Page 1

Los AngeLes Metro September 2015

southern california

The Golden Girls

pheNoMeNoN Could it work

For you? ParTing wiTh Possessions –

prudently and professionally

Donny MosT

of “Happy days”

Now Most happy

in Jazz Clubs

Judith

Light Taking a bossy stance

on staying well during the flu season

lifeafter50.com


Contents

September 2015

10

18

22

24

Cover Profile

Departments

10 Judith Light

6 50-Plus: What You Need to Know

Taking a bossy stance on her career, life, and staying well during flu season.

A quick look at things 50-plusers should be aware of.

  8 It’s The Law

Features

Mitchell A. Karasov on what to do when the time for a timely settlement has passed.  

18 Thinking About Going Golden? What You Should Know Could “The Golden Girls Phenomenon” work for you?

22 Parting With Possessions – Prudently And Professionally Liquidating an estate can be overwhelming, and professional guidance is vital.

24 The Look Of Life After 50 – Donny Most

The “Happy Days” star is now most happy on jazz club stages.

28 The Hallowed Hall Of Must-Knowtables * Frank Lloyd Wright Legendary notables that everyone, of every age, should know. Cover photo by Jonathan W. Stoller

26 Tuned In To What’s On

The best in September television viewing.

31 Let’s Get Out

Looking to get out and about? Our September/October calendar has some great suggestions.

35 Rick Steves’ Travels

The bare basics on European beer.

38 And Finally…The Bookworm’s Best, A Look Back and Just A Thought Before We Go

A book suggestion, memory, and a little something to leave you with.

All material published within this issue of Life After 50 and on www.lifeafte50.com is strictly for informational and educational purposes only. No individual, advice, product or service is in any way endorsed by Life After 50 or Southland Publishing, Inc. or provided as a substitute for the reader’s seeking of individualized professional advice or instruction. Readers should seek the advice of qualified professionals on any matter regarding an individual, advice, recommendations, services or products covered within this issue. All information and material is provided to readers with the understanding that it comes from various sources from which there is no warranty or responsibility by Life After 50 or Southland Publishing, Inc. as to its or their legality, completeness or technical accuracy.

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Editor’s Note...

It’s A New Month… It’s A New Issue… And I’m Feelin’ Good!

M

y career path has included work on hundreds of television and film productions. From writing and producing news, special events, travel programs, documentaries and commercials, to being a part of crews that churned out music videos, television shows and made-for-television and feature films, I’ve had my share of incredible experiences and crossed paths with some fascinating people.   While some of those I labored alongside were “challenging,” as the politically correct say, for the most part, that time of my life provided me with many lasting friendships and people I enjoyed and who made me feel good.   Of the numerous productions I worked on, a 1989 made-for-television film called “My Boyfriend’s Back” stands out. The film was a dramedy about a musical trio of woman known as “The Fabulous Bouffants” who, after having been disbanded for many years, overcome personal challenges and reunite to perform on a television special that also featured numerous real musical performers from the 1960s. I loved being a part of the crew on that film because we got to work with legendary musicians, including Gary Puckett, “Little Peggy” March, Gary Lewis and Mary Wells; and also because we got to shoot in great locations such as the Hollywood Palace and the Presidential Suite of The Century Plaza Hotel (in which actual presidents have actually stayed).  Another reason I enjoyed working on “My Boyfriend’s Back” was because it gave me the opportunity to get to know the woman who graces the cover of this month’s issue – Judith Light – who starred in the film along with Sandy Duncan and Jill Eikenberry. It was a daily pleasure to interact with Judith and her management team of Jonathan Stoller and Herb Hamsher, who were always kind, gracious, fun to be around and seemed – each day – to do something that made me feel good. I greatly enjoyed working with them and, on the day we wrapped production, I gave the guys little gifts and Judith an antique perfume bottle, which I knew she collected. A few days later, a film canister filled with cookies arrived at my home with a note of thanks from them – which really made me feel good.   Throughout my life, whenever I have had the wonderful experience of working with people such as Judith, Jonathan and Herb, who share my belief that we should do all we can to a make our work a joy for those we work with as well as ourselves, I always wonder why everyone doesn’t strive to make that their top daily priority. Having done that (and, at times, failed to do so) I can attest that by doing it, the law of the echo is made manifest and the good vibes you cast almost always render good feelings in return.  As we put this issue together, it was good to reconnect with Jonathan, who shot the photo that appears on the cover, and reminisce with Judith about our days working together. It was also good to learn that she still has the perfume bottle I gave her. Knowing that made me feel good – really good!

David Laurell, Editor-in-Chief

4 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

Publisher Valarie Anderson Editor-in-Chief David Laurell Associate Editors Steve Stoliar Claire Yezbak Fadden Art Director Michael Kraxenberger Editorial Assistant Max Andrews VP Of Finance Michael T. Nagami Human Resources Andrea E. Baker Business Manager Linda Lam Billing Supervisor Kacie Cobian VP Of Operations David Comden

Account Executives: San Diego County/Orange County Phil Mendelson Phil@lifeafter50.com Los Angeles/ Valley/Travel Beverly Sparks Beverly@lifeafter50.com For advertising/distribution inquiries contact: Valarie Anderson (310) 822-1629 x 121, Valarie@lifeafter50.com 5301 Beethoven St., Suite 183 LA CA 90066 Valarie Anderson Valarie@lifeafter50.com 310 822-1629 x 121

To contact our editorial department: (818) 563-1007 davidl@lifeafter50.com

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©2015 Southland Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved

A September Thought

“One day you turn around and it’s summer Next day you turn around and it’s fall And the springs and the winters of a lifetime Whatever happened to them all?”

– Sammy Cahn


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September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 5 1/5/15 2:53 PM


50

Apartment Sweet Apartment

B

Plus

What You Need To Know

By Claire Yezbak Fadden and Max Andrews

The Deepening Debt Of Daily Life

L

iving with debt has become a way of life for both generation X and 50-plussers as the stigma of owing money is gradually disappearing, according to a new study from Allianz Life. The study on how the baby boomer generation (ages 49 to 67) and generation Xers (ages 35 to 48) are facing their financial future shows both age groups equally reliant on using credit cards as a survival tool. Nearly half – 48 percent – of both generations agree that credit cards now function as a survival tool to pay for everyday expenses, and 43 percent agree that “lots of smart, hardworking people who are careful with spending also have a lot of credit card debt.” Alarmingly, this growing comfort with debt may be having a greater effect on the retirement plans of gen Xers. Twice as many of them – 27 percent versus 11 percent of 50-plussers – say they are either unsure about when they plan to retire or don’t plan to ever be able to retire at all.

Fifty Candles

F

ifty years ago this month, Singapore joined the United Nations; Pakistani troops entered the Indian sector of Kashmir while Indian troops invaded Lahore; Pope Paul VI issued the encyclical “Mysterium Fidei;” Hurricane Betsy roared ashore on Louisiana and Florida, killing 76 people and causing $1.42 billion in damage; television shows “F-Troop,” “Hogan’s Heroes,” “Lost in Space, “Get Smart” and “I Dream of Jeannie” premiered; the Los Angeles Angels changed their name to to the California Angels and moved to Anaheim; and Donovan made his first appearance in the United States on “Shindig!” Notable personalities born in September 1965 who are celebrating their 50th birthday this month include boxer Lennox Lewis, actor Charlie Sheen, runner Derek Redmond, professional poker player Annie Duke, news anchor Patti Ann Browne, actresses Constance Marie and Cheryl Hines, Miss America 1990 Debbye Turner, singer-songwriter Moby (Richard Melville Hall), basketball player Scottie Pippen and comedian Kathleen Madigan.

6 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

aby boomers are the force behind the boom in the construction of larger and more luxurious apartments with high-end amenities, according to a recently released report authored by Jordan Rappaport, senior economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. The study, “Millennials, Baby Boomers and Rebounding Multifamily Home Construction,” suggests the boomers will likely eclipse young adults as the main driver of apartment construction growth over the next decade. Research shows that the downsizing from single-family homes to apartments starts to rise at age 70 and picks up sharply at age 75. Fiftyplussers, with far greater financial resources than younger people, are demanding more spacious dwelling units, amenities they have become accustomed to in their single-family homes, and aging-in-place design considerations.

Growing Up With George

C

omedian and social commentator George Carlin, who died in 2008, was the comedic voice of a generation. His fivedecade-long career spanned books, record albums, cable specials, movies, and network shows that resonated with young and old alike. While every baby boomer grew up with Carlin, in her newly released memoir, “A Carlin Home Companion” (St. Martin’s Press, 2015), Carlin’s daughter, Kelly, provides readers with what it was really like to grow up with him. Reflecting on a childhood filled with love, laughter, chaos, drugs, and debilitating anxiety, the younger Carlin tells the story of how her father’s career, the crazy times of the counter culture, and her family’s dysfunctional dynamics shaped her relationship with her parents and her ability to step out into the world as an adult. Booklist, in a rave review, lauded it as being much more than the biography of a man by a daughter. “Kelly also tells a muchneeded, revealing story about what it means to grow up in the shadow of fame and overcome dysfunctional, show-business-family patterns on the way to her own successful performing and writing career,” says the review. Along with this insightful book on George Carlin, the legendary comedian will also be the subject of a three-month-long exhibition at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles beginning on September 30. For more information on Kelly Carlin and “A Carlin Home Companion,” click on www.thekellycarlinsite.com.


A Little More You Need To Know Photo by Iwan Baan

The Most Important Thing To Know This Month

Be Aware: The Prostate

S

Where You Need To Go

eptember is National Prostate Health Month, a time when health experts, advocates, and individuals concerned with men’s prostate health promote awareness for regular testing, prevention and proper treatment of prostate cancer. The American Cancer Society reminds men that early prostate cancer often has no symptoms. While prostate cancer can only be discovered with a screening test, such as a PSA blood test or a digital rectal exam, more advanced evidence of prostate cancer can sometimes cause symptoms such as:

The Broad

• Problems urinating or holding in urine

he Broad, the new contemporary art museum in downtown Los Angeles,will officially open on Sunday, September 20. Built by philanthropists and longtime art collectors Eli and Edythe Broad, the inaugural installation draws from two collections of more than 2,000 works of contemporary art, beginning with those by major artists who came to prominence in the 1950s, including Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly. The pop art of the 1960s – an area of great depth in the collections – will be represented through works by Roy Lichtenstein, Ed Ruscha and Andy Warhol, among others. Moving into the 1980s, this exhibition will present a rich concentration of works by artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat, Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, Barbara Kruger and Jeff Koons. The installation continues up through the present, with works including a monumental, immersive, nine-screen video piece, “The Visitors,” by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson, which was only recently acquired for the collections, among many other new acquisitions. Among the other artists represented are Richard Artschwager, John Baldessari, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Chuck Close, Eric Fischl, Leon Golub, Andreas Gursky, Damien Hirst, Mike Kelley, Ellsworth Kelly, Glenn Ligon, Sharon Lockhart, Lari Pittman, Charles Ray, Frank Stella, Philip Taaffe, Robert Therrien, Kara Walker and Terry Winters.

• Blood in the urine

T

• Trouble having or keeping an erection (erectile dysfunction)

• Pain in the spine, hips, ribs, or other bones • Weakness or numbness in the legs or feet • Loss of bladder or bowel control Other conditions can also cause many of these same symptoms. For example, trouble urinating is much more often caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) than cancer. Tell your doctor if you have any of these problems so that the cause can be found and treated, if needed. For more detailed information on prostate cancer symptoms and treatments, click on www.cancer.org.

The Broad is located at 221 South Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles. For more information and tickets, call (213) 232-6220 or click on www.thebroad.org.

New Words

Y

ou might not find them in a dictionary yet, but they’re a part of the everyday American vocabulary. Here’s what they mean.

Stan: A portmanteau of “stalker” and “fan,” a Stan is an over-the-top fanatic, admirer and supporter of a celebrity, franchise or musical group. Based on the 2000 song “Stan” by rapper Eminem. Ghosting: When a person (especially one you have been dating) avoids you, stops taking your calls, answering your texts and, basically, disappears from your life. Netiquette: Etiquette rules and norms that apply when communicating over computer networks, answering e-mails and using the Internet.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 7


Did you use marijuana when you were younger?

It’s The Law Mitchell A. Karasov

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When the time for a timely settlement has passed

Q

My father passed away last year during the holidays. In his will, it states that my sister is to serve as his executrix and his assets are to be split between us. Almost a year has now passed, and my sister has done nothing to settle the estate. During this time, his stocks have gone down and she is living in his home rent free. I’m afraid to go against her, because there is a clause in the will that if anyone contests it they are to be disinherited. It was upsetting enough to lose my father last Christmas. Now, if I do something against my sister and her family, I feel they will have nothing to do with me this Christmas or ever again. What can I do to get my share of the estate without causing problems?

A

In spite of the “no contest” provision, you have rights as a beneficiary to pursue your rightful inheritance in probate court. Preserving or regaining a good relationship with your sister, however, could be another matter. If the no contest clause contains standard language, you may challenge your sister’s failure to handle his estate without running the risk of disinheriting yourself. Typically, no contest clauses are meant to penalize beneficiaries who challenge the beneficiary’s inheritance, not mismanagement or failure to act by the executor. As the executrix, your sister should have filed the original will and a petition to appoint her executrix in probate court. Since she has not done that, you could file a petition with the court to appoint yourself as the executor instead of your sister. In addition to being appointed to take over the management of your late father’s estate, you would ask the court to reduce your sister’s inheritance by an amount equal to the financial harm she caused. You may be entitled to lost rent during the time she lived in the residence, the decreased value of the stock, and possibly other damages. Sometimes, “family member” executors are so distraught about the death of their loved one that they don’t always start the probate of the will as quickly they should. If you believe your sister fits into that category, you could ask her if she wants your help with the process or if she will let you help her by taking care of it. If she agrees to either, then the only issue would be what she owes you for any losses to your share of the inheritance. If she isn’t agreeable to any of those proposals, then you could propose pre-litigation mediation. That is a process that can avoid a costly legal battle by bringing the parties together with a mediator to work out the differences. If your sister refuses to agree to any of these reasonable proposals, than you will have no choice but to have your conflict resolved by the court. Whether you wait until after Christmas to deal with this and avoid any family strife is a personal decision. Either way, before you approach your sister, I strongly recommend that you consult with an attorney.


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Judith

Light Taking a bossy stance on the roles she has played, the service she has rendered, and the way to stay well during flu season

A

By David Laurell

ward-winning actress Judith Light has teamed up with the National Council on Aging to raise awareness about preventing influenza. She is

currently serving as the national spokeswoman for The Flu + You program, a public education initiative aimed at adults 65 and over about the importance of annual flu vaccination and what preventative options are available. 10 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

Photo courtesy of National Council on Aging

Cover Profile


Photo by Jonathan W. Stoller

B

orn in Trenton, New Jersey in 1949, Light graduated from Carnegie Mellon University with a degree in drama and made her professional stage debut in “Richard III” at the California Shakespeare Festival in 1970. First appearing on Broadway in the 1975 revival of “A Doll’s House,” she came to national prominence in 1977 when she took on the role of Karen Wolek on the ABC daytime drama “One Life to Live” for which, over her sixyear run, she won two Daytime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. Perhaps best-known for her role as Angela Bower in the ABC sitcom “Who’s the Boss?” which ran from 1984 to 1992, Light has also played the recurring role of Elizabeth Donnelly in the NBC drama “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” and Claire Meade in the ABC series “Ugly Betty,” for which she was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award in 2007. Light received her first nomination for a Tony Award in 2011 for her performance in the Broadway play “Lombardi,” based on the life of legendary football coach Vince Lombardi. In 2012 and 2013, she won two consecutive Tony Awards for Best Featured Actress in a Play for her performances in “Other Desert Cities” and “The Assembled Parties.” After a short stint as the villainous Judith Brown Ryland in the TNT reboot of “Dallas,” 2014 saw Light take on the role of Shelly Pfefferman in the critically acclaimed dark dramedy, “Transparent,” for which she received a Critics’ Choice Television Award nomination. Cast opposite Jeffrey Tambor in the Jill Soloway-created series, Light plays the ex-wife of a transgender character played by Tambor. A longtime passionate activist of the LGBT community, Light, who played Ryan White’s mother in the 1989 made-for-television movie “The Ryan White Story,” sits on the board of the Matthew Shepard Foundation, as well as the Point Foundation, an LGBT organization that provides financial support, mentoring, leadership training and hope to meritorious students who are or feel marginalized due to their sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. Next month, Light will return to Broadway in the role of Madame Raquin in “Thérèse Raquin” a stage adaptation of the 1867 Emile Zola novel that will be presented by the Roundabout Theatre Company. As she prepared for her latest Broadway performance, one that will mark Keira Knightley’s Broadway debut and begin previews on October 1, Light took time to talk with Life After 50 about aging, how to stay well, especially during flu season, and the roles that have defined her career and life. life After 50 (lA50): few actresses have taken on the roles of such diverse characters as you have throughout your career. Can we throw out a couple of them for you to share what comes to mind when you think of them? Judith Light (JL): Sure. lA50: let’s start at the beginning, with Karen Wolek. JL: Taking the role of Karen changed my life. Before taking that role, I was seriously considering getting out of acting. Up until that time, I had only done one television role, on “Kojak.” Everything else I had done was in theater. I was hesitant about taking the role of Karen at first. I never wanted to do television. I was a real snob back then. I only wanted to do theater or feature film work, and certainly didn’t want to do a soap opera. But then I began to think about the people I could reach by doing it, and that there was no reason I couldn’t bring the quality of work I had been doing in the theater to television. In retrospect, taking that role was one of the most powerful and life-changing choices of my life. lA50: You say you were contemplating getting out of the business. What would have been the other career path you would have pursued? JL: I seriously thought about becoming a psychologist or pursuing a career in law. I would have also been interested in working with children with learning difficulties or physical disabilities. There was always some sort of a service element that was involved in what I considered to be among my choices. That same desire, to be of service to others, was actually a part – a big part – in my decision to take the role of Karen. I thought it would be a way to present

a character that was dissatisfied with her life, who suffered from low selfesteem, who was obsessed with searching for love and acceptance, and how she coped and survived. lA50: few woman were as different as Karen Wolek and Angela Bower. Tell us about Angela. JL: Well, Angela represents another life-changing choice for me, because I always said I would never do a sitcom [laughs]. Do you see a pattern here? Again, just like with doing a soap opera, my decision not to ever do a sitcom was due to the way I looked down my nose at that sort of material. I had never realized how powerful both of those mediums can be to reaching people. When I auditioned for that role with Tony [Danza], I realized I had been making decisions based on perceptions that were incorrect. When I decided to go with my gut, and accept that role – just like taking the role of Karen – it changed my life. Those roles opened my eyes to the fact that I had been making poor choices about a lot of things that were cutting me off from having wonderful and powerful experiences. I think the thing I learned from taking the role of Angela is how wonderful

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 11


it is to have the opportunity in life to be able to make people laugh. That was the service element I found in taking that role – making people laugh. That is such a wonderful thing to do – an extraordinary thing to do as a career.

S E N I O R R E W A R D S P RO G R A M

lA50: You had done comedic work in theater. Did that help prepare you for that role? JL: I’ll tell you, I learned so much from Tony about doing comedy. He gave me an education every week. By watching him and working with him, I learned timing and balance – the understanding – the underpinnings of what must be established before you can make something funny. He was a great teacher.

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LA50: A successful television or film production stems from that inexplicable magical chemistry that occurs between actors. That was certainly the case with you and Tony.

September 8 Rebecca Jade

September 15 Revisiting the Orbison Years

A Tribute to Sade

featuring Mark Barnett as Roy Orbison

JL: It was. We knew that right from the time we did the audition. It was very evident – just no question – everybody involved saw that. We had a great connection right from the start and continued to have that connection for the eight years the show ran. That is still true to this day. We are very close friends.

September 22

September 29

Gregory Wolfe A Tribute to Rod Stewart

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lA50: You said that had you not continued to act, you may have sought a career in law. You kind of got that by playing elizabeth Donnelly on “law & order: Special victims Unit.” Tell us about her. JL: The way the part of Elizabeth came to me was interesting. After being away from the theater for over 20 years, I was back in New York doing a play –

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“Wit” [“W;t”]. I was playing the role of a woman who was dying of ovarian cancer, which I had taken over from Kathleen Chalfant. Many of the people who were working on “SVU,” that Kathleen was a part of, came to see my performance and that led to my being offered the part of the head of the Special Victims Unit. Then I became a judge. I loved doing that role. It meant constantly flying back and forth from California to New York for several seasons, but that was fine because I loved it. That was a very special time for me, because I loved being involved with that show and playing that role. Playing Elizabeth was so different than anything I had ever done. lA50: Tell us about Claire Meade. JL: Again, another very different role. I had done a pilot about real estate agents. It was a great pilot, but it didn’t go. But that was what led to my getting the role of Claire, who was a fascinating woman with all sorts of Achilles’ heels and complications. Doing that show gave me the chance to work with my dear and wonderful America Ferrera, who has become a deeply cherished friend. We were all very much family on that show. Claire gave me the chance to go in a very different direction with a role and that was so great. It is so easy for an actress to get pigeonholed, but that never happened to me. That was because of my terrific management team. I’ve had wonderful people who have guided me to take on very different roles. That has been such a joy – to have such diversity in the roles I’ve done. lA50: So here’s the one i really want to hear about, because she is different from all the rest in that she was a real person – Marie lombardi. JL: Oh wow! How interesting that you would ask about her. She was a very special woman and you do have a huge responsibility when you are playing the role of a woman who actually lived and who still has family members alive, many who came to see the performance. I really did a lot of research on her and had many of her family members tell me how much I had her down. Even though that role was small, Marie was a dynamic and important part of that play. lA50: last woman i’ll ask you about – Shelly Pfefferman. JL: “Transparent” has captured my heart as both an actor and a viewer. I think it’s so incredibly powerful to be doing a story that is in service to something greater than ourselves – opening eyes and hearts, and hopefully, minds to save lives – to open a conversation that gives people the gift of knowing what is your true, courageous, authentic self. Although the show is about a man transitioning to becoming a woman, the larger context of the story we are trying to present is a message to everyone that it is fine to be who you are – to present yourself to the world as you are – and to love yourself for who you are. People really relate to this show because every family has some sort of an issue that deals with something that turns their world upside down – that causes everyone to look at who they are and how they relate to each other or a situation or a world that they may be uncomfortable with – something they don’t understand. I am very proud of what we do in “Transparent.” During each table read, we all take a moment to be grateful for being able to be a part of this show that has the power to open eyes and hearts and minds.

