Page 1

LIEZEL PIMENTEL PORTFOLIO


LIEZEL PIMENTEL INTRODUCTION Thank you for taking a look at my work. I received my Master of Architecture degree in 2012 from the University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. I am available for full-time, part-time, and freelance work. With a passion for socially responsible/responsive design, I am eager to share my wide array of skills with firms and organizations committed to similar pursuits. For further information, please contact me at: liezel.pimentel@gmail.com or (630) 854-2640. Hope you enjoy the work!

04 / THESIS: DESTRUCTION OF A DAM 14 / DISMANTLED 22 / BALANCING TRANSITIONAL HOUSING 30 / AGENCIES OF INFILTRATION 34 / PEINETA PLAZA 38 / OTHER WORK

00

02 GRADUATE

University of Michigan Master of Architecture with Distinction


42 / PERFORMANCE SPACE 46 / URBAN INFILL 52 / MIXED USE 56 / CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

62 64 65 65 66

40

60

68

UNDERGRADUATE

PROFESSIONAL

OTHER

University of Illinois Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies Minor Sociology

/ LEVY RESTAURANTS / CRITICALPRODUCTIVE, INC. / BETTER FUTURE INTERNATIONAL / ARCHIVE INSTITUTE / COMPETITIONS

CONTENTS 2005 - 2012

CONTENTS / 01


OBJECTIVE Going in to the University of Michigan, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, I viewed this as an opportunity to discover and understand why and for who we design for. The following projects attempt to frame and encourage the audience as active participants in increasing individual and communitywide sustainability and their capacity to develop and grow.

02 / GRADUATE


GRADUATE

04 / THESIS: DESTRUCTION OF A DAM 14 / DISMANTLED 22 / BALANCING TRANSITIONAL HOUSING 30 / AGENCIES OF INFILTRATION 34 / PEINETA PLAZA 38 / OTHER WORK

GRADUATE / 03


DESTRUCTION OF A DAM

THESIS / INTERACTIVE WATER MANAGEMENT IN CHICAGO, IL ADVISOR: KATHY VELIKOV

In an attempt to reorient the concept of water infrastructure and unpack how we negotiate, manage, and access water, the representations, uses, and manipulations of this liquid resource are explored through “Destruction of a Dam”. Flooding and its consequences continue to be a global concern, motivating this exploration into the American-style of artificial water control, including the design, intent, and demolition of dams and the networks they comprise. The perception of hubris - that water should serve man - induced the fervor of dam building and canal construction during the 20th century, changing the nature of rivers, lakes, and entire ecologies - implications that only recently began to be assessed with the formation, in 1997, of the World Commission on Dams. Recent North American efforts involve the decommissioning and destruction of dams.

Destruction of a Dam works in the condition of a decommissioned, less regulated Chicago River and Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC). Now over 110 years old, the CSSC, the Engineering Monument of the Millennium, as awarded by the American Society of Civil Engineers, has allowed Chicago, IL to prosper and become the city it is today. Maintained by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC), this governing body attempts to further assuage the movement and “wildness” of water with the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan. The designs for this project involve six locations along the canal, working as a network and engaging each of the other sites along the way from Lake Michigan to the Lockport, IL dam where the system meets the Des Plaines River to continue to flow into the Gulf of Mexico.

ARCHIVE

MCCOOK RESERVOIR

YS DA

TO

MO

NT

H

S

CA DE DE

HE

RE

S

TO

MI

LLE

TO

YE

AR

WE

EKS

S

NIA

SH

TYPICAL RECHARGE TIMELINE

AN D TA RY

21 MI LE S HA PP EN S BE TW EE N

LOCKPORT POWERHOUSE, LOCK AND DAM

DE

SP

IN LA

ES

ER

RIV

CH IC

PR

AY

AG O

SA NI

PLAY


CA NA L

HI P

< VIDEO / DESTRUCTION OF A DAM

The first tool utilized was film, allowing the tone of the thesis to be expressed concisely and in an engaging manner. The documentary is a compilation of events and ideas associated with water infrastructure exposing the attitude of hubris that still exists in the design, planning, maintenance, and destruction of water coercion mechanisms.

<

> ABSTRACTED PERSPECTIVE RENDERING

This drawing was developed to present the immensity of data gathered in such a way that the audience could grasp the physical conditions that exist along the river and canal and the relationships between sites.

PROGRAMS 1. BATHE 2. DRINK 3. EAT 4. ARCHIVE 5. PRAY 6. PLAY

EAT DRINK

BATHE


ATLAS OF THE NEW CHICAGO SANITARY AND SHIP CANAL Data was collected, mapped, and analyzed utilizing GIS and AutoCAD software to provide exact locations of the specified sites and to present their relationships to existing geographies, boundaries, jurisdictions, land-use, and more, providing visual understanding of the infrastructure’s network. The actual atlas is a set of eleven clear acrylic sheets with each layer depicting a set of data. The atlas is laser-cut, laser-etched, and painted to portray the connections between the data. Below is a sample set of six of the eleven sheets.

CH

41° 51' 51.08" N 87° 38' 04.67" W

STICKNEY WAT ER RECLAMATIO N PLAN

T

CHICAGO HARBOR

LAKE MICHIGAN

R I C AG O R IVE

41° 53' 18.72" N 87° 36' 43.21" W

41° 49' 17.77" N 87° 46' 22.93" W

41° 46' 48.21" N 87° 49' 57.41" W

MCCOOK RES

IC CH

O AG

SH

LA

IP

IN E

CA

S

RI

NA L

VE

R

ERVOIR

Y AR NIT SA

D AN

41° 42' 27.16" N 87° 55' 45.34" W

CALU MET - SA GA NA

41° 34' 14.03" N 87° 04' 44.63" W

EVENT

LOCKPORT

WATER

LOCK & DAM

WATER BOD

IES CANAL WATER MAN

AGEMENT STRU

0

6 SITES CHOSEN

MILES

for their variety and significance to water management. 06 / GRADUATE / DESTRUCTION

CTURE

PROJECT SITE

3

WATER GEOGRAPHY

existing water bodies, both artificial and natural, and water management structures.

