, and team effectiveness. He received PhDs from the University of Buenos Aires and Antioch University. WSP 97

Saturday, May 11 9:30 am – 5:00 pm $300 Limit: 25 Non-refundable online assessment fee: $35 Special refund deadline: May 4

WSP 19 A

Saturday, May 11 10:00 am – 4:00 pm $235 Limit: 24 Non-refundable materials fee: $5 Special refund deadline: May 4 WSP 19 B

Saturday, June 1 10:00 am – 4:00 pm $235 Limit: 24 Non-refundable materials fee: $5 Special refund deadline: May 25 Sections A and B of “Negotiation Mastery” cover the same content.

56

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 56

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


How Much? Valuing Business and Investment Opportunities

H

ow much is it worth? How much can we afford? How much can we make? How much is too much? Whether you are in a startup seeking funding, in an established company evaluating a new initiative, or an individual analyzing your investment portfolio — we are constantly “selling” or “buying” business ideas. Putting the right value on a business idea can make the difference between success and failure. This course will introduce students to valuation tools and methods for tackling a broad range of business and investment situations. Our approach will be hands-on, with students building and using models to apply the concepts to business cases. Guest speakers with extensive valuation experience will provide a perspective on real-life implementation. Students should expect a broad and practical introduction to a critical analytical discipline.

i d d o h a da r

M&A Transaction Advisor, Ernst & Young

Iddo Hadar has more than twenty years of strategy experience in many segments of the high tech industry—combining industry and consulting work in M&A, restructuring, technology strategy, and marketing strategy. He has advised major clients across the technology spectrum on strategic investment, capital allocation, and business modeling. He was also head of corporate strategy and chief marketing officer at Applied Materials and a turnaround CEO of a digital publishing startup. He received an MBA from Stanford.

W

hether you’re a new parent thinking about changing diapers or a parent of young kids figuring out how to get them to soccer practice, you have a lot more to think about. What about getting life insurance? Or planning how to pay for college? These are just two of the many important financial planning issues facing all parents. This workshop will make you feel secure that you have addressed the most critical family financial planning issues including the following: education planning (saving for college); estate planning (writing a will that names a guardian); insurance (especially life insurance); cash flow (to be or not to be a stay-at-home parent); and retirement (starting sooner rather than later). You will leave the workshop with a better understanding of what areas of financial planning you need to think about and how to take action. In addition, you will take home financial planning tools and information to use in developing your own family’s financial plans. Due to its short format, this workshop may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade.

BUSINESS

Completion of the Continuing Studies Winter 2012 course “Discovering Your Inner Quant Jock: Financial Modeling and Business Decisions” (WSP 150) or its equivalent elsewhere is strongly recommended. Students enrolling in this course are required to bring their own laptops to class. All exercises will be demonstrated in Microsoft Excel 2011, but should be easily understandable by users of other Excel versions.

Financial Planning for Parents

tom lo

Financial Planner, Fluent Wealth Partners

Tom Lo specializes in financial planning services for families on the Peninsula and in the South Bay. He received a BA from Stanford and an MBA from the University of Virginia. In addition, he has completed the Certificate Program in Personal Financial Planning at UC Santa Cruz Extension. WSP 193

Saturday, April 27 10:00 am – 4:00 pm $215 Special refund deadline: April 20

WSP 195

Saturdays, April 13 and April 27 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $290 Limit: 35 Special refund deadline: April 6

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 57

57

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

Planning for 21st-Century Retirement

H

ow will you know with confidence when you can retire? None of us wants to outlive our money, yet in coming decades, most of us will have to take far greater responsibility for creating retirement income than our parents’ generation did. Costs for retirees are rising rapidly, yet pension and health benefits are shrinking. Increased longevity and investment volatility strain government and corporate pensions as well as private portfolios. This workshop addresses the challenges of retirement planning in the 21st century. Topics to be addressed include cash flow analysis, saving and investing for retirement, retirement income sources, Social Security strategies, Medicare, insurance and annuities, longterm care, gifting, and estate planning. By the end of this workshop, you will have created a personal retirement plan that integrates your financial objectives within a framework of your goals and values. This plan will serve as a flexible framework to guide your current and future financial decisions. This workshop is led by a team of Palo Alto–based private wealth managers who focus on serving the Stanford community. m a ry c r aw f o r d

Senior Vice President; Senior Portfolio Manager Director dá i r e pat r i c k h o g a n

COMMUNICATION

Public Speaking

I

n today’s “attention-deficit” world, delivering powerful presentations is an indispensable skill. This course provides a practical approach to public speaking. Students will learn how to make positive first impressions, captivate their listeners, and move audiences from “no” to “yes.” Students will practice informal speaking skills (impromptu and storytelling), followed by traditional speech genres (informative, persuasive, and entertaining). They will also sharpen their skills with videotape, the use of PowerPoint, the study of famous speeches, and participation in a final dinner program of roasts, toasts, and fun. j a m e s wag s ta f f e

Lecturer, Stanford Center for Teaching and Learning

James Wagstaffe received a BA in communications from Stanford and won the National Public Speaking title for Stanford in 1977. He received a JD from Hastings College of Law and is a partner with Kerr & Wagstaffe in San Francisco. In addition to his work as a trial attorney and public speaker, he teaches at Stanford and Hastings. He is the author of Romancing the Room. COM 01

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $365 Limit: 40

Certified Financial Planner; Chartered Financial Analyst s a n d r a wa n g

Certified Financial Planner; Certified Divorce Financial Analyst pau l m a l i n

Certified Financial Planner; Certified in Long-Term Care e va n c r aw f o r d

Financial Advisor WSP 164

Saturdays, April 6 and April 20 9:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $320 Special refund deadline: March 30

58

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 58

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Improvisationally Speaking

C

Lecturer, Film and Media Studies Program, Stanford

Adam Tobin is a screenwriter and an actor. He created the sitcom About a Girl and the reality show Best Friend’s Date for Viacom’s TeenNick and has written for ABC, ESPN, Discovery Channel, and the National Basketball Association. Tobin was a story analyst for Jim Henson Pictures and has taught story and pitching seminars at Twentieth Century Fox/Blue Sky Studios and Aardman Animations. He was a founding member of the Stanford Improvisors (SImps) and the Los Angeles performance group The But Franklies. He received an MFA in screenwriting from USC. COM 42

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $365 Limit: 40

BUSINESS c o m m uni c a t i o n

oncerned about an upcoming question-andanswer session? Anxious about adding your thoughts in a meeting? Afraid of needing to present your hour-long business proposal in twenty minutes? Many of us are uneasy about speaking in public, especially in an impromptu, off-the-cuff manner. However, much of what happens in our personal and professional lives requires exactly this type of communication. By building on our natural speaking and improvisational abilities, we will become more comfortable presenting with authority and awareness. Informed by scholarly research, this hands-on course combines theory, basic principles, and methods of effective public speaking and improvisation in action. Through individual and collaborative exercises, you will learn how to speak extemporaneously with greater confidence and clarity, regardless of content or context. Lessons will directly apply to both professional and life skills. The course will emphasize development and delivery of both formal presentations and less formal, impromptu speaking opportunities (e.g., job interviews, introductions, toasts, and question-and-answer sessions) through up-on-your-feet activities. We will explore such topics as gaining confidence and conveying credibility, engaging with your material and audience, and quickly putting ideas together. Everyone will participate in improvisational exercises.

a da m t o b i n

m at t h e w a b r a h a m s

Lecturer, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Matt Abrahams is an educator and a coach who has published research articles on cognitive planning, persuasion, and interpersonal communication. He is the author of Speaking Up Without Freaking Out, a book written to help those who suffer from speaking anxiety, and he is co-founder and principal at Bold Echo Communications Solutions. He received a BA in psychology from Stanford, an MA in communication from UC Davis, and a secondary education teaching credential from San Francisco State. Prior to teaching, Abrahams held senior leadership positions in several leading software companies.

Tulip; Photograph by Joel Simon

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R2.indd 59

59

1/21/13 3:25 PM


Professional and personal development

P ro f e s s i o n a l E n g l i s h N o n - N at i v e S p e a k e r s

for

T

he ability to communicate ideas effectively continually ranks at the top of the list of skills needed by business people, engineers, and other professionals. This series of advanced English courses gives non-native speakers the chance to identify and practice the essential speaking and writing skills needed in professional settings.

The Art of Conversation

T

his course focuses on developing effective conversation skills and is geared toward advanced non-native speakers of English who have significant experience with the language. We will focus on advanced interaction skills to help students become more effective in areas including narration, description, negotiation, hypothesizing, and supporting opinions. Special emphasis will be placed on interactive listening, accuracy, and overall intelligibility. Activities will include storytelling, interviews, and panel discussions. k e n n e t h ro m e o

Lecturer, English for Foreign Students, Stanford Language Center

Kenneth Romeo specializes in listening, vocabulary, and writing courses for foreign students from beginning to advanced levels. He received a PhD in education from Stanford, specializing in language instruction and second-language acquisition.