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lA50: You have always been a champion of the lGBT community. What was the impetus for that? JL: During the early days of the AIDS epidemic – in the 1980s – I had seen people I had worked with die and I didn’t know what was going on. Then it began to happen to close friends and I saw them being discounted because they were gay, and that was not okay with me. I remember when I was doing “The Ryan White Story” and Ryan, who had contracted HIV because he was a hemophiliac, came to the set one day and was being interviewed by a woman who asked him how he had been treated by people. He told her he had been spit upon and been called the “f” word – the derogatory one used for gay people. I was so devastated to hear this young boy talk about how cruel he had been treated by people. There was a mob mentality about the way people with HIV were being treated back then. That homophobic

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Photo courtesy of National Council on Aging

response made me know I could not sit still without using my voice to come out and say something – to say how wrong this was. We had two presidents who would not even say the word “AIDS,” although thousands of Americans were suffering from this disease. That makes you wonder what kind of a country we are living in. If there is a flood or a hurricane that affects a segment of our country, the government runs to help them with a big show. But with AIDS, it was nothing. There was a disdain and a discounting of Americans who had contracted AIDS because they were gay, or thought to be gay. That was deeply offensive to me – to anyone who cares about justice and the dignity of life. I was also very impressed with how the LGBT community rose up to powerfully care for their own during that time. Watching that was inspiring and beautiful to me.

thought: If I don’t know about it, I bet there are a lot of people out there who don’t know about it. Every year, people die from the flu and not enough people talk about it, so I really felt we need to be talking about and educating people about the strong vaccine that is available for older people and that you can go to a pharmacy and get it for free. I wanted to be a part of telling people to do this – to do something that may save their life. I know that may sound dramatic, but I was once one of those people who was irresponsible by not getting a flu shot and putting an entire cast and crew at risk. lA50: So tell our readers what they should do.

JL: I had to say something. The cruelty I saw was inhuman. And when I did, I got some horrible letters from people saying they would never watch anything I did again. I found that to be devastating, that people could be so cruel, but I had to finally come to terms with the fact that their bigotry and hatred was their problem to deal with – their cross to bear.

JL: Go to the National Council on Aging website and get all the information. There is no reason for people to be getting the flu. You just have to be knowledgeable of what is available and then make it a priority to get the immunization. The flu season starts this month and runs through the winter, so now is the time to do it. During most flu seasons, it’s estimated that 90 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths and between 50 and 60 percent of seasonal flurelated hospitalizations in the United States occur in people 65 years and older. This is because human immune defenses become weaker with age. So influenza can be a very serious disease for people 65 and older.

lA50: let’s talk about another cause you have embraced, influenza immunization.

LA50: I’ll take for granted you are dutifully immunized against influenza. Tell us what else you do to take care of yourself.

JL: It is the same thing as my support of the LGBT community. My work is my service. I took the roles of Karen, and Angela and others to be of service to people. To me, everything I do has that context to it. I have always chosen roles to educate or expose issues or problems, or to make people laugh, so my work with the National Council on Aging is a natural extension of that – to educate people. I consider myself to be a reasonably educated and aware person, and yet I never knew there was a special flu shot for people 65 and older. So I

JL: In New York, I walk everywhere, which is my main form of exercise. My diet is gluten free and I am primarily vegetarian. If I ever feel that I’m not getting the protein I need, I will have some fish. I try to stay away from dairy, because I don’t respond well to it. I just really try to listen to my body to hear what it is that I need. I have dieted in the past and always felt frustrated and deprived. I then came to realize that I had never really learned how to eat or to discern what I wanted or needed as opposed to a conditioned or compulsive need to eat.

LA50: You were one of the first LGBT advocates not of the community to come out in support of lGBT rights.

14 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015


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Photo by Jonathan W. Stoller

So I retrained myself and have learned to be as conscious as I can be as to what foods I need or want. lA50: Any guilty pleasures – moments when you are bad? JL: I don’t consider anything I eat to be bad. Ice cream is one of my favorite things and I will have a bite or two instead of eating an entire pint. I never deprive myself of anything I’m craving, but I do just take a few bites. That works for me, because I know I can eat whatever I want, just as long as I don’t eat a lot of it. I had been an emotional eater for many years and by going into therapy, I learned food is something that is to be nutritious and to be enjoyed, not something to suffer over and cause anxiety. Being conscious about how I eat and treating myself with grace and kindness and compassion in how and what I eat has worked for me. lA50: As you have gotten older, have you adopted any thoughts or a philosophy about aging? JL: My manager, Herb Hamsher talks about what he calls “conscious aging.” He says we should conscientiously observe ourselves and how the process of aging is personally affecting us. That philosophy, if that’s what you want to call it, is about being self-aware and actively choosing to live in each moment. I don’t mean any of this to sound like some pop culture self-help book, but what I do mean is that we should adopt an active consciousness of watching ourselves age and understanding how we should be treating ourselves and others as we get older. We should always be aware of who we are in the world and what our value is and to always grow in grace. Getting older is going to happen to all of us, so it’s much better to get on the roller coaster of aging and enjoy the ride rather than being dragged behind it. Aging should be a process of being incredibly grateful for the gift of getting older – for having life. That is a precious gift that not everyone gets. Life should be full and exciting and filled with a great fullness of being alive. That only comes by continuing to grow and to be continually living a life of service to others, no matter what it is you do.

“I

need to stay healthy and can’t let the flu slow me down, so I received my annual vaccination and learned there are different flu vaccine options for people 65 and older,” says actress Judith Light. “I want to encourage others to speak with their doctor or pharmacist to find out more about simple steps they can take to help prevent the flu for themselves and the people they care about.” Research shows that the immune system weakens with age, which means older adults are more likely to catch the flu and that they can suffer greater complications because of other health issues. Through the National Council on Aging’s Flu + You program, everyone can get the information they need to help protect themselves by getting vaccinated as early in the season as possible. The flu is a contagious illness that can be severe and life-threatening, especially for adults 65 and older who have flu vaccine options, including the traditional, standarddose vaccine and a higher-dose vaccine specifically designed to address the age-related weakening of the immune system. The higher-dose flu vaccine, which includes four times the antigen compared with the standard-dose vaccine, triggers the body to produce more antibody against the flu virus. Older adults should speak with their healthcare provider about the risk of catching the flu and how it can be prevented, including the best vaccine option for them. And remember: Flu vaccination is a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for eligible beneficiaries.

the National Council on Aging is a respected leader and trusted partner to help people meet the challenges of aging. through innovative community programs and services, online help, and advocacy, they are a trusted voice and innovative problem-solver helping people navigate the challenges of aging in America. For more facts about flu prevention, click on www.ncoa.org.

16 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

Photo courtesy of National Council on Aging

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Special to Life After 50 by Robyn Miller-Tarnoff

Thinking About Going Golden? What You Should Know

To minimize the costs of living, with the added benefit of full-time support and friendship, “The Golden Girls Phenomenon” is on the rise with 50-plussers.

W

hile some may see it as a throwback to the hippies of the 1960s returning to the commune, there is now a formal term that has been pegged for the growing number of female 50-plussers who are rooming together. It is known as “The Golden Girls Phenomenon,” inspired by the popular NBC sitcom, “The Golden Girls,” which aired from 1985 to 1992. Cheesecake at midnight, with four forks, a bottle of wine, and a quartet of mature women discussing world events, old boyfriends, health issues and the latest gossip. That is a scenario reminiscent of a scene from “The Golden Girls,” the television show that has inspired what is becoming a new national lifestyle trend. Demographic data reveals that since the recession of 2008, shared living for mature adults is on the rise. In 2000, 820,000 households had single people ages 46 to 64 sharing with non-relatives, according to Bowling Green State University’s Center for Family and Demographic Research. By 2013, that number jumped to well over a million, and with the baby boomers retiring in droves, this number will continue to grow dramatically. If you are like many people over the age of 50 – especially women – you may be intrigued by the idea

18 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

of living with someone, but are concerned about how you and a new roommate will get along. “Being a good roommate is about being considerate and communicating in a mature manner,” notes Golden Girls Network founder Bonnie Moore. And she would know. Since 2008, the author of “How to Start a Golden Girls Home” (Bonnie Moore, 2015), has shared her fivebedroom home with four roommates. “Living with others at this stage has been more fun and rewarding than I ever imagined,” Moore says. “In addition to contributing rent, my roommates have become an important part of my life. We throw parties together, get to know one another’s friends, go to the gym together, and help each other out.” Moore acknowledges, however, that there are occasions when living together can prove tricky. She has had turnover, and the lessons learned from it became the basis for her book.

FINDING A GOLDEN ROOMIE Finding the right person to become housemates with is at the top of the list when you embark on the shared-living adventure. But who is right for you? How do you know? Moore recommends you

answer those questions by asking yourself: “Who am I?” and “What is important to me?” “When you know these answers,” Moore says, “you know who you are looking for!” Another good starting point, according to Moore, is to consider some common deal breakers. Is it okay if the new roommate smokes? Is it okay if he/she has a pet or a significant other? It’s also important to ask about cultural or lifestyle differences. “Diversity is great,” Moore says, “but sometimes you can happily live next door to someone, just not in the same house.” If there are significant differences in religious practices, eating habits, hobbies, political interests or working and sleeping hours between you and a potential roomie, these things must be taken into consideration. According to Moore: “Some of these things can be worked around, but others cannot.” “I love holiday decorations,” Moore says. “My house is filled with stuff for every holiday. I had a great housemate once — sweet, easy to get along with — but she belonged to a religion that didn’t celebrate the same holidays that I do. One day, I said something about getting out the Halloween decorations and her face went ashen. Within two weeks, she gave me notice she would be leaving based totally on her discomfort with the decorations.”


“I learned something important from this,” Moore explains. “During the initial interview with a prospective roommate, you need to ask about differences – big or small – that might cause issues or problems. As the homeowner, you have to know what is important to you and then talk about it. No one is ever right or wrong; it is just differences that need to be discussed.”

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS Differences in age can also be an issue. Moore recommends that you look for a roommate within 10 years of your age and don’t go beyond 20 years on either side. “With too much of an age difference, the nuances will frustrate you,” she says. Cleanliness matters when it comes to roommates, according to Moore. “Most people will keep a place in good shape,” she says. “Some people, however, really need things to be back in their places immediately, every spot wiped off the counter, and the floor swept daily. If this is you, find someone like you. If this is not you, same advice.” According to Moore, another aspect to explore is how in sync your personality is with that of a potential roommate. “Are you fairly assertive and outgoing?” she asks, “or are you quiet and bookish?”

TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS, BUT PUT IT IN WRITING Interviewing a potential roommate is a lot like a job interview. He or she will tell you what they believe you want to hear. It is your job to listen below the surface and hear danger signals. “It wasn’t long ago,” Moore recalls, “that I interviewed a recently retired woman who was very positive and cheerful and talked about all of her

activities and interests. We accepted her, and within a week we knew we were wrong. She had nothing to do with her time except complain, complain and complain. We were all too busy to pay attention to her. Within three months, she complained about us and moved.” According to Moore, it’s important to trust your intuition. “Selecting a good roommate takes patience, but it can be done. You also learn a great deal about yourself, and you learn to develop assertiveness.” Regardless of who you select, Moore recommends that you have a written house agreement and lease to fall back on. “Even if you decide to rent on a month-to-month basis, you need it in writing,” she counsels. “Don’t take anything for granted. Be positive and forthright in writing it, but put those details in writing!”

MAKE IT COMFORTABLE FOR EVERYONE The hardest part of living together is actually living together. What can you do to ensure that you are a good roommate? Sharing a space for the first time can be hard. Each roommate has his or her own personal items and routines. As a homeowner, do your best to make sure your new housemate feels at home. If you are a roommate, try not to tread too heavily on the homeowner’s toes. “I get lots of questions every time I do a presentation or teach a class,” Moore says. “For instance, someone once said that she didn’t want the roommate receiving mail at her home. What? It’s her home, too! Make her feel that way and she will be a great person to live with!”

Is The Golden Girl Lifestyle Right For You?

So you like the idea of shared living, but don’t know where to start? Bonnie Moore’s book “How to Start a Golden Girls Home” offers guidance on how to make your home attractive to roommates, questions you should ask in an interview, how to handle pets, boyfriends, and other tricky situations, as well as hundreds of other tips about 50-plus adults sharing living quarters. This book draws on the real-world experience of Moore – both in her own shared home and as the founder of Golden Girls Network, a website that helps adults find roommates. A retired management consultant, she came up with the idea for Golden Girls Network after a 2008 divorce left her living alone in a newly remodeled five-bedroom home. She searched for and found four roommates to fill the empty bedrooms and the group became fast friends. The experience was so positive that Moore embarked on a new career dedicated to helping adults ease their way into shared living. Moore’s book also offers sample applications, leases, and other practical resources for home owners and potential roommates. “How to Start a Golden Girls Home” is available at www.Amazon.com for $14.99 in paperback or $9.99 in Kindle format. To learn more about Golden Girls Network, click on www. goldengirlsnetwork.com.

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Parting With Possessions – Prudently And Professionally

Special to Life After 50 by Joe Baratta of Abell Auction Company

Liquidating the assets of an estate can be overwhelming. That is why professional guidance is vitally important.

T

he liquidation of an estate can be a difficult and emotional process. Along with the monetary value of furnishings, antiques, art, China, jewelry and other items, the contents of a home can include sentimental treasures that hold a lifetime or even generations of memories. While sentiment should always be taken into consideration, honored, and handled personally through the agreement of family members or professionally through the direction of a will or trust, it is equally important to prudently handle the disposition of items that are to be sold. Whether one is personally disposing of their own items to downsize and move to a smaller dwelling or liquidating the estate of a loved one that has died, this task must be handled with pragmatic prudence, knowledgeable understanding and professional verification of each item’s intrinsic or current market value. For those who find themselves in the position of liquidating an estate, an understanding of just how to begin the process can be overwhelming. That is why, as with making funeral arrangements, handling legal affairs or buying or selling real property, professional guidance is vitally important.

AN AUCTION HOUSE AT YOUR SERVICE A well-advertised estate auction conducted by a reputable firm is the best choice for family members, executors, trustees or attorneys to execute a liquidation, connect sellers with buyers and realize 22 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

the proper profits. An auction house is a bonded business subject to all local and state laws and taxation. They conduct their sales in an open and transparent fashion with accredited appraisals and a detailed accounting that will be accepted by any court and/or the Internal Revenue Service. According to the National Auctioneers Association, over a quarter-trillion dollars in goods and services are sold at auction every year in the U.S. With live and online bidding platforms, auctions attract attentive buyers from every corner of the globe who enjoy the excitement of aggressively competing to acquire items. “There are few options for liquidating the contents of a property,” says Don Schireson, CEO of Abell Auction Company, a Los Angelesbased, centuryold auction house.

“A well-advertised auction with a reputable firm is the easiest and most cost-effective way to find a place for personal belongings. By selling at auction, rather than hosting a house sale, items are exposed to a larger and better-informed audience, which leads to higher prices from competitive bidding.” Many people believe the terms “estate sale” and “estate auction” are interchangeable, however, there are significant differences. There are many stories about bargain


hunters who purchase an item at a yard sale for a few dollars, only to discover that it is worth hundreds or thousands of dollars. While this type of mistake can easily happen at an estate sale, it is very unlikely to happen at an estate auction.

AUCTIONS ATTRACT AN INTERNATIONAL AUDIENCE At public auction, personal property is marketed to a global audience of consumers who participate in a competitive process by placing bids in-person, online or via telephone. Prices are negotiated upward, delivering fair market value or higher to the seller. Most auction houses will set times for exhibition, allowing potential buyers to examine and preview items prior to sale. Estate auctions and sales are both used to dispose of property owned by someone who is either moving out of a home or deceased. However, estate sales usually take place over a weekend, which limits the event to neighbors and friends rather than educated buyers. At an estate sale, the early bird gets the worm. Since consumers who arrive first get their choice of merchandise, items often sell at lower than market value. In addition, valuable items are often priced too low or misidentified by individuals who lack experience dealing with furnishings, fine art, jewelry, antiques, collectibles and other valuable items.

AUCTIONS ARE OPERATED BY PROS Reputable auction companies are licensed or bonded and follow a strict code of ethics. Professional auctioneers have years of experience and an extensive educational background in the industry, and they come equipped with a full team of specialists to handle every need. “We provide tailored and complete services to those who choose to sell their personal property through Abell,” Schireson says. “Our staff includes accredited appraisers, jewelry and gem experts, and even translators to assist our international clients.” Estate sales are often operated by representatives who are eager to accept the first offer, collect a large commission and even augment the sale with their own items. Many are resale dealers who bring a certain level of expertise, but have a conflict of interest in setting prices. For example, a dealer may quietly sell merchandise to friends or associates at reduced prices so they can realize their true value elsewhere.

AUCTIONS ARE PREFERRED BT FIDUCIARIES Auction transactions are open and transparent, with accredited appraisals and a detailed accounting accepted by all courts and the IRS. Competitive bidding by educated buyers achieves the highest price. For these reasons, they are generally the preferred method of liquidating assets. While an auction house is an established place of business, estate sale operators are not regulated by any state or local entity. The sales process is closed to the both buyer and seller, and no record keeping is required.

“Unlike estate sales where strangers enter your home, [an auction house] professionally removes all contents and delivers them to [a] secure auction gallery where they are carefully inventoried and catalogued,” says Schireson. “At Abell, we hold our clients and their privacy in the highest regard. We also carry all insurance, so there are no worries about liability issues.”

AUCTIONS ARE WELL-MARKETED An established auction company knows that exposing valuable assets to a wider audience leads to higher returns. Knowing that, they expend great effort marketing assets through a combination of strategies, including both print and digital media. Consumers, ranging from individuals to private collectors and dealers, have the opportunity to preview items days or weeks in advance. Conversely, most estate sale companies perform limited advertising, marketing valuable assets only to the area surrounding the home. At the end of the day, leftover items are usually discarded, donated to charity or sold at bulk prices without proper appraisals.

THE ABELL AUCTION COMPANY Los Angeles’ first permanent auction house, Abell Auction Company handles fine estates and collections. Still family-operated, this 100-yearold company holds weekly and quarterly auctions drawing an international audience of in-person and online buyers. Abell’s weekly general auctions are held for private buyers, collectors, decorators, dealers and designers on Thursdays at 9 a.m. Their catalogued fine art and antique auctions are held quarterly, attracting live and international bidders who compete for record prices. Entrusted with estates and consignments throughout Southern California since 1916, Abell Auction Company’s gallery is located at 2613 Yates. Avenue in Los Angeles. For more information, call (310) 858-3073 or click on www.abell.com.

are heavily promoted through professionally designed direct mail, targeted print and online Many times, individuals who are liquidating an estate advertisements, and postings on affiliate websites,” says Schireson. “Located in Los Angeles, the face difficult circumstances and have limited time. nation’s second largest market, our sales draw It’s important to select an auction house that will serious collectors from around the world.” professionally handle the entire contents of a home, While the process of liquidating an estate can ranging from everyday household items and personal seem overwhelming at first, a well-advertised items to high-end antiques and collections. auction with a professional auction house is the Once you’ve selected a reputable auction optimal and most cost-effective choice. The right company, a specialist will meet with you to preview company will handle every detail with sensitivity, your estate, discuss your desires, and answer questions about the auction process and the property privacy and professionalism, while serving the seller’s best interests. being sold. Estimates of higher-end items will be provided based on the current market and past Joe Baratta is the vice president of business auction records. development at Abell Auction Company in When it comes to the terms of sale, consignors Los Angeles that was founded in 1916. are required to pay the auction house a commission or sellers fee. This percentage should be significantly lower than what is charged by an estate sale company, especially on higher-end items. “Individuals should select an auction house that is committed to handling your estate professionally, with the highest levels of integrity and transparency, and without charging extra hidden fees,” Schireson advises. “For example, we do not charge extra fees for photography or insurance.” After a seller’s agreement is signed, the auction company will quickly and professionally remove personal belongings from the home. This can usually be accomplished in one day. After being delivered to the auction gallery, items will be inventoried and catalogued. Soon after the auction, the seller will receive payment and an itemized settlement for estate-related purposes. Finally, a top auction house recognizes marketing as an important step in the process of connecting the right buyers with the right sellers. “Our auctions

UNDERSTANDING THE PROCESS

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 23


Photo courtesy of Donny Most

Donny Most

The actor who played Ralph Malph on “Happy Days” is now most happy performing on the stages of jazz and supper clubs By David Laurell

F

or those who grew up watching “Happy Days,” the popular ABC sitcom that ran for a decade beginning in the mid-1970s, the character of Ralph Malph conjures up a girl- and car-crazed jokester who, in spite of his jokes usually falling flat, never missed the chance to remind people: “I still got it!” The character of Ralph was brought to life by Donny Most, a Brooklyn-born actor who, at the age of nine, decided to pursue a career in show business after seeing the 1946 biopic, “The Jolson Story,” based on the life of Al Jolson, the singer, actor and comedian who dominated American entertainment in the first half of the 20th century. “That film had a very strong impact on me,” says Most who turned 62 this past August. “I became a huge Jolson fan. None of my friends had any idea who he was, but I was obsessed with him. I bought Jolson albums and would learn the songs and sing along to them. Then, when I was 13, at my bar

24 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

mitzvah, I got up and sang a few Jolson songs with the band and pretty much surprised the hell out of everybody.” Encouraged by many of those bar mitzvah attendees to do what he secretly hoped to do – pursue a career as a singer – Most finally mustered up the courage to discuss the idea with his parents. “No one in my family was in show business, so I was kind of embarrassed to really express my interest in that,” Most recalls. “But my parents understood it was what I wanted to do and they found a school in Manhattan that catered to young kids who were interested in singing and acting.”