FLOOD ZONES

areas affected during overflows.


Water created the region and continues to support its growth. The canal, its dam, locks, and other mechanisms designed to control the movement of water from Lake Michigan are over a century old, establishing the ecologies along the waterway as a sort of second nature. The newer tunnels, reaching 350 feet below these canals, meant to filter and control the water will eventually become the new ecology.

STICKNEY

LYONS

FOREST VIEW MCCOOK

SUMMIT HODGKINS

JUSTICE

WILLOW SPRING

S

LEMONT

ROMEOVILLE

LOCKPORT

CHICAGO MET

RO REGION

ADJACENT

CITIES

CHICAGO METRO REGION urban landscape boundary.

50 FOOT CON

TOURS

ADJACENT CITIES

communities directly affected.

50 FT CONTOURS

elevation changes within the site. DESTRUCTION / GRADUATE / 07


START OF THE MWRDGC JURISDICTION [MAIN BRANCH]

CHOSEN SITES: REIMAGINED AS PUBLIC:

LOCKPORT LOCK & DAM

SUBURBAN FOREST

DEEP TUNNEL PUMPING STATION

RECREATION SPACE

WATER TEMPLE

SEWER MUSEUM

REIMAGINED WATERS ARE USED BY THE INDIVIDUAL, TAKING PRECEDENCE OVER THE DISAPPEARING BOAT CULTURE


[MAIN BRANCH] END OF THE MWRDGC JURISDICTION

STICKNEY WATER RECLAMATION PLANT

INDUSTRIAL SPACE

CHICAGO HARBOR

FLOATING EATERY

RECLAMATION LANDSCAPE

POOL & BEACH


CANAL ANALYZED

The section drawing below provides details about the construction of the canal and the supporting sewer system, giving an idea of scale, volume, and context. The land use that existed along the canal largely included meatpacking, echoed in the floating silhouettes, to emphasize the fact that what occurred along the canal consequentially affected the condition of the canal. Highlighted in red are trouble spots along the limestone walls of the canal structure. This highly controversial canal may be closed and re-reversed to flow back into Lake Michigan. As an aging infrastructure (over 112 years old), its status is currently rated as 2 or “Urgent” by the United States Army Corps of Engineer’s Dam Safety Action Classification (left). USACE DAM SAFETY ACTION CLASSIFICATION I. URGENT & COMPELLING II. URGENT III. HIGH PRIORITY IV. PRIORITY V. NORMAL 30’-0”

CLAY

CONCRETE

ROCKFILL

35’-0”

FINELY CRYSTALLINE DOLOMITIC BEDROCK

16’-0”

170’ to 300’

4’-0”

OVERBURDEN OVERBURDEN

CONCRETE

37’-0”

9’-0”

578.7’ ABOVE SEA LEVEL (FLUCTUATES)

3’-0”

0’

10’

30’

60’

100’


SITES ANALYZED

The design proposal works in the condition of a less regulated canal, in which the waters are allowed to flow naturally, without the sluice gates at the Chicago River Controlling Works and the dam in Lockport maintaining the specific levels of 0.5-2 ft below the mean sea level of 579.48 ft. Six specific locations have been chosen along the canal for design intervention. Conditions chosen are urban, industry and park, industry and industry, the main pumping station of the Deep Tunnel Project, the forested suburbs, and the lock and dam at its conclusion. Rather than merely erasing the existing, and established â&#x20AC;&#x153;second natureâ&#x20AC;?, of the crumbling limestone canal and its mechanisms, the design appropriates these existing structures to reinvent the use of the canal, in order to more fully engage the people, animals, and environments they exist within. The interventions interact with the fluctuations in water levels to establish a dynamic system designed for change, decay, and transformations of the waterscape.

STICKNEY, IL

4 MILES

HODGKINS, IL

LEMONT, IL

LOCKPORT, IL

8 MILES

STICKNEY, IL

CHICAGO, IL

CHICAGO, IL

Lockport: 570

14 MILES

7 MILES

4 MILES

8 MILES

4 MILES


SITES 2 & 5 DESIGNED [SAMPLE SET OF 6] 0’

25’

50’

100’

OUTFALL EXPOSED

SITE 5: WATER TEMPLE

SITE 2: RECLAMATION LANDSCAPE

F

Before passing under the disused St. Charles Air Line Bridge [18th Street Railroad Bridge], pedestrians will be welcomed by a landscape of polders, taller than the actual ground level, creating island like massings when waters are high. The polders help slow runoff and the central waste stabilization pond begins the water treatment process, especially important due to the waste exiting the existing, and now more fully exposed, outfall. The landscape, once industrial with some plant life, is now a park, educating users about low impact development strategies for wastewater.

O TH PA ER RM O

R GO ICA CH HE FT

R IVE

WASTE STABILIZATION POND OUTFALL EXPOSED

ER AT FW NO TIO

EC DIR

12 / GRADUATE / DESTRUCTION

The imagery and concept of water towers is transformed by this trio of 70’ water towers. The forests once hid the CSSC from the public but these structures reveal the water system to the surrounding suburbs. Each tower is accessible and climbable with stairs that spiral along its core, even into the canal water. The public can then walk across the wide bowl-like top with opportunities to see and touch the water inside. Towers store water for emergency situations; this intervention allows visitors to honor the resource and cherish their current conveniences.

FL

OW

EC DIR

ER AT FW NO TIO

FL

OW


PONTOON BRIDGE

It became evident that the designs were a bit lofty in scale. With the intention of making water accessible at a more personal scale, I concluded the proposal with a bridge design. This bridge is found throughout the site. It is designed as pontoon bridge. It is a multi-level design, with the lower platform at times merely seeming to float on top of the water or completely submerged. This gives the user the opportunity to dangle their feet or almost bathe depending on the variance of the water elevation. The structure goes between double barrel to single barrel pontoons.

