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What do you value? 2015 LifeCenter Northwest Annual Report

Collaboration. A sense of leadership. I like to know when someone’s going to be there for the long haul. A spirit of service. Data-driven decisions. Common sense. A focus on outcomes. Friendly competition. It all comes back to process, and just a recurring focus on questioning the why and the how of what we do. Commitment to families. Strategic thinking. Small changes that over time add up to a big difference. Better integration. Customized solutions. Transparency. Taking the time to analyze and think beyond the current situation. Reliability. Honoring sacrifices. Outcomes. Remembering the mission. Peer learning. Honesty. Celebration. Creating more consistent practices and policies. Being there sooner and being there more often. Courageous leadership. Community-mindedness. An approach that takes into account the changing healthcare landscape. Efficiencies. A commitment not just to saving lives but to improving transplant outcomes. Providing aftercare support for the families of our generous donors. When two partners understand and value each other’s goals, it’s amazing what they can do together. Piloting new technologies. Systematic changes. Trust. You’ve got a much stronger relationship when you know someone’s going to be there tomorrow and the day after that. Relationships. Solid, incremental progress. Inspired training. Being attentive to the unique needs of our community. Improving morale. Bettering the community as a whole. More opportunities for CEUs. It was powerful to hear from both recipients and donor families. Forming a relationship with the patient and understanding their last wishes. Connection. Teamwork. Removing roadblocks. Trust. Celebrating life. Service. Being a part of something that helps us to live out our mission.


In 2015 we had a lot of conversations in our community about the meaning of “value”— and we found that different people define that word in many different ways.


Letter from the CEO More than ever before, the healthcare community is focused on “value,” and this is a very good thing. At LifeCenter Northwest, we too are intent on seeking ways to add value for everyone who is touched by organ and tissue donation. What does that mean? In healthcare, adding value can mean better clinical outcomes, higher quality service, increased safety, helping more and more people, and doing all of these things while controlling and, if possible, reducing cost. For donor families, added value comes in the form of compassionate care and support—throughout the donation process and for years afterwards. For patients and transplant program staff, we add value by providing the highest quality organs and tissue grafts, in the safest manner. For hospital staff, we add value by streamlining the donation process and working together to optimize the outcome of every donation opportunity.


In collaboration with our partners, we’ve made steady progress over the past few years and added substantial value for many. Yet there’s always more we can do, so we continuously seek new opportunities to improve.

day, with so many others, towards our shared goals of saving and improving lives. This ethos of collaboration, service, and respect for all resulted in a record year in 2015, with 200 organ donors, 640 organs transplanted, and 525 tissue donors.

One example is restructuring our staffing model and partnership with Harborview Medical Center over the past year, a change that’s led to record results in an already high-performing medical center. Another example is tailoring our staffing in Alaska to meet the unique needs of the local community, resulting in sustained high performance for several years running. These and other examples of our efforts to add value are highlighted throughout this annual report.

As we enter 2016, our resolve to help more people than ever before has never been stronger, nor have we been better poised to succeed. Working together, we look forward to optimizing every precious donation opportunity—and adding value for all—in the months and years ahead.

We are deeply grateful to the donors and their families who give the gift of life. And we consider it an honor and a privilege to work together every

Onward and upward,

KEVIN J. O’CONNOR President & CEO


2015 LIFECENTER NORTHWEST ANNUAL REPORT: WHAT DO YOU VALUE?

“Thinking strategically. Small, smart changes can lead to big results.” Seattle’s Harborview Medical

But one of our favorite stories

a measurable increase in

Center (HMC) is one of our most

from 2015 came from this quest

the number of collaborative

important partners. Not only is it

to improve processes and prac-

approaches, from 69% to 73%.

the Regional Level 1 Trauma

tices—to make every donation-

Residents in particular improved

Center and King County hospital,

related event as meaningful

even more: the number of times

but HMC accounts for over a

and beneficial as possible for

that they didn’t use a collaborative

quarter of all our organ donors.

all involved.

approach dropped by two-thirds.