SINGING AND SWINGING IN THE CATSKILLS Finding his niche as a singer during the first nine months of his training, Most was tapped for his first professional performance in 1968.

“The man who ran that school would pick certain kids to be a part of a professional troupe that performed in the Catskill Mountains during the summer, and in 1968, he picked me to be a part of the group,” Most says. “I was kind of a curiosity with my friends because of that. We were in a time of all this incredible music – The Beatles – all the emerging styles from rock to folk and blues and jazz. It was a fervent time for music. And yet, while I loved what was going on, I always felt my heart and soul was in Bobby Darin and Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cloe, Tony Bennett, Dean Martin and the Great American Songbook. That made me an anomaly and most of my friends thought I was sort of weird because I was into that kind of music.” Following his summer of performing in the Catskills, Most sat down with his father and expressed his desire to seriously pursue a career in entertainment. “He was very supportive and we found a really good acting coach and through


Photo courtesy of Bill Dow

her, I got an agent and a manager,” Most remembers. “Then I started going on auditions and getting work in commercials.”

THE PATH TO “HAPPY DAYS”

THE POST “HAPPY DAYS” DAYS When the curtain fell on “Happy Days” in 1984, Most continued to work. In addition to the 1999 feature film “EDtv,” 2005’s “Planting Melvin,” and “The Great Buck Howard,” which was released in 2008, he made guest appearances on “CHiPs,” “Baywatch,” “The Love Boat,” “Star Trek: Voyager,” “Diagnosis: Murder” and “Glee.” Most also carved out a niche as a voice actor on several animated productions.

BACK WITH HIS FIRST LOVE Today, along with acting and directing, mostly in independent film projects, Most has returned to his first love – singing the swinging standards. While his show, “Donny Most Sings and Swings,” may attract audiences who come because they remember him from “Happy Days,” they leave with a very different impression.

BUMMED BUT BELIEVING

“People are really surprised when they come to the show,” Most reasons. “They know me as an actor, but not as a singer. I’ve had people tell me they have been blown away, because in their minds, I’m Ralph from ‘Happy Days,’ not a guy in front of a big band doing jazz standards from the Great American Songbook and arrangements by Billy May and Nelson Riddle. I do Darin songs, not his rock ‘n’ roll stuff, but his standards and swing stuff, which he did as well as anyone. I also do Sinatra and Count Basie, Joe Williams and Tony Bennett and some less-recognizable blues and swing-era stuff.” Now a part of the grand tradition and class of Brooklyn-born music-makers, whose short list includes George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, Marvin Hamlisch, Neil Diamond and Barbra Streisand, Most shrugs when asked why he thinks his hometown borough has produced so many legendary entertainers. “It’s a great question,” he says. “I think maybe it has something to do with the fact that Brooklyn has always been a melting pot made up of immigrants from different countries who have brought about a vibrancy and a spirit.”

Photob By Hayley Sparks

Matriculating at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, Most found himself returning to New York for auditions on a regular basis. “I was still getting some work while I was in college and then, after my junior year, I went out to Los Angeles,” he explains. “My plan was just to go out for the summer, but while I was there, I started going on auditions and getting work on various television shows. That was when I had a meeting with my agent and my manager who felt that, because I was doing well, I should take time off from school and keep the momentum going. That was what eventually led to the ‘Happy Days’ interview and audition and screen test. And the rest – everyone knows.” Cast as Ralph on “Happy Days,” Most says he looked to numerous people he had known growing up to form the character’s persona. “There was very little of me in Ralph,” Most laughs. “He was maybe 10 percent me. Ninety percent of Ralph was people I had known back in Brooklyn – friends and the class comedians. Then, as time went by, the character evolved and the writers picked up on what I was doing. When the show first began, Ralph was just a peripheral character – kind of a wise guy who was into girls and cars. But as he evolved, he became a jokester. I would say he ultimately became a lot like Jerry Paris, who had been a comedic actor and was one of the show’s directors.”

While Most’s own vibrancy and spirit is clearly evident when he takes to the stage of jazz and supper clubs, he is acutely aware that it is the work he did over 30 years ago that still greatly resonates with his audiences. “I am so thankful for the people who come up to me and tell me how much ‘Happy Days’ has meant to them,” he says. “I’ve had people even get emotional telling me how watching that show helped them get through difficult times and how they thought of all of us – Ron [Howard], and Henry [Winkler], and Anson [Williams] – as a part of their family. I always feel so blessed and thankful when that happens. I am so grateful to have been a part of a show that had such a powerful impact.”

When not working, Most, an avid golfer, and his wife, Morgan, who loves tournament poker, enjoy spending time with their two children. Questioned about his thoughts on the passage of years, he rolls his eyes and says he isn’t the right person to come to for inspiring wisdom. “I’m no wise sage when it comes to offering any great philosophy about aging,” he laughs. “I have no inspirational thoughts or advice on the subject whatsoever. All I know is that every time I get ready to play golf, I have to take three Advils, because my back is really hurting and when I’m finished playing, my muscles don’t recuperate as quickly as they once did. So lately, I’ve been kind of bummed out about getting older. All I can say is, I’m really trying to watch my daily routine as far as getting exercise and eating right. I am a big believer in that. Getting exercise and eating right is so important, for everyone of every age, but so much more so as we get older. There are so many things I want to do over the next 25 years or more, and I know the only way I can do them is to stay healthy by taking care of myself. So that’s my advice: exercise, eat well and take care of yourself.” For more information on Donny Most and his upcoming show schedule, click on www.Donmost.net.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 25


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The Player – New Series, NBC –

Premieres Thursday September 24 at 10 p.m.

This new one hour series is a high-octane thriller about a former intelligence officer, played by Wesley Snipes, who, while working as a security expert for the wealthy, is wrongly accused of the brutal murder of his wife. A syndicate of powerful people offers him freedom in exchange for stopping high-stakes crimes, as he continues to avenge his wife’s death and uncover the game-like conspiracy among his mysterious employers. He eventually realizes he’s a player in a long-standing tradition where the rich and powerful bet on the ultimate “game” – crime in our world.

Masterpiece: Indian Summers –

New Miniseries, PBS – Premieres Sunday September 27 at 9 p.m. (check local listings)

Julie Walters stars as the glamorous doyenne of an English social club in the twilight era of British rule in India. Set in a subtropical paradise, this nine-part series explores the collision of the high-living English ruling class with the local people agitating for Indian independence. As the drama unfolds, the two sides alternately clash and merge in an intricate game of power, politics and passion.

The Grinder- New Series, Fox - Premieres Tuesday September 29 at 8:30 p.m.

Tuned In To What’s On

How many television lawyers does it take to try a real-life case in a real-life courtroom? “The Grinder” is a new comedy about a famous television lawyer at a crossroads. When his legal series ends, he decides to move back home and join his family’s real law firm - despite having no formal education, no bar certification, no license to practice and no experience in an actual courtroom. Dean Sanderson, played by Rob Lowe, spent eight seasons playing the title role on the hit legal drama “The Grinder.” Now he’s moving back to his hometown of Boise, Idaho, where his brother, Stewart, portrayed by Fred Savage, is a real-life attorney who is poised to take over the family law firm. It doesn’t take long for Dean to start injecting his show-biz drama into every aspect of Stewart’s life, both in the courtroom and at home.

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KAISER PERMANENTE MEDICARE HEALTH PLANS

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The Hallowed Hall of Must-Knowtables By David Laurell Illustration by Mark Hammermeister

Frank Lloyd

Wright

Recognized by the American Institute of Architects as “the greatest American architect of all time,” Frank Lloyd Wright designed homes, office buildings, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels and, perhaps most notably, New York’s Guggenheim Museum. A flamboyant and colorful character with extravagant tastes that outweighed his financial means, Wright believed structures should work in harmony with humanity and environment, a philosophy he called “organic architecture.”

B

orn Frank Lincoln Wright in Richland Center, Wisconsin in 1867, Wright changed his middle name from Lincoln to Lloyd in honor of his mother’s family name when he was a teenager. Because there was no evidence he actually graduated from Madison High School, Wright was admitted to the University of Wisconsin–Madison as a special student who studied civil engineering in 1886. After completing two semesters of college, he left school for Chicago where he was first hired as a draftsman and then went on to work as an architect for various prestigious firms. Wright, who never had a head for managing money, was constantly falling into financial turmoil due to his proclivity to live far beyond his means and feed his extravagant appetite for Japanese art, custom cars, expensive clothing, and all the finer things of life. In order to dig his way out of debt and continue his lavish lifestyle, Wright supplemented his income by doing independent commissioned work. While this may have helped to solve one problem, it caused another, because he found himself in breach of contract with his firm by doing outside work.

Deciding that working for someone other than himself was holding him back, Wright established his own firm in downtown Chicago and, in 1898, relocated his business into his Oak Park home. During the dawn of the 1900s, Wright designed and built houses that became known as “prairie style” homes, so-called because their designs complemented the surrounding environment. These designs, which featured extended low structures with shallow, sloping roofs, suppressed chimneys, overhangs and terraces made of unfinished materials, also ushered in the architectural concept of the “open plan.” By 1903, Wright, then a husband and father, had gained a reputation as a flirtatious and flamboyant man-about-town. He was blatant about his romantic dalliances, especially with Mamah Cheney, a woman with an artistic flair who embraced the early tenets of feminism, and who was also the wife of one of his clients. Mamah and Wright openly carried on their affair, which was known to both of their spouses, neither of whom would grant their cheating partners a divorce, and

This feature is intended for you to clip and give to your children or grandchildren because…they must-know! 28 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015


in 1909, the couple ventured to Europe together. During this time, Wright produced * a portfolio that included more than 100 lithographs of his designs, which was published by Berlin publisher Ernst Wasmuth in two editions. * Wright remained in Europe for the better part of a year setting up home with Mamah in Italy. During this time, Edwin Cheney granted Mamah a divorce, though Wright’s wife, Kitty, still refused to grant one to her husband. After Wright’s return to the United States in October of 1910, he persuaded his mother to purchase a large piece of property in Spring Green, Wisconsin adjacent to land that had been in her family for many years. It was there that Wright built himself an estate he named “Taliesin,” after the poet, magician and priest of Welsh mythology. On August 15, 1914, while Wright was away working on a project, one of his household employees, Julian Carlton, set fire to Taliesin. As the fire raged through the home’s living quarters, Carlton proceeded to run through the house and property with an axe killing seven people including Mamah, her two children by a previous marriage, three other Wright employees and one of their children. Immediately after the violent attacks, Carlton tried unsuccessfully to commit suicide, although he succumbed to starvation in prison shortly thereafter. In 1922, Kitty finally granted Wright a divorce. The following year, he married an artist, Maude “Miriam” Noel. The marriage of Wright and Mariam lasted only four years and he went on to marry Olga Ivanovna “Olgivanna” Lazovich Milanoff, a dancer and writer he met at a Petrograd Ballet performance in Chicago. On the work front, the 1920s saw Wright design a number of California homes using precast “textile” concrete blocks. During the later 1920s and 1930s, his organic style had fully matured with his design of the Graycliff estate just south of Buffalo, New York, and one of his most famous creations, Fallingwater, which has been called “the best all-time work of American architecture.” Fallingwater, a private residence at Mill Run in Western Pennsylvania that was completed in 1937, was designed with a stream running under part of the building and was constructed over a 30-foot waterfall in accordance with Wright’s desire to place the structure within its natural surroundings. During this time, he also designed and built Taliesin West, a winter home and studio complex in Scottsdale, Arizona. Having taken to designing his own clothing and accessories, Wright became a sartorial eccentric adorned in expensive suits, fancy ascots and cravats, porkpie hats and silk capes that flew in the breeze as he traveled in his yellow Mercer Raceabout, orange Cord convertible, and customized cherry-red Lincoln Continental. In 1959, Wright suffered an intestinal blockage. Surgery to correct the medical emergency failed and Wright died at the age of 91 in Phoenix, Arizona. His body was returned to his Wisconsin estate where, after a funeral service, a horse-drawn wagon carried his remains from Unity Chapel to a Wright family plot where his mother and Mamah, along with her two children, were interred. Wright’s “final resting place” would prove to be less than final. When Olgivanna died in 1985, it was revealed that her dying wish was that Wright’s body be disinterred, cremated and his ashes comingled with hers for burial at Taliesin West. Against an uproar by many Wright family members as well as the Wisconsin legislature, the legendary architect’s body was finally removed from his grave under the direction of the Taliesin Fellowship, cremated and sent to Scottsdale. There, his ashes were, reportedly, divided with a portion mixed with Olivanna’s and interred in a memorial garden at Taliesin West, while the remaining portion was spread over the Arizona desert. This action, compounded by the fact that his original gravesite in Wisconsin, though empty, is still marked with his headstone, continues to cause some confusion as to where Wright is actually buried.

“Frank Lloyd Wright: Complete Works, Vol. 2, 1917-1942” by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer (Taschen America; Box Mul edition, 2010) “Frank Lloyd Wright: A Biography” by Meryle Secrest (University Of Chicago Press, 1998)

LEARN MORE While there are numerous books available about Frank Lloyd Wright, three of the essentials are: * “Frank Lloyd Wright: An Autobiography” (Pomegranate Communications, 2005)

Mark Hammermeister is an award-winning artist. His work is available for purchase at www.markdraws.com September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 29


SoCal’s Premier Lifestyle, Health and Active Aging Expo Series!

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Saturday, September 19th 2015 10am-3pm Veterans Memorial Complex 4117 Overland Avenue Culver City, CA 90230

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Golden Future Expos Presents….The 5th Annual Southern California Baby Boomer & Senior Expo Series!

●80+ Vendor Booths ●Resume Review

●Beauty/Hair Makeovers ●Health Screenings ●Mini Job/Volunteer Fair ●Live Entertainment ●Lifestyle Workshops ●Chair Massages ●Engaging Speakers ●And Much More!! All Events Offer FREE Admission & Parking! For More Information & To Pre-Register: www.GoldenFutureSeniorExpo.com. You Can Also Register At The Door. (Info: 818-763-4197)

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Let’S Get OUt A Preview of Upcoming Events for September/October By Claire Yezbak Fadden

eNteRtAINMeNt TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 THESE PAPER BULLETS! Meet the Quartos. Ben, Claude, Balth, and Pedro. Their fans worship them. Scotland Yard fears them. And their former drummer will stop at nothing to destroy them. Can these fab four from Liverpool find true love in London and cut an album in seven nights? Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles. Also Oct. 18. $39-$74 (310) 208-5454. geffenplayhouse.com. REAL WOMAN HAVE CURVES Set in a tiny sewing factory in East L.A., this is the story of five full-figured women racing to meet an impossible deadline to keep their tiny factory from going under. The Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave. Pasadena. Tues.-Sun. through Oct. 4. $47-$87. (626) 356-7529. pasadenaplayhouse.org. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY A vanished father. A pill-popping mother. Three sisters harboring shady little secrets. When the large Weston family unexpectedly reunites after dad disappears, their Oklahoman family homestead explodes in a maelstrom of repressed truths and unsettling secrets. Will Geer’s Theatricum Botanicum, 1419 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga. Dates vary through Sept. 27. $10-$40. (310) 455-3723. theatricum.com. GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS First Baptist Church of Glendale, 209 N. Louise St., Glendale. Free. (818) 242-2113. glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com.

LA/Ventura

September/October 2015

Do You Love,” “I Drink Alone,” “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer,” “Move It On Over” and “Bad To The Bone.” Saban Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. $48-$874. (888) 645-5006. sabantheatre.org. A FLEA IN HER EAR Very strange bedfellows rub shoulders – and more – at the Hotel Coq d’Or in the work that is thought to be Feydeau’s comic masterpiece. Based on older French farces, the demimonde and their caprices are exposed in this entertaining romp. A Noise Within, 3352 East Foothill Blvd., Pasadena. Through Nov.22. Prices vary. (626) 356-3100. anoisewithin.org. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 RAVENSCROFT On a snowy night in rural England in the early 1900s, Inspector Ruffing is called to a remote country estate to investigate a murder. He subsequently becomes involved in the lives of five intriguing and dangerous women. As everyone’s secrets and desires are revealed, Ruffing is bewildered, amused, and frightened as he is led to a dark encounter with the truth. Kentwood Players, Westchester Playhouse, 8301 Hindry Ave., Westchester. Weekends through Oct. 17. $20-$25. (310) 645-5156. kentwoodplayers.org. AS YOU LIKE IT Rosalind, daughter of a banished duke, is forced to flee the court and enter the Forest of Arden when her uncle, usurper of his brother’s estate, threatens to have her killed. Will Geer’s Theatricum Botanicum, 1419 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga. Performances vary through Sept. 26. $10-$40. (310) 455-3723. theatricum.com.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 GEORGE THOROGOOD Appearing with his longtime band, The Destroyers– Jeff Simon (drums, percussion), Bill Blough (bass guitar), Jim Suhler (rhythm guitar) and Buddy Leach (saxophone) Thorogood’s catalog of classics includes “Who

THE PRINCES OF KINGS ROAD Inspired by a true incident, playwright Tom Lazarus imagines a 1953 reunion between iconic L.A. architects Richard Neutra and Rudolph Schindler — longtime friends and partners who have been estranged for 23 years — when they find themselves thrown together in a shared room at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital. Ensemble Studio Theatre/LA, 2379 Glendale Blvd., Silverlake. Fri.-Sun. through Oct. 4. $25. (323) 6417747. www.ThePrincesofKingsRoad.com” theprinceofkingsroad.com.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

PORT OF LOS ANGELES LOBSTER FESTIVAL

Come to the world’s largest lobster festival featuring Maine lobster meals flown in fresh daily and cooked at this scenic outdoor park along Los Angeles’ historic waterfront. Enjoy dancing, street performers, a pirate camp, tall ships, shopping for arts and crafts and musical performances. Ports O’ Call Village, 1200 Nagoya Way, San Pedro. Through Sept. 27. lobsterfest.com. lawaterfront.org.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD In a small Southern town during the depression, the idyllic childhood of eight-year old Scout and her brother, Jem, is changed forever when their lawyer-father defends a poor black man accused of raping a white girl. Through the drama of the trial and its aftermath, the children experience the harsh realities of prejudice that surround them. Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum, 1419 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga. Performances vary through Sept. 27. $10-$40. (310) 455-3723. theatricum.com.

THE BEST OF ENEMIES Meet Ann, an African-American civil rights activist, and the Exalted Cyclops of the Ku Klux Klan. They are forced by the federal government to work together to achieve integration in their small North Carolina town 15 years after Brown v. Board of Education. Clearly, they will never be friends, but over the course of time they discover things they have in common, and ultimately forge an alliance based on respect and trust. The Colony Theatre is located at 555 North Third St., Burbank. Through Oct. 18. Prices vary. (818) 558-7000. colonytheatre.org.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Shakespeare conjures a world of wonder, magic and romance where comical misunderstandings and the pain of unrequited love are resolved, and all is reconciled through midsummer night revelries and the enduring power of nature. Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum, 1419 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga. Performances vary through Sept. 25. $10-$40. (310) 455-3723. theatricum.com. A NEW LOOK FOR LA WALK Landscape designer Cassy Aoyagi of Form LA Landscaping discusses her vision and aesthetic for a new Los Angeles landscape where drought is the norm. Descanso Gardens, 1418 Descanso Dr., La Cañada Flintridge. $6-$9. (818) 949-4200. descansogardens.org.

CAFÉ SOCIETY All bets are off when five self-absorbed customers find themselves trapped in a Los Angeles Starbucks. Emmy Award-winning writer Peter Lefcourt’s outrageous comedy takes an irreverent glimpse at our obsession with social media and the way we connect in today’s world. Odyssey Theatre, 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. Weekends through Oct. 11. $25-$30. (323) 960-7712. plays411.com/society. GREEN GROW THE LILACS The courtship between a rancher and his gal is threatened by a menacing farmhand and turns violent, jeopardizing the young lovers’ future. Will Geer’s Theatricum Botanicum, 1419 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 31


CALeNDAR Through Sept. 26. $10-$40. (310) 455-3723. theatricum.com. WESTERN MUSIC ASSOCIATION SHOWCASE Musicians and cowboy poets perform stories and songs of the romantic days of the Old West, contemporary music of the American West and songs of the open range and the American cowboy. The Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Griffith Park, Los Angeles. $6-$10. (323) 667-2000. theautry. org.

September/October 2015 LA/Ventura incorporates live music, song and lyrical storytelling. 24th Street Theatre, 1117 West 24th St., Los Angeles. Weekends through Nov. 15. $10-$24. (213) 745-6516. 24thstreet.org.