Presenting in English

D

esigned for advanced non-native speakers working in professional contexts, this course focuses on the development of clear, effective presentation skills in English, with specific attention to the accurate use of American English sounds, stress, and intonation. Students will present to both small and large groups, learning how best to organize information to gain and keep audience attention. The goals are to develop confidence, fluency, and accuracy when presenting in English. Two presentations will be videotaped for analysis and personalized instructor feedback. Students may also complete individual audio recordings for further instructor feedback. lisa si ngleton qu ija no

Lecturer, English for Foreign Students, Stanford Language Center

Lisa Singleton Quijano specializes in oral presentation, advanced oral communication, essay writing, and science writing. She speaks French and Spanish with high fluency and converses in Thai. She has studied in France and taught English as a foreign language in Japan and Brazil, at Foothill College, and at UC Santa Cruz Extension. Quijano received an MA in teaching English as a second/foreign language from San Francisco State. COM 23

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 9:05 pm 9 weeks, April 2 – May 28 2 units, $425 Limit: 21

COM 34

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 2 units, $425 Limit: 21

60

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 60

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


g e

s w

d -

T

his course is designed for individuals who are already proficient in English, but who would benefit from reduction of their foreign accent. It provides an approach to accent reduction that is systematic yet not overly technical. The course combines theory and practice. Key concepts are introduced and then applied to language-specific pronunciation issues, followed by practical exercises and feedback. Special emphasis is placed on practical exercises that will lead students to rapid and noticeable improvement in the classroom and will also serve as a guide for continued improvement after the course is over. Topics covered include: a quick, basic, and useful introduction to where and how speech sounds are produced; individual sounds of American English in isolation, with close attention to typically problematic consonants and vowels; difficult combinations of sounds; word stress; intonation; and pronunciation differences between formal and casual speech.

Flowering Cherry and Daffodils; Photograph by Joel Simon

n e i l j ac o b s

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Emeritus, Ohio State University

c o mBm Uu Sn I Ni c ES aS tion

n

Accent Reduction for Non-Native Speakers of English

Neil Jacobs has taught courses and workshops on phonetics, phonology, and accent reduction, and has also studied and taught several languages. He received a PhD from Columbia. COM 39 A

Mondays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 1 – April 29 1 unit, $220 Limit: 28 COM 39 B

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 2 – April 30 1 unit, $220 Limit: 28 Sections A and B of “Accent Reduction for Non-Native Speakers of English” cover the same content.

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 61

61

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

Incorporating Storytelling into Public Speaking

Building Interpersonal Skills: An Experiential Workshop

H

T

ave you ever wondered how certain speakers captivate audiences, riveting their attention with every word and gesture? Have you ever wanted to be such a speaker yourself? There are many elements to effective speaking, but a key ingredient is the ability to weave vibrant stories into one’s presentations. Whether delivering a PowerPoint presentation or a brief summary of one’s work project, the use of stories and storytelling techniques can dramatically enhance delivery and charisma. In this course, we will examine basic storytelling techniques as used by seasoned and professional storytellers. Students will have a clear sense of what mesmerizing stories look and sound like, which techniques work best for keeping audiences rapt, and how to incorporate these techniques into their own presentations. By the end of the course, students will be able to use stories to streamline their material; identify which personal anecdotes are and are not effective; develop the ability to access their most natural and confident tone of voice; incorporate body language that commands attention and respect; project vitality and charisma in their self-expression; and remain calm and poised under pressure. Fairy tales, myths, modern movies, books, and plays will be used as source material. Class members will prepare, practice, and deliver various presentations, incorporating techniques learned in class. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. m a r i a n n e n eu w i rt h

Communication Consultant

Marianne Neuwirth has been teaching communication courses and workshops since 1992, with an emphasis on skilled verbal and nonverbal discourse in public and interpersonal contexts. At Stanford, she is a consultant with the Knight Fellowship program, the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs, and several other departments. She received a PhD in communication from the University of Utah. COM 29

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 6 2 units, $425 Limit: 30

62

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 62

his workshop is a combination of T-group (“T” is for training) and class exercises. T-group is a highly experiential way of learning that has been the cornerstone of a very popular course in Interpersonal Dynamics at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business for forty years. Come and find out why this is such a powerful way to learn about yourself and others! We will have three groups—each with a facilitator and twelve students. There will also be presentations and exercises with the full class. This is real-time learning with plenty of opportunity to practice effective interpersonal skills and increase your awareness of your feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. You will hone your ability to listen fully, to give and receive honest feedback, and to express yourself more authentically. There is wisdom in groups that can help you uncover aspects of yourself that often remain unseen. The practice you get during this weekend building effective and trusting relationships can be applied with friends and family and in the workplace. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. susa n nev ille

Advanced Facilitator, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Susan Neville has been facilitating the Interpersonal Dynamics course at the Graduate School of Business for thirteen years. She received an MBA from Stanford. k ev i n m a rt i n

Advanced Facilitator, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Kevin Martin facilitates Interpersonal Dynamics and Diversity at the Graduate School of Business. He is the president of Mentor Training and received an MS in management science from Stanford. ca mpbell fr a n k

Advanced Facilitator, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Campbell Frank facilitates Interpersonal Dynamics at the Graduate School of Business. He received an MBA from Stanford. Frank works in the investment industry. COM 19

Friday, May 17, 6:30 – 9:30 pm Saturday, May 18, 9:30 am – 7:30 pm Sunday, May 19, 9:30 am – 4:30 pm Monday, May 20, 6:30 – 8:00 pm 2 units, $405 Limit: 36 Special refund deadline: May 10

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


N

one of us will forget the day we witnessed the news accounts of airline Captain “Sully” Sullenberger’s successful landing in the Hudson River, having lost both engines in a bird strike while taking off from La Guardia Airport. He exercised extraordinary judgment that day by not getting trapped into a wellknown phenomenon the FAA describes as “negative target fixation.” Based on the cockpit recordings between Captain Sullenberger and the La Guardia air-traffic controller, what can we learn about the training he relied upon to help him process a lifetime of experience that saved 155 lives? What lessons can executive and entrepreneurial leaders take from this and apply to their own environments to manage crises and increase their odds of successfully piloting their organizations to a safe landing? In this course, you will learn a pragmatic protocol and process that begins at the moment you and your staff recognize a crisis. From there you will learn how to triage the crisis’s dynamics; discern what data is relevant to your situation; build and deploy a plan of action; and then retain focus until you reach your desired outcomes. Due to its short format, this workshop may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade. k e n t v i c k e ry

Co-founder, Rev Media

Kent Vickery has a thirty-year career managing crisis as an entrepreneur, executive, and advisor to government and business organizations in the technology, entertainment, and media industries. He is an expert at neutralizing the powerful forces of negative target fixation. Vickery has been a guest lecturer in entrepreneurship and private equity at Stanford.

Effective Nonverbal Communication

T

his dynamic workshop will help improve the way you communicate by focusing on the nonverbal aspects of communication. Nonverbal communication can reinforce what you say, but when not used effectively, it can weaken your message. This workshop will focus on the techniques of expression, including gestures, body movements, positions and postures, the voice, breathing techniques, sustaining eye contact, the use of silence, and others, with an emphasis on consistency between verbal and nonverbal communication. We will also examine how nonverbal communication can be used as a tool to influence others in difficult contexts (such as lecturing to an unsettled group) and to optimize the impact of your message in stressful settings, such as job interviews and business negotiations. The workshop will include short video recordings of each student. Due to its short format, this workshop may not be taken for Credit or a Letter Grade. jeff ca bili

Director, International Business Development, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Jeff Cabili has spent more than twenty-five years in senior management positions for international companies. He has lived in seven countries, and visited more than seventy countries for business or leisure. He speaks and conducts business in five languages and has some knowledge of two others. As a Total Quality Management (TQM) consultant, he has conducted seminars for more than 3,300 senior executives. He received an MBA from Wharton.

Uu Sn I Ni c ES c o mBm aS tion

.