see two or three donors in a

One of HMC’s unique challenges

In a hospital with the donation

year, HMC averages one every

is that it’s a teaching hospital, so

potential of HMC, small shifts like

week. Not surprisingly, there’s a

the residents turn over frequently.

these can quickly add up to many

strong and deep donation culture

We’ve long known that the most

lives improved and saved.

throughout the entire hospital.

respectful way to speak with

—Dr. Richard Goss, Medical Director at Harborview Medical Center, Professor of Medicine at UW School of Medicine

Where a small hospital might

families about donation is with That means we have a different

a collaborative approach, where

role at HMC than we might at

LifeCenter Northwest and the

a smaller hospital: rather than

healthcare team work together

educating and guiding on how

to establish trust and find the

to improve donation outcomes,

best time and manner to discuss

we’re often in the role of learning

donation. But residents are often

and collaborating on how to

still unfamiliar with donation, and

improve processes and practices.

they don’t yet fully understand this process—and they also might

This was already a momentous

not realize that a collaborative

year at HMC: They had 53 organ

approach can increase

donors (a 36% increase over

authorization rates, ultimately

2014) and 90 potential organ

saving more lives.

donors (a 39% increase), and 175 lives were saved through

Working together with Dr. Richard

organ donation (a 44% increase).

Goss, Medical Director at HMC,

The number of tissue donors

we zeroed in on an education

and potential tissue donors also

opportunity during the initial

increased by 83% and 63%,

orientation that could be done

respectively. Grafts from these

for each incoming group of

donors can heal more than 4,000

residents. Even with this one

people in need of a tissue transplant.

small change, we quickly saw

36% MORE ORGAN DONORS IN 2015

3x MORE LCNW STAFF DEDICATED TO HMC


In 2015, HMC helped save 175 people on the transplant waiting list. That’s 44% more lives saved by HMC donors than in 2014.

Photo: Clare McLean, Harborview Medical Center


2015 LIFECENTER NORTHWEST ANNUAL REPORT: WHAT DO YOU VALUE?

“Removing roadblocks.

When two partners understand and value each other’s goals, it’s amazing what they can do together.” —Jean Fetterly, Driver Exam

Administrator, Washington State Department of Licensing


99% OF PEOPLE WHO REGISTER TO BE AN ORGAN, EYE, AND TISSUE DONOR DO SO WHEN RECEIVING THEIR DRIVER’S LICENSE

The overall U.S. donor designation

This was the first year that the

We’ve helped make donor

rate just broke 50% at the start

Governor’s Gift of Life Award in

registration an integral step in the

of 2015—but in our region, we’re

both states was given to all organ

licensing process, both online

blessed with a much deeper and

donors, and a member of every

and in person. We supply frontline

more engaged donation culture.

donor family from the previous

DOL/MVD staff with cards that

For example, Washington has the

year was invited to official

answer common questions about

third-highest donor designation

ceremonies in Olympia and

donation and provide our number

rate in the country (84%), and

Helena. In 2015, we also helped

to call for more information. We

Montana has the highest (88%).

unveil the Tree of Life in the

participate in all-staff trainings, to

Montana Capitol Rotunda. This

answer questions and reinforce

Why? Part of the credit goes to the

metal sculpture donated by

the life-saving importance of

hard work of our driver licensing

Montana artist Jim Dolan will

donation to our communities. In

offices—where over 99% of the

grow each year, as new leaves

Washington, we include an insert

people who register as organ

inscribed with the names of

about donor designation with

donors do so.

Montana donors are added.

every single license that is mailed— a program that we hope to

We’ve built a very close, collabor-

Because we know that saving

ative, open-door relationship with

lives begins at the driver licensing

the Washington State Department

office, we continued and

of Licensing (DOL) and Montana

strengthened many of the

Motor Vehicle Division (MVD), and

programs that help drive our

2015 was a busy year.

states’ high designation rates:

expand to Montana as well.


2015 LIFECENTER NORTHWEST ANNUAL REPORT: WHAT DO YOU VALUE?

“Sharing and collaboration.