VICKI LAWRENCE AND MAMA, A TWO WOMAN SHOW The multi-talented comedienne is, perhaps, best known for her stint on “The Carol Burnett Show.” After the Burnett show ended, Lawrence went on to star in her own TV series, “Mama’s Family.” Saban Theatre, 8440 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills. $38-$58. (888) 645-5006. sabantheatre.org.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 VENTURA BLUEGRASS JAMS Milano’s Italian Restaurant, Patio, Ventura Harbor Village, 1559 Spinnaker Dr., Ventura. (805) 658-0388. milanositalianrestaurant.com. WEDNESDAY, SEPTMEBER 23

THE SOUND OF MUSIC A brand new, lavish production of one of the world’s most popular musicals the romantic and beloved musical story of Maria and the von Trapp family features such songs as “My Favorite Things,” “DoRe-Mi,” “Climb Ev’ry Mountain,” “Edelweiss” and the title song. Center Theatre Group/ Ahmanson Theatre at the Music Center, 135 N. Grand Ave., Los Angeles. Dates vary through Oct. 31. $25-$130. (213) 972-4400. centertheatregroup.org. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 LATINO HERITAGE CELEBRATION WEEKEND Among the festivities designed to highlight the diversity of Latin American cultures and animals native to the Americas include crafts, keeper close-ups and live performances including traditional music and dance. The Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens, Griffith Park, 5333 Zoo Dr., Los Angeles. Also Sept. 27. $20. (323) 644-6042. lazoo.org. AWAKE AND SING! Gritty, passionate, funny and heartbreaking, Odets’ masterpiece beautifully captures the hopes and the struggles of a lower-middleclass, three-generation Jewish family living in a Bronx apartment during the Great Depression. Starring Marilyn Fox and directed by Elina DeSantos. Odyssey Theatre, 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. Dates vary through Nov. 29. $34. (310) 477-2055 x2. www.OdysseyTheatre.com” odysseytheatre.com. MAN COVETS BIRD Finegan Kruckemeyer’s internationally acclaimed tale of friendship and optimism

32 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

forms. Peruse a wide range of vendors of paper, ink and graphic arts, rare books, printing presses and equipment on sale. Vendors items include book arts, letterpress printing, paper, printmaking, handmade announcements and invitations, posters, limited edition books and more. Printing demonstrations and tours. International Printing Museum, 315 Torrance Blvd., Carson. $10. (310) 515-7166. printmuseum.org.

THE ISLEY BROTHERS A musical institution, the Isley Brothers shook up multiple musical genres from funk to soul and R and B to rock. With a broad spectrum of hits including “Love the One You’re With,” “This Old Heart of Mine,” “It’s Your Thing” and Shout,– the band clinched a spot in the Vocal Group Hall of Fame and Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame. Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Drive, Cerritos. Prices vary. $58-$82. (562) 467-8818. cerritoscenter.com.

LOS ANGELES PRINTERS FAIR A showcase of the art of letterpress printing and paper in historical and contemporary

OCTOBER THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1 THE MONEY FISH Sometimes you have to journey to the end of the world to find yourself. From Army Airborne Ranger to Dutch Harbor, Alaska fisherman, John Cox learned the hard way that what you want in life isn’t always what you need. Hudson Theatre, 6539 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles. Thurs.-Sun. through Nov. 21. $20. (323) 960-7780. coxtheshow.com. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 VENTURA HARVEST FESTIVAL Hundreds of artisans showcasing more than 24,000 handcrafted originals, stage entertainment, a Kidzone, strolling performers, contests, a pumpkin patch, specialty foods, and more. Ventura County Fairgrounds, Seaside Park, 10 W. Harbor Rd., Ventura. Also Oct. 3-4. $4-$9. (800) 346-1212. harvestfestival.com. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3 THE PAINTED ROCKS AT REVOLVER CREEK Aging farm laborer Nukain has spent his life transforming the rocks at Revolver Creek into a vibrant garden of painted flowers. Now, the final unpainted rock, as well as his young companion Bokkie, has forced Nukain to confront his legacy as a painter, a person and a black man in 1980s South Africa. The Fountain Theatre, 5060 Fountain Ave., Los Angeles. Sat.-Mon. through Dec. 19. $15–$35. (323) 663-1525. fountaintheatre.com.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26

VENTURA COUNTY FARM DAY

Visit and tour over 20 working farms in Ventura County. This free, multi-location and self-guided event features unique tours, hands-on activities, educational demonstrations and an artisanal farmers market that will showcase the farmers and farm lands that produce foods and goods such as lemons, strawberries, tomatoes, onions, avocados, olives and goat milk soap After the tour, enjoy a rustic outdoor barbecue with entertainment by Todd Hannigan, a kiss-the-farmer photo booth, tractor rides, gourmet salads, craft beers and small batch wines. Limoneira Farm, 1141 Cummings Rd., Santa Paula. Farm tour, free. Barbecue ticket, $35. venturacountyfarmday.com.


CALeNDAR

September/October 2015 LA/Ventura SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4 FREE FIRST SUNDAY Free admission to the Museum of Ventura County including its galleries and any special events. Museum of Ventura County, 100 East Main St., Ventura. First Sunday of each month. (805) 653-0323. venturamuseum.org. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6 VENTURA BLUEGRASS JAMS Milano’s Italian Restaurant, Patio, Ventura Harbor Village, 1559 Spinnaker Dr., Ventura. (805) 658-0388. milanositalianrestaurant.com. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7 GLENDALE NOON CONCERTS First Baptist Church of Glendale, 209 N. Louise St., Glendale. Free. (818) 242-2113. glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8 DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES ART WALK This self-guided, public art walk brings art lovers and community friends together in downtown Los Angeles. 411 S. Main St., between Second and Ninth Streets, Los Angeles. Free. downtownartwalk.org. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11 SECOND SUNDAY CONCERT Pasadena Central Library, 285 E Walnut, Pasadena. Free. (626) 398-0658. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14 SONDHEIM ON SONDHEIM His story. His inspiration. His genius. Sondheim on Sondheim is an intimate portrait of the famed songwriter in his own words … and music. The carefully selected songs blend beautifully with video interviews to shine new light on Sondheim’s childhood, his relationship with Oscar Hammerstein, his personal demons and professional triumphs. International City Theatre, Long Beach Performing Arts Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. Thurs.-Sun. through Nov. 8. $46-$48. (562) 436-4610. internationalcitytheatre.org. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15 UNCLE VANYA Vanya and his niece, Sonya, have toiled for years to maintain the crumbling family estate. When Sonya’s father, the retired Professor Serebryakov, returns with his dazzling, much younger wife, old resentments explode and secret longings come to light. The Antaeus Company, 5112 Lankershim Blvd., North Hollywood. Thurs.-Sun. through Dec. 6. $30$34. (818) 506-1983. antaeus.org.

eXHIBItIONS RAVI SHANKAR: A LIFE IN MUSIC This display features a collection of sitars played by Shankar throughout his life and career; performance attire, including outfits worn at Woodstock in 1969 and the Concert

for Bangladesh, rare photographs from the Shankar family collection as well as original correspondences, writings and music. The Grammy Museum at L.A. Live, Fourth Floor, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. Through Spring 2016. $12-$13. (213) 765-6803. grammymuseum.org. BILL GRAHAM AND THE ROCK ‘N’ ROLL REVOLUTION Concert promoter Bill Graham (1931–1991), launched the careers of countless iconic acts in the 1960s at his famed Fillmore Auditorium including the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane and Janis Joplin. He also broke ground conceiving of rock ‘n’ roll as a force for humanitarian causes, spearheading benefit concerts such as Live Aid (1985) and Human Rights Now! (1988). To chronicle Graham’s impact on American popular culture, more than 400 objects have been gathered, including Jerry Garcia’s “Wolf” guitar, and Janis Joplin’s tambourine and microphone used during a Fillmore East show. Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Los Angeles. Through Oct. 11. $7-$10. (310) 440-4500. skirball.org. LEGENDS OF MOTOWN: CELEBRATING THE SUPREMES Founded as the Primettes, the Supremes became Motown’s most consistent hit makers and the most popular female group of the ‘60s. The polished singing style of original members Mary Wilson, Diana Ross and Florence Ballard bridged the worlds of pop and soul. On display are rare photographs from the personal collection of Mary Wilson, concert posters, tour books, fan memorabilia and an assortment of performance gowns, including the Turquoise Freeze dresses worn during a 1967 appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show.” The Grammy Museum at L.A. Live, Third Floor, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. Through Spring 2016. $12-$13. (213) 765-6803. grammymuseum.org. JELLIES Delve into the mysterious world of sea jellies through this new exhibition. Often referred to as “jellyfish,” sea jellies are actually invertebrates or animals without backbones. Explore the amazing life of these gelatinous animals and learn about their importance to our ocean planet through new exhibits, educational programs, a film and even art. Ever wondered what a jelly feels like? You can even safely touch them. The Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach. Through April 30. $26-$29. (562) 590-3100. aquariumofpacific.org. SOMEDAY IS NOW: THE ART OF CORITA KENT This is the first full-scale exhibition to survey the entire career of pioneering artist and designer Corita Kent (1918–1986). For more than three decades, Kent experimented in printmaking, producing a groundbreaking body of work that combines faith, activism, and teaching with messages of acceptance and hope. Her work was widely recognized for its revolutionary impact and remains an iconic symbol of that period in American history. Pasadena Museum of Art, 490 East Union Street, Pasadena. Through Nov. 1. $5-

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4

GORDON LIGHTFOOT

Singer-songwriter and musician Gordon Lightfoot resides atop the list of all-time greats. His song catalog is incredibly vast and includes such immortals as “If You Could Read My Mind,” “Carefree Highway,” “Sundown,” “(That’s What You Get) For Lovin Me” and the “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.” The Canyon, 28912 Roadside Dr., Agoura Hills. $48-$89. (818) 879-5016. canyonclub.net.

$7. Wed.-Sun. (626) 568-3665. pmcaonline. org. A WORSE PLACE THAN HELL The Changing Face of Abraham Lincoln. This new exhibition of George Stuart Historical Figures coincides with the 150-year anniversary of the death of our celebrated 16th U.S. president. Pivotal moments of Abraham Lincoln’s life and presidency are shown via Stuart’s three dimensional sculptures amid historic photographs. This exhibit illustrates how Lincoln’s appearance changed from clean-shaven to bearded, from vigorous to careworn and exhausted. The carnage, grief and suffering, in addition to struggles in his personal life, weighed heavily on the president; a progression which Ojai-based sculptor George Stuart has so effectively captured in this series of Historical Figures. Museum of Ventura County, 100 E. Main St., Ventura. Through Oct 11. $3-$4. (805) 653-0323. venturamuseum.org. EMPIRE AND LIBERTY: THE CIVIL WAR AND THE WEST The West is seldom considered in the context of the Civil War, yet Westward expansion shaped the issues that ignited that tumultuous conflict. This exhibition combines personal stories of Americans with audio-visual presentations and extraordinary historical artifacts. Come to know Sacagawea, John

Sutter, Jesse and Frank James, Andrés Pico, Biddy Mason and Big Tree. Artifacts include: Jefferson Davis’s pistol, Ulysses S. Grant’s revolver, John Fremont’s 1842 expedition flag, George Armstrong Custer’s Bible and Kicking Bear’s muslin painting of the Battle of the Little Bighorn. The Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way, Griffith Park, Los Angeles. Through Jan. 3. $6-$10. (323) 6672000. theautry.org. JOAN RIVERS: CAN WE TALK? Artifacts on display include various stage costumes worn by the comedian, a vintage Louis Vuitton travel trunk, Rivers’ 1990 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Talk/ Service Show Host, family photographs, her 1984 Harvard Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year award as well as her Hollywood Walk of Fame Star award. The Grammy Museum at L.A. Live, Fourth Floor, 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles. Through Sept. 20. $12-$13. (213) 765-6803. grammymuseum.org.

Get the Word Out. E-mail your announcements to Claire Fadden, cfadden@lifeafter50.com 60 days prior (or even earlier) to your event. Include a brief description, location, date, time, cost, phone and website. Submission does not guarantee publication.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 33


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Rick Steves’ Travels The Bare Basics On European Beer

W

hen I’m far from home, I become a cultural chameleon. I eat and drink regional specialties with gusto, feasting on steak and red wine in Tuscany and stuffing down tapas at midnight in Spain. So when I travel to countries that are known for their beer, I morph into the best beer aficionado I can be. Germany is synonymous with beer, and there’s no better place to drink up than in Bavaria. German beer is regulated by the Reinheitsgebot (Purity Decree) of 1516 — the oldest food and beverage law in the world — which dictates that only four ingredients may be used: malt, yeast, hops, and water. You can order your beer “helles” (“light” but not “lite”) or “dunkles” (“dark”). Beer gardens go back to the days when monks brewed their beer and were allowed to sell it directly to the public. They stored their beer in cellars under courtyards kept cool by the shade of chestnut trees. Eventually, tables were set up, and these convivial eateries evolved. My favorite beer garden (and German beer) can be found an hour’s drive outside of Munich at the Andechs Monastery. The stately church stands as it has for centuries, topping a hill at the foot of the Alps. Its Baroque interior — and its beer hall — both stir the soul and stoke the appetite. The hearty meals served here come in medieval portions. Belgians would argue that they, not their German neighbors, have Europe’s best beer. With about 120 varieties and 580 different brands — more than any other country — locals take their beers as seriously as the French do their wines. But the best beers are not available from a tap. The only way to offer so many

excellent beers fresh is to serve them bottled. The best varieties generally are available only by the bottle. Belgian beers come in various colored ales, lagers, and white (wheat) varieties and are generally yeastier and higher in alcohol content than beers in other countries. “lambics,” popular in Brussels, are the least beer-like and taste more like a dry and bitter farmhouse cider. Another Belgian specialty is the “trappist” beer — heavily fermented, malty, and brewed for centuries by monks between their vespers and matins. While there, I also recommend you try a Westmalle, Rochefort, Chimay, or Orval beer. Belgians are exacting consumers when it comes to beer. Most special local beers are served in a glass unique to that beer. Connoisseurs insist that each beer’s character comes out best in the proper glass. If a bar runs out of a specific glass, the bartender asks if you’ll accept a similar glass. Many Belgians will switch beers rather than drink one from the wrong glass. Another devout beer region is the Czech Republic. Czechs are among the world’s most enthusiastic beer drinkers. Whether you’re in a restaurant or bar, a “pivo” (beer) will land on your table upon the slightest hint to the waiter, and a new serving will automatically appear when the old glass is almost empty. After the end of the Cold War, most former Communist countries had lots of workers going to Western countries for jobs, but Czechs say their workers mostly stayed in the Czech Republic as they couldn’t imagine living in a place without their beloved local brews. Czechs don’t go from bar to bar like many other Europeans. They have an old saying: “In one night, you must stay loyal to one woman and to one beer.” The Czechs invented Pilsner-style lager in Plzeň, and the result, Pilsner Urquell, is on tap in many pubs. Other good beers include

Krušovice, Gambrinus, Staropramen, and Kozel. “Budweiser Budvar” is popular with AnheuserBusch’s attorneys; the Czech and the American breweries for years disputed the name “Budweiser.” The solution: Czech Budweiser brewed in the city of Ceske Budejovice is sold under its own name in Europe but marketed as “Czechvar” in the U.S. The British are equally passionate about their pubs. Short for “public house,” pubs are a basic part of the social scene and an extended living room. Many were built in the late 1800s, when pubs were independently owned and land prices were high enough to make it worthwhile to invest in fixing them up. Brits take great pride in their beer, and many think that drinking beer cold and carbonated, as Americans do, ruins the taste. At pubs, long-handled pulls are used to pull traditional, rich-flavored “real ales” up from the cellar. These are the connoisseur’s favorites: fermented naturally, varying from sweet to bitter, often with a hoppy or nutty flavor. Short-handled pulls at the bar mean colder, fizzier, mass-produced keg beers that don’t taste as good — at least not to the Brits. Of course, beer tastes are subjective. What makes a fine beer in one country changes the second you go elsewhere. Experimenting is part of the fun. So wherever you are, belly up to the bar, try a local beer or two, and discover your own favorite brew.

Rick St eveS’ t RavelS

By Rick Steves

Rick Steves writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and radio. You can e-mail him at rick@ricksteves.com and visit his website at www.ricksteves.com.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 35


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And Finally... The Bookworm’s Best A Life After 50 book review

by Terri “The Bookworm” Schlichenmeyer

Simple Lessons For A Better Life By Charles E. Dodgen

G

etting your news these days is a nerve wracking thing. Yes, you’re happy to be able to simply turn on the television or radio to keep informed on what’s going on in the world, or to social media to note cute cat videos, newborn babies, and neighbors having fun, but, who likes to hear and see the constant drumbeat of war, destruction, terrorism, grisly accidents, horrific deaths, political fighting and financial instability? Of course, keeping informed means taking the good with the bad, but, as people age, many feel as though there should be some sort of a better balance as to the information they allow into their brains. Seek it in “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” by Charles E. Dodgen. Things sure have changed since the baby boomers were kids. That’s a common sentiment in today’s world, although people have probably been uttering it since two years after time began. But things are, in fact, different today, largely because of the news we are bombarded with on a constant basis. With all of this negative information and bad news coming at us from every direction, how do we not exist in a perpetual state of fear and misery? Dodgen, a clinical psychiatrist, answers that question with what he found in, of all places, a nursing home. As we age, and especially when we pass our 50s, everyone endures bad news, personal loss, suffering and pain to some degree, but, according to Dodgen, there is a way to overcome those things. “Pain and suffering in life is inevitable,” he writes, “but a good support system can help overcome it to the point of toleration.” His advice is to take comfort in knowing simple love and companionship can work wonders in helping you overcome the negative aspects of life, and he encourages readers to reach for those things and give them. The author also suggests we keep in mind that we are our own best health plan, and that we all have the power to improve our own attitude and experiences, love our bodies, and balance our minds by what we allow ourselves to be exposed to. He preaches that while there’s pain and suffering in life, what matters is how we handle it and what we do about it. War, racial tensions, financial upheavals, personal problems and losses – the list of woes you have to deal with all depends on your personal situation, what you allow into your life, and how you deal with those things. “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” may help you overcome the depression that comes with bad news, negativity, pain and loss – or it may not. As self-help books go, this one is unique. By examining the emotions of those who’ve lost a lot (home, partner, independence, health) and have moved to a nursing home, Dodgen shows how richer lives can emerge from adversity. Yes, it sounds simplistic (and there are parts where it definitely is), but what the author consistently writes makes sense on at least some level, although that may take a bit of between-the-lines reading. This is not a book of wisdom so much as it’s a book of inspiration that needs to be savored and pondered in order get the best from it. If you’re dealing with personal adversity or just find yourself becoming depressed by watching too much news, “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” may be just the thing to put some balance in your life “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” by Charles E. Dodgen, 2015, Prometheus Books, $18.00, 288 pages. The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer who lives on a hill with two dogs and more than 12,000 books. You can read more of her book reviews at www.lifeafter50.com. Just click on “Entertainment” and then “Book Reviews.”

A Look Back

Just A Thought Before We Go

F

ifty years ago this month, Frank Sinatra, approaching his 50th birthday, released his album “September of My Years.” The Reprise Records offering included orchestral arrangements by Gordon Jenkins, marking the composer’s fifth studio collaboration with Sinatra. Peaking at Number Five on Billboard’s Pop Albums chart, the release of this album marked a resurgence in popularity for Ol’ Blue Eyes. From “Don’t Wait Too Long,” “Last Night When We Were Young” and “The Man in the Looking Glass,” to “It Was a Very Good Year,” “When the Wind Was Green,” “Hello, Young Lovers,” “I See It Now,” “Once Upon a Time” and “September Song,” the collection of reflective songs that dealt with aging resonated with Sinatra’s fans, many who, like him, were entering the autumn of their lives. Sinatra’s recording of “It Was a Very Good Year” would go on to win the Grammy Award for Best Male Vocal Performance and also Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying a Vocalist. The album was remastered in 1998 as Reprise and Capitol Records partnered for their “Entertainer of the Century” series. While that 1998 version of the album is currently out of print, Concord Records again remastered and reissued “September of My Years” in 2010 with two bonus tracks, a live performance of “This Is All I Ask” that was recorded in 1984 at Carnegie Hall, and the 1968 single “How Old Am I?

38 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.” – Chili Davis


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Orange COunty September 2015

southern california

The Golden Girls

pheNoMeNoN Could it work

For you? ParTing wiTh Possessions –

prudently and professionally

Donny MosT

of “Happy days”

Now Most happy

in Jazz Clubs

Judith

Light Taking a bossy stance

on staying well during the flu season

lifeafter50.com


Contents

September 2015

10

18

22

24

Cover Profile

Departments

10 Judith Light

6 50-Plus: What You Need to Know

Taking a bossy stance on her career, life, and staying well during flu season.

A quick look at things 50-plusers should be aware of.

  8 It’s The Law

Features

Mitchell A. Karasov on what to do when the time for a timely settlement has passed.  

18 Thinking About Going Golden? What You Should Know Could “The Golden Girls Phenomenon” work for you?

22 Parting With Possessions – Prudently And Professionally Liquidating an estate can be overwhelming, and professional guidance is vital.

24 The Look Of Life After 50 – Donny Most

The “Happy Days” star is now most happy on jazz club stages.

28 The Hallowed Hall Of Must-Knowtables * Frank Lloyd Wright Legendary notables that everyone, of every age, should know. Cover photo by Jonathan W. Stoller

26 Tuned In To What’s On

The best in September television viewing.

31 Let’s Get Out

Looking to get out and about? Our September/October calendar has some great suggestions.

35 Rick Steves’ Travels

The bare basics on European beer.

38 And Finally…The Bookworm’s Best, A Look Back and Just A Thought Before We Go

A book suggestion, memory, and a little something to leave you with.

All material published within this issue of Life After 50 and on www.lifeafte50.com is strictly for informational and educational purposes only. No individual, advice, product or service is in any way endorsed by Life After 50 or Southland Publishing, Inc. or provided as a substitute for the reader’s seeking of individualized professional advice or instruction. Readers should seek the advice of qualified professionals on any matter regarding an individual, advice, recommendations, services or products covered within this issue. All information and material is provided to readers with the understanding that it comes from various sources from which there is no warranty or responsibility by Life After 50 or Southland Publishing, Inc. as to its or their legality, completeness or technical accuracy.