Managing Crisis: Lessons Learned from the Miracle on the Hudson

WSP 75

Wednesday, April 17 9:00 am – 5:00 pm $200 Limit: 21 Special refund deadline: April 10

WSP 196

Saturday, May 18 10:00 am – 4:00 pm $155 Limit: 24 Special refund deadline: May 11

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 63

63

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

INFORMATION & WEB TECHNOLOGIES

Beginning Website Design

I

n this hands-on course, students will learn the fundamentals of creating and publishing a website through a mixture of exercises, lectures, and demonstrations. Computer novices and more advanced users alike should find the course both challenging and engaging. Topics include website design principles, HTML5 basics, images, tables, Cascading Style Sheets, forms, and graphics. By the end of the course, students will have built a website and will be ready to strike out on their own. No prior HTML experience is necessary, although students must have access to a computer, be familiar with computer basics, and have access to the Internet. m a r k br a nom

Technology Instructor and Curriculum Developer, Stanford Information Technology Services

Mark Branom received a BA and an MA from Stanford and specializes in demystifying computers and information technologies for non-techies. CS 21 A

Enhanced Website Design

T

his hands-on course will expose students to some of the enhanced techniques used by web professionals to create dynamic web pages. Topics will include using the WYSIWYG tool Dreamweaver, graphics programs such as Fireworks and Photoshop, a brief review of the web page creation process, site organization techniques, and web design issues (including the biggest mistakes designers make and how to avoid them), Cascading Style Sheets (including CSS3), JavaScript, and adding HTML5 video. We will also cover creating HTML5 forms and basic CGI scripting (Perl and PHP), incorporating e-commerce into a site, and creating dynamically produced web content. We will touch on some Web 2.0 tools, including RSS, blogs, wikis, podcasts, and content management systems such as Joomla! and Drupal. By the end of the course, students will have learned how to build an enhanced website using just a text editor and a web browser. Students must have access to a computer, be familiar with computer basics, and have access to the Internet.

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 2 – June 4 2 units, $525 Limit: 20

m a r k br a nom

CS 21 B

Mark Branom received a BA and an MA from Stanford and specializes in demystifying computers and information technologies for non-techies.

Technology Instructor and Curriculum Developer, Stanford Information Technology Services

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 2 units, $525 Limit: 20

CS 22

Sections A and B of “Beginning Website Design” cover the same content.

Thursdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 4 – June 6 2 units, $525 Limit: 20

Stanford Foothills; Photograph by Joel Simon

64

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 64

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


f

eli lev

Software Developer; Computer Instructor; Documentation Writer

Eli Lev received an MSEE from Johns Hopkins and has developed software for various government and private sector projects. He has taught continuing education courses at UC San Diego, Foothill College, and Stanford. CS 4 1

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 6 weeks, April 2 – May 7 1 unit, $385 Limit: 18

P o s i t i v e P s yc h o l o g y a n d t o S u s ta i n a b l e H a pp i n e s s

the

K eys

I

n the last decade, two scientific discoveries have emerged from the field of positive psychology, the science of happiness and success. The first of these is that sustainable happiness is a cause, not merely a consequence, of success. The second is that sustainable happiness is based on a skill set that can be learned. These findings have created a paradigm shift in the pursuit of happiness and success at work, in relationships, and in personal life. In this four-course sequence, students will learn how to build mastery in the skills that underlie sustainable happiness and success. The first course, “Choosing Happiness,” (Fall) provided a science-based action plan for enhancing sustainable happiness. The second course, “Enhancing Emotional Intelligence,” (Winter) focused on building the fundamental internal skills for happiness and success. The third course, “Enhancing Social Intelligence,” (Spring) will aim to advance students’ interpersonal skills that underlie strong relationships. The fourth course, “Strategic Happiness at Work,” (Summer) will aim to assist students in applying positive psychology research findings in the workplace. While these courses build upon one another, each course can be taken independently as well.

personal development

d -

H

ave you ever wondered how software developers create their products? In this hands-on course, students will explore the world of programming by learning the fundamental grammar and meaning of the PHP programming language. PHP is a computer scripting language that has been used for many years to produce dynamic web pages. Students will come away with a fundamental understanding of PHP that will be applicable to other programming languages. Topics covered include language basics (syntax, semantics, data types), variable basics, control flow structures, functions, file handling, and ways to leverage others’ code through the use of libraries. By the end of the course, students will be able to write and build a program, and will be able to figure out how to solve a problem in a programmatic way. No prior programming experience is necessary. Students must have access to a computer, be familiar with computer basics, and have access to the Internet.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

i n fo r m at i o n & w e b t ec h n o lo g i e s

a

Beginning Programming: PHP

Enhancing Social Intelligence

W

hat qualities and abilities are behind great relationships, strong leadership, and personal magnetism? Are these qualities based on fixed traits or are they skills that can be learned? Research shows that people who excel at work, in leadership positions, and in relationships tend to be high in a set of abilities known as social intelligence. Social intelligence, similar to emotional intelligence, is a skill set that can be learned. It involves the ability to read nonverbal cues, understand another’s mental state, and influence and manage relationships.

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 65

65

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

The aim of this course is to help students assess and build the skills of social intelligence. Students will learn how to use emotional intelligence to improve close relationships and communication skills, build a team, motivate others, and engage in successful negotiations and conflict management. The emphasis is on applying these skills at work, at home, and in relationships. Activities will include self-assessment, experiential exercises including meditation practices, and working with personal scenarios. l au r a d e l i z o n n a

Clinical Psychologist

Laura Delizonna specializes in the fundamental practices and skill sets that lead to sustainable happiness and success. She is an author of three positive psychology handbooks, consults with businesses, conducts trainings and workshops in organizations, and coaches individuals. She has been a staff psychologist and a postdoctoral fellow at the Stanford School of Medicine. Delizonna received a PhD from Boston University. ted anstedt

CEO, Merit Training Corporation

Ted Anstedt has spent the past twenty years creating and delivering workshops for major companies across the US, Canada, and Europe. He specializes in leadership and coaching programs related to change management, positive psychology, and emotional intelligence. Anstedt received an MA from Stanford. PDV 78

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 3 – May 1 1 unit, $200 Non-refundable materials fee: $40

66

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 66

Compass Journey: A Personal Career and Life Strategizing Course

T

his interactive course is designed for the person who would like to create a life vision based on personal or professional goals, or both. Students will explore who and where they are now, where they want to go next, and how to get there. This course blends personal analysis, imagination, and strategic planning to help students determine and achieve their desired future. Those wanting to explore their career path, retirement plans, or work/life balance will find this course beneficial. Using a unique visual workbook, they can tap into creative ideas for determining their future life’s path. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to set their vision in motion. Students must commit to attending all eight sessions, expect at least one hour of homework per week, and be comfortable sharing personal information in a smallgroup setting. This course includes a $35 non-refundable fee for a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment, to be paid at the time of registration. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade. k at h l e e n s e x t o n

Manager of Employee Development, County of Santa Clara

Kathleen Sexton received an MS in counseling from San Francisco State and is a nationally certified career counselor. In Stanford’s Learning and Development department, she developed the staff career development program, COMPASS. She is also the CEO of the consulting firm Kairos Learning. PDV 58

Tuesdays, 7:00 – 9:00 pm 8 weeks, April 2 – May 28 1 unit, $350 Limit: 30 Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment: $35 (No class on April 30)

S t u d i es

1/16/13 6:25 PM


T

he career-oriented life can lose its meaning as we gain experience and acquire wisdom with age. And, without a plan, fear and uncertainty about aging can take hold. Longevity research suggests that as we age we become more creative, seek more meaning, value, and purpose, and are better able to integrate multiple facets of our lives. This course will empower students to design a personal blueprint for living a life that maximizes health, physical function, cognitive agility, social networks, and personal meaning. Weekly lectures will introduce students to new findings from preventive science, mind-body medicine, and positive psychology. Through self-reflection, sustainable changepractices, and values-focused “design thinking” tools, students will create a meaningful and practical prototype document that will serve as an evolving guide for the years ahead.

m a n j u l a wa l d ro n

Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering Design, Stanford; Instructor, Stanford’s Health Improvement Program

Manjula Waldron was a chaplain resident and master trainer for healthy living programs at the Stanford Patient Education Research Center. She is certified in advanced mind-body medicine and as a well-being coach. Previously, she was a professor of biomedical engineering at Ohio State with a focus on integrated design, aids for disability, holistic health, and healthy aging. She received a PhD from Stanford. PDV 88

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 10 weeks, April 3 – June 5 2 units, $405 Limit: 30

personB aU l SdI e N vE eS lSo p m e n t

-

Resilient Aging: An Integrated Approach to Achieving Longevity

r a n da l l s ta f f o r d

Professor of Medicine; Director, Stanford Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, Stanford Prevention Research Center

Randall Stafford received an MS in health administration from Johns Hopkins, an MD from UCSF, and a PhD in epidemiology from UC Berkeley. His research on prevention has led to more than 135 articles in The Journal of the American Medical Association and The New England Journal of Medicine, among others. At the Stanford Internal Medicine Clinic, Stafford focuses on healthy aging and the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases. Tulips; Photograph by Joel Simon

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 67

67

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Professional and personal development