Photo: CHI Franciscan

500

89% TIMELY REFERRAL RATE FOR CHI FRANCISCAN HOSPITALS

STAFF FROM EIGHT CHI FRANCISCAN HOSPITALS ATTENDED

CHI FRANCISCAN PATIENTS REFERRED FOR ORGAN DONATION EVALUATION


We want everyone to see the impact they’re having and the difference they’re making.” —Mary Ragsdale, Associate Vice President, CHI Franciscan Health

One of the most significant recent

During the summit, attendees

changes in healthcare has been

worked in small teams to come

the concentration of more hospitals

up with creative solutions to

into larger systems. We know

removing barriers and improving

that to keep healing and saving

compliance metrics and donation

more lives, we need to adapt our

outcomes. The people in the

approach to this new healthcare

room were the ones with the

landscape.

power to create change­—and everyone learned from each other,

In Fall 2015, we helped host the

sharing what worked and how

Second Annual Donation Summit

best to make improvements.

for one of our most important regional partners, CHI Franciscan

After two years of working

Health, a large system of hospitals

together on these summits, we’ve

and clinics in the South Puget

seen an increase in the number of

Sound area. We interact with

referrals, the rate at which those

hundreds of nurses, physicians,

referrals were made in a timely

administrators, and other hospital

manner, and overall an even more

staff each year in the Franciscan

positive culture around the process

system.

of donation in the hospitals. Timely referrals have climbed to

In advance of the summit, we

89%, with a total of 500 patients

surveyed bedside RNs and asked

referred for organ donation

what barriers they encounter in

evaluation—which represents a

the donation process and how

6% increase from 2014 to 2015.

we could work together towards timely referral calls. We had an

We’re thankful to have such

overwhelming response of over

thoughtful and committed partners

150 individuals.

at CHI Franciscan Health, as we work together in 2016 to champion donation and create more consistent practice and policy.

At CHI Franciscan, we find value in being a part of something that helps us live out our mission.


2015 LIFECENTER NORTHWEST ANNUAL REPORT: WHAT DO YOU VALUE?

“Trust. You’ve got a much stronger

someone’s going to be there tomorrow

—Vivian Echavarria, FACHE, Director of Operations, Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, AK

We have 23 partner hospitals in Alaska, even in locations as remote as Valdez.

Over the last two years, we’ve

clinical or family support staff in

“The hospital knows that when

seen a dramatic shift in the

Alaska, instead working with local

they call us, either Mary [Dawson,

quality of service that we’ve been

contractors to provide service.

Organ Recovery Coordinator] or I

able to provide communities in

can be there very quickly. Before,

Alaska, thanks to changes we’ve

In December 2013, we added

they would talk to one of us on

made in staffing—and that quality

three full-time coordinators—

the phone and we’d have to go

has translated into even more

to work on improving response

get on a flight, and it would be

lives healed and saved.

times and building closer

at least 5 or 6 hours before we

relationships with partner

could actually be on site.”

We work with 23 different

hospitals.

hospitals across a huge

Stronger bonds with partner

geographic area in Alaska,

“One of the things that’s very

hospitals have boosted morale,

serving Anchorage, Fairbanks,

different is the timeliness that we

improved outcomes, and even

and Juneau as well as Ketchikan,

can have on site now,” says

created new opportunities for

Nome, and other outlying areas.

Val Manikko, Organ Recovery

education and training. “We’re on

But up until recently, LifeCenter

Manager at LifeCenter Northwest.

site sooner, we’re on site more

Northwest has had no full-time


relationship when you know and the day after that.”

often, and we’re able to work

(73%), and the highest number of

with healthcare teams in a whole

organs transplanted per donor—

new way when you have this

which is especially impressive

respect and trust,” says Candy

given how far most Alaska

Wells, Director of Organ Donation

hospitals are from our region’s

Services at LifeCenter Northwest.

transplant centers.

In the first two years since the

“It’s amazing how generous

staffing change, successful organ

people are in Alaska,” says

donations have nearly doubled—

Candy. “Especially with the native

with just 16 in 2013, compared to

community, where you see very

a total of 30 and 27 in 2014 and

large families coming to support

2015, respectively. Alaska now

their loved one. It’s a very giving

also has the highest organ donor

group of folks, and there’s a

authorization rate of any state

certain level of trust and respect

in our designated service area

when they know that you live here.”