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Editor’s Note...

It’s A New Month… It’s A New Issue… And I’m Feelin’ Good!

M

y career path has included work on hundreds of television and film productions. From writing and producing news, special events, travel programs, documentaries and commercials, to being a part of crews that churned out music videos, television shows and made-for-television and feature films, I’ve had my share of incredible experiences and crossed paths with some fascinating people.   While some of those I labored alongside were “challenging,” as the politically correct say, for the most part, that time of my life provided me with many lasting friendships and people I enjoyed and who made me feel good.   Of the numerous productions I worked on, a 1989 made-for-television film called “My Boyfriend’s Back” stands out. The film was a dramedy about a musical trio of woman known as “The Fabulous Bouffants” who, after having been disbanded for many years, overcome personal challenges and reunite to perform on a television special that also featured numerous real musical performers from the 1960s. I loved being a part of the crew on that film because we got to work with legendary musicians, including Gary Puckett, “Little Peggy” March, Gary Lewis and Mary Wells; and also because we got to shoot in great locations such as the Hollywood Palace and the Presidential Suite of The Century Plaza Hotel (in which actual presidents have actually stayed).  Another reason I enjoyed working on “My Boyfriend’s Back” was because it gave me the opportunity to get to know the woman who graces the cover of this month’s issue – Judith Light – who starred in the film along with Sandy Duncan and Jill Eikenberry. It was a daily pleasure to interact with Judith and her management team of Jonathan Stoller and Herb Hamsher, who were always kind, gracious, fun to be around and seemed – each day – to do something that made me feel good. I greatly enjoyed working with them and, on the day we wrapped production, I gave the guys little gifts and Judith an antique perfume bottle, which I knew she collected. A few days later, a film canister filled with cookies arrived at my home with a note of thanks from them – which really made me feel good.   Throughout my life, whenever I have had the wonderful experience of working with people such as Judith, Jonathan and Herb, who share my belief that we should do all we can to a make our work a joy for those we work with as well as ourselves, I always wonder why everyone doesn’t strive to make that their top daily priority. Having done that (and, at times, failed to do so) I can attest that by doing it, the law of the echo is made manifest and the good vibes you cast almost always render good feelings in return.  As we put this issue together, it was good to reconnect with Jonathan, who shot the photo that appears on the cover, and reminisce with Judith about our days working together. It was also good to learn that she still has the perfume bottle I gave her. Knowing that made me feel good – really good!

David Laurell, Editor-in-Chief

4 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

Publisher Valarie Anderson Editor-in-Chief David Laurell Associate Editors Steve Stoliar Claire Yezbak Fadden Art Director Michael Kraxenberger Editorial Assistant Max Andrews VP Of Finance Michael T. Nagami Human Resources Andrea E. Baker Business Manager Linda Lam Billing Supervisor Kacie Cobian VP Of Operations David Comden

Account Executives: San Diego County/Orange County Phil Mendelson Phil@lifeafter50.com Los Angeles/ Valley/Travel Beverly Sparks Beverly@lifeafter50.com For advertising/distribution inquiries contact: Valarie Anderson (310) 822-1629 x 121, Valarie@lifeafter50.com 5301 Beethoven St., Suite 183 LA CA 90066 Valarie Anderson Valarie@lifeafter50.com 310 822-1629 x 121

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A September Thought

“One day you turn around and it’s summer Next day you turn around and it’s fall And the springs and the winters of a lifetime Whatever happened to them all?”

– Sammy Cahn


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K. Hovnanian® Companies® of California, Inc. reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to make changes or modifications without prior notice to any and all content set forth in this advertisement, and other ancillary information upon which this advertisement is based, including, but not limited to, prices, maps, plans, specifications, materials, features and exterior elevations/colors. Square footage is approximate. Any home at an advertised price is subject to immediate sale and, therefore, the availability of a home at an advertised price is subject to change without prior notice. Please contact a Sales Consultant for the latest information concerning the availability and pricing of homes as well as the availability of amenities and facilities within the community including, if applicable, information about any related assessments. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. ©2015 K. Hovnanian® Companies® of California, Inc. BRE license number 01183847

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September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 5 1/5/15 2:53 PM


50

Apartment Sweet Apartment

B

Plus

What You Need To Know

By Claire Yezbak Fadden and Max Andrews

The Deepening Debt Of Daily Life

L

iving with debt has become a way of life for both generation X and 50-plussers as the stigma of owing money is gradually disappearing, according to a new study from Allianz Life. The study on how the baby boomer generation (ages 49 to 67) and generation Xers (ages 35 to 48) are facing their financial future shows both age groups equally reliant on using credit cards as a survival tool. Nearly half – 48 percent – of both generations agree that credit cards now function as a survival tool to pay for everyday expenses, and 43 percent agree that “lots of smart, hardworking people who are careful with spending also have a lot of credit card debt.” Alarmingly, this growing comfort with debt may be having a greater effect on the retirement plans of gen Xers. Twice as many of them – 27 percent versus 11 percent of 50-plussers – say they are either unsure about when they plan to retire or don’t plan to ever be able to retire at all.

Fifty Candles

F

ifty years ago this month, Singapore joined the United Nations; Pakistani troops entered the Indian sector of Kashmir while Indian troops invaded Lahore; Pope Paul VI issued the encyclical “Mysterium Fidei;” Hurricane Betsy roared ashore on Louisiana and Florida, killing 76 people and causing $1.42 billion in damage; television shows “F-Troop,” “Hogan’s Heroes,” “Lost in Space, “Get Smart” and “I Dream of Jeannie” premiered; the Los Angeles Angels changed their name to to the California Angels and moved to Anaheim; and Donovan made his first appearance in the United States on “Shindig!” Notable personalities born in September 1965 who are celebrating their 50th birthday this month include boxer Lennox Lewis, actor Charlie Sheen, runner Derek Redmond, professional poker player Annie Duke, news anchor Patti Ann Browne, actresses Constance Marie and Cheryl Hines, Miss America 1990 Debbye Turner, singer-songwriter Moby (Richard Melville Hall), basketball player Scottie Pippen and comedian Kathleen Madigan.

6 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

aby boomers are the force behind the boom in the construction of larger and more luxurious apartments with high-end amenities, according to a recently released report authored by Jordan Rappaport, senior economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. The study, “Millennials, Baby Boomers and Rebounding Multifamily Home Construction,” suggests the boomers will likely eclipse young adults as the main driver of apartment construction growth over the next decade. Research shows that the downsizing from single-family homes to apartments starts to rise at age 70 and picks up sharply at age 75. Fiftyplussers, with far greater financial resources than younger people, are demanding more spacious dwelling units, amenities they have become accustomed to in their single-family homes, and aging-in-place design considerations.

Growing Up With George

C

omedian and social commentator George Carlin, who died in 2008, was the comedic voice of a generation. His fivedecade-long career spanned books, record albums, cable specials, movies, and network shows that resonated with young and old alike. While every baby boomer grew up with Carlin, in her newly released memoir, “A Carlin Home Companion” (St. Martin’s Press, 2015), Carlin’s daughter, Kelly, provides readers with what it was really like to grow up with him. Reflecting on a childhood filled with love, laughter, chaos, drugs, and debilitating anxiety, the younger Carlin tells the story of how her father’s career, the crazy times of the counter culture, and her family’s dysfunctional dynamics shaped her relationship with her parents and her ability to step out into the world as an adult. Booklist, in a rave review, lauded it as being much more than the biography of a man by a daughter. “Kelly also tells a muchneeded, revealing story about what it means to grow up in the shadow of fame and overcome dysfunctional, show-business-family patterns on the way to her own successful performing and writing career,” says the review. Along with this insightful book on George Carlin, the legendary comedian will also be the subject of a three-month-long exhibition at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles beginning on September 30. For more information on Kelly Carlin and “A Carlin Home Companion,” click on www.thekellycarlinsite.com.


A Little More You Need To Know Photo by Iwan Baan

The Most Important Thing To Know This Month

Be Aware: The Prostate

S

Where You Need To Go

eptember is National Prostate Health Month, a time when health experts, advocates, and individuals concerned with men’s prostate health promote awareness for regular testing, prevention and proper treatment of prostate cancer. The American Cancer Society reminds men that early prostate cancer often has no symptoms. While prostate cancer can only be discovered with a screening test, such as a PSA blood test or a digital rectal exam, more advanced evidence of prostate cancer can sometimes cause symptoms such as:

The Broad

• Problems urinating or holding in urine

he Broad, the new contemporary art museum in downtown Los Angeles,will officially open on Sunday, September 20. Built by philanthropists and longtime art collectors Eli and Edythe Broad, the inaugural installation draws from two collections of more than 2,000 works of contemporary art, beginning with those by major artists who came to prominence in the 1950s, including Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly. The pop art of the 1960s – an area of great depth in the collections – will be represented through works by Roy Lichtenstein, Ed Ruscha and Andy Warhol, among others. Moving into the 1980s, this exhibition will present a rich concentration of works by artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat, Cindy Sherman, Keith Haring, Barbara Kruger and Jeff Koons. The installation continues up through the present, with works including a monumental, immersive, nine-screen video piece, “The Visitors,” by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson, which was only recently acquired for the collections, among many other new acquisitions. Among the other artists represented are Richard Artschwager, John Baldessari, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Chuck Close, Eric Fischl, Leon Golub, Andreas Gursky, Damien Hirst, Mike Kelley, Ellsworth Kelly, Glenn Ligon, Sharon Lockhart, Lari Pittman, Charles Ray, Frank Stella, Philip Taaffe, Robert Therrien, Kara Walker and Terry Winters.

• Blood in the urine

T

• Trouble having or keeping an erection (erectile dysfunction)

• Pain in the spine, hips, ribs, or other bones • Weakness or numbness in the legs or feet • Loss of bladder or bowel control Other conditions can also cause many of these same symptoms. For example, trouble urinating is much more often caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) than cancer. Tell your doctor if you have any of these problems so that the cause can be found and treated, if needed. For more detailed information on prostate cancer symptoms and treatments, click on www.cancer.org.

The Broad is located at 221 South Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles. For more information and tickets, call (213) 232-6220 or click on www.thebroad.org.

New Words

Y

ou might not find them in a dictionary yet, but they’re a part of the everyday American vocabulary. Here’s what they mean.

Stan: A portmanteau of “stalker” and “fan,” a Stan is an over-the-top fanatic, admirer and supporter of a celebrity, franchise or musical group. Based on the 2000 song “Stan” by rapper Eminem. Ghosting: When a person (especially one you have been dating) avoids you, stops taking your calls, answering your texts and, basically, disappears from your life. Netiquette: Etiquette rules and norms that apply when communicating over computer networks, answering e-mails and using the Internet.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 7


It’s The Law Mitchell A. Karasov

Mitchell A. Karasov, Esq. covers Los Angeles, Ventura County and the Coachella Valley. His focus is in elder law with emphasis in estate planning, Medi-Cal eligibility, trust administration, probate, conservatorships of person or estate, estate and trust litigation and financial abuse litigation. For more information click on www.karasovelderlaw.com or call (818) 508-7192.

When the time for a timely settlement has passed

Q

My father passed away last year during the holidays. In his will, it states that my sister is to serve as his executrix and his assets are to be split between us. Almost a year has now passed, and my sister has done nothing to settle the estate. During this time, his stocks have gone down and she is living in his home rent free. I’m afraid to go against her, because there is a clause in the will that if anyone contests it they are to be disinherited. It was upsetting enough to lose my father last Christmas. Now, if I do something against my sister and her family, I feel they will have nothing to do with me this Christmas or ever again. What can I do to get my share of the estate without causing problems?

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A

In spite of the “no contest” provision, you have rights as a beneficiary to pursue your rightful inheritance in probate court. Preserving or regaining a good relationship with your sister, however, could be another matter. If the no contest clause contains standard language, you may challenge your sister’s failure to handle his estate without running the risk of disinheriting yourself. Typically, no contest clauses are meant to penalize beneficiaries who challenge the beneficiary’s inheritance, not mismanagement or failure to act by the executor. As the executrix, your sister should have filed the original will and a petition to appoint her executrix in probate court. Since she has not done that, you could file a petition with the court to appoint yourself as the executor instead of your sister. In addition to being appointed to take over the management of your late father’s estate, you would ask the court to reduce your sister’s inheritance by an amount equal to the financial harm she caused. You may be entitled to lost rent during the time she lived in the residence, the decreased value of the stock, and possibly other damages. Sometimes, “family member” executors are so distraught about the death of their loved one that they don’t always start the probate of the will as quickly they should. If you believe your sister fits into that category, you could ask her if she wants your help with the process or if she will let you help her by taking care of it. If she agrees to either, then the only issue would be what she owes you for any losses to your share of the inheritance. If she isn’t agreeable to any of those proposals, then you could propose pre-litigation mediation. That is a process that can avoid a costly legal battle by bringing the parties together with a mediator to work out the differences. If your sister refuses to agree to any of these reasonable proposals, than you will have no choice but to have your conflict resolved by the court. Whether you wait until after Christmas to deal with this and avoid any family strife is a personal decision. Either way, before you approach your sister, I strongly recommend that you consult with an attorney.


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Judith

Light Taking a bossy stance on the roles she has played, the service she has rendered, and the way to stay well during flu season

A

By David Laurell

ward-winning actress Judith Light has teamed up with the National Council on Aging to raise awareness about preventing influenza. She is

currently serving as the national spokeswoman for The Flu + You program, a public education initiative aimed at adults 65 and over about the importance of annual flu vaccination and what preventative options are available. 10 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

Photo courtesy of National Council on Aging

Cover Profile


Photo by Jonathan W. Stoller

B

orn in Trenton, New Jersey in 1949, Light graduated from Carnegie Mellon University with a degree in drama and made her professional stage debut in “Richard III” at the California Shakespeare Festival in 1970. First appearing on Broadway in the 1975 revival of “A Doll’s House,” she came to national prominence in 1977 when she took on the role of Karen Wolek on the ABC daytime drama “One Life to Live” for which, over her sixyear run, she won two Daytime Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. Perhaps best-known for her role as Angela Bower in the ABC sitcom “Who’s the Boss?” which ran from 1984 to 1992, Light has also played the recurring role of Elizabeth Donnelly in the NBC drama “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” and Claire Meade in the ABC series “Ugly Betty,” for which she was nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award in 2007. Light received her first nomination for a Tony Award in 2011 for her performance in the Broadway play “Lombardi,” based on the life of legendary football coach Vince Lombardi. In 2012 and 2013, she won two consecutive Tony Awards for Best Featured Actress in a Play for her performances in “Other Desert Cities” and “The Assembled Parties.” After a short stint as the villainous Judith Brown Ryland in the TNT reboot of “Dallas,” 2014 saw Light take on the role of Shelly Pfefferman in the critically acclaimed dark dramedy, “Transparent,” for which she received a Critics’ Choice Television Award nomination. Cast opposite Jeffrey Tambor in the Jill Soloway-created series, Light plays the ex-wife of a transgender character played by Tambor. A longtime passionate activist of the LGBT community, Light, who played Ryan White’s mother in the 1989 made-for-television movie “The Ryan White Story,” sits on the board of the Matthew Shepard Foundation, as well as the Point Foundation, an LGBT organization that provides financial support, mentoring, leadership training and hope to meritorious students who are or feel marginalized due to their sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. Next month, Light will return to Broadway in the role of Madame Raquin in “Thérèse Raquin” a stage adaptation of the 1867 Emile Zola novel that will be presented by the Roundabout Theatre Company. As she prepared for her latest Broadway performance, one that will mark Keira Knightley’s Broadway debut and begin previews on October 1, Light took time to talk with Life After 50 about aging, how to stay well, especially during flu season, and the roles that have defined her career and life. life After 50 (lA50): few actresses have taken on the roles of such diverse characters as you have throughout your career. Can we throw out a couple of them for you to share what comes to mind when you think of them? Judith Light (JL): Sure. lA50: let’s start at the beginning, with Karen Wolek. JL: Taking the role of Karen changed my life. Before taking that role, I was seriously considering getting out of acting. Up until that time, I had only done one television role, on “Kojak.” Everything else I had done was in theater. I was hesitant about taking the role of Karen at first. I never wanted to do television. I was a real snob back then. I only wanted to do theater or feature film work, and certainly didn’t want to do a soap opera. But then I began to think about the people I could reach by doing it, and that there was no reason I couldn’t bring the quality of work I had been doing in the theater to television. In retrospect, taking that role was one of the most powerful and life-changing choices of my life. lA50: You say you were contemplating getting out of the business. What would have been the other career path you would have pursued? JL: I seriously thought about becoming a psychologist or pursuing a career in law. I would have also been interested in working with children with learning difficulties or physical disabilities. There was always some sort of a service element that was involved in what I considered to be among my choices. That same desire, to be of service to others, was actually a part – a big part – in my decision to take the role of Karen. I thought it would be a way to present

a character that was dissatisfied with her life, who suffered from low selfesteem, who was obsessed with searching for love and acceptance, and how she coped and survived. lA50: few woman were as different as Karen Wolek and Angela Bower. Tell us about Angela. JL: Well, Angela represents another life-changing choice for me, because I always said I would never do a sitcom [laughs]. Do you see a pattern here? Again, just like with doing a soap opera, my decision not to ever do a sitcom was due to the way I looked down my nose at that sort of material. I had never realized how powerful both of those mediums can be to reaching people. When I auditioned for that role with Tony [Danza], I realized I had been making decisions based on perceptions that were incorrect. When I decided to go with my gut, and accept that role – just like taking the role of Karen – it changed my life. Those roles opened my eyes to the fact that I had been making poor choices about a lot of things that were cutting me off from having wonderful and powerful experiences. I think the thing I learned from taking the role of Angela is how wonderful

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 11


it is to have the opportunity in life to be able to make people laugh. That was the service element I found in taking that role – making people laugh. That is such a wonderful thing to do – an extraordinary thing to do as a career.

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lA50: You had done comedic work in theater. Did that help prepare you for that role? JL: I’ll tell you, I learned so much from Tony about doing comedy. He gave me an education every week. By watching him and working with him, I learned timing and balance – the understanding – the underpinnings of what must be established before you can make something funny. He was a great teacher.

The Legends Rock & Roll Revue

LA50: A successful television or film production stems from that inexplicable magical chemistry that occurs between actors. That was certainly the case with you and Tony.

September 8 Rebecca Jade

September 15 Revisiting the Orbison Years

A Tribute to Sade

featuring Mark Barnett as Roy Orbison

JL: It was. We knew that right from the time we did the audition. It was very evident – just no question – everybody involved saw that. We had a great connection right from the start and continued to have that connection for the eight years the show ran. That is still true to this day. We are very close friends.

September 22

September 29

Gregory Wolfe A Tribute to Rod Stewart

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lA50: You said that had you not continued to act, you may have sought a career in law. You kind of got that by playing elizabeth Donnelly on “law & order: Special victims Unit.” Tell us about her. JL: The way the part of Elizabeth came to me was interesting. After being away from the theater for over 20 years, I was back in New York doing a play –

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“Wit” [“W;t”]. I was playing the role of a woman who was dying of ovarian cancer, which I had taken over from Kathleen Chalfant. Many of the people who were working on “SVU,” that Kathleen was a part of, came to see my performance and that led to my being offered the part of the head of the Special Victims Unit. Then I became a judge. I loved doing that role. It meant constantly flying back and forth from California to New York for several seasons, but that was fine because I loved it. That was a very special time for me, because I loved being involved with that show and playing that role. Playing Elizabeth was so different than anything I had ever done.

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lA50: Tell us about Claire Meade. JL: Again, another very different role. I had done a pilot about real estate agents. It was a great pilot, but it didn’t go. But that was what led to my getting the role of Claire, who was a fascinating woman with all sorts of Achilles’ heels and complications. Doing that show gave me the chance to work with my dear and wonderful America Ferrera, who has become a deeply cherished friend. We were all very much family on that show. Claire gave me the chance to go in a very different direction with a role and that was so great. It is so easy for an actress to get pigeonholed, but that never happened to me. That was because of my terrific management team. I’ve had wonderful people who have guided me to take on very different roles. That has been such a joy – to have such diversity in the roles I’ve done.

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lA50: So here’s the one i really want to hear about, because she is different from all the rest in that she was a real person – Marie lombardi.

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JL: Oh wow! How interesting that you would ask about her. She was a very special woman and you do have a huge responsibility when you are playing the role of a woman who actually lived and who still has family members alive, many who came to see the performance. I really did a lot of research on her and had many of her family members tell me how much I had her down. Even though that role was small, Marie was a dynamic and important part of that play.

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lA50: last woman i’ll ask you about – Shelly Pfefferman. JL: “Transparent” has captured my heart as both an actor and a viewer. I think it’s so incredibly powerful to be doing a story that is in service to something greater than ourselves – opening eyes and hearts, and hopefully, minds to save lives – to open a conversation that gives people the gift of knowing what is your true, courageous, authentic self. Although the show is about a man transitioning to becoming a woman, the larger context of the story we are trying to present is a message to everyone that it is fine to be who you are – to present yourself to the world as you are – and to love yourself for who you are. People really relate to this show because every family has some sort of an issue that deals with something that turns their world upside down – that causes everyone to look at who they are and how they relate to each other or a situation or a world that they may be uncomfortable with – something they don’t understand. I am very proud of what we do in “Transparent.” During each table read, we all take a moment to be grateful for being able to be a part of this show that has the power to open eyes and hearts and minds.