Writing Through Illness: Finding Strength in Storytelling

W

hen life gives you lemons, write about it. For those who live with a chronic condition, or care for a loved one with a chronic condition, the constant challenges can be emotionally exhausting and demanding, often leaving one to feel that the disease or ailment defines them. But when given the right voice and platform, that same condition can also provide a powerful story. By examining successful blogs, books, magazine articles, and other media created by those with lifechanging conditions, students will learn how to write their own “illness memoirs” and manifestos, and how to use these hardships to set sail into unexpected, inspiring territory. Throughout the course, students can look forward to discovering the message they wish to share and the medium through which they wish to share it. Everyone will also have an opportunity to guest post on the class blog. In addition, students will have the opportunity to create a polished, ready-for-print piece and leave with industry references. And for the grand finale, those willing and interested will take the stage with other published authors for an open-mic-night presented to the Stanford Medical community. Lemonade, of course, will be provided.

blog, SodiumGirl.com, focuses on leading a limitless low-sodium life. It was nominated as a Saveur Best Blog in 2012. Her cookbook, Sodium Girl’s Limitless Low-Sodium Cookbook, will be published in early 2013. Foung also consults on health care awareness and other issues for the National Kidney Foundation, the American Heart Association, and Whole Foods Market. PDV 26

Mondays, 7:00 – 8:50 pm 5 weeks, April 1 – April 29 1 unit, $200

Hoover Tower, Palms and Full Moon; Photograph by Joel Simon

j e ssica g oldm a n fou ng

Author

Jessica Goldman Foung began to study food, health, and the many ways they interact after lupus caused her kidneys to fail during her junior year at Stanford. She regularly writes about low-sodium cooking and eating for Huffington Post, Edible San Francisco, the San Francisco Chronicle, Ladies Home Journal, Better Homes & Gardens, Living Without, and Arthritis Today. Her

68

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 68

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Looking In and Reaching Out : Relationship Skills That Work

W

hether at home or at work, our relationships require wisdom, self-awareness, and skill. Our sometimes subtle, sometimes intense emotions need attention if we are to have meaningful and effective relationships with family, friends, and colleagues. This workshop will promote confidence in your relationships by presenting a model that focuses attention on what is important, and by providing a practical guide to developing and using interpersonal communication skills. You will learn how to deal with opinions and emotions in communications, how to listen effectively, how to distinguish conflicts that can be easily resolved from those that cannot, how to approach those that can be resolved, and how best to communicate your concerns in a responsible and constructive way. This workshop may not be taken for a Letter Grade. Retired Director of Human Resources, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Lee Lyon has thirty years of experience in teaching interpersonal skills and conflict resolution techniques. He has taught for UC Santa Cruz and the University of Santa Clara. Lyon has also consulted with various organizations in Silicon Valley. He received a BA in psychology from Stanford and an MA from San Jose State. WSP 1 4 3

Saturdays, May 4 and May 11 9:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $240 Special refund deadline: April 27

M

ore of us are held back by destructive thoughts and habits than by lack of ability or drive. The twin obstacles of perfectionism and procrastination account for a majority of the professional and personal dilemmas that clients bring to executive and life coaches. The two are related, for they stem from a false belief that it is disastrous to fail. This course will offer strategies drawn from research in positive and Buddhist psychologies, leadership, and neuroscience. Interactive exercises, writing, and discussion will allow students to customize theoretical material and practical techniques to their own situations. We will discover how to dissolve these obstacles with humor, safety, and creative zest. This workshop may not be taken for a Letter Grade. c a ro ly n f o s t e r

Principal, Creative Choices

Carolyn Foster coaches individuals on professional development and creative projects and teaches communication and leadership skills within organizations. She was a founding member of the Coaching Center at Google and teaches at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. Earlier, she was on the faculty of the California Institute of Integral Studies, heading the East-West Psychology program. She received a master’s in counseling psychology from the American Academy of Family Studies.

personal development

l e e lyo n

Managing Perfectionism and Procrastination

WSP 165

Saturdays, April 20 and April 27 10:00 am – 4:00 pm 1 unit, $200 Special refund deadline: April 13

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 69

69

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Public Programs

Public Programs

Flowering Cherry and Daffodils; Photograph by Joel Simon

Creative Writing at Stanford : A History with Eavan Boland, Nancy Packer, Philip Levine, and Scott Turow

T

he celebrated writer and environmentalist Wallace Stegner founded the Stanford Creative Writing Program in 1946 with the aim of providing young, talented writers the guidance, encouragement, and funding to further their writing knowledge and craft. “Minds grow by contact with other minds,” Stegner wrote. “The bigger the better, as clouds grow toward thunder by rubbing together.” Over the past sixty-seven years, the Creative Writing program has grown in stature so that it is widely recognized, alongside the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, as one of the two best programs in the country. It has trained thousands of undergraduates and hundreds of Stegner Fellows including Wendell Berry, Tillie Olsen, Philip Levine, Ernest Gaines, Scott Momaday, Ken Kesey, Larry McMurtry, Raymond Carver, Robert Pinsky, ZZ Packer, Scott Turow, and Tobias Wolff. The directors and instructors in the program have been equally distinguished, among them: Wallace Stegner, Yvor Winters, John L’Heureux, Ken Fields, Nancy Packer, Simone DiPiero, Elizabeth Tallent, Tobias Wolff, and Eavan Boland. This extraordinary program will bring together in conversation: e ava n b o l a n d

Professor of English; Director of the Creative Writing Program, Stanford

Eavan Boland is author of a dozen volumes of poetry and prose; most recently, the PEN Award-winning A Journey with Two Maps: Becoming a Woman Poet. philip levine

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Philip Levine is a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and former Poet Laureate of the US. His most recent collection is News of the World. s c o t t t u row

Former Stegner Fellow, Stanford

Scott Turow is a practicing lawyer and author of nine novels and two nonfiction books about the law that have sold more than 30 million copies. Four of his novels have been filmed, including the successful feature film Presumed Innocent. 70

S ta n f o r d

Co n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 70

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


n a n c y h u d d l e s t o n pac k e r , m o d e r at o r

Panelists for the “Language” event include:

Professor of English, Emerita; Former Stegner Fellow; Former Director of the Creative Writing Program, Stanford

l e r a b o ro d i t s k y

Nancy Packer is the author of four collections of short stories, most recently Old Ladies. Tuesday, April 2 7:30 pm Cubberley Auditorium, School of Education FREE; no registration is required This program is co -sponsored by the Stanford Historical Societ y and Stanford Continuing Studies.

SMMMASH: “Language” Stanford Multidisciplinary Multidimensional Meeting of Arts, Science, and Humanities

O

Lera Boroditsky was raised in the former Soviet Union. Her research on how languages and cultures shape human thinking has been widely featured in the media. She has received numerous awards and was named one of “25 visionaries changing the world” by Utne Reader in 2011. sh a n sh a n sh eng

Multimedia Artist

Shan Shan Sheng, who commutes between her motherland China and California, has completed more than twenty-five large-scale installations in various cities of the US as well as in Venice (53rd Venice Biennale), Shanghai (Shanghai World Expo), Beijing, Taipei, Hong Kong, and London. Her artwork is installed in four of the world’s tallest buildings. a m y x n e u b u rg

Composer/Performer

Amy X Neuburg’s career bridges the boundaries of classical, experimental, and popular music using electronics, poetic wordplay, and the many colors of her four-octave vocal range. She has performed at avant garde festivals worldwide, and she has composed extensively for theater and visual media, as well as sung in numerous operas. p i e ro s c a ru f f i , m o d e r at o r

Author

Piero Scaruffi’s education and professional life took him from theoretical physics to cognitive science and the Internet, while writing on music, cinema, and the arts as well as publishing his own poetry. His books include The Nature of Consciousness; A History of Rock and Dance Music; Synthesis: Essays, Photographs, Poems; and A History of Silicon Valley.

Public Programs

ver the years, artists, scientists, engineers, and humanities scholars have explored the grand themes that define the human condition from radically different perspectives. Too infrequently, they are given the opportunity to listen to each other and engage in conversations that cross boundaries and mix up categories. We continue the series titled SMMMASH (the Stanford Multidisciplinary Multidimensional Meeting of Arts, Science, and Humanities) that started in the Fall quarter with “Space” and in the Winter with “Body.” Now, we turn to “Language.” These programs feature some of the most exciting thinkers in the Bay Area. To complement the panel, artists from several media genres will exhibit works that relate to “Language” in the lobby of the auditorium. Each panelist will provide reading, viewing, or listening material that will be posted online before the event and that will constitute “homework” for the audience. A brief audio interview with each of the presenters will also be posted online at smmmash.com.

Psychologist; Assistant Professor of Psychology, Stanford

Thursday, April 18 Art exhibit in the lobby: 6:30 – 9:00 pm Panel: 7:00 – 8:30 pm Cubberley Auditorium, School of Education FREE; no registration is required

R e g i s t r at i o n f o r a l l c o u r s e s b e g i n s o n M o n d ay, F e b r u a r y 2 5 at 8 : 3 0 a m . R e g i s t e r o n l i n e at c o n t i n u i n g s t u d i e s . s ta n f o r d . e d u .