100% CONVERSION RATE FOR REGISTERED DONORS

73% HIGHEST ORGAN DONOR AUTHORIZATION RATE OF ANY STATE IN OUR DESIGNATED SERVICE AREA


2015 LIFECENTER NORTHWEST ANNUAL REPORT: WHAT DO YOU VALUE?

It’s a profound and humbling

Last year, donor mother Wendy

experience to stand with families in

Rice introduced us to a new way

the moment of their greatest grief

to provide honor and comfort, as

and their greatest generosity. We

she said goodbye to her young

see the very best in humanity—

son Cooper—who went on to

strength, courage, and hope,

save three lives, including two

all in the face of loss.

children. After surgery, Wendy asked that we please dress

We’re always working to find

Cooper in his favorite pajamas.

new ways to honor and comfort these families through an extremely

That simple gesture changed

challenging time. Our family

the way the end of the donation

service staff are all professionally

process felt to everyone in the

trained in grief counseling and

room. We immediately knew

bereavement support, and they’re

that we should provide the

present at the hospital for nearly

same gentle transition to all our

every donation in our large

youngest donors.

139 FLIGHTS TAKEN BY FAMILY SUPPORT COORDINATORS TO CARE FOR FAMILIES DURING THE DONATION PROCESS

MORE THAN

geographic region. After Cooper’s donation we Sometimes families will want to

asked Wendy if we could create

play the donor’s favorite music,

a new program called the

bring their favorite toys to accom-

“Cooper PJ Project.” She

pany them, or stay with the donor

agreed, and even sent some of

through the procedure. We also

Cooper’s PJs to help them get

help with “memory-making”

started. Several other hospitals

activities, such as making hand

have already donated new

and footprints, and every organ

pajamas to the project in the

donor family receives a hand-

last year, and we invite anyone

made memorial quilt.

in our community to contact us

200 HONOR QUILTS GIVEN TO DONOR FAMILIES

for details on how to participate.

MORE THAN

700 BEREAVEMENT RESOURCES SENT TO ORGAN AND TISSUE DONOR FAMILIES


“Peace and comfort. That’s exactly what a parent needs during a time of grief.” —Wendy Rice, mother of Cooper


2015 LCNW Hospital Awards We want to thank and recognize the hospitals in our region that made outstanding achievements in organ and tissue donation in 2015. We are honored to partner with the staff at these hospitals on such important work. Without your help, we would be unable to fulfill the donation wishes of so many families and save the lives of so many thankful recipients.

DONATION REFERRAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD Timely referrals have a significant impact on donation outcomes. One of the single most important steps in donation is recognizing that a patient has met referral criteria, and making the call in a timely manner. Achieving and maintaining a high compliant referral rate is incredibly challenging and requires a strong commitment and effective processes.

ORGAN DONATION ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

We’re proud to present the “2015 Gift of Life Award” to Yakima Valley Memorial Gift of Life Award

Hospital, which provided seven organs transplanted per donor in 2015. Many aspects of a patient’s clinical course impact the number of organs able to be recovered for transplant, and we know that the heroic efforts made to save a patient’s life will also be beneficial to a donation outcome. This award honors both the lifesaving work that occurs before donation, and the top-quality and collaborative care during the donation process.

Many factors impact a hospital’s measurement of how many potential donors go on to donate. Hospitals with high donation rates tend to excel at recognizing referral criteria and making timely calls, maintaining the opportunity for donation, and collaborating with LifeCenter Northwest for a planned donation discussion. Achieving a 70% or greater donation rate is an impressive accomplishment, requiring vigilance and sustained commitment to ensure every possible donation opportunity is realized.

TISSUE DONATION ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Many factors impact tissue donation, including timely referrals, logistics, community education, and outreach. Hospital staff play an integral part in the process, and the average U.S. donation rate is around 50%. Few hospitals are able to achieve a 70% or greater tissue donation rate.