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lA50: You have always been a champion of the lGBT community. What was the impetus for that? JL: During the early days of the AIDS epidemic – in the 1980s – I had seen people I had worked with die and I didn’t know what was going on. Then it began to happen to close friends and I saw them being discounted because they were gay, and that was not okay with me. I remember when I was doing “The Ryan White Story” and Ryan, who had contracted HIV because he was a hemophiliac, came to the set one day and was being interviewed by a woman who asked him how he had been treated by people. He told her he had been spit upon and been called the “f” word – the derogatory one used for gay people. I was so devastated to hear this young boy talk about how cruel he had been treated by people. There was a mob mentality about the way people with HIV were being treated back then. That homophobic

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response made me know I could not sit still without using my voice to come out and say something – to say how wrong this was. We had two presidents who would not even say the word “AIDS,” although thousands of Americans were suffering from this disease. That makes you wonder what kind of a country we are living in. If there is a flood or a hurricane that affects a segment of our country, the government runs to help them with a big show. But with AIDS, it was nothing. There was a disdain and a discounting of Americans who had contracted AIDS because they were gay, or thought to be gay. That was deeply offensive to me – to anyone who cares about justice and the dignity of life. I was also very impressed with how the LGBT community rose up to powerfully care for their own during that time. Watching that was inspiring and beautiful to me.

thought: If I don’t know about it, I bet there are a lot of people out there who don’t know about it. Every year, people die from the flu and not enough people talk about it, so I really felt we need to be talking about and educating people about the strong vaccine that is available for older people and that you can go to a pharmacy and get it for free. I wanted to be a part of telling people to do this – to do something that may save their life. I know that may sound dramatic, but I was once one of those people who was irresponsible by not getting a flu shot and putting an entire cast and crew at risk. lA50: So tell our readers what they should do.

JL: I had to say something. The cruelty I saw was inhuman. And when I did, I got some horrible letters from people saying they would never watch anything I did again. I found that to be devastating, that people could be so cruel, but I had to finally come to terms with the fact that their bigotry and hatred was their problem to deal with – their cross to bear.

JL: Go to the National Council on Aging website and get all the information. There is no reason for people to be getting the flu. You just have to be knowledgeable of what is available and then make it a priority to get the immunization. The flu season starts this month and runs through the winter, so now is the time to do it. During most flu seasons, it’s estimated that 90 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths and between 50 and 60 percent of seasonal flurelated hospitalizations in the United States occur in people 65 years and older. This is because human immune defenses become weaker with age. So influenza can be a very serious disease for people 65 and older.

lA50: let’s talk about another cause you have embraced, influenza immunization.

LA50: I’ll take for granted you are dutifully immunized against influenza. Tell us what else you do to take care of yourself.

JL: It is the same thing as my support of the LGBT community. My work is my service. I took the roles of Karen, and Angela and others to be of service to people. To me, everything I do has that context to it. I have always chosen roles to educate or expose issues or problems, or to make people laugh, so my work with the National Council on Aging is a natural extension of that – to educate people. I consider myself to be a reasonably educated and aware person, and yet I never knew there was a special flu shot for people 65 and older. So I

JL: In New York, I walk everywhere, which is my main form of exercise. My diet is gluten free and I am primarily vegetarian. If I ever feel that I’m not getting the protein I need, I will have some fish. I try to stay away from dairy, because I don’t respond well to it. I just really try to listen to my body to hear what it is that I need. I have dieted in the past and always felt frustrated and deprived. I then came to realize that I had never really learned how to eat or to discern what I wanted or needed as opposed to a conditioned or compulsive need to eat.

LA50: You were one of the first LGBT advocates not of the community to come out in support of lGBT rights.

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So I retrained myself and have learned to be as conscious as I can be as to what foods I need or want. lA50: Any guilty pleasures – moments when you are bad? JL: I don’t consider anything I eat to be bad. Ice cream is one of my favorite things and I will have a bite or two instead of eating an entire pint. I never deprive myself of anything I’m craving, but I do just take a few bites. That works for me, because I know I can eat whatever I want, just as long as I don’t eat a lot of it. I had been an emotional eater for many years and by going into therapy, I learned food is something that is to be nutritious and to be enjoyed, not something to suffer over and cause anxiety. Being conscious about how I eat and treating myself with grace and kindness and compassion in how and what I eat has worked for me. lA50: As you have gotten older, have you adopted any thoughts or a philosophy about aging? JL: My manager, Herb Hamsher talks about what he calls “conscious aging.” He says we should conscientiously observe ourselves and how the process of aging is personally affecting us. That philosophy, if that’s what you want to call it, is about being self-aware and actively choosing to live in each moment. I don’t mean any of this to sound like some pop culture self-help book, but what I do mean is that we should adopt an active consciousness of watching ourselves age and understanding how we should be treating ourselves and others as we get older. We should always be aware of who we are in the world and what our value is and to always grow in grace. Getting older is going to happen to all of us, so it’s much better to get on the roller coaster of aging and enjoy the ride rather than being dragged behind it. Aging should be a process of being incredibly grateful for the gift of getting older – for having life. That is a precious gift that not everyone gets. Life should be full and exciting and filled with a great fullness of being alive. That only comes by continuing to grow and to be continually living a life of service to others, no matter what it is you do.

“I

need to stay healthy and can’t let the flu slow me down, so I received my annual vaccination and learned there are different flu vaccine options for people 65 and older,” says actress Judith Light. “I want to encourage others to speak with their doctor or pharmacist to find out more about simple steps they can take to help prevent the flu for themselves and the people they care about.” Research shows that the immune system weakens with age, which means older adults are more likely to catch the flu and that they can suffer greater complications because of other health issues. Through the National Council on Aging’s Flu + You program, everyone can get the information they need to help protect themselves by getting vaccinated as early in the season as possible. The flu is a contagious illness that can be severe and life-threatening, especially for adults 65 and older who have flu vaccine options, including the traditional, standarddose vaccine and a higher-dose vaccine specifically designed to address the age-related weakening of the immune system. The higher-dose flu vaccine, which includes four times the antigen compared with the standard-dose vaccine, triggers the body to produce more antibody against the flu virus. Older adults should speak with their healthcare provider about the risk of catching the flu and how it can be prevented, including the best vaccine option for them. And remember: Flu vaccination is a Medicare Part B benefit, which means there is no copay for eligible beneficiaries.

the National Council on Aging is a respected leader and trusted partner to help people meet the challenges of aging. through innovative community programs and services, online help, and advocacy, they are a trusted voice and innovative problem-solver helping people navigate the challenges of aging in America. For more facts about flu prevention, click on www.ncoa.org.

16 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

Photo courtesy of National Council on Aging

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Special to Life After 50 by Robyn Miller-Tarnoff

Thinking About Going Golden? What You Should Know

To minimize the costs of living, with the added benefit of full-time support and friendship, “The Golden Girls Phenomenon” is on the rise with 50-plussers.

W

hile some may see it as a throwback to the hippies of the 1960s returning to the commune, there is now a formal term that has been pegged for the growing number of female 50-plussers who are rooming together. It is known as “The Golden Girls Phenomenon,” inspired by the popular NBC sitcom, “The Golden Girls,” which aired from 1985 to 1992. Cheesecake at midnight, with four forks, a bottle of wine, and a quartet of mature women discussing world events, old boyfriends, health issues and the latest gossip. That is a scenario reminiscent of a scene from “The Golden Girls,” the television show that has inspired what is becoming a new national lifestyle trend. Demographic data reveals that since the recession of 2008, shared living for mature adults is on the rise. In 2000, 820,000 households had single people ages 46 to 64 sharing with non-relatives, according to Bowling Green State University’s Center for Family and Demographic Research. By 2013, that number jumped to well over a million, and with the baby boomers retiring in droves, this number will continue to grow dramatically. If you are like many people over the age of 50 – especially women – you may be intrigued by the idea

18 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

of living with someone, but are concerned about how you and a new roommate will get along. “Being a good roommate is about being considerate and communicating in a mature manner,” notes Golden Girls Network founder Bonnie Moore. And she would know. Since 2008, the author of “How to Start a Golden Girls Home” (Bonnie Moore, 2015), has shared her fivebedroom home with four roommates. “Living with others at this stage has been more fun and rewarding than I ever imagined,” Moore says. “In addition to contributing rent, my roommates have become an important part of my life. We throw parties together, get to know one another’s friends, go to the gym together, and help each other out.” Moore acknowledges, however, that there are occasions when living together can prove tricky. She has had turnover, and the lessons learned from it became the basis for her book.

FINDING A GOLDEN ROOMIE Finding the right person to become housemates with is at the top of the list when you embark on the shared-living adventure. But who is right for you? How do you know? Moore recommends you

answer those questions by asking yourself: “Who am I?” and “What is important to me?” “When you know these answers,” Moore says, “you know who you are looking for!” Another good starting point, according to Moore, is to consider some common deal breakers. Is it okay if the new roommate smokes? Is it okay if he/she has a pet or a significant other? It’s also important to ask about cultural or lifestyle differences. “Diversity is great,” Moore says, “but sometimes you can happily live next door to someone, just not in the same house.” If there are significant differences in religious practices, eating habits, hobbies, political interests or working and sleeping hours between you and a potential roomie, these things must be taken into consideration. According to Moore: “Some of these things can be worked around, but others cannot.” “I love holiday decorations,” Moore says. “My house is filled with stuff for every holiday. I had a great housemate once — sweet, easy to get along with — but she belonged to a religion that didn’t celebrate the same holidays that I do. One day, I said something about getting out the Halloween decorations and her face went ashen. Within two weeks, she gave me notice she would be leaving based totally on her discomfort with the decorations.”


“I learned something important from this,” Moore explains. “During the initial interview with a prospective roommate, you need to ask about differences – big or small – that might cause issues or problems. As the homeowner, you have to know what is important to you and then talk about it. No one is ever right or wrong; it is just differences that need to be discussed.”

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS Differences in age can also be an issue. Moore recommends that you look for a roommate within 10 years of your age and don’t go beyond 20 years on either side. “With too much of an age difference, the nuances will frustrate you,” she says. Cleanliness matters when it comes to roommates, according to Moore. “Most people will keep a place in good shape,” she says. “Some people, however, really need things to be back in their places immediately, every spot wiped off the counter, and the floor swept daily. If this is you, find someone like you. If this is not you, same advice.” According to Moore, another aspect to explore is how in sync your personality is with that of a potential roommate. “Are you fairly assertive and outgoing?” she asks, “or are you quiet and bookish?”

TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS, BUT PUT IT IN WRITING Interviewing a potential roommate is a lot like a job interview. He or she will tell you what they believe you want to hear. It is your job to listen below the surface and hear danger signals. “It wasn’t long ago,” Moore recalls, “that I interviewed a recently retired woman who was very positive and cheerful and talked about all of her

activities and interests. We accepted her, and within a week we knew we were wrong. She had nothing to do with her time except complain, complain and complain. We were all too busy to pay attention to her. Within three months, she complained about us and moved.” According to Moore, it’s important to trust your intuition. “Selecting a good roommate takes patience, but it can be done. You also learn a great deal about yourself, and you learn to develop assertiveness.” Regardless of who you select, Moore recommends that you have a written house agreement and lease to fall back on. “Even if you decide to rent on a month-to-month basis, you need it in writing,” she counsels. “Don’t take anything for granted. Be positive and forthright in writing it, but put those details in writing!”

MAKE IT COMFORTABLE FOR EVERYONE The hardest part of living together is actually living together. What can you do to ensure that you are a good roommate? Sharing a space for the first time can be hard. Each roommate has his or her own personal items and routines. As a homeowner, do your best to make sure your new housemate feels at home. If you are a roommate, try not to tread too heavily on the homeowner’s toes. “I get lots of questions every time I do a presentation or teach a class,” Moore says. “For instance, someone once said that she didn’t want the roommate receiving mail at her home. What? It’s her home, too! Make her feel that way and she will be a great person to live with!”

Is The Golden Girl Lifestyle Right For You?

So you like the idea of shared living, but don’t know where to start? Bonnie Moore’s book “How to Start a Golden Girls Home” offers guidance on how to make your home attractive to roommates, questions you should ask in an interview, how to handle pets, boyfriends, and other tricky situations, as well as hundreds of other tips about 50-plus adults sharing living quarters. This book draws on the real-world experience of Moore – both in her own shared home and as the founder of Golden Girls Network, a website that helps adults find roommates. A retired management consultant, she came up with the idea for Golden Girls Network after a 2008 divorce left her living alone in a newly remodeled five-bedroom home. She searched for and found four roommates to fill the empty bedrooms and the group became fast friends. The experience was so positive that Moore embarked on a new career dedicated to helping adults ease their way into shared living. Moore’s book also offers sample applications, leases, and other practical resources for home owners and potential roommates. “How to Start a Golden Girls Home” is available at www.Amazon.com for $14.99 in paperback or $9.99 in Kindle format. To learn more about Golden Girls Network, click on www. goldengirlsnetwork.com.

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Parting With Possessions – Prudently And Professionally

Special to Life After 50 by Joe Baratta of Abell Auction Company

Liquidating the assets of an estate can be overwhelming. That is why professional guidance is vitally important.

T

he liquidation of an estate can be a difficult and emotional process. Along with the monetary value of furnishings, antiques, art, China, jewelry and other items, the contents of a home can include sentimental treasures that hold a lifetime or even generations of memories. While sentiment should always be taken into consideration, honored, and handled personally through the agreement of family members or professionally through the direction of a will or trust, it is equally important to prudently handle the disposition of items that are to be sold. Whether one is personally disposing of their own items to downsize and move to a smaller dwelling or liquidating the estate of a loved one that has died, this task must be handled with pragmatic prudence, knowledgeable understanding and professional verification of each item’s intrinsic or current market value. For those who find themselves in the position of liquidating an estate, an understanding of just how to begin the process can be overwhelming. That is why, as with making funeral arrangements, handling legal affairs or buying or selling real property, professional guidance is vitally important.

AN AUCTION HOUSE AT YOUR SERVICE A well-advertised estate auction conducted by a reputable firm is the best choice for family members, executors, trustees or attorneys to execute a liquidation, connect sellers with buyers and realize 22 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

the proper profits. An auction house is a bonded business subject to all local and state laws and taxation. They conduct their sales in an open and transparent fashion with accredited appraisals and a detailed accounting that will be accepted by any court and/or the Internal Revenue Service. According to the National Auctioneers Association, over a quarter-trillion dollars in goods and services are sold at auction every year in the U.S. With live and online bidding platforms, auctions attract attentive buyers from every corner of the globe who enjoy the excitement of aggressively competing to acquire items. “There are few options for liquidating the contents of a property,” says Don Schireson, CEO of Abell Auction Company, a Los Angelesbased, centuryold auction house.

“A well-advertised auction with a reputable firm is the easiest and most cost-effective way to find a place for personal belongings. By selling at auction, rather than hosting a house sale, items are exposed to a larger and better-informed audience, which leads to higher prices from competitive bidding.” Many people believe the terms “estate sale” and “estate auction” are interchangeable, however, there are significant differences. There are many stories about bargain


hunters who purchase an item at a yard sale for a few dollars, only to discover that it is worth hundreds or thousands of dollars. While this type of mistake can easily happen at an estate sale, it is very unlikely to happen at an estate auction.

AUCTIONS ATTRACT AN INTERNATIONAL AUDIENCE At public auction, personal property is marketed to a global audience of consumers who participate in a competitive process by placing bids in-person, online or via telephone. Prices are negotiated upward, delivering fair market value or higher to the seller. Most auction houses will set times for exhibition, allowing potential buyers to examine and preview items prior to sale. Estate auctions and sales are both used to dispose of property owned by someone who is either moving out of a home or deceased. However, estate sales usually take place over a weekend, which limits the event to neighbors and friends rather than educated buyers. At an estate sale, the early bird gets the worm. Since consumers who arrive first get their choice of merchandise, items often sell at lower than market value. In addition, valuable items are often priced too low or misidentified by individuals who lack experience dealing with furnishings, fine art, jewelry, antiques, collectibles and other valuable items.

AUCTIONS ARE OPERATED BY PROS Reputable auction companies are licensed or bonded and follow a strict code of ethics. Professional auctioneers have years of experience and an extensive educational background in the industry, and they come equipped with a full team of specialists to handle every need. “We provide tailored and complete services to those who choose to sell their personal property through Abell,” Schireson says. “Our staff includes accredited appraisers, jewelry and gem experts, and even translators to assist our international clients.” Estate sales are often operated by representatives who are eager to accept the first offer, collect a large commission and even augment the sale with their own items. Many are resale dealers who bring a certain level of expertise, but have a conflict of interest in setting prices. For example, a dealer may quietly sell merchandise to friends or associates at reduced prices so they can realize their true value elsewhere.

AUCTIONS ARE PREFERRED BT FIDUCIARIES Auction transactions are open and transparent, with accredited appraisals and a detailed accounting accepted by all courts and the IRS. Competitive bidding by educated buyers achieves the highest price. For these reasons, they are generally the preferred method of liquidating assets. While an auction house is an established place of business, estate sale operators are not regulated by any state or local entity. The sales process is closed to the both buyer and seller, and no record keeping is required.

“Unlike estate sales where strangers enter your home, [an auction house] professionally removes all contents and delivers them to [a] secure auction gallery where they are carefully inventoried and catalogued,” says Schireson. “At Abell, we hold our clients and their privacy in the highest regard. We also carry all insurance, so there are no worries about liability issues.”

AUCTIONS ARE WELL-MARKETED An established auction company knows that exposing valuable assets to a wider audience leads to higher returns. Knowing that, they expend great effort marketing assets through a combination of strategies, including both print and digital media. Consumers, ranging from individuals to private collectors and dealers, have the opportunity to preview items days or weeks in advance. Conversely, most estate sale companies perform limited advertising, marketing valuable assets only to the area surrounding the home. At the end of the day, leftover items are usually discarded, donated to charity or sold at bulk prices without proper appraisals.

THE ABELL AUCTION COMPANY Los Angeles’ first permanent auction house, Abell Auction Company handles fine estates and collections. Still family-operated, this 100-yearold company holds weekly and quarterly auctions drawing an international audience of in-person and online buyers. Abell’s weekly general auctions are held for private buyers, collectors, decorators, dealers and designers on Thursdays at 9 a.m. Their catalogued fine art and antique auctions are held quarterly, attracting live and international bidders who compete for record prices. Entrusted with estates and consignments throughout Southern California since 1916, Abell Auction Company’s gallery is located at 2613 Yates. Avenue in Los Angeles. For more information, call (310) 858-3073 or click on www.abell.com.

are heavily promoted through professionally designed direct mail, targeted print and online Many times, individuals who are liquidating an estate advertisements, and postings on affiliate websites,” says Schireson. “Located in Los Angeles, the face difficult circumstances and have limited time. nation’s second largest market, our sales draw It’s important to select an auction house that will serious collectors from around the world.” professionally handle the entire contents of a home, While the process of liquidating an estate can ranging from everyday household items and personal seem overwhelming at first, a well-advertised items to high-end antiques and collections. auction with a professional auction house is the Once you’ve selected a reputable auction optimal and most cost-effective choice. The right company, a specialist will meet with you to preview company will handle every detail with sensitivity, your estate, discuss your desires, and answer questions about the auction process and the property privacy and professionalism, while serving the seller’s best interests. being sold. Estimates of higher-end items will be provided based on the current market and past Joe Baratta is the vice president of business auction records. development at Abell Auction Company in When it comes to the terms of sale, consignors Los Angeles that was founded in 1916. are required to pay the auction house a commission or sellers fee. This percentage should be significantly lower than what is charged by an estate sale company, especially on higher-end items. “Individuals should select an auction house that is committed to handling your estate professionally, with the highest levels of integrity and transparency, and without charging extra hidden fees,” Schireson advises. “For example, we do not charge extra fees for photography or insurance.” After a seller’s agreement is signed, the auction company will quickly and professionally remove personal belongings from the home. This can usually be accomplished in one day. After being delivered to the auction gallery, items will be inventoried and catalogued. Soon after the auction, the seller will receive payment and an itemized settlement for estate-related purposes. Finally, a top auction house recognizes marketing as an important step in the process of connecting the right buyers with the right sellers. “Our auctions

UNDERSTANDING THE PROCESS

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 23


Photo courtesy of Donny Most

Donny Most

The actor who played Ralph Malph on “Happy Days” is now most happy performing on the stages of jazz and supper clubs By David Laurell

F

or those who grew up watching “Happy Days,” the popular ABC sitcom that ran for a decade beginning in the mid-1970s, the character of Ralph Malph conjures up a girl- and car-crazed jokester who, in spite of his jokes usually falling flat, never missed the chance to remind people: “I still got it!” The character of Ralph was brought to life by Donny Most, a Brooklyn-born actor who, at the age of nine, decided to pursue a career in show business after seeing the 1946 biopic, “The Jolson Story,” based on the life of Al Jolson, the singer, actor and comedian who dominated American entertainment in the first half of the 20th century. “That film had a very strong impact on me,” says Most who turned 62 this past August. “I became a huge Jolson fan. None of my friends had any idea who he was, but I was obsessed with him. I bought Jolson albums and would learn the songs and sing along to them. Then, when I was 13, at my bar

24 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

mitzvah, I got up and sang a few Jolson songs with the band and pretty much surprised the hell out of everybody.” Encouraged by many of those bar mitzvah attendees to do what he secretly hoped to do – pursue a career as a singer – Most finally mustered up the courage to discuss the idea with his parents. “No one in my family was in show business, so I was kind of embarrassed to really express my interest in that,” Most recalls. “But my parents understood it was what I wanted to do and they found a school in Manhattan that catered to young kids who were interested in singing and acting.”

SINGING AND SWINGING IN THE CATSKILLS Finding his niche as a singer during the first nine months of his training, Most was tapped for his first professional performance in 1968.