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 71

71

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Public Programs

A Company of Authors

C

ome celebrate the 10th annual “A Company of Authors.” Once again, an amazing group of Stanford writers will be discussing their recently published books. Each author will make a brief presentation and be available for conversation and book signing. The authors who are scheduled to be present include Stephen Hinton (Weill’s Musical Theater), Nancy Huddleston Packer (Old Ladies), Peter N. Carroll (A Child Turns Back to Wave), Tanya Luhrmann (When God Talks Back), John Bender (Ends of Enlightenment), Adrian Daub (Uncivil Unions), Scott Hutchins (A Working Theory of Love), Herant Katchadourian (The Way It Turned Out), Irvin Yalom (The Spinoza Problem), Marilyn Yalom (How the French Invented Love), Nancy Kollmann (Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Russia), and Richard Meyer (Art and Queer Culture). This program is hosted by Peter Stansky, Field Professor of History, Emeritus, Stanford. Drop in, or indulge yourself by spending the entire afternoon in the company of these bright, entertaining, and stimulating writers. At the event, the Stanford Bookstore will sell books at a 10 percent discount, and authors will sign copies. Refreshments will be served.

Saturday, April 20 1:00 – 5:00 pm Stanford Humanities Center, 424 Santa Teresa Street FREE; no registration is required This program is co -sponsored by the Stanford Humanities Center, the Stanford Bookstore, and Stanford Continuing Studies.

How I Write: A Conversation with Clarence B. Jones

A

s the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington approaches, we have the opportunity to talk with a key speechwriter and counsel to Martin Luther King, Jr. From 1960 until King’s assassination in 1968, Clarence Jones worked closely with Reverend King, assisting him in drafting the celebrated “I Have a Dream” speech that King delivered August 28, 1963. Through his work in the civil rights movement, Jones has had a dramatic impact on the course of American history. For example, in April 1963, he drafted the settlement agreement between the City of Birmingham, Alabama, and Reverend King to bring about the end of demonstrations and the desegregation of department stores and public accommodations. In September 1971, he again found himself at the center of historic events when, at the request of Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller, he helped in the attempt to negotiate an end to the historic Attica prison inmate rebellion. Jones also had a successful career in an investment banking firm, and calls himself the “first Negro on Wall Street.” He has founded several successful financial, corporate, and media-related ventures. He is the co-author of What Would Martin Say?; Behind the Dream: The Making of the Speech That Transformed a Nation; and Uprising: Understanding Attica, Revolution, and the Incarceration State. He is currently co-writing Where Were You? for the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He is also writing his autobiography, Memoirs of a Winter-Time Soldier. Jones is a writer in residence and visiting professor at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute at Stanford. Hilton Obenzinger, an accomplished fiction and nonfiction writer and lecturer in the Stanford Department of English, American Studies Program, and Stanford Continuing Studies, will engage Clarence Jones in conversation, focusing on the techniques, quirks, and joys of writing.

Wednesday, April 24 7:30 pm History Corner (Bldg. 200), Room 002 FREE; no registration is required

72

This program is co -sponsored by the Hume Writing Center and Stanford Continuing Studies. For video, audio, and transcripts of previous “How I Write” conversations, please visit: continuingstudies.stanford.edu/ howiwrite. S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 72

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


The Other Bagpipes: Exotic and Lesser-Known Piping Traditions of the World

F

or a thousand years, across Europe, North Africa, and much of the Near East, rural people danced to, performed rituals with, and treasured the music of their indigenous bagpipes—once one of the most ubiquitous of folk instruments. Today, though, the bagpipe is most often thought of as a uniquely Scottish instrument, a circumstance largely due to the British Army’s use of Scottish regiments as the vanguard in their creation of the British Empire. This program will introduce listeners to the bagpipes of many cultures, along with a bit of the folklore associated with this powerful, beguiling, almost shamanic instrument. The piping traditions of Ireland, Scotland, England, France, Spain, Italy, Sweden, Slovakia, Croatia, Georgia, Iran, and Tunisia will be represented. The pipes of these countries range from grand to petite in size, and in sound volume and timbre from strident to suave. The pipes themselves are marvelous cultural icons to look at—each unique, and each chosen to represent a particular type, or family of instruments. kevin carr

Traditional Musician

Wednesday, May 1 7:30 pm Annenberg Auditorium, Cummings Art Building FREE; no registration is required

M

edieval Matters is a series of public lectures co-sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, the Office for Religious Life, the Sarum Seminar, and Stanford Continuing Studies. It explores the relevance of medieval history and culture to understanding the modern world. “We Fight for Liberty Alone”: Scotland and England in the Middle Ages and the 21st Century

S

cotland and England have formed a United Kingdom for more than 300 years. But will the union endure? Scotland plans to hold a referendum next year to decide whether to become an independent country again. These modern political issues are much entangled with medieval history—both real and legendary. It has been argued that the establishment of a separate Scottish Parliament in 1999 was helped by the enthusiasm for the film Braveheart, in which the medieval Scottish patriot William Wallace is portrayed by Mel Gibson (not known for his love of the English), and the 2014 referendum is timed to coincide with the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn, when Robert Bruce ensured the survival of an independent Scotland. This lecture by the renowned medievalist Robert Bartlett looks at relations between Scotland and England in the Middle Ages for the light it throws on current debates.

ro b e r t b a r t l e t t

Bishop Wardlaw Professor of Medieval History, University of St. Andrews; Fellow of the British Academy

Robert Bartlett’s books include England under the Norman and Angevin Kings 1075–1225, and The Making of Europe: Conquest, Colonization and Cultural Change 950–1350, which won the Wolfson History Prize and has been translated into many languages. He has also written and presented historical documentaries for BBC television. Bartlett has taught at the Universities of Edinburgh and Chicago.

Public Programs

Kevin Carr has performed music of traditional cultures for more than thirty years. He received an NEA grant in the 1970s to study Irish folk fiddling, spent much time in the 1980s pursuing French Canadian fiddling, and simultaneously began a study of Irish Uilleann bagpipes. He currently performs with Wake the Dead, a popular Celtic jam band; Hillbillies from Mars, an eclectic dance band; Les Têtes de Violon, a traditional Québécois fiddle ensemble; Verdegaio, a Galicia-based folk bagpipe/accordion band, and with The Family Carr, playing music of Ireland, Appalachia, Quebec, and Galicia with his son, daughter, and wife. Carr is considered one of the most accomplished traditional musicians on the West Coast.

M e d i e va l M at t e r s

Tuesday, May 7 7:30 pm Annenberg Auditorium, Cummings Art Building FREE; no registration is required

73

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 73

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Public Programs

J a s p e r R i d g e ’ s 40 t h A n n i v e r s a ry : A C e l e b r at i o n

P

lease join us as we celebrate the anniversary of the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford’s remarkable 1,200-acre field station where pioneering scientific research has been generated in more than a dozen disciplines. In honor of its 40th year, the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and Stanford Continuing Studies will offer two programs with journalist, science educator, and author Ira Flatow. Reviving the Science/Statecraft Dialogue

H

ow can the relationship between scientists and politicians be improved, and how can that relationship benefit public policy? Award-winning journalist, author, and science educator Ira Flatow and a distinguished panel of scientists, social entrepreneurs, elected officials, and policymakers will discuss how public perceptions of the authority and reliability of science— and scientists—influence national and global policy, and how these perceptions can be reshaped. Thursday, May 9 Panel: 5:30 pm Reception: 6:30 pm CEMEX Auditorium, Knight Management Center Tickets: visit jrbp.stanford.edu

Live Broadcast of National Public Radio’s Science Friday

J

oin Ira Flatow for the live broadcast of National Public Radio’s Science Friday, the weekly science radio program broadcast to more than one million listeners across hundreds of NPR’s affiliate stations. The program’s slogan is “making science radioactive.” Friday, May 10 11:00 am – 1:00 pm Paul & Mildred Berg Hall Li Ka Shing Center Tickets: visit jrbp.stanford.edu These programs are sponsored by the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and Stanford Continuing Studies. For additional event details, visit: jrbp.stanford.edu.