+1.0’

CHICAGO CITY DATUM

AI RP

OCKE

T FOR BUOY

CY AN

+1.0’

CHICAGO CITY DATUM

AI RP

OCKE

T FOR BUOY

CY AN

PHYSICAL MODEL


DISMANTLED

SITUATION

I focused my efforts on creating a hybrid museum and junkyard on the 230+ acre former manufacturing complex of Buick City in Flint, Michigan, a city known as “Vehicle City”. The project seeks to reinterpret the “legacy” and “heritage” of the city and car branding. As a critique on the automotive industry, it places more responsibility for automobile post-use in the hands of the corporation and hopes to provide jobs to those skilled individuals who had originally pieced the vehicles together.

14 / GRADUATE / DISMANTLED

Schnitzer Steel, El Monte, CA

Iron Ore Mine

All automotive attractions adopt aspects of the vehicle lifetime: research, design and development, production, and use & maintenance. A deeper mapping of the vehicle lifetime was conducted to understand the processes, materials, places, regions, and environments that all these events occurred in. However, information regarding the end process/end-of-life vehicle is lacking and barely represented in any corporate automotive museum.

LANDSCAPE

Corporations are not only represented by their office buildings but, more increasingly, by their “corporate museums”. In an attempt to establish a “legacy”, these brands perpetuate the curation of the spectacle, which is especially evident in the automotive industry. Analysis was conducted on over 50 corporate owned and sponsored automotive museums including in-depth visits to the General Motors Heritage Center and the Ford River Rouge Plant in Michigan. It became evident from this catalog of data that these corporations were trying to create a “brand experience”.

Nissan Design America, San Diego, CA

DESIGN, RESEARCH, & DEVELOPMENT

STUDIO / AUTOMOTIVE DISMANTLING FACILITY IN FLINT, MI ADVISOR: NAHYUN HWANG


x 248,231,351 CARS ON THE ROAD H I G H W A Y

D E A L E R S H I P

J U N K Y A R D

x 10,628,811 CARS SCRAPPED IN 2010

Trademark Metals Recycling, Ocala, FL

USE & SERVICE

Harryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s U-Pull-It, West Hazleton, PA

Circle Interchange, Chicago, IL

Longo Toyota, El Monte, CA

Chicago Assembly, Chicago, IL

GM Metal Fabrication Division, Parma, OH

PRODUCTION END-OF-LIFE MANAGEMENT


DESIGN, RESEARCH, & DEVELOPMENT

PRODUCTION

USE & SERVICE

END-OF-LIFE MANAGEMENT

DEPOLLUTION

SHREDDING

Coolant / Waste Oil / Brake Fluid / Waste Oil

SORT: M

REGISTRATION

D R A Y K N U J


METALS

< MAPPINGS

Significant aspects of the Flint landscape, as divided into land use parcels are indicated in pink. Left: The pink parcels are indicative of current locations used for automotive design, production, and service. Middle: The significant parcels are those currently used as junkyards and abandoned automotive facilities. Right: This large swathe depicts the former site of Buick City, a 230+ acre car and truck production site. It is no longer in use and is the location for the project. Due to heavy contamination, from years of vehicle manufacturing runoff, remediation and further prevention strategies are implemented throughout the design to rehab the landscape.

<

> DIAGRAMMATIC DEPICTION OF VEHICLE TIMELINE

As a continuation of the diagram on the previous page, the drawing depicts the process from start to end and back again. This portion of the diagram indicates the program for the design. The graph below presents what materials are found in vehicles and the relative amount that can be recycled.

FERROUS METALS

% RECYCLED

NON-FERROUS METALS GLASS THERMOPLASTICS PU SEAT FOAM THERMOSET PLASTICS OTHER RUBBER BATTERY FLUIDS OTHER

AUTOMOBILE SHREDDER RESIDUE (ASR)

COMPONENTS

END-LIFE

REPEAT SORT: NON-FERROUS

SORT: ASR

DISTRIBUTION / waste


1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 < 2010 | GENERAL MOTORS COMPANY LLC.

< 2009 | GM CHAPTER 11 REORGANIZATION

< 1998 | BUICK HEADQUARTERS MOVES TO DETROIT

1901 | FLINT AUTOMOBILE COMPANY 1902 | A. B. C. HARDY, FLINT’S FIRST AUTO MANUFACTURER | FLINT BODY COMPANY 1903 | BUICK MOVES TO FLINT | FLINT AUTOMOBILE COMPANY < 1904 | IMPERIAL WHEEL WORKS MOVES TO FLINT 1906 | WESTON-MOTT MOVES TO FLINT 1908 | CHAMPION IGNITION | GENERAL MOTORS | WILLIAM A. PATTERSON CO. 1909 | CHAMPION IGNITION BECOMES AC SPARK PLUG COMPANY 1911 | CHEVROLET MOTOR CAR CO. | LITTLE MOTOR CAR CO. | MASON MOTORS 1912 | CHEVROLET PURCHASES IMPERIAL WHEEL WORKS 1912 | FLINT BODY COMPANY 1913 | CHEVROLET ABSORBS LITTLE 1915 | CHEVROLET ABSORBS MASON MOTORS < 1915 | DORT MOTOR COMPANY 1916 | MICHIGAN LUMBER AND FUEL CO. 1917 | WESTON-MOTT BOUGHT OUT BY BUICK < 1920 | DURANT MOTORS HEADQUARTERS 1922 | FLINT MOTOR CAR CO. / FISHER BODY 1923 | GM HEADQUARTERS MOVES TO DETROIT 1924 | DORT MOTOR COMPANY v

1898 | W.F. STEWART CO.

< 1895 | DURANT-DORT CARRIAGE CO.

1886 | FLINT ROAD CART CO. FOUNDED BY WILLIAM DURANT AND JOSIAH DORT

1881 | W.F. STEWART CO. < 1882 | FLINT WAGON WORKS

DESIGN, RESEARCH, & DEVELOPMENT

< 2010 | GM POWERTRAIN, FLINT NORTH

2006 | AC SPARK PLUG

2004 | CHEVY IN THE HOLE

2002 | BUICK NO. 40

< 2000 | FLINT ENGINE SOUTH

1990 | WATER STREET PAVILION < 1990 | GM SERVICE PARTS OPERATIONS

KEY CLOSURE / CORPORATE REORGAINZATION FLINT COMMUNITY

1998 | STRIKE AT GENERAL MOTORS PARTS FACTORY

1999 | BUICK CITY

1996 | CHEVY IN THE HOLE, BUILDING 35 DONATED TO KETTERING UNIVERSITY

1985 | WATER STREET PAVILION

1985 | AUTOWORLD, FLINT, MI

< 1984 | AUTOWORLD, FLINT, MI

1982 | SAFETYVILLE, U.S.A.