“The man who ran that school would pick certain kids to be a part of a professional troupe that performed in the Catskill Mountains during the summer, and in 1968, he picked me to be a part of the group,” Most says. “I was kind of a curiosity with my friends because of that. We were in a time of all this incredible music – The Beatles – all the emerging styles from rock to folk and blues and jazz. It was a fervent time for music. And yet, while I loved what was going on, I always felt my heart and soul was in Bobby Darin and Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cloe, Tony Bennett, Dean Martin and the Great American Songbook. That made me an anomaly and most of my friends thought I was sort of weird because I was into that kind of music.” Following his summer of performing in the Catskills, Most sat down with his father and expressed his desire to seriously pursue a career in entertainment. “He was very supportive and we found a really good acting coach and through


Photo courtesy of Bill Dow

her, I got an agent and a manager,” Most remembers. “Then I started going on auditions and getting work in commercials.”

THE PATH TO “HAPPY DAYS”

THE POST “HAPPY DAYS” DAYS When the curtain fell on “Happy Days” in 1984, Most continued to work. In addition to the 1999 feature film “EDtv,” 2005’s “Planting Melvin,” and “The Great Buck Howard,” which was released in 2008, he made guest appearances on “CHiPs,” “Baywatch,” “The Love Boat,” “Star Trek: Voyager,” “Diagnosis: Murder” and “Glee.” Most also carved out a niche as a voice actor on several animated productions.

BACK WITH HIS FIRST LOVE Today, along with acting and directing, mostly in independent film projects, Most has returned to his first love – singing the swinging standards. While his show, “Donny Most Sings and Swings,” may attract audiences who come because they remember him from “Happy Days,” they leave with a very different impression.

BUMMED BUT BELIEVING

“People are really surprised when they come to the show,” Most reasons. “They know me as an actor, but not as a singer. I’ve had people tell me they have been blown away, because in their minds, I’m Ralph from ‘Happy Days,’ not a guy in front of a big band doing jazz standards from the Great American Songbook and arrangements by Billy May and Nelson Riddle. I do Darin songs, not his rock ‘n’ roll stuff, but his standards and swing stuff, which he did as well as anyone. I also do Sinatra and Count Basie, Joe Williams and Tony Bennett and some less-recognizable blues and swing-era stuff.” Now a part of the grand tradition and class of Brooklyn-born music-makers, whose short list includes George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, Marvin Hamlisch, Neil Diamond and Barbra Streisand, Most shrugs when asked why he thinks his hometown borough has produced so many legendary entertainers. “It’s a great question,” he says. “I think maybe it has something to do with the fact that Brooklyn has always been a melting pot made up of immigrants from different countries who have brought about a vibrancy and a spirit.”

Photob By Hayley Sparks

Matriculating at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, Most found himself returning to New York for auditions on a regular basis. “I was still getting some work while I was in college and then, after my junior year, I went out to Los Angeles,” he explains. “My plan was just to go out for the summer, but while I was there, I started going on auditions and getting work on various television shows. That was when I had a meeting with my agent and my manager who felt that, because I was doing well, I should take time off from school and keep the momentum going. That was what eventually led to the ‘Happy Days’ interview and audition and screen test. And the rest – everyone knows.” Cast as Ralph on “Happy Days,” Most says he looked to numerous people he had known growing up to form the character’s persona. “There was very little of me in Ralph,” Most laughs. “He was maybe 10 percent me. Ninety percent of Ralph was people I had known back in Brooklyn – friends and the class comedians. Then, as time went by, the character evolved and the writers picked up on what I was doing. When the show first began, Ralph was just a peripheral character – kind of a wise guy who was into girls and cars. But as he evolved, he became a jokester. I would say he ultimately became a lot like Jerry Paris, who had been a comedic actor and was one of the show’s directors.”

While Most’s own vibrancy and spirit is clearly evident when he takes to the stage of jazz and supper clubs, he is acutely aware that it is the work he did over 30 years ago that still greatly resonates with his audiences. “I am so thankful for the people who come up to me and tell me how much ‘Happy Days’ has meant to them,” he says. “I’ve had people even get emotional telling me how watching that show helped them get through difficult times and how they thought of all of us – Ron [Howard], and Henry [Winkler], and Anson [Williams] – as a part of their family. I always feel so blessed and thankful when that happens. I am so grateful to have been a part of a show that had such a powerful impact.”

When not working, Most, an avid golfer, and his wife, Morgan, who loves tournament poker, enjoy spending time with their two children. Questioned about his thoughts on the passage of years, he rolls his eyes and says he isn’t the right person to come to for inspiring wisdom. “I’m no wise sage when it comes to offering any great philosophy about aging,” he laughs. “I have no inspirational thoughts or advice on the subject whatsoever. All I know is that every time I get ready to play golf, I have to take three Advils, because my back is really hurting and when I’m finished playing, my muscles don’t recuperate as quickly as they once did. So lately, I’ve been kind of bummed out about getting older. All I can say is, I’m really trying to watch my daily routine as far as getting exercise and eating right. I am a big believer in that. Getting exercise and eating right is so important, for everyone of every age, but so much more so as we get older. There are so many things I want to do over the next 25 years or more, and I know the only way I can do them is to stay healthy by taking care of myself. So that’s my advice: exercise, eat well and take care of yourself.” For more information on Donny Most and his upcoming show schedule, click on www.Donmost.net.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 25


Premieres Monday September 14 and Tuesday September 15 at 9:00 p.m. (two-night event)

Few creative figures before or since have held such a long-lasting place in American life and popular culture as Walt Disney. This two-part, four-hour film is an unprecedented look at the life and legacy of one of America’s most enduring and influential storytellers. From “Steamboat Willie” to “Pinocchio” to “Mary Poppins,” Disney’s movies grew out of his own life experiences. He told stories of outsiders struggling for acceptance and belonging, while questioning the conventions of class and authority. As Disney rose to prominence and gained financial security, his work became increasingly celebratory of the American way of life that made his unlikely success possible. The film features rare archival footage from the Disney vaults, scenes from some of his greatest films, and interviews with biographers and historians, animators and artists who worked on “Snow White” and other early films, and designers who helped create Disneyland.

Photo Courtesy of Condé nast arChive/Corbis

Walt Disney – New Documentary, PBS –

Life In Pieces – New Series, CBS –

Premieres Monday September 21 at 8:30 p.m.

The story of one big happy family and their sometimes awkward, often hilarious and ultimately beautiful milestone moments as told by its various members. Of the three siblings, middle child Matt, played by Thomas Sadowski, may have just found his true love; his coddled youngest brother, Greg, portrayed by Colin Hanks, and his wife are overwhelmed by the birth of their first child; and the eldest, Heather, played by Betsy Brandt, and her husband are dreading their impending empty nest so much, they’re considering having another baby. Their parents are Joan, played by Dianne Wiest, the family’s adoring matriarch who would do anything for her kids - as long as she agrees with it - and John, played by James Brolin, the gregarious patriarch who’s searching for ways to soften the blow of turning 70. As the family’s lives unfold in four short stories each week, they try to savor little pieces of time that flash by too quickly, because these moments add up to what life’s all about.

The Player - New Series, NBC - Premieres Thursday September 24 at 10 p.m.

This new one hour series is a high-octane thriller about a former intelligence officer, played by Wesley Snipes, who, while working as a security expert for the wealthy, is wrongly accused of the brutal murder of his wife. A syndicate of powerful people offers him freedom in exchange for stopping high-stakes crimes, as he continues to avenge his wife’s death and uncover the game-like conspiracy among his mysterious employers. He eventually realizes he’s a player in a long-standing tradition where the rich and powerful bet on the ultimate “game” – crime in our world.

Masterpiece: Indian Summers – New Miniseries, PBS –

Premieres Sunday September 27 at 9 p.m. (check local listings)

Julie Walters stars as the glamorous doyenne of an English social club in the twilight era of British rule in India. Set in a subtropical paradise, this nine-part series explores the collision of the high-living English ruling class with the local people agitating for Indian independence. As the drama unfolds, the two sides alternately clash and merge in an intricate game of power, politics and passion.

The Grinder- New Series, Fox - Premieres Tuesday September 29 at 8:30 p.m.

How many television lawyers does it take to try a real-life case in a reallife courtroom? “The Grinder” is a new comedy about a famous television lawyer at a crossroads. When his legal series ends, he decides to move back home and join his family’s real law firm - despite having no formal education, no bar certification, no license to practice and no experience in an actual courtroom. Dean Sanderson, played by Rob Lowe, spent eight seasons playing the title role on the hit legal drama “The Grinder.” Now he’s moving back to his hometown of Boise, Idaho, where his brother, Stewart, portrayed by Fred Savage, is a real-life attorney who is poised to take over the family law firm. It doesn’t take long for Dean to start injecting his show-biz drama into every aspect of Stewart’s life, both in the courtroom and at home. 26 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

The Best In SepTemBer Television Viewing By Sandi Berg

Tuned In To What’s On


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The Hallowed Hall of Must-Knowtables By David Laurell Illustration by Mark Hammermeister

Frank Lloyd

Wright

Recognized by the American Institute of Architects as “the greatest American architect of all time,” Frank Lloyd Wright designed homes, office buildings, churches, schools, skyscrapers, hotels and, perhaps most notably, New York’s Guggenheim Museum. A flamboyant and colorful character with extravagant tastes that outweighed his financial means, Wright believed structures should work in harmony with humanity and environment, a philosophy he called “organic architecture.”

B

orn Frank Lincoln Wright in Richland Center, Wisconsin in 1867, Wright changed his middle name from Lincoln to Lloyd in honor of his mother’s family name when he was a teenager. Because there was no evidence he actually graduated from Madison High School, Wright was admitted to the University of Wisconsin–Madison as a special student who studied civil engineering in 1886. After completing two semesters of college, he left school for Chicago where he was first hired as a draftsman and then went on to work as an architect for various prestigious firms. Wright, who never had a head for managing money, was constantly falling into financial turmoil due to his proclivity to live far beyond his means and feed his extravagant appetite for Japanese art, custom cars, expensive clothing, and all the finer things of life. In order to dig his way out of debt and continue his lavish lifestyle, Wright supplemented his income by doing independent commissioned work. While this may have helped to solve one problem, it caused another, because he found himself in breach of contract with his firm by doing outside work.

Deciding that working for someone other than himself was holding him back, Wright established his own firm in downtown Chicago and, in 1898, relocated his business into his Oak Park home. During the dawn of the 1900s, Wright designed and built houses that became known as “prairie style” homes, so-called because their designs complemented the surrounding environment. These designs, which featured extended low structures with shallow, sloping roofs, suppressed chimneys, overhangs and terraces made of unfinished materials, also ushered in the architectural concept of the “open plan.” By 1903, Wright, then a husband and father, had gained a reputation as a flirtatious and flamboyant man-about-town. He was blatant about his romantic dalliances, especially with Mamah Cheney, a woman with an artistic flair who embraced the early tenets of feminism, and who was also the wife of one of his clients. Mamah and Wright openly carried on their affair, which was known to both of their spouses, neither of whom would grant their cheating partners a divorce, and

This feature is intended for you to clip and give to your children or grandchildren because…they must-know! 28 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015


in 1909, the couple ventured to Europe together. During this time, Wright produced * a portfolio that included more than 100 lithographs of his designs, which was published by Berlin publisher Ernst Wasmuth in two editions. * Wright remained in Europe for the better part of a year setting up home with Mamah in Italy. During this time, Edwin Cheney granted Mamah a divorce, though Wright’s wife, Kitty, still refused to grant one to her husband. After Wright’s return to the United States in October of 1910, he persuaded his mother to purchase a large piece of property in Spring Green, Wisconsin adjacent to land that had been in her family for many years. It was there that Wright built himself an estate he named “Taliesin,” after the poet, magician and priest of Welsh mythology. On August 15, 1914, while Wright was away working on a project, one of his household employees, Julian Carlton, set fire to Taliesin. As the fire raged through the home’s living quarters, Carlton proceeded to run through the house and property with an axe killing seven people including Mamah, her two children by a previous marriage, three other Wright employees and one of their children. Immediately after the violent attacks, Carlton tried unsuccessfully to commit suicide, although he succumbed to starvation in prison shortly thereafter. In 1922, Kitty finally granted Wright a divorce. The following year, he married an artist, Maude “Miriam” Noel. The marriage of Wright and Mariam lasted only four years and he went on to marry Olga Ivanovna “Olgivanna” Lazovich Milanoff, a dancer and writer he met at a Petrograd Ballet performance in Chicago. On the work front, the 1920s saw Wright design a number of California homes using precast “textile” concrete blocks. During the later 1920s and 1930s, his organic style had fully matured with his design of the Graycliff estate just south of Buffalo, New York, and one of his most famous creations, Fallingwater, which has been called “the best all-time work of American architecture.” Fallingwater, a private residence at Mill Run in Western Pennsylvania that was completed in 1937, was designed with a stream running under part of the building and was constructed over a 30-foot waterfall in accordance with Wright’s desire to place the structure within its natural surroundings. During this time, he also designed and built Taliesin West, a winter home and studio complex in Scottsdale, Arizona. Having taken to designing his own clothing and accessories, Wright became a sartorial eccentric adorned in expensive suits, fancy ascots and cravats, porkpie hats and silk capes that flew in the breeze as he traveled in his yellow Mercer Raceabout, orange Cord convertible, and customized cherry-red Lincoln Continental. In 1959, Wright suffered an intestinal blockage. Surgery to correct the medical emergency failed and Wright died at the age of 91 in Phoenix, Arizona. His body was returned to his Wisconsin estate where, after a funeral service, a horse-drawn wagon carried his remains from Unity Chapel to a Wright family plot where his mother and Mamah, along with her two children, were interred. Wright’s “final resting place” would prove to be less than final. When Olgivanna died in 1985, it was revealed that her dying wish was that Wright’s body be disinterred, cremated and his ashes comingled with hers for burial at Taliesin West. Against an uproar by many Wright family members as well as the Wisconsin legislature, the legendary architect’s body was finally removed from his grave under the direction of the Taliesin Fellowship, cremated and sent to Scottsdale. There, his ashes were, reportedly, divided with a portion mixed with Olivanna’s and interred in a memorial garden at Taliesin West, while the remaining portion was spread over the Arizona desert. This action, compounded by the fact that his original gravesite in Wisconsin, though empty, is still marked with his headstone, continues to cause some confusion as to where Wright is actually buried.

“Frank Lloyd Wright: Complete Works, Vol. 2, 1917-1942” by Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer (Taschen America; Box Mul edition, 2010) “Frank Lloyd Wright: A Biography” by Meryle Secrest (University Of Chicago Press, 1998)

LEARN MORE While there are numerous books available about Frank Lloyd Wright, three of the essentials are: * “Frank Lloyd Wright: An Autobiography” (Pomegranate Communications, 2005)

Mark Hammermeister is an award-winning artist. His work is available for purchase at www.markdraws.com September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 29


Welcome to North Coast Rep’s New Season Whether you love hilarious comedies or heartwarming love stories, we’ve got a show for you! “Three words best describe ‘The Fox on the Fairway’... Hilarious, hilarious and hilarious. The audience was howling with joy.” — THE EXAMINER

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30 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

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Let’S Get OUt A Preview of Upcoming Events for September/October By Claire Yezbak Fadden

eNteRtAINMeNt TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 ONE MAN, TWO GUVNORS This delicious farce is set in swinging ’60s Brighton. Francis, a failed washboard player with an insatiable appetite, finds himself in the employ of both Roscoe, who is really his own twin sister (in disguise), and Stanley, a well-bred twit (who actually killed the real Roscoe). And that’s only the beginning. South Coast Repertory, Segerstrom Stage, 655 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa. Dates vary through Oct. 11. $22-plus. (714) 708-5555. scr.org. THE NERD Larry Shue’s comic masterpiece about an architect stuck in a rut whose life is suddenly upended by an old army buddy. Lamb’s Players Theatre, 1142 Orange Ave., Coronado. $52-plus. Through Sept. 20. (619) 437-6000. lambsplayers.org. THE COMEDY OF ERRORS A young man and his servant arrive in town, unaware that each of them has a separated-at-birth identical twin already there. This can’t end well—or maybe it can, but not before the unexpected double vision leads to furious wives, confused mistresses, scandalized family members, and general mayhem. The Old Globe, Lowell

Davies Festival Theatre (outdoors), 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, San Diego. $29plus. Through Sept. 20. (619) 234-5623. theoldglobe.org. THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 PAUL – THE ROAD TO DAMASCUS From his dramatic conversion on the road to Damascus to his trials and travels spreading the Gospel of Christ, the exciting life of Paul is recounted in this Biblical biography. LifeHouse Theater, 1135 N. Church St., Redlands. Thurs.Sun. through Sept. 27. $14-$18. (909) 3353037 ext. 21. lifehousetheater.com.

San Diego/Orange County/Inland Empire

September/October 2015

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 BLUEPRINTS TO FREEDOM: AN ODE TO BAYARD RUSTIN In the sweltering political and racial heat of 1963, Bayard Rustin, a brilliant architect of the Civil Rights Movement and an openly gay man, is enlisted to orchestrate an unprecedented March on Washington by colleagues that recently exiled him. La Jolla Playhouse, UCSD Campus, Sheila and Hughes Potiker Theatre, Mandell Weiss Theatre, 2910 La Jolla Village Dr., La Jolla. Through Oct. 4. Prices vary. (858) 550-1010. lajollaplayhouse.org.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 HELLO DOLLY Dolly Levi, the well-known matchmaker, attempts to find herself a husband in the wealthy Horace Vandergelder. Welk Resorts Theatre, 8860 Lawrence Welk Dr., Escondido. Dates vary through Nov. 15. $48-$75. (888) 802-7469. welktheatre.com. SAFARI ADVENTURE DINNER San Dimas Community Center, 245 E. Bonita Ave., San Dimas. $15. (909) 394-6290. DIXIELAND AT THE TCC Temecula Community Center, 28816 Pujol St., Temecula. $15. (866) 653-8696. temeculatheater.org.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 MARIINSKY BALLET: RAYMONDA One of the most elegant ballets of all time – and rarely seen in its entirety - the full-length “Raymonda” received its world premiere at the Mariinsky in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1898, the last masterpiece by Marius Petipa. It has remained one of the most celebrated works in the company’s vast repertory. Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Segerstrom Hall, 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa. Through Sept. 27. $29-plus. (714) 556-2787. scfta.org. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

BIG FISH Edward Bloom lives life to the fullest - and then some - as he spins incredible, largerthan-life stories that thrills all who are around him. Yet his son, about to have a child of his own, is determined to find the truth behind his father’s epic tales. Moonlight Amphitheatre, Brengle Terrace Park, 1200 Vale Terrace, Vista. Through Sept. 26. $24-$52. (760) 724-2110. moonlightstage.com.

DAVE KOZ/RICK BRAUN Special guest: Kenny Lattimore. Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay, 2241 Shelter Island Dr., San Diego. $55. (800) 745-3000. humphreysconcerts.com. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 CHAMPAGNE JAZZ George Benson Thornton Winery, 32575 Rancho California Rd., Temecula. $95. (951) 699-0099. thorntonwine.com/champagnejazz-series.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20

BLUE SKY RIDERS

In 2008, singer-songwriter Kenny Loggins was working with accomplished Nashville songwriter Gary Burr. Loggins was so excited about their collaboration that he asked Burr to form a band. Georgia Middleman’s voice was added to the mix. The result — tightly woven songs full of dazzling harmonies combining elements of country, pop and folk. Poway Center for the Performing Arts Foundation, 15498 Espola Rd., Poway. $45-$65. (858) 668-4798. powayarts.org.

IN YOUR ARMS Ten dance vignettes tell wordless stories of love, yearning and romance, and constitute a magical evening of movement and music performed by a cast of 20 talented dancers. Each vignette takes place in a different place and time, and the 10 dances range from duets to large ensemble numbers. Thrilling styles of dance from classical ballet to swing, tap to tango, rock ’n’ roll to Charleston, modern to jazz are celebrated with verve and nuance. The Old Globe Theatre, Sheryl and Harvey White Theatre, Conrad Prebys Theatre Center, 1363 Old Globe Way, Balboa Park, San Diego. $29-plus. Through Oct. 25. (619) 234-5623. theoldglobe.org. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 JAZZ WEDNESDAYS Laguna Beach Live All Stars. Laguna Beach Live, The Ranch at Laguna Beach, 31106 S. Coast Hwy, Laguna Beach. $22. (949) 7159713. lagunabeachlive.org.