Organ Donation Alaska Regional Hospital Confluence Health Central Washington Hospital Harborview Medical Center Holy Rosary Healthcare Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children’s Hospital St. Clare Hospital St. Vincent Healthcare Valley Hospital, Spokane

Tissue Donation Cabinet Peaks Medical Center Central Montana Medical Center Crow/Northern Cheyenne Hospital Fort Belknap Hospital

Great Falls Clinic Hospital Holy Rosary Healthcare Kootenai Health Mountainview Medical Center North Valley Hospital, Whitefish Northern Idaho Advanced Care Hospital Odessa Memorial Healthcare Center PeaceHealth Peace Island Medical Center Pioneer Medical Center Providence Mount Carmel Hospital Providence St. Joseph’s Medical Hospital, Chewelah St. Anthony Hospital St. Patrick Hospital, Missoula Steele Memorial Medical Center Stillwater Billings Clinic

Alaska Regional Hospital Benefis Heatlh System, East Campus Bozeman Health; Deaconess Hospital Central Peninsula Hospital Deaconess Hospital Fairbanks Memorial Hospital Harrison Medical Center, Bremerton Kalispell Regional Medical Center Madigan Army Medical Center

Mat-Su Regional Medical Center St. Clare Hospital St. Francis Hospital St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, Lewiston St. Vincent Healthcare Swedish Medical Center—First Hill Campus Valley Medical Center, Renton Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center

EvergreenHealth Medical Center Garfield County Memorial Hospital Liberty Medical Center Mineral Community Hospital Phillips County Hospital Pioneer Medical Center

Providence Holy Family Hospital St. Elizabeth Hospital St. Luke Community Hospital St. Peter’s Hospital, Helena Trinity Hospital


FINANCIAL REPORT

Facts & Figures LifeCenter Northwest is one of 58 federally designated nonprofit organ procurement organizations (OPO) in the United States. LifeCenter Northwest works together with families, medical professionals, and communities in Alaska, Montana, North Idaho, and Washington to save and heal lives through organ and tissue donation.

Financial Position

Total Revenue

DECEMBER 31, 2015

$29,654,536

Assets Liabilities

$ 14,472,579 $ 4,861,802

Net Assets

$

Organ Procurement $24,695,833

2015

Contributions & Others $527,042

9,610,777 Tissue Procurement $4,431,661

Lives Saved (Organs Transplanted) BY YEAR

462

624 525

640

Total Expenses Administration & General $4,220,140

$26,422,888

541

2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Organ & Tissue Procurement $22,202,748

Organ Donors BY YEAR

197 163

176

200

162

Transplant & Tissue Partners 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Tissue Donors BY YEAR

463 383

525

385

270

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015


LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN Success in organ and tissue transplantation can be measured in many ways. If we look at the mission of LifeCenter Northwest—“working together to save lives through organ and tissue donation”—the final measure is how many lives have been saved. The numbers for 2015 show that we’ve saved and improved lives at the highest level in our history! The teamwork of the many organizations and individuals involved was key to this success. In the past year, LifeCenter Northwest and its many partners emphasized not only what we do to save the most lives possible, but also how we do our important work with a focus on value. If a step in the work does not add value to the final outcome, it is waste and should be eliminated. Value itself can be measured in many ways—timeliness, cost, outcomes, and compassionate care are but a few means. We’ve made progress and can still do better. The collaboration and partnership we’ve seen with this effort only motivates us to do more.

Jim Young Treasurer Certified Professional Accountant Issaquah, WA Maude Blair Secretary Vice President Alaska Federation of Natives Anchorage, AK William Coleman Member at Large Cardiovascular/Thoracic Surgery Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Spokane,WA Jonathan Himmelfarb, MD Member at Large Professor of Medicine Director, Kidney Research Institute Joseph W. Eschbach MD Endowed Chair for Kidney Research Dept. of Medicine, Div. of Nephrology University of Washington Seattle, WA

Gerard Fischer, FACHE | LifeCenter Northwest Governing Board Chair and Vice President—Ancillary & Business Services Group Practice Division, Group Health Cooperative

ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS

GOVERNING BOARD MEMBERS Gerard Fischer, FACHE Chair Vice President—Ancillary & Business Services Group Practice Division, Group Health Cooperative

On behalf of the Governing Board, thank you to the tremendous, committed staff of LifeCenter Northwest and our partners in assuring that the wishes of those choosing to donate organs and tissue are honored whenever possible, that the families and loved ones affected by loss are cared for with respect and compassion, and that the recipients of the Gift of Life benefit from the best clinical and operational processes, which truly save and improve their lives.