1981 | HYATT REGENCY HOTEL

< 1971 | SAFETYVILLE, U.S.A.

< 1968 | BUICK WORKER STRIKE

< 1955 | BUICK WORKER STRIKE

1950 | BUICK GALLERY AND RESEARCH CENTER

< 1945 | GM STRIKE

1938 | FIRST “FLINT MOTOR FESTIVAL”

< 1936 - 1937 | FLINT SIT-DOWN STRIKE

1936 | STREETCARS REPLACED WITH TROLLEY BUSES

1934 | FLINT STREETCAR AND BUS DRIVER STRIKE

1930 | BRIEF STRIKE AT FISHER BODY NO. 1

< 1918 | GM’S MODERN HOUSE CORPORATION BUILDS HOMES ON 280 ACRES FOR EMPLOYEES / CIVIC PARK 1919 | GENERAL MOTORS INSTITUTE BEGINS NIGHTLY CLASSES

< 1905 | NAMED “VEHICLE CITY”

1900 | FIRST FLINT-MADE CAR IN LABOR DAY PARADE

< 1885 | CARRIAGE TOWN OCCUPIED BY INDUSTRY WORKERS

USE & SERVICE

1988 | COLDWATER ROAD PLANT

1987 | FLINT PLANT NO. 1 / FISHER BODY NO. 1

< 1987 | CHEVY IN THE HOLE BECOMES AC SPARK PLUG FLINT WEST

1984 | CHEVROLET FLINT MOTOR PLANT NO. 4

1984 | BUICK CITY PROJECT BEGINS

1983 | REAR WHEEL DRIVE CARS CEASE PRODUCTION

< 1972 | DELPHI ON INDUSTRIAL

1970 | FLINT PLANT NO. 2

1953 | COLDWATER ROAD PLANT < 1953 | FIRST CORVETTE BUILT 1953 | FLINT V8 PLANT 1954 | FLINT FRAME & STAMPING PLANT 1957 | NATIONAL PARTS DISTRIBUTION

< 1947 | CHEVY ASSEMBLY DIVISION / TRUCK ASSEMBLY

1942 | GRAND BLANC PLANT / GRAND BLANC WELD TOOL CENTER

1938 | BUICK NO. 35 < 1939 | NO. 84 PARTS AND SERVICES

< 1926 | FISHER BODY NO. 1

< 1919 | BUICK NO. 40 1919 | NO. 28 FLINT MOTOR AXLE FACTORY

1911 | FIRST CLOSED-BODY CAR (BUICK) 1913 | CHEVROLET PRODUCTION MOVES TO FORMER IMPERIAL WHEEL PLANT, CHEVROLET NO. 2 1913 | LITTLE PLANT BECOMES CHEVROLET NO. 1

1909 | BUICK FACTORY NO. 11 | BUICK PLANT NO. 35

< 1906 | BUICK PLANT NO. 1

1904 | FIRST BUICK MODEL B

< 1880 | AREA FORESTS CUT OVER, LARGE SCALE LUMBERING ENDS

< 1871 | LUMBER INDUSTRY PEAKS

PRODUCTION

POPULATION 196,940

2010


< FLINT, MICHIGAN TIMELINE

The timeline provides important events in the automotive history of Flint, both positive and negative, categorized by their place in the stages of vehicle design and production. The automotive culture is embedded in the city; it is the birthplace of General Motors, the site of significant United Auto Workers strikes, and more. Since the city is based on this industry, an idea of population change is provided with the grey bars.

> AXONOMETRIC LANDSCAPES BUICK CITY BOUNDARIES AND SITE PLAN

CONTAMINATION, EPA REPORTS

SPECIFICALLY PLUMES OF LIGHT NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

SIDEWALK DESIGN

CONTAMINATION IS NOW EVENT SPACE, ACCESSED BY SIDEWALKS TO CREATE JUNKPARK

TRAIN INFRASTRUCTURE

DESIGN

IMPLEMENTATION WITH SITE PLAN

DISMANTLED / GRADUATE / 19


SITE PLAN N

0’

225’

< RENDERINGS

550’

1100’

Top: Education Plaza Middle: Automotive storage features pervious paving to help filter fluids and contaminated runoff from cars and custom salvage racks for ease, efficiency, safety, and cleaner storage methods Bottom: Junkpark spectacle


DISMANTLED / GRADUATE / 21


>>

:

g

jo

in

c

y

rta

tion.he

al

th

>>

The program provides both private and public spaces for expression through voice/music (performance spaces to isolation booths) and strength training (gymnasiums to meditation spaces). Utilizing the existing auditorium and gymnasium at the front of John Marshall Elementary, the building gradually progresses from public and open spaces to more private and introspective spaces when circulating towards the north end and upper floors of the building. The building includes amenities typically found in transitional housing such as childcare, healthcare, & job training, which can be found in the 3-floor tower addition.

living space

a voice

t

po

rt

hous

Single Mothers

e ar

fo

ns

:

a .s t e

n ity

t ools

om

uc

o mmu

s uppo

om

ng . ed

e. safety

.c

.h

ai ni

c

With homeless shelter funds recently cut from Detroit city budgets and a lack of low-income housing, the focus audience are the marginalized community of single female-headed households, at high risk of homelessness, and battered women seeking refuge. Typologies of transitional housing were examined and innovated beyond the typical provisions of empowerment in order to create a living and event space that attempts to address all foundations and literally provide and accommodate the opportunity for transition.