OCEANSIDE HARBOR DAYS Two event filled days of sun, sand and surf provide an outstanding opportunity to experience fun activities including a sandcastle competition, entertainment stage, arts, crafts and food booth areas, a “Nail ‘n’ Sail Competition,” military and public safety displays. This festival features some 200 arts and craft exhibits, a tasty food court, costumed pirates and a beer garden. Also Sept. 27. Oceanside Harbor, beach side, N. Pacific St., Oceanside. oceansideharbordays.com.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 31


CALeNDAR

September/October 2015 San Diego/Orange County/Inland Empire

CHAMPAGNE JAZZ Boz Scaggs. Thornton Winery, 32575 Rancho California Rd., Temecula. $95. (951) 6990099. thorntonwine.com/champagne-jazzseries. ANAHEIM CRAFT AND VINTAGE FAIR Shop for one of a kind antiques and vintage collectibles and for handmade items from local crafters. Food will also be sold, including some Eastern European favorites, baked goods and homemade jam. Church tours, that will include viewing hand painted icons. Annunciation Byzantine Catholic Church, 995 N. West St., Anaheim. anaheimcraftfair@ gmail.com. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 THE OKEE DOKEE BROTHERS As childhood friends growing up in Denver, Colorado, Joe Mailander and Justin Lansing were born adventurers. The duo have put their passion for the great outdoors at the heart of their Americana folk music. Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Samueli Theater, 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa. $20-plus. (714) 556-2787. scfta.org. LIVE JAZZ ON THE PATIO Jimmy and Enrique. Bernardo Winery, Tasting Room Patio, 13330 Paseo Del Verano Norte, San Diego. Free. bernardowinery.com.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26

PEKING DREAMS

For more than 50 years, The National Circus and Acrobats of The People’s Republic of China has been entertaining and mesmerizing generations of audiences around the world with incredible feats. This special engagement features both the circus troupe and elite group of acrobats as they perform together in a program exhibiting Chinese cultural treasures such as acrobatic arts, Chinese circus and Peking Opera. Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa. $19-plus. (714) 556-2787. scfta.org.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 THE TIME JUMPERS WITH VINCE GILL Led by Vince Gill, The Time Jumpers are an assemblage of some of Nashville’s most sonically gifted musicians. Formed in 1998, the group quickly built a monumental following while earning two Grammy nominations. With unprecedented talent and a strong affinity for western swing, the 10-member group continues to expand the richness and vigor of country music. California Center for the Arts, Escondido, Concert Hall, 340 N. Escondido Blvd., Escondido. Prices vary. (800) 988-4253. artcenter.org. HEALING WARS This multisensory experience blends dance, storytelling and multimedia in an exploration of how soldiers and healers cope with the physical and psychological wounds of war. Incorporating narratives from the American Civil War, as well a remarkable performance from a young Navy veteran, this powerful piece asks how we as a nation recover from what seems like endless battles. La Jolla Playhouse, UCSD Campus, Sheila and Hughes Potiker Theatre, Mandell Weiss Theatre, 2910 La Jolla Village Dr., La Jolla. Through Oct. 25. Prices vary. (858) 550-1010. lajollaplayhouse.org.

OCTOBER THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1 JAZZ AT THE TCC Temecula Community Center, 28816 Pujol St., Temecula. $15. (866) 653-8696. temeculatheater.org.

32 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6

TOWER OF POWER Special guest: Average White Band. Humphrey’s Concerts by the Bay, 2241 Shelter Island Dr., San Diego. $55. (800) 745-3000. humphreysconcerts.com.

DISNEY’S THE LION KING Giraffes strut. Birds swoop. Gazelles leap. The entire Serengeti comes to life. And as the music soars, Pride Rock slowly emerges

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4 VIETGONE An all-American love story about two very new Americans. It’s 1975, and Saigon has fallen. He lost his wife. She lost her fiancé. But now in a new land, they just might find each other. Using his uniquely infectious style and skipping back and forth from the dramatic evacuation of Saigon to the here and now—playwright Qui Nguyen gets up close and personal to tell the story that led to the creation of…Qui Nguyen. South Coast Repertory, Segerstrom Stage, 655 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa. Dates vary through Oct. 25. $22-plus. (714) 708-5555. scr.org. LIVE JAZZ ON THE PATIO Whitney Shay. Bernardo Winery, Tasting Room Patio, 13330 Paseo Del Verano Norte, San Diego. Free. bernardowinery.com. COMPOSTING WORKSHOP Learn how to use your yard clippings as a resource, naturally achieve a beautiful, health yard and garden and reduce your use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. Living Coast Discovery Center, 100, Gunpowder Point Dr., Chula Vista. Shuttle to entrance from parking lot. $9-$14. Sundays. (619) 409-5900. thelivingcoast.org.

from the mist. Tony Award-winning director Julie Taymor brings to life a story filled with hope and adventure set against an amazing backdrop of stunning visuals. Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Segerstrom Hall, 600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa. Through Nov. 1. $31plus. (714) 556-2787. scfta.org. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7 I’M STILL GETTING MY ACT TOGETHER Based on Gretchen Cryer’s and Nancy Ford’s 1978 groundbreaking Off-Broadway musical. “Act One,” the original musical, introduces Heather, a 39-year-old divorced

song-writer attempting a comeback by ditching the romantic songs of her past for a more personal collection. “Act Two” visits Heather and her band 30 years later. Laguna Playhouse, 606 Laguna Canyon Rd., Laguna Beach. Dates vary through Nov. 1. $41-$66. (949) 497-2787. lagunaplayhouse.com. THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Based on the classic novel “Le Fantôme de L’Opéra” by Gaston Leroux, this play tells the story of a masked figure who lurks beneath the catacombs of the Paris Opera House, exercising a reign of terror over all who inhabit it. He falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine, and devotes himself to creating a new star by nurturing her extraordinary talents and by employing all of the devious methods at his command. San Diego Civic Theatre, Third and B St., 1100 Third Ave., downtown San Diego. Through Oct. 18. Prices vary. (619) 570-1100. broadwaysd.com.


September/October 2015 San Diego/Orange County/Inland Empire THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8 HARVEST TIME TAVERN Happy Hour Mocktail Social. San Dimas Community Center, 245 E. Bonita Ave., San Dimas. (909) 394-6290. FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9 THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ A new musical adaptation of Frank Baum’s wondrous American folktale about Dorothy Gale and her adventure in the land of Oz. Lamb’s Players Theatre, 1142 Orange Ave., Coronado. $52-plus. Through Nov. 15. (619) 437-6000. lambsplayers.org.

and quilters. Old Town San Diego State Historic Park, San Diego Ave. and Twiggs Str., San Diego. Free. (619) 220-5422. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 11 CHAMPAGNE JAZZ Jesse Cook. Thornton Winery, 32575 Rancho California Rd., Temecula. $65. (951) 6990099. thorntonwine.com/champagne-jazzseries. CELEBRITY READINGS: In conjunction with its “Ingenious! The World of Dr. Seuss” exhibition in Balboa Park, local celebrities read from their favorite Dr. Seuss books. San Diego History Center, Casa De Balboa, Balboa Park, 1649 El Prado, San Diego. $6-$8. (619) 232- 6203. sandiegohistory.org/seusscelebrityreadings.

eXHIBItIONS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16

HARVEST FESTIVAL The festive fall-themed atmosphere makes exploring the array of exhibits an exciting discovery of beautiful jewelry, blown glass, ceramics, hand woven clothing, photography, candles, wood carvings, garden designs, homemade sauces and soups, antique treasures, children’s accessories, sculptures and holiday ornaments. Ontario Convention Center; 2000 E. Convention Center Way, Ontario. Also Oct. 10-11. $4-$9. (800) 3461212. harvestfestival.com. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10 THE ADDAMS FAMILY You’re invited to Gomez and Morticia Addams’s annual family gathering, where you’ll rub elbows with the macabre and morbid, the cadaverous and crazy. Watch what happens when daughter Wednesday brings a normal boy and his stuffy parents to the party. Plummer Auditorium, 201 E. Chapman Ave., Fullerton. Through October 25. Ticket prices vary. (714) 589-2770. 3dtshows.com. PALM SPRINGS MODERNISM SHOW AND SALE Featuring 45 premier national and international decorative and fine arts dealers with items representing all design movements of the 20th century. A classic car show, plus book signings and other special events. Palm Springs Air Museum, 745 N. Gene Autry Trail, Palm Springs. Also Oct. 11. $15. palmspringsmodernism.com. OLD TOWN FALL FESTIVAL Enjoy fall crafts and children’s activities a la San Diego in the 1850s including pumpkin painting and corn-husk doll making. Carved jack-o-lanterns will be on display and pumpkin-carving demonstrations are part of the event. Volunteers offers a peek into life in California when it just becoming a state, including woodworkers, weavers, spinners

FIVE: NEW FACETS, DIVERSE EXPRESSIONS Artwork by Maria Evangelina Rodriquez, Therese Cipiti-Herron, Louanne Kroemshroeder-Davis, Judy Pike and Carol Freno. Bonita Museum and Cultural Center, 4355 Bonita Rd., Bonita. Wed.Sat. through Oct. 24. (619) 267-5141. bonitahistoricalsociety.org. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 MODERN TWIST Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art. This exhibition explores the innovative shape bamboo art has taken since the mid-20th century. The display features a stunning selection of works from the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture. With rare wall-hung installations and pieces never before seen in the United States, this exhibition both engages and educates audiences about a vibrant cultural art form. Bowers Museum, Mary Muth Wing 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana. Through Jan. 3. $10-$15. (714) 567-3679. bowers.org.

Jeff Horn, Gregory Hull, Mark Kerchhoff, Kevin MacPherson, Mian Situ and Jeff Yeomans. The Irvine Museum, 18881 Von Karman Ave., Irvine. Tues-Sat. through Sept. 24. Free. (949) 476-2565. irvinemuseum.org. MY GENERATION: YOUNG CHINESE ARTISTS This exhibition is an extended look at the new generation of artists emerging in mainland China since 2000, the year that China opened wide its doors to international artists and that Chinese artists began to command attention in the global arena. All artists represented in this exhibit were born after 1976—the end of the Cultural Revolution. Almost all of them are products of the One Child Policy and have grown up in a country with a high-powered market economy. Orange County Museum of Art, 850 San Clemente Dr., Newport Beach. Wed.-Sun. through Oct. 11. $10. (949) 75911122. ocma.net. ADAMS, CURTIS AND WESTON Photographers of the American West. This exhibition documents the changing landscape of the west and the art of photography through time as well as through the lenses of three of the most celebrated 20th century American photographers: Ansel Adams, Edward S. Curtis and Edward Weston. The photos range in date from 1905 to 1967 and depict a variety of subjects, including landscapes and portraits. Bowers Museum, Mary Muth Wing 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana. Through Nov. 29. $10$15. (714) 567-3679. bowers.org. MARCIA HAFIF: FROM THE INVENTORY Well-versed in a variety of media over her 50-year-career including photography, film,

CALeNDAR performance, writing and installations, this exhibition showcases Hafif’s austere monochrome works created since 1999. Although she also maintains a studio in New York, most of the works in this exhibition were created at her studio in Laguna Beach. Now in her mid-80s, Hafif continues to produce work. Laguna Art Museum, 307 Cliff Dr., Laguna Beach. Through Sept. 27. Closed Wednesdays. $5-$7. (949) 494-8971. lagunaartmuseum.org. INGENIOUS! THE WORLD OF DR. SEUSS The highly popular traveling Dr. Seuss exhibition includes signature elements for the Balboa Park Centennial, emphasizing San Diego as the renowned author’s home and Theodor Geisel as the world’s most celebrated children’s author and an innovator. The lively and whimsical exhibition features rare early works, ephemera, illustration and editorial cartoons, as well as two newly released Geisel illustrations. The Seuss-land gallery features giant bronze Seuss character sculptures, anchoring interactive family activities that emphasize the important themes and innovative nature of Seuss books. San Diego History Center, Casa De Balboa, Balboa Park, 1649 El Prado, San Diego. Through Dec. 31. $6-$8. (619) 232- 6203. sandiegohistory.org.

Get the Word Out. E-mail your announcements to Claire Fadden, cfadden@lifeafter50.com 60 days prior (or even earlier) to your event. Include a brief description, location, date, time, cost, phone and website. Submission does not guarantee publication.

SUNLIGHT AND SHADOW: THE TRADITION OF PLEIN AIR PAINTING The exhibition features a selection of the museum’s celebrated historic landscape paintings (one dating as old at 1890) alongside contemporary plein air works (some as recent as 2015). Featured historic California Impressionist artists include Anna Hills, John Gamble, Guy Rose, Louis Betts, Hansen Puthuff and Benjamin Brown. Contemporary artists include Peter Adams, Saim Caglayan, John Cosby, Dennis Doheny,

MAYA: HIDDEN WORLDS REVEALED

The ruined cities of the ancient Maya have captured imaginations since news of their discovery in the jungles of Central America was published in the 1840s. This exhibition tells the story through the eyes of Maya rulers and their loyal subjects. On display are more than 200 authentic artifacts, including spectacular examples of Maya artistry made by masters of their craft, along with objects from everyday life. San Diego Natural History Museum, 1788 El Prado, Balboa Park, San Diego. $15-$27. Through Jan 3. (619) 232-3821. sdnhm.org.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 33


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Rick Steves’ Travels The Bare Basics On European Beer

W

hen I’m far from home, I become a cultural chameleon. I eat and drink regional specialties with gusto, feasting on steak and red wine in Tuscany and stuffing down tapas at midnight in Spain. So when I travel to countries that are known for their beer, I morph into the best beer aficionado I can be. Germany is synonymous with beer, and there’s no better place to drink up than in Bavaria. German beer is regulated by the Reinheitsgebot (Purity Decree) of 1516 — the oldest food and beverage law in the world — which dictates that only four ingredients may be used: malt, yeast, hops, and water. You can order your beer “helles” (“light” but not “lite”) or “dunkles” (“dark”). Beer gardens go back to the days when monks brewed their beer and were allowed to sell it directly to the public. They stored their beer in cellars under courtyards kept cool by the shade of chestnut trees. Eventually, tables were set up, and these convivial eateries evolved. My favorite beer garden (and German beer) can be found an hour’s drive outside of Munich at the Andechs Monastery. The stately church stands as it has for centuries, topping a hill at the foot of the Alps. Its Baroque interior — and its beer hall — both stir the soul and stoke the appetite. The hearty meals served here come in medieval portions. Belgians would argue that they, not their German neighbors, have Europe’s best beer. With about 120 varieties and 580 different brands — more than any other country — locals take their beers as seriously as the French do their wines. But the best beers are not available from a tap. The only way to offer so many

excellent beers fresh is to serve them bottled. The best varieties generally are available only by the bottle. Belgian beers come in various colored ales, lagers, and white (wheat) varieties and are generally yeastier and higher in alcohol content than beers in other countries. “lambics,” popular in Brussels, are the least beer-like and taste more like a dry and bitter farmhouse cider. Another Belgian specialty is the “trappist” beer — heavily fermented, malty, and brewed for centuries by monks between their vespers and matins. While there, I also recommend you try a Westmalle, Rochefort, Chimay, or Orval beer. Belgians are exacting consumers when it comes to beer. Most special local beers are served in a glass unique to that beer. Connoisseurs insist that each beer’s character comes out best in the proper glass. If a bar runs out of a specific glass, the bartender asks if you’ll accept a similar glass. Many Belgians will switch beers rather than drink one from the wrong glass. Another devout beer region is the Czech Republic. Czechs are among the world’s most enthusiastic beer drinkers. Whether you’re in a restaurant or bar, a “pivo” (beer) will land on your table upon the slightest hint to the waiter, and a new serving will automatically appear when the old glass is almost empty. After the end of the Cold War, most former Communist countries had lots of workers going to Western countries for jobs, but Czechs say their workers mostly stayed in the Czech Republic as they couldn’t imagine living in a place without their beloved local brews. Czechs don’t go from bar to bar like many other Europeans. They have an old saying: “In one night, you must stay loyal to one woman and to one beer.” The Czechs invented Pilsner-style lager in Plzeň, and the result, Pilsner Urquell, is on tap in many pubs. Other good beers include

Krušovice, Gambrinus, Staropramen, and Kozel. “Budweiser Budvar” is popular with AnheuserBusch’s attorneys; the Czech and the American breweries for years disputed the name “Budweiser.” The solution: Czech Budweiser brewed in the city of Ceske Budejovice is sold under its own name in Europe but marketed as “Czechvar” in the U.S. The British are equally passionate about their pubs. Short for “public house,” pubs are a basic part of the social scene and an extended living room. Many were built in the late 1800s, when pubs were independently owned and land prices were high enough to make it worthwhile to invest in fixing them up. Brits take great pride in their beer, and many think that drinking beer cold and carbonated, as Americans do, ruins the taste. At pubs, long-handled pulls are used to pull traditional, rich-flavored “real ales” up from the cellar. These are the connoisseur’s favorites: fermented naturally, varying from sweet to bitter, often with a hoppy or nutty flavor. Short-handled pulls at the bar mean colder, fizzier, mass-produced keg beers that don’t taste as good — at least not to the Brits. Of course, beer tastes are subjective. What makes a fine beer in one country changes the second you go elsewhere. Experimenting is part of the fun. So wherever you are, belly up to the bar, try a local beer or two, and discover your own favorite brew.

Rick St eveS’ t RavelS

By Rick Steves

Rick Steves writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and radio. You can e-mail him at rick@ricksteves.com and visit his website at www.ricksteves.com.

September 2015 LIFEAFTER50.COM 35


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And Finally... The Bookworm’s Best A Life After 50 book review

by Terri “The Bookworm” Schlichenmeyer

Simple Lessons For A Better Life By Charles E. Dodgen

G

etting your news these days is a nerve wracking thing. Yes, you’re happy to be able to simply turn on the television or radio to keep informed on what’s going on in the world, or to social media to note cute cat videos, newborn babies, and neighbors having fun, but, who likes to hear and see the constant drumbeat of war, destruction, terrorism, grisly accidents, horrific deaths, political fighting and financial instability? Of course, keeping informed means taking the good with the bad, but, as people age, many feel as though there should be some sort of a better balance as to the information they allow into their brains. Seek it in “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” by Charles E. Dodgen. Things sure have changed since the baby boomers were kids. That’s a common sentiment in today’s world, although people have probably been uttering it since two years after time began. But things are, in fact, different today, largely because of the news we are bombarded with on a constant basis. With all of this negative information and bad news coming at us from every direction, how do we not exist in a perpetual state of fear and misery? Dodgen, a clinical psychiatrist, answers that question with what he found in, of all places, a nursing home. As we age, and especially when we pass our 50s, everyone endures bad news, personal loss, suffering and pain to some degree, but, according to Dodgen, there is a way to overcome those things. “Pain and suffering in life is inevitable,” he writes, “but a good support system can help overcome it to the point of toleration.” His advice is to take comfort in knowing simple love and companionship can work wonders in helping you overcome the negative aspects of life, and he encourages readers to reach for those things and give them. The author also suggests we keep in mind that we are our own best health plan, and that we all have the power to improve our own attitude and experiences, love our bodies, and balance our minds by what we allow ourselves to be exposed to. He preaches that while there’s pain and suffering in life, what matters is how we handle it and what we do about it. War, racial tensions, financial upheavals, personal problems and losses – the list of woes you have to deal with all depends on your personal situation, what you allow into your life, and how you deal with those things. “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” may help you overcome the depression that comes with bad news, negativity, pain and loss – or it may not. As self-help books go, this one is unique. By examining the emotions of those who’ve lost a lot (home, partner, independence, health) and have moved to a nursing home, Dodgen shows how richer lives can emerge from adversity. Yes, it sounds simplistic (and there are parts where it definitely is), but what the author consistently writes makes sense on at least some level, although that may take a bit of between-the-lines reading. This is not a book of wisdom so much as it’s a book of inspiration that needs to be savored and pondered in order get the best from it. If you’re dealing with personal adversity or just find yourself becoming depressed by watching too much news, “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” may be just the thing to put some balance in your life “Simple Lessons for a Better Life” by Charles E. Dodgen, 2015, Prometheus Books, $18.00, 288 pages. The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer who lives on a hill with two dogs and more than 12,000 books. You can read more of her book reviews at www.lifeafter50.com. Just click on “Entertainment” and then “Book Reviews.”

A Look Back

Just A Thought Before We Go

F

ifty years ago this month, Frank Sinatra, approaching his 50th birthday, released his album “September of My Years.” The Reprise Records offering included orchestral arrangements by Gordon Jenkins, marking the composer’s fifth studio collaboration with Sinatra. Peaking at Number Five on Billboard’s Pop Albums chart, the release of this album marked a resurgence in popularity for Ol’ Blue Eyes. From “Don’t Wait Too Long,” “Last Night When We Were Young” and “The Man in the Looking Glass,” to “It Was a Very Good Year,” “When the Wind Was Green,” “Hello, Young Lovers,” “I See It Now,” “Once Upon a Time” and “September Song,” the collection of reflective songs that dealt with aging resonated with Sinatra’s fans, many who, like him, were entering the autumn of their lives. Sinatra’s recording of “It Was a Very Good Year” would go on to win the Grammy Award for Best Male Vocal Performance and also Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying a Vocalist. The album was remastered in 1998 as Reprise and Capitol Records partnered for their “Entertainer of the Century” series. While that 1998 version of the album is currently out of print, Concord Records again remastered and reissued “September of My Years” in 2010 with two bonus tracks, a live performance of “This Is All I Ask” that was recorded in 1984 at Carnegie Hall, and the 1968 single “How Old Am I?

38 LIFEAFTER50.COM September 2015

“Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.” – Chili Davis


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IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: WEMTALK offer valid on 400 minute plan and applies to new GreatCall customers only. Offer valid until plan is changed or cancelled. Jitterbug is owned by GreatCall, Inc. Your invoices will come from GreatCall. All rate plans and services require the purchase of a Jitterbug phone and a one-time set up fee of $35. Coverage and service is not available everywhere. Other charges and restrictions may apply. Screen images simulated.There are no additional fees to call GreatCall’s U.S. Based Customer Service. However, for calls to an Operator in which a service is completed, minutes will be deducted from your monthly balance equal to the length of the call and any call connected by the Operator, plus an additional 5 minutes. Monthly minutes carry over and are available for 60 days. If you exceed the minute balance on your account, you will be billed at 35¢ for each minute used over the balance. Monthly rate plans do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges. Prices and fees subject to change. We will refund the full price of the GreatCall phone and the activation fee (or set-up fee) if it is returned within 30 days of purchase in like-new condition. We will also refund your first monthly service charge if you have less than 30 minutes of usage. If you have more than 30 minutes of usage, a per minute charge of 35 cents will be deducted from your refund for each minute over 30 minutes.You will be charged a $10 restocking fee. The shipping charges are not refundable. Jitterbug and GreatCall are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. Samsung is a registered trademark of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. ©2015 Samsung Electronics America, LLC. ©2015 GreatCall, Inc. ©2015 firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.


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