Ruth A. McDonald, MD Member at Large Pediatrician-in-Chief Professor and Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs Medical Director, Solid Organ Transplantation and Ambulatory Services Seattle Children’s Hospital, University of Washington Department of Pediatrics Seattle, WA Kevin O’Connor Nonvoting Member President & CEO, LifeCenter Northwest Bellevue, WA Ken Price Member at Large Regional Director, North American Sales Boeing Commercial Airplanes Seattle, WA Sarah Tallon Member at Large Director of Finance and Accounting Virginia Mason Medical Center Seattle, WA

Monty Montoya, Chair SightLife Seattle, WA

Christian Kuhr, MD Virginia Mason Medical Center Bellevue, WA

Debbie Whitlock, Vice Chair/Secretary Recipient Family Member Seattle, WA

George McCann Life Alaska Donor Services Anchorage, AK

Geoff Austin University of Washington Medical Center Seattle, WA

Arlene Mitterholzer Donor Family Member Puyallup, WA

Megan Clark LifeCenter Northwest Bellevue, WA

Karen Nelson, PhD Bloodworks Northwest Seattle, WA

Kathy Jo Freeman, RN Seattle Children’s Hospital Seattle, WA

Okechukwu Ojogho, MD Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center Spokane, WA

Shirley Harney-Taylor Donor Family Member Tukwila, WA

Vicky Phillips, RN, MSN Providence Alaska Medical Center Anchorage, AK

Marquis Hart, MD Swedish Medical Center Seattle, WA

Jorge Reyes, MD University of Washington Medical Center Seattle, WA

Vickie Hatzenbeller Benefis Hospitals Great Falls, MT

Todd Seiger Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center Spokane, WA

Patrick Healey, MD Seattle Children’s Hospital Seattle, WA

Michael Souter, MD Harborview Medical Center Seattle, WA

Joan Huffman, MD St. Vincent Healthcare Billings, MT

Timothy Stevens Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center Spokane, WA

Ellen Klohe, PhD Inland Northwest Blood Center, Reg HQ Spokane, WA

Deborah Swets Recipient Family Member Seattle, WA

© 2016 LifeCenter Northwest. All rights reserved. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Design: Studio Rayolux


3650 131st Ave. SE, Ste 200 Bellevue, WA 98006 www.lcnw.org main (877) 275-5269 (425) 201-6563 fax (425) 688-7641

Collaboration. A sense of leadership. I like to know when someone’s going to be there for the long haul. A spirit of service. Data-driven decisions. Common sense. A focus on outcomes. Friendly competition. It all comes back to process, and just a recurring focus on questioning the why and the how of what we do. Commitment to families. Strategic thinking. Small changes that over time add up to a big difference. Better integration. Customized solutions. Transparency. Taking the time to analyze and think beyond the current situation. Reliability. Honoring sacrifices. Outcomes. Remembering the mission. Peer learning. Honesty. Celebration. Creating more consistent practices and policies. Being there sooner and being there more often. Courageous leadership. Community-mindedness. An approach that takes into account the changing healthcare landscape. Efficiencies. A commitment not just to saving lives but to improving transplant outcomes. Providing aftercare support for the families of our generous donors. When two partners understand and value each other’s goals, it’s amazing what they can do together. Piloting new technologies. Systematic changes. Trust. You’ve got a much stronger relationship when you know someone’s going to be there tomorrow and the day after that. Relationships. Solid, incremental progress. Inspired training. Being attentive to the unique needs of our community. Improving morale. Bettering the community as a whole. More opportunities for CEUs. It was powerful to hear from both recipients and donor families. Forming a relationship with the patient and understanding their last wishes. Connection. Teamwork. Removing roadblocks. Trust. Celebrating life. Service. Being a part of something that helps us to live out our mission.


LifeCenter Northwest 2015 Annual Report