b

tr

a r mt h .c

l dc a re. chi t n. y . s t a b i ra io ri t li u

STUDIO / TRANSITIONAL HOUSING IN DETROIT, MI ADVISOR: MIREILLE RODDIER

e.w

rt

v lo

TIERS OF EMPOWERMENT

BALANCING TRANSITIONAL HOUSING

>>

independence

PROVIDING A VOICE

> PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

private on

a

per ssi

nc

e.

zumba. sel

p r es sion

ll

us

is

yoga

e

ex

a l p e r for

physical

yt

ic

a voice

nse.exe rc

audio

ffe

.d

nc

ex e.

de

ma

private

st or

in

g.singi ng.

m

“Where I can always go” is the first tier of empowerment. We need a LIVING SPACE and the comfort, safety, security, and stability it affords. The next tier are the tools such as job training, education, healthcare, etc. to help one lead an INDEPENDENT and healthy lifestyle. Tools should not include critiquing one’s parenting style or lifestyle – the tools should be given but not enforced, allowing the individual, in this case the single mother, the ability to “make your own rules”. The last tier of empowerment is support which comes in the form of love, warmth, and community, the latter of which is especially lacking in the homeless spectrum. It is this support that provides the “chance” and “belonging” that the homeless need, giving them A VOICE.

soundproof enclosed personal

personal quiet meditative strength expressive

e.

The homeless live no where. They are the public but are discouraged and criminalized for using public space. This leads to feelings of placelessness, of not belonging, and revoked ownership. I have categorized the necessities for empowerment, based on readings and research into the topic, especially interviews with these individuals.

public

public

broadcast speakers concert hall open mic airwaves spoken word dj concert

fast-paced many people combat dance expressive


1

Window sills are converted to cushioned surfaces promoting areas for rest and sleep, a practice typically discouraged outdoors and in parks. The entrance is enclosed and translucent, protecting the identities and security of the residents and visitors.


TOP: ELEVATION BOTTOM: FIRST FLOOR PLAN N

0’

25’

50’

RESIDENTIAL TOWER PRIVATE

100’

PUBLIC PUBLIC

PRIVATE

3 3

1

2

6

1 2 3 6 5 3

6

3

3

1

1. RECEPTION/LOBBY 2. GYMNASIUM 3. YOGA/FITNESS STUDIO 4. MEDITATION SPACE 5. AUDITORIUM 6. RECORDING STUDIO 7. ISOLATION BOOTH 8. RESIDENCE 9. DAYCARE 10. HEALTHCARE & SERVICES


2

Spatial size and materiality change to suit varying comfort levels. Some windows are completely removed for an open, and more public atmosphere such as the interior courtyard, allowing families to play and interact. Some interior spaces have no windows or translucent windows to protect the identities of visitors.

BALANCING / GRADUATE / 25


TOP: SECOND FLOOR PLAN BOTTOM: THIRD-SIXTH FLOOR PLANS N

0’

25’

50’

100’

10

10

10 1

10 10

10

10

10

10

<

> AUDIENCE

6

Program spaces support varying comfort levels from private to public and inbetween.

6

6 4 7

PRIVATE

ISOLATION BOOTH MEDITATION SPACE

SEMI-PRIVATE

6

8

8

8

8

8

8

7

7 7

3

3

7 3

7 7

4 4 4

RECORDING STUDIO YOGA/FITNESS STUDIO

9

SEMI-PUBLIC

PUBLIC

AUDITORIUM GYMNASIUM

26 / GRADUATE / BALANCING

1. RECEPTION/LOBBY 2. GYMNASIUM 3. YOGA/FITNESS STUDIO 4. MEDITATION SPACE 5. AUDITORIUM 6. RECORDING STUDIO 7. ISOLATION BOOTH 8. RESIDENCE 9. DAYCARE 10. HEALTHCARE & SERVICES


3

<

The main hallway has an entrance at one end and a large window at the other. This creates a framed view of the community. Visitors will take this as it is as the desired future to own one of those properties or the relief of not having to endure a foreclosure.

VIEWS


> PHYSICAL MODEL [TOP 2 AND ALL BOTTOM] > DIGITAL DESIGN DATUM INDICATING HALLWAYS, PATHS, AND ROOF PATTERN [FAR RIGHT, TOP] Beginning with a form that maintains the original exterior faรงade and is delineated by this structure, I thought about how this structure interacts and creates spaces. This datum, created from the position of exterior columns, allowed for the dynamic and spatial qualities necessary for the variety of uses and for the spectrum of private to public.


AGENCIES OF INFILTRATION

ELECTIVE / WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE LAKE ST. CLAIRE BASIN ADVISORS: JEN MAIGRET AND MARIA ARQUERO TEAMMATES: KATHERINE BALDWIN, JEFF DUBE, LIZ DURFEE

This project was completed for the course “Liquid Planning”. The objective of the course was to study water management systems, including low-impact development (LID) planning strategies for storm water runoff. A group project culminated in a study of the Lake St. Clair Watershed. We chose four areas along a small channel flowing from the Lake S. Clair River. Each site is unique in its land use and demographics. Through an analysis of the sites’ factors of imperviousness and current and future uses, we explored ways to manage stormwater and alleviate impairment, and the associated networks and implications of these implementations. Overall, it is clear that multi-strategy efforts would work best in effectively alleviating water management issues. Sample design combinations can be found on the following pages.

30 / GRADUATE / AGENCIES

USA

Superior

CANADA

Huron

Lake St. Clair

Ontario Michigan

Identifying the need and opportunity to restore hydrologic function in subcatchments of the Lake St. Clair Watershed through local implement of low impact development strategies.