74

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R2.indd 74

Life and Shadow: Photographer Robert Buelteman’s Exploration of Plant Life at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve

R

obert Buelteman developed his love of landscape growing up on the Peninsula, and over a career that has spanned forty years he has produced awardwinning portfolios of black-and-white photography and, more recently, revolutionary camera-less color photographs. Much of the recent work has been done at Stanford’s Jasper Ridge—a space he knew intimately as a child and where he has been a guest artist since 2010. His newest portfolio, Life and Shadow, sees the native flora of the Preserve as only Buelteman could, through the remarkable technique of high-voltage, fiber-optically illuminated photogrammetry. A review in Wired magazine describes the technique as “a combination of Frankenstein and Georgia O’Keeffe… so dangerous and laborious that no one else will attempt it—even if they could get through all the steps.” Each image can take as many as 100 attempts before Buelteman has a piece worthy of exhibition. He regards these camera-less works as an expression of “biophilia,” capturing that ineffable quality that Dylan Thomas called “the force that through the green fuse drives the flower.” You have to see these images to believe them. Visit buelteman.com and click on “Through the Green Fuse.” But nothing will compare to seeing these extraordinary images projected at this program.

ro b e r t b u e lt e m a n

Photographer

Robert Buelteman is committed to the great things in life as reflected in his photographs, which portray the universe as alive, and life as purposeful. His work is represented in many major museums internationally, and appears in thirteen published portfolios. He has received numerous prizes, and has served as a resident of the Djerassi Foundation, a fellow at the Santa Fe Institute, and currently as guest artist at Jasper Ridge. Tuesday, May 14 7:30 pm Annenberg Auditorium, Cummings Art Building FREE; no registration is required

S t u d i e s

1/21/13 3:32 PM


B u d d h i s t C o m pa s s i o n W o r k s h o p w i t h N o r m a n F i s c h e r a n d S p r i n g Wa s h a m

Wisdom and Compassion: The Wings of Awakening

P

M

lease join us for a Saturday afternoon workshop co-sponsored by the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford, Everyday Zen Foundation, Spirit Rock Meditation Center, and East Bay Meditation Center. The workshop will combine guided meditation and talks by two of the Bay Area’s most distinguished Zen practitioners.

Training in Compassion: Zen Teachings on the Practice of Lojong

S

cience is lately showing that the brain is “plastic,” that our basic attitudes and emotional mindsets can be changed if we train our minds. In this talk Norman Fischer will present a Zen take on an ancient Indo-Tibetan text that offers fifty-nine practice slogans for training the mind and heart in compassion. What are the main points for training? What are the techniques and cautions needed for a realistic approach to changing your mind from guardedness and smallness to expansive compassion and kind regard for everyone you meet? nor m a n fisch er

Founder and Spiritual Director, Everyday Zen Foundation; Former Abbot, San Francisco Zen Center

s p r i n g wa s h a m

Teacher, Spirit Rock Meditation Center; Co-founder and Core Teacher, East Bay Meditation Center

Spring Washam has been immersed in the dharma since 1997, studying with revered Asian monastics and lay Western teachers, including Jack Kornfield and Joseph Goldstein. She is considered a pioneer in bringing mindfulness-based healing practices to diverse communities. Saturday, May 18 1:00 – 4:00 pm Black Communit y Services Center, 418 Santa Teresa Street FREE; no registration is required

Public Programs

Norman Fischer is the spiritual director of the Everyday Zen Foundation, a network of Zen groups and related projects whose mission is the sharing of Zen teaching and practice widely with the world. His most recent poetry collection is The Strugglers, and his latest dharma book is Training in Compassion: Zen Teachings on the Practice of Lojong.

any religious traditions regard compassion as the most important quality a person can possess, yet they neglect the development of knowledge and wisdom. In following this path, one may become a caring person but with little understanding of the nature of reality. Other systems of thought, such as science, assume that wisdom can best be developed by suppressing all emotions, including compassion. The risk here is that one becomes knowledgeable, but may lack ultimate purpose. In this talk, Spring Washam will explore from the Theravada Buddhist perspective how innate wisdom may be the best foundation for a life of ultimate purpose, one of genuine love and compassion.

75

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 75

1/16/13 6:25 PM


Public Programs

Haydn on Trial ! An Evening with the Saint Michael Trio

W

as he trivial and simplistic? Formulaic? A left-brained technician cranking out purely mechanical constructions? A mere stepping stone to Mozart and Beethoven? Franz Joseph Haydn (1732– 1809) has been accused of all of these things. In a special “informance” pitting the audience as jury, the Saint Michael Trio will defend Haydn against his critics in a courtroom-style drama incorporating slides, commentary, and demonstrations of Haydn’s compositional devices. As primary evidence, the Trio will present Haydn’s “Piano Trio in C Major, No. 43 (Hob. XV:27).” the sa i nt michael trio

Established in 2007, the Saint Michael Trio has risen quickly to prominence. Hailed as Silicon Valley’s update to the classical music scene, the trio’s recordings have been applauded in the national press, and the members receive special praise for making their concerts interesting and accessible. In 2008, Saint Michael was named artists-in-residence at Menlo College, where they quickly outgrew the auditorium and established a loyal fan base. In 2010, they became affiliated artists at Notre Dame de Namur University, and began a partnership with Montalvo Arts Center. Based in Palo Alto, the group now appears nationally, and has become the subject of considerable notoriety because all three artists maintain thriving careers in the tech sector. Friday, May 24 8:00 pm Dinkelspiel Auditorium FREE; no registration is required

The Symphonic Body

T

he Symphonic Body is a performance, the likes of which you have never seen before! Imagine the musicians’ chairs in the brand-new Bing Concert Hall filled not with musicians, but with students, staff, professors, provosts, groundskeepers, cooks, lab workers, nurses, accountants, department chairs, and alumni— all types of people who make up the diverse Stanford community, all dressed in black and moving in silence. Instead of playing instruments, they will perform an “orchestral” work with choreographed gestures— movements derived from their everyday work lives. The Symphonic Body performance has been conceived, choreographed, and directed by award-winning choreographer Ann Carlson, who is in residence at Stanford during Winter and Spring 2013. This will be a one-night performance of nuance and gesture, timing and attention, reflecting the breadth of activity that animates Stanford at any given moment. We expect the Symphonic Body, as a living gestural orchestra, to be formal and surprising, unusual and idiosyncratic, subtle and funny—and magically ephemeral. a n n carlson

Choreographer

Ann Carlson is an American dancer, choreographer, and performance artist whose work explores contemporary social issues. She has performed internationally, and is probably best known to the Stanford community as the ingenious force behind last Spring’s Picture Jasper Ridge: A Performance Hike. This was a “tableau vivant” experience combining a walk in the preserve with actors recreating historic photos in the locations where the photos were taken. In 2011–2012 she was a visiting artist at Jasper Ridge; this year she is in residence at Stanford. Wednesday, May 29 7:30 pm Bing Concert Hall FREE; no registration is required This program is co -sponsored by the Department of Theater & Performance Studies, Stanford Continuing Studies, the Stanford Arts Institute, and the Of fice of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education.

76

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 76

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:25 PM


,

H

uman beings have sought to amass wealth but they have also condemned it as a source of human corruption. Social science, theology, and philosophy have long been home to intense debates about the implications of wealth for happiness, virtue, justice, and democracy. In a series of talks, seminars, readings, films, and performances, the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society, along with several campus partners, will explore the ethical questions at the heart of wealth. Events include: Free Market Fairness Thursday, April 4 Contemporary Art in the Museum and the Marketplace Thursday, April 18 The Exception and the Rule Thursday–Saturday, April 25–27 Buddha and the Green Goo: How Much Is Too Much? Thursday, May 2 Where Is Inequalit y Headed? Thursday, May 16 Justice, Wealth, Taxes: A View from the Perspective of Rabbinic Judaism Wednesday, May 22

Narcissus ‘Paperwhite’; Photograph by Joel Simon

For event locations and more information on the series, visit: ethicsinsociet y.stanford.edu. The McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Societ y’s partners include the Stanford Humanities Center, the Department of Religious Studies, the Stanford Center for the Study of Povert y and Inequalit y, Stanford Institute for Creativit y and the Arts, Stanford Continuing Studies, the Program in Creative Writing, the Cantor Arts Center, Stanford Summer Theater, and Stanford Law School.

e

Public Programs

u

The Ethics of Wealth

77

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 77

1/16/13 6:26 PM


MLA

M ast er of Liber al A rts a gr a duat e degr e e progr a m design ed for wor k i ng a dults

W

hy is interdisciplinary liberal arts study so crucial today? The questions we ponder differ very little from those that worried our remote—and not-so-remote—ancestors. Their wisdom and their imaginings, like our own, weave the fabric of what we call human nature. Philosophy, mythology, music, art, literature, history, religious studies—these records of human experience, thought, and interpretation have formed the core of the liberal arts education ever since the Greeks encouraged their citizens to live with wellinformed skepticism and to speak with courage. We want to know, as they did, who we are, what the past tells us, and how to move responsibly into the future. We need to

know, too, how best to respect the diverse social and biological world we inhabit, and how to husband it for the future. Today’s investigations into the human condition include the sciences, psychology, anthropology, geography, economics, sociology, and political science. Understanding the human impact of scientific discovery and the scientific necessity of humanistic thinking is vital. Bringing the fullness of human intelligence into creative conversation is the business of the interdisciplinary scholar, and of the student of the liberal arts. —linda paulson