Erie

N

0m

300m

600m

1200m


RURAL LOW DENSITY RURAL HIGH DENSITY

PROBLEMS

ATMOSPHERE pollution

SOLUTIONS

ATMOSPHERE vegetated infiltration

METHOD VEGETATED

riparian buffer

infiltration vegetated TERRAIN

fertilizer and chemical runoff TERRAIN

bioswale

ATMOSPHERE infiltration vegetated

ATMOSPHERE odor pollution

INFILTRATION

detention pond

mismanaged wastewater naked shoreline imperviousness TERRAIN

material change water storage TERRAIN

ATMOSPHERE heat island

underground detention

ATMOSPHERE material change vegetated

MATERIAL CHANGE

vegetated wall unit

URBAN WETLAND URBAN

infiltration material change TERRAIN

imperviousness TERRAIN

ATMOSPHERE material change vegetated

ATMOSPHERE heat island

imperviousness TERRAIN

pervious paving

infiltration material change TERRAIN

WATER STORAGE

tree box filter

underground sand filter

AGENCIES / GRADUATE / 31


RURAL LOW DENSITY This type of landscape is used primarily for farming, leading to issues of fertilizer and chemical runoff into the channel, as well as general air quality concerns. The best LIDS would be vegetating the shoreline via riparian buffers and/or bioswales and infiltration through properly placed detention ponds.

RURAL HIGH DENSITY Rural high density areas consist of suburban blocks, where paving and roofing have led to imperviousness, naked shorelines, mismanaged wastewater, odor and pollution. Vegetation, infiltration, material changes, and water storage could accommodate those issues. The latter two are initiatives that homeowners can help with by installing pervious paving and/or vegetated walls and by utilizing treebox filters under their plants.

32 / GRADUATE / AGENCIES

RURAL LOW DENSITY

RURAL HIGH DENSITY


URBAN WETLAND The urban wetland is former wetland area that has been developed into industrial, commercial, and residential space. Main concerns are the heat island effect and imperviousness which in combination drastically impair water quality. Increased vegetation, vegetated walls, and other material changes can alleviate these issues and slow water flow. It is important to attempt to reestablish or make a new wetland as the area had previously relied on this environment for water remediation and management.

URBAN The urban space suffers similar issues to that of the urban wetland. Pervious paving, urban gardens, vegetated roofs, other material changes, and underground detention ponds may work best in this area, so as not to be as invasive on established businesses and landscapes.

URBAN WETLAND

URBAN

AGENCIES / GRADUATE / 33


PEINETA PLAZA

STUDIO / TEXTILE GALLERY IN BARCELONA, SPAIN ADVISOR: SOPHIA PSARRA

Barcelona has a long and illustrious textile history. Most interesting are the social conditions that the textile industry has established, which expands its breath globally due to the imperialist nature of old world Spain and the globalization of the new world market. Keeping with the extravagance and lavishness elicited by Italo Calvino, in Invisible Cities, I look towards mantillas, peinetas, and abanicos, distinct cultural markers that are still used today, although less frequently. Barcelona continues to remain relative to the textile industry as host to the 2011 ITMA, the “world’s largest international textile and garment machinery show”. The lacework of traditional Catalan fabric and peinetas, large decorative combs placed on the head and typically draped with lace, influenced the design of Peineta Plaza. Meant to reinvigorate the Catalan textile industry, designers, factory workers, and factory owners are given a location to eat, relax, collectivize, display their work, sell their work, teach, and, in general, interact with the public and tourists, allowing for greater exposure. The program includes a cafe, gallery, conference rooms, classrooms, and a large plaza area. The building is composed of walls patterned with diamond cutouts, which create doors, windows, a sense of lightness, and opportunities for product display. Not only is “lace” depicted in section and elevation, the shadows produced by the form create “lace in plan”.

Peineta Plaza

34 / GRADUATE /PEINETA


SITE PLAN N

0’

15’

30’

60’


> PHYSICAL MODEL PHOTOS

The walls were lasercut in basswood and sandwiched with clear acrylic, creating the building volume.

> 0’

ELEVATION 15’

30’

60’


OTHER WORK GRADUATE STUDIES

> LIQUID PLANNING RETENTION POND MODEL The laser cut model mimics the processes found in the low-impact development strategy of retention ponds.

> CABINET INSPIRED BY ITALO CALVINO’S INVISIBLE CITIES Creating a filigree encasement reflects the grandeur and extravagance Calvino emanates throughout the book. The cities of Olinda and Olivia were the main inspirations for the design. A pin was placed within an acrylic box whose sides were etched, in miniscule font, quotes from Olivia: “filigree cities to be seen through their opaque and fictitious thickness” & “filigree palaces with fringed cushions on the seats by the mullioned windows” Two magnifying lenses were hung from wire allowing them to appear as if they were floating in the center of the box. Both the etchings and pin are made legible and visible by the lenses. Two walls of the encasement were composed of rose colored wood while the opposing walls were made of acrylic, further reflecting the themes of materiality and duplicity present in many of the stories.

38 / GRADUATE / OTHER


> MECHANICS OF GRAPHIC DESIGN Left: A wallpaper design was developed influenced by chain linked fences. The design was screen printed and placed in an alley of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Right: Book cover design using crocheted chains and then stitched into an acrylic cover.

> TRAVEL POSTERS Designed for a representation class, these travel posters depict existing landscapes in Lucena City, Philippines. The photo has been made to look weathered and vintage. The landscapes themselves look old-world but are the current state of these locations. The vector designs on top are meant to contrast the more dirty, less colorful world in the background to emphasize the fantasy of travel with the reality of place.


OBJECTIVE My undergraduate experience in architecture involved developing drawing, computer, and hand modeling skills. The work depicts experimental forms and exciting layouts that play with space, light, volume, and the sites that they inhabit.

40 / UNDERGRADUATE


UNDERGRADUATE 42 / PERFORMANCE SPACE 46 / URBAN INFILL 52 / MIXED USE 56 / CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

UNDERGRADUATE / 41


PERFORMANCE SPACE

STUDIO / PERFORMANCE SPACE IN ALLERTON PARK, MONTICELLO, IL ADVISOR: JOHN STALLMEYER

Designed with both indoor and outdoor performance areas, the abstracted cloud structure engages the user, modifying natural shadows and space. The elevated interior space is shaped by a “glass box” and concrete walls, cast-in-place to resemble disparately sized layers, in order to elicit a feeling of floating, while providing views of the vast and expansive meadow.

>

CONCEPT SKETCH

>

PHOTO MONTAGE/COLLAGE

The site is a vast and rolling meadow, bounded by forest.

42 / UNDERGRADUATE / PERFORMANCE


TOP: VIEW TOWARDS ENTRANCE MIDDLE: SW ELEVATION BOTTOM: SE ELEVATION 0’

10’

20’

40’

44 / UNDERGRADUATE / PERFORMANCE


FLOOR PLAN N

0’

10’

20’

40’

4

4

4

4

2 6

1

7

5

3 8

1. LOBBY 2. LADIES’ RESTROOM 3. MEN’S RESTROOM 4. DRESSING ROOM 5. AUDITORIUM 6. BACKSTAGE 7. MECHANICAL ROOM 8. OUTDOOR PERFORMANCE SPACE


URBAN INFILL

STUDIO / MIXED USE URBAN INFILL IN CHAMPAIGN, IL ADVISOR: JOY MONICE MALNAR

Designed for live and work, this urban infill matches the materiality of the surrounding downtown cityscape while defying the Georgian-inspired flat city-facade. The balconies curve, emerging from the edges of the surrounding structures; users and passersby enjoy shade and visual stimulation from the kinetic facade. The structural grid provides a central circulation core flanked by rooms on either side. Live/work spaces are provided on the first and second floors, while the third, fourth, and fifth floors are comprised of residential space. <

SITE PLAN

0’

N

64’

128’

256’


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT CIRCULATION CORES

FIRST FLOOR PLAN N

0’

8’

16’

32’

SITE BOUNDARY

PARKING

SPATIAL ORGANIZATION

COMMERCIAL LOBBY

Live

Work

PARTI DIAGRAM AND FLOOR PLATE DEVELOPMENT

COMMERCIAL


FLOOR PLANS N

0’

8’

16’

32’

SECOND FLOOR

ONE BEDROOM

ONE BEDROOM

SITE BOUNDARY

ONE BEDROOM

SITE BOUNDARY

ONE BEDROOM

THIRD FLOOR


FOURTH FLOOR

TWO BEDROOM

FIFTH FLOOR

TWO BEDROOM

ONE BEDROOM

STUDIO

SITE BOUNDARY

SITE BOUNDARY STUDIO


MIXED USE

STUDIO / MIXED-USE LOW-RISE IN CHICAGO, IL ADVISOR: JOY MONICE MALNAR

Inspired by the terraces and forms of ziggurats, this mixed-use low-rise presents a dynamic environment for people and CTA (Chicago Transit Authority) train passengers. The site is cut across by the Brown and Purple lines of the CTA. By presenting a typical low-cost city facade of steel and glass on the street side, funds can be put towards the lush, unexpected, and compelling green balconies/roofs and plant-life on the interior facade. Train riders witness a new green landscape, rarely seen on these routes. The stepped private parks of the building are continued into the available portions of the site as public parks. < FIFTH FLOOR PLAN N

0

20’

80’

<

STREET VIEW

40’

ENLARGED ON NEXT PAGE

The design has a typical steel and glass facade.


INTERIOR VIEW

Residents and train users enjoy a vibrant and vegetated landscape.


TYPICAL FLOOR PLANS 0’

10’

20’

40’ 5 2

1. BEDROOM 2. LIVING ROOM 3. KITCHEN 4. BATHROOM 5. CLOSET 6. BALCONY

3

5 2

6

3

1

4

4

4

1 2 4

5

4

5

5

5 1 4

1

3

1 Bedroom Plan

2 Bedroom Plan

SITE PLAN N

1

0

100’

54 / UNDERGRADUATE / MIXED

200’

3 Bedroom Plan

1


>

AXONOMETRIC SECTION


DISCOVEREUM

STUDIO / CHILDREN’S MUSEUM IN CHICAGO, IL ADVISOR: KEVIN HINDERS

With the notion that life is a continuous journey, the utilized form is a “Möbius strip” covered in temperature sensitive (thermochromic) glass tiles, for a continuously changing and modifiable public exterior. The sculptural quality engages and encourages interaction. Acting as a mover between local modes of transportation, the entrances highlight the underground CTA red-line, and the prominent elevated green-line, aka the L, imparting the necessity of public transportation and its in/finite nature.

THERMOCHROMIC GLASS TILES

PHOTO MONTAGE / COLLAGE

SECTION CUT 1-1 0’

20’

40’

80’

SECTION CUT 2-2


SUSTAINABILITY

WALL SECTION DETAIL 0’

15

5’

10’

20’

Exhaust expelled from separation in roof plates

14

Draft created between double skin from warmth of sun

Underground cooler air enters space Draft helps balance air temperature

STRUCTURE

1/ STEEL ROOF COVERED IN THERMOCHROMIC PIGMENT 2/ TUBULAR STEEL TRUSS 3/ SPECIALLY CAST CONCRETE SUPPORT BLOCKS 9

4 1

12

2

3

AXONOMETRIC SECTION

3 13

1

5, 6 10

2

11 7

8

1. EXTRUDED ALUMINUM TRANSOM 2. EXTRUDED ALUMINUM MULLION 3. FIXING BRACKET 4. DOUBLE GLAZED UNIT OR PYROGLASS 5. PRESSURE PLATE 6. COVER CAP 7. ONE-WAY CONCRETE JOIST SYSTEM 8. THERMOCHROMIC GLASS TILE 9. OUTER GLAZED SCREEN PROVIDING SOLAR SHADING 10. THERMAL INSULATION 11. METAL SHEET SEAL 12. MAINTENANCE ACCESS DECK 13. SMOKE SEAL 14. TUBULAR TRUSS SYSTEM 15. STEEL ROOF COVERED IN THERMOCHROMIC PIGMENT


FLOOR PLANS N

0

60’

120’

240’

UNDERGROUND LEVEL

ENTRANCE FROM SUBWAY

GROUND LEVEL

1

2

1 2


60 / PROFESSIONAL


PROFESSIONAL 62 64 65 65 66

/ LEVY RESTAURANTS / CRITICALPRODUCTIVE, INC. / BETTER FUTURE INTERNATIONAL / ARCHIVE INSTITUTE / COMPETITIONS

PROFESSIONAL / 61


LEVY RESTAURANTS

DINING AND RECREATION ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

Designed for Soldier Field's current Colonnade Level dining stations. Popular local Chicago, IL concepts and their material palettes, logos, and aesthetics are implemented within existing stands. The image above depicts a lower-cost renovation, maintaining most of the original materials. The image to the left is a higher-cost renovation using tinceiling panels, pendant lighting, and custom identity signage.