Associate Dean & Director, MLA Program

Recent and upcoming MLA courses

The Age of Enlightenment Dan Edelstein, Associate Professor of French and Italian, and, by courtesy, of History, Stanford American Foreign Policy and the Challenges of the 21st Century Stephen Stedman, Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science, Stanford Darwin, Marx, and Freud Paul Robinson, Richard W. Lyman Professor in the Humanities, Emeritus, Stanford The Arts as History: 1900–1956 Peter Stansky, Frances and Charles Field Professor of History, Emeritus, Stanford The Economics of Life and Death Jay Bhattacharya, Associate Professor of Medicine and, by courtesy, in Economics, Stanford From Slavery to Obama Clarence Jones, Scholar in Residence, King Institute, Stanford

Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems William Durham, Bing Professor in Human Biology, Stanford Reflections on the American Condition William Chace, Professor of English, Emeritus, Stanford; President Emeritus, Emory University The Meaning of Life: Moral and Spiritual Inquiry through Literature Scotty McLennan, Dean for Religious Life, Stanford Transatlantic Romance: British and American Fiction in the 19th and Early 20th Century Al Gelpi, Coe Professor of American Literature, Emeritus, Stanford Barbara Gelpi, Professor of English, Emerita, Stanford When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo Paula Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of History and Professor, by courtesy, of French and Italian, Stanford Who Was Shakespeare? David Riggs, Mark Piggott OBE Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Emeritus, Stanford

78

S ta n fo r d

Co n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 78

S t u d ie s

1/16/13 6:26 PM


A

m

Consider Sta nford’s M LA Progr a m Explore the Past, Engage in the Present, and Contemplate the Future

Join an Intellectual Community MLA students bring diverse cultures, professions, and interests to the classroom. They are lawyers, teachers, CEOs, full-time parents, journalists, physicians, retirees, and more.

Find the Structure You’ve Been Searching For The MLA offers students a structured program with a broadly cohesive curriculum, allowing them to refine the critical analysis, writing, and research skills necessary to engage in significant scholarship in the liberal arts. The path to an MLA degree begins with a sequence of foundation courses, continues with seven MLA seminars, and culminates in a master’s thesis.

Small Seminars with Stanford Faculty All MLA seminars are taught by members of Stanford’s distinguished faculty. Seminars are limited to twenty students (and are frequently smaller). MLA seminars bring students and professors together in close, intellectual conversations that are rare outside this type of small academic setting.

i n t e r e s t e d i n applyi n g ?

The application process for the academic year 2014– 2015 will begin in Fall 2013. If you have been out of school for a while, we encourage you to take a few Continuing Studies courses prior to applying. Prospective applicants should consider enrolling in the Continuing Studies course “A Terrible Beauty: Cultural Revival and Political Rebellion in Ireland” this Spring. This course aims to introduce those who are strongly interested in pursuing a degree in the MLA program to the kind of seminar they will encounter if they are admitted to the program. Students will face the same opportunities to engage in weekly discussion and the same stimulus to write persuasive research essays. For more information on this course, please see page 23. We invite you to visit our website for more information about the program, the admissions process, and the upcoming information sessions. Website: mla.stanford.edu Email: mlaprogram@stanford.edu Phone: 650-725-0061

Opportunities for Intellectual Journeys Stanford MLA students are part of a larger international academic community. MLA students have been chosen to present their papers at regional and national Graduate Liberal Studies conferences; MLA students are also encouraged to study in specially designed seminars that take place abroad.

Access to Stanford’s Rich Resources Stanford graduate students enjoy access to Stanford libraries, campus events, and athletic facilities.

M L A P r o g r am S t a f f

Linda Paulson

Associate Dean & Director

Michelle Bennett

Assistant Director

“An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” —Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Flexible Schedule Designed as a part-time program for adults, most MLA seminars meet once a week, usually in the evening, ten times a quarter.

79

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 79

1/16/13 6:26 PM


Con tinuing St udies Gener al I nfor m ation

Gener

A full listing of program policies as well as further details about the information below can be found on our website at continuingstudies.stanford.edu. TU ITION A N D PAY M ENT

Tuition is indicated with each course description and varies depending on course length and class size. Tuition may be paid by credit card, check, cashier’s check, money order, or STAP funds (for those eligible). We cannot accept cash payment. If your check is returned for any reason, we will charge a $25 service fee. Continuing Studies does not offer a payment program or financial aid. Full payment of tuition and fees is due at the time of registration. A non-refundable registration fee of $35 is required for each student once per quarter (not per course). If the total amount of your course tuition and/or event fee is less than $100, then the registration fee is waived. DROPS AND REFUNDS

Tuition refunds will be granted if a course is dropped prior to the drop deadline. The $35 registration fee is never refundable. In order to receive a full tuition refund, you must cancel your registration by 5:00 pm on the refund deadline date for the course. (Please see the Refund Deadlines section on page 82 for specific dates.) The $35 registration fee, any additional course or materials fees, and tuition under $100 are non-refundable. Continuing Studies does not prorate tuition for dropped courses and cannot apply the funds to future quarters. Requests for payment-type switches will be handled as a drop and re-enrollment. Therefore, all drop policies will apply. Drop requests must be made in writing in one of the following ways: online, by email, fax, or postal mail. Please allow up to two weeks to process refunds on your credit card. Refunds by check could take up to four weeks to process. No refunds will be given after the deadline unless the Continuing Studies Program cancels the course. C redit A nd G rading S ystems

Most Continuing Studies courses may be taken for credit. Credits cannot be applied toward any Stanford degree. Credits will be recorded on student transcripts, and students might be able to transfer credits to another university, subject to that university’s policies. Courses taken for No Grade Requested (NGR) will not be awarded credits and will not appear on official transcripts. Students must select one of the following grading options upon registration: Letter Grade—written work required; Credit/No Credit (CR/NC)—attendance and participation required; No Grade Requested (NGR)—no work is required but no credit shall be received and no proof of attendance

80

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 80

can be provided. Letter Grades and Credit are not available for all courses. Students should check individual course listings for details. For most courses, students may change grade options anytime before the last class meeting with a written notification. Students should select their grading option carefully. If they require proof that they completed a course, they must choose either the Letter Grade or Credit option if available. Courses taken for NGR will not appear on official transcripts. Grading options cannot be changed after a course ends. B oo k s and C ourse M ateria l s

Textbooks and course readers are available at the Stanford Bookstore (lower level) in a section designated “Continuing Studies,” and are usually available two weeks prior to the start of the quarter. Returns can be made—with receipt— through the third week of the quarter, provided materials are unmarked and undamaged. LIBRARY PRIVILEGES

The library policy for Continuing Studies students has recently changed. Borrowing privileges and building access are now determined by the duration of the student’s course. Students should check their enrollment confirmation letter for details. D isabi l ity A ccommodation

Students who need a disability-related accommodation or access information should contact the Diversity and Access Office at 650-725-0326 (voice), 650-723-1216 (TTY) or email: disability.access@stanford.edu. Note: Transportation to and from classes is not provided. P ar k ing and T ransportation

Campus parking is free after 4:00 pm and on weekends (except where 24-hour-enforced signs are posted). No permits are required. Most Continuing Studies courses are located in or near the Quad to allow access to parking in the Oval. However, parking on campus has become increasingly difficult, so please allow ample time to get to class. Alternatively, the Marguerite, Stanford’s free shuttle, offers transportation to and from the Palo Alto Transit Center. For maps, shuttle schedules, and more information on parking, students should visit transportation.stanford.edu/.

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:26 PM


neral information Admission policy

Admission is discretionary. Stanford Continuing Studies requires students to hold a high school diploma or its equivalent. Students are not matriculated Stanford University students, and not all University privileges apply to Continuing Studies students. The University reserves the right, at its discretion, to withhold registration from, or require withdrawal from the program of, any student or applicant. S T U D E N T COD E O F COND U C T

Stanford Continuing Studies is dedicated to the mission of nurturing a vibrant learning community, nourishing the life of the mind, and promoting the pleasures of intellectual exploration and exchange. Students in the program are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that represents the spirit of this mission. Please read the entire code of conduct on the Continuing Studies website prior to registering for a course. State m e n t o f N o n - d i s c r i m i n at o r y P o l i c y

Stanford University admits qualified students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. Consistent with its obligations under the law, Stanford prohibits unlawful discrimination, including harassment, on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law in the administration of the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding this non-discrimination policy: the Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; 650-723-0755 (voice), 650-723-1216 (TTY), 650-723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email). T u i t i o n A s s i s ta n c e

Only one discount per student. Discounts do not apply to special events or to courses with tuition less than $100. Stanford University Employees Who Are STAP-Eligible: University and Medical Center employees who receive STAP funds may apply up to the full amount of their yearly STAP fund allocation ($800) toward tuition and registration fees. It is the employee’s responsibility to verify sufficient STAP funds prior to enrolling in a course.