62 / PROFESSIONAL / LEVY RESTAURANTS


Above: Portable market concept, “MiMo Market”, for the Miami Beach Convention Center, Miami, FL. As a new concept for the venue, a new logo, patterning and material palette were developed for the renovation and adopted throughout the convention center for a more cohesive display of the guest services. Left: Original food stands were fitted with new materials, lighting, and spatial design. A local burger restaurant, “B&B Burger & Beer Joint”, is conceptualized with the proposed design. LEVY RESTAURANTS / PROFESSIONAL / 63


CRITICALPRODUCTIVE, INC. ARCHITECTURE NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

CRITICALPRODUCTIVE V1.1: THEORETIC ACTION [AUTUMN 2011]

thin and outside ers and students campuses of the tical, and social history. Theoretic of aesthetics and

The significance of working within and outside of the walls of the academy was evident when the workers and students converged in Paris, Mexico City and in the streets and campuses of the United States in 1968 to give voice to democratic, political, and social movements – consequently changing the trajectory of history. “Theoretic Action” inaugurates a new discourse on the political role of aesthetics and space in contemporary culture.

with, Justin A. Doro,

Huey P. Newton Raymond Depardon

V1.1

AUTUMN

2011

Contributions by Milton S. F. Curry, Peter Gilgen, Naomi Beckwith, Justin A. Doro, Richard M. Sommer, and Glenn Forley Interviews with Lance Wyman and Michael Gross Works by Hank Willis Thomas, Amanda Wojick, Mounir Fatmi, and Raymond Depardon

V1.1 THEORETIC ACTION

AUTUMN 2011

CRITICALPRODUCTIVE V2.1: POST-CAPITALIST CITY? [AUTUMN 2012/WINTER 2013] The contemporary city is challenged by economic circumstances, but also by our own inability to visualize the possibilities for the city of the future. The dichotomy of physical embodiment versus digital presence has repositioned the city as one of the few realms in which class differences manifest themselves tangibly, in the architectures and urban spaces inhabited by different classes of people. “Post-Capitalist City?” explores speculative desires for the city of the future. Whether utopian, fictional, or networked, these urban imaginaries insist that we suspend our conventional way of seeing the city in order to open up new possibilities. Contributions by Milton S. F. Curry, David Bieri, Madhu Dubey, Morgan Ng, Steve Schwenk, Sabine Haenni, Livia Corona, and SUPERFLEX Works by Doug Rickard, Michael Zelehoski, arquitectura 911sc, Giancarlo Mazzanti, and Luis Urculo

V2.1 POST-CAPITALIST CITY?

WINTER 2013

CRITICALPRODUCTIVE V3.1: BEYOND CURATING [FORTHCOMING] On whose authority is design work on the city screened, curated, installed, exhibited, and exposed to the larger public? The museum is just one of many venues for the public to examine speculative work related to the city. Arts expositions and installations, film and media festivals, and biennials offer potential alternative venues for presenting and discussing urban-scale work. Curators adjudicate what the public sees and navigate the politics of the institutions they work for, whether these are museums, other cultural institutions, or independent nonprofits. Is there sufficient public engagement with speculative work on the contemporary city? Do visions for the city selected for public exhibitions reflect the diversity of the constituencies that they purport to represent?

V3.1 BEYOND CURATING

SPRING 2013


BETTER FUTURE INTERNATIONAL ORPHAN CARE NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

FUNDACION Casa Ana

er Future Inter national Bett Family Care for Orphans

FUNDACION Casa Ana

Bridge to A Better Future

Campaign for orphaned and abandoned children in Haiti Sponsored by the ACBL Foundation

better future inter national

sri lanka

b e t t e r f u t u r e i n t e r n at i o n a l

dominican republic

FUNDACION Casa Ana

ARCHIVE INSTITUTE

ARCHITECTURE FOR HEALTH, NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

SAMPLE RESEARCH AND DIAGRAM

Excerpt from Report “Climate Change, Housing, & Health”:

HIV/AIDS Prevalence Rates HAITI: 2.2% ~120,000

ATLANTIC OCEAN CUBA

North West 2.0% North 2.9% Artibonite 2.15%

North East 2.7% Center 1.6%

Capital Area 1.4% Grande-Anse 1.6%

Nippes 1.4%

South 2.2%

West 2.4% South East 1.4%

REPUBLIC

The effects of increased weather related events, upon informal settlements, can be alleviated through systemic improvements to housing, infrastructure and consequently health. These modifications should limit the release of anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG), diminishing the quantity of potential emissions that encourage climate change, while providing individuals with stronger foundations to buffer the impact of climate change and its associated effects.

DOMINICAN

“The most important physical asset for the urban poor is housing.” (UN-HABITAT 2007, 186)

Artibonite 2.15%

Women 1.8%

Men 2.5%

CARIBBEAN SEA Kilometers

PROFESSIONAL / 65


AURORA BOREALIS ARCTIC OBSERVATORY ARCHMEDIUM COMPETITION TEAMMATES: MISHAYLA BINKERD, RAZIEH GHORBANI, & JENNY WANG


WE-SAW

MULTI-USER SEE-SAW ACTIVATE2013, ARCHITECTURE FOR HUMANITY-CHICAGO COMPETITION TEAMMATES: MISHAYLA BINKERD, DANNI CHEN, & JENNY WANG


68 / OTHER


OTHER

OTHER / 69


70 / OTHER


OTHER / 71


SKETCHES & DRAWINGS

72 / OTHER


OTHER / 73


THANK YOU

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION


LIEZEL PIMENTEL

liezel.pimentel@gmail.com (630) 854-2640

Liezel Pimentel, Portfolio  

Portfolio of academic and professional work between 2005-2013.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you