Stanford Hospital Employees: Employees of Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital may apply their educational fund allocation toward tuition and registration fees but are required to obtain supervisor approval and must use an authorization form provided by their HR manager. Online registration is not available. Stanford University Faculty, Medical Center Employees, Postdocs, and Part-Time Staff: Any Stanford employee who does not receive STAP funds may receive a 20% tuition discount. Stanford Alumni or GSB Alumni Association Members: 15% tuition discount (valid SAA or SBSAA ID # required) Senior (65+): 20% tuition discount Credentialed Classroom Teachers: 20% tuition discount Please see website for eligibility and verification requirements. C O N T I N U I N G S T U D I E S P R O G R A M S ta f f

Charles Junkerman

Randall Albright

Associate Provost & Dean

Education Technology Specialist

Daniel Colman

Anna Iluk

Associate Dean & Director

Special Programs Coordinator; Assistant Financial Manager

Elana Hornstein

Associate Director

Kristine Yang

Rayna Krohn

Student Services Manager

Director of Finance & Administration

Student Services Assistant

Christopher Brooks

Denise Osborne

Technology Manager

Scott Hutchins

Alex Argyropoulos

Online Writer’s Studio & Certificate Program Curriculum Coordinator

Registrar Lee Ann Soares

Human Resources & Administrative Manager

Tom Kealey

The Writer’s Studio Curriculum Coordinator Hal Louchheim

Liz Frith

Program & Planning Manager

Business Curriculum Coordinator Alice Miano

Emma Walker

Marketing Manager Azin Massoudi

Events & Communications Manager Rolando Garcia

Associate Registrar

Foreign Language Curriculum Coordinator Malena Watrous

Online Writer’s Studio Lead Instructor

Gina Freeman

Financial Management Analyst

(General Information continued on next page)

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 81

81

1/16/13 6:26 PM


Continuing Studies General Information

(continued)

4 Ea s y W a y s t o R e g i s t e r ! C o u r s e r e g i s t ra t i o n b e g i n s M o n da y , f e b r u ar y 2 5 a t 8 : 3 0 am R E G ISTE R ON L INE

R E G ISTE R BY P OST A L M A I L

continuingstudies.stanford.edu You will receive an emailed confirmation notice containing course location and payment information. All course information may be viewed online by logging into your student account.

Mail registration form to: Stanford Continuing Studies 365 Lasuen Street, Littlefield Center Stanford, CA 94305-5005 or on-campus MC: 2078 We will accept registrations sent by US mail postmarked February 20 or later.

R E G ISTE R BY F A X

650-725-4248 Fax registration form no earlier than February 20. We do not accept phone or email registration.

R E G ISTE R IN P E R SON

365 Lasuen Street, Littlefield Center Office hours: Mon–Fri; 8:30 am –12 noon; 1:00–5:00 pm Open until 7:15 pm during the first week of the quarter.

R E G IST R A TION F EE

A non-refundable registration fee of $35 is required for each student once per quarter. If the total amount of your

course and event fees is less than $100, then the registration fees are waived and tuition discounts do not apply.

R E F UN D D E A D L INES

You may drop a course online by logging into your student account or by written request. Please allow 2–3 weeks to process emailed or mailed tuition refund requests. After the drop deadline, no refunds will be given unless the course is cancelled. Continuing Studies reserves the right to cancel a

course for any reason including insufficient enrollment. In the event that Continuing Studies cancels a course, a full refund including registration fee will be granted. (Registration fee will not be refunded if you are taking a second course.)

Ty p e o f C o u r s e

Drop Deadline for Refund

4 –10 Week Classroom Courses

Day before third class meeting

1 day–3 Week Classroom Courses*

7 days before first class meeting

Online Writing Courses

Fourth day of class by 5:00 pm

Events

All event fees are non-refundable

*1-day courses that are less than $100 are non-refundable

Questions?

650-725-2650 (Phone registration is not available) continuingstudies@stanford.edu (Email registration is not available) Phone Email

82

S ta n f o r d

C o n t i n u i n g

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 82

W e b For complete Continuing Studies Program information and policies, visit continuingstudies.stanford.edu.

S t u d i e s

1/16/13 6:26 PM


Course R egist r ation For m

Register Online! • Instant Course Confirmation • Faster Processing

Registration for all courses begins on Monday, February 25 at 8:30 am

M et h o d o f Pay m en t che ck (payable to Stanford University)

Check if you are a returning student and this is a new address

mas t e r ca r d

V i sa

Am e r i can e xp r e ss Nam e ( l a s t / f i r s t / m i d d l e i n i t i a l ) C r e d i t car d num b e r C u r r e n t a d d r e ss E xp i r at i o n D ATE S i g nat ur e

C i t y s tat e z i p

T ui t i o n t o t a l Ev e n i n g p h o n e

d ay p h o n e

T ui t i o n a s s i s t a nc e

d at e o f b i r t h ( r e q u i r e d )

ADD T L COURSE FEE ( IF ANY ) (Non-refundable)

Ema i l a d d r e ss A valid Stanford email address is required when selecting any Stanford-affiliated discount below.

reqd registration fee

( –

)

+ + 35.00

(Non-refundable)

Tuition assistance

To t al

(Choose only one; see page 81 for eligibilit y)

A.

Stanford Employee using STAP Funds:

Stanford Hospital Employee using STAP Funds

UNI V ER S IT Y ID *

*Required for STAP users

If total is $1–$99: Registration fee does not apply but no discounts are applicable

(see your HR manager for required form)

If total is $100+: Registration fee of $35 does apply (See opposite page for registration policies)

B. 20% Discount (check one):

Stanford Faculty

Stanford Staff, Part-Time, or Non-STAP-Eligible

Stanford Postdoc

SUMC or Hospital employee

65+

Credentialed Classroom Teachers

C. CSP Instructor? 

Yes

(verification required)

Spouse/Domestic Partner of an Instructor? 

Yes

List Instructor’s Name: D. 15% Discount:

Stanford Alumni or GSB Alumni Assoc. Member:

R e gi s t r a t i o n

I agree to read the Student Code of Conduct, found on the Continuing Studies website, prior to the start of my course.

(not using STAP)

Member No. Required

These questions are asked per new federal regulations. The information you provide will be used for analysis and reporting and will be kept confidential. Please check all that apply:

We will accept registration sent by US mail postmarked February 20 or later.

A F RI C A N A M ERI C A N

MALE

HI S PA NI C

FEMALE

ca ucasi an

Course title

Course code tuition

Select Grade Option

No Grade Requested

Credit/No Credit

Letter Grade

(default, no written work required)

(attend/participation required)

(written work required)

NOTE: Credit or a Letter Grade MUST be selected to receive proof of completion.

Course code

tuition

Credit/No Credit

Native Ha waiian/ Other PA C I F I C I S L A NDER

UNDERGR A DU ATE GR A DU ATE ( M A S TER S)

Asi an OTHER

PRO F E S S ION A L ( J D, M D, P h D)

Are you a US citizen? YES

Letter Grade

NO

Are you a Stanford alumnus/a?

Course title

YES

Course code

No Grade Requested

HIGH S C HOO L OR EQ UI VA L ENT

Decline to State

Course title

No Grade Requested

AMERICAN INDIAN/ ALASKA NATIVE

NO

tuition

Credit/No Credit

Letter Grade

How did you hear about the Stanford Continuing Studies Program?

If my chosen course fills, please register me for the following alternate course:

4 ways to register!

continuingstudies.stanford.edu 650-725-4248 p e r s o n Mon–Fri, 8:30 am–12:00; 1:00–5:00 pm

Web

Mail

Fax

In

Stanford Continuing Studies 365 Lasuen Street, Littlefield Center Stanford, CA 94305-5005

T h is fo r m m ay b e d u pli cat ed. E ach r eg ist r a n t m ust h av e a s epa r at e fo r m. Yo u w i l l r ecei v e a w r i tt en co n f i r m at i o n o f yo u r co u rs e en ro l lm en t, i n clu d i n g ro o m lo cat i o n a n d co u rs e m at er i a ls, b efo r e t h e f i rst cl as s m ee t i n g.

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R1.indd 83

83

1/16/13 6:26 PM


STANFORD CONTINUING STUDIES

N O N P R O F I T

3 6 5 L asuen street , littlefield center

ORG ANIZ ATION U.S.

STANFORD, CA 94305 -50 05

P

POSTAGE A

I

D

PA L O A LT O

CA

PERMIT NO. 28

CONTACT US

PHON E: 650 -725 -2650

FA X: 650 -725 - 4248

EMAIL: CONTINUINGSTUDIES@STANFORD.EDU

STANFORD CONTINUING STUDIES

Registration begins Monday, February 25, 2013

SPRING 2013 COURSES

Most courses begin the week of April 1, 2013

R EG I S T E R I N S TA N T LY O N L I N E CONTINUINGSTUDIES.STANFORD.EDU

CSP_SPR2013_036-084_CS5.5_R2.indd 84

1/21/13 3:25 PM

Stanford Continuing Studies - Spring 2013  

Catalogue of Spring 2013 courses for Stanford Continuing Studies