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MARIE WALLIN • BOADICEA BINNERTS • PAT MENCHINI

KNITS MEET THE WOMEN MAKING A LIVING FROM THEIR CRAFT

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DYP304 in DY Choice Alchemy shade 05 Magic. For more details on the DY Choice range please visit: www.designeryarns.uk.com

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Knitting is published 13 times a year by GMC Publications Ltd, 86 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XN T: 01273 402838 ISSN 1740 6943 EDITOR Christine Boggis T: 01273 402824 christine.boggis@thegmcgroup.com CONTRIBUTORS Lauren Goodchild, Katie Holloway PATTERN EDITORS Rachel Vowles, Sue Culligan, Carol Ibbetson patternqueries@thegmcgroup.com DESIGNERS Amber Stoddart, Claire Stevens PHOTOGRAPHERS Laurel Guilfoyle, Anthony Bailey, Louise Clarkson MODELS Tess Dimos, Sebastian Sacco, Gabriella-Olivia Robinson, Ania Grzymajlo HAIR AND MAKE-UP Jeni Dodson PRODUCTION MANAGER Jim Bulley jimb@thegmcgroup.com PRODUCTION CONTROLLER Amanda Hoag amanda.hoag@ thegmcgroup.com MARKETING Anne Guillot PUBLISHER Jonathan Grogan DISTRIBUTION Seymour Distribution Ltd T: 020 7429 4000 PRINTER Precision Colour Printers ADVERTISING Russell Higgins T: 01273 402841 russellh@thegmcgroup.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Helen Johnston T: 01273 402873 helenj@thegmcgroup.com Subscribe online at: thegmcgroup.com 12 issues (including a 10% discount) UK £64.69 Europe £80.87 Rest of World £90.57 24 issues (including a 20% discount) UK £115.01 Europe £143.76 Rest of World £161.01 DD – UK only (including a 30% discount) Every 6 issues £25.16 Every 12 issues £50.32 US customers should call the subscriptions department for subscription rates in USD ($). Cheques should be made payable to GMC Publications Ltd, and sent to The Subscriptions Department GMC Publications Ltd, 166 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XU Current subscribers will automatically receive a renewal notice (excludes direct debit subscribers) See page 90 for more details With special thanks to Presuming Ed, Brighton, where this month’s galleries were photographed. presuming-ed.com

Views and comments expressed by individuals do not necessarily represent those of the publishers and no legal responsibility can be accepted for the result of the use by readers of information or advice of whatever kind given in this publication, either in editorial or advertisements. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means without the prior permission of the Guild of Master Craftsman Publications Ltd.

Editor’s letter

A new year can be a reflective time, when we think about what has happened in our lives over the past 12 months and set goals for the future. I’ve got lots of resolutions for my 2017 knitting, from relearning double knitting (you can too in Jeanette Sloan’s Techniques A-Z on page 48), to improving my intarsia and getting out to more of the exciting yarn events around the country. This month we’ve asked you, our readers, to tell us your targets for the year ahead in a Twitter poll – read the results on page 47. We’ve gone mad for ultra-modern monochrome in this issue, with knits in trendy black and white, soft greys and gradients. Some of the highlights are Bo Balder’s gorgeous Gradually in Madelinetosh Tosh Chunky (page 50), Maisie Smith’s stylish fitted Shades of Gradient (page 59) and Jo Allport’s striking mosaic stitch Fae (page 62), which comes with a handy how-to guide on page 64. This issue marks a milestone for me – a full year as editor of Knitting. Having the chance to combine my two great passions – magazines and knitting – in my job has been a wonderful thing for me, and I know making a living with yarn is a dream for lots of fellow crafters. We’ve explored this in our feature Live your craft on page 12, and meet Kerry Kimber of Knitting For All, a franchise for knitting teachers, on page 15.

Christine n winter blues get you dow NEXT MONTH: Don’t let the of p cro per bum with our – celebrate the m instead from sky blue through knits in beautiful shades S how knitting can lift teal to deepest nav y, PLU it on January 12. ut abo your mood. Read all

knittingmag.com

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Contents... ISSUE 163 JANUARY 2017 62

69 79 60

83 REGULARS

FEATURES

1 5 8 38 46 91 96

10 Shopping special: 10 knits for under £50 11 Guest column: Naomi Marks, novice knitter 12 Feature: making a living from knitting 15 Profile: Kerry Kimber of Knitting For All

Editor’s letter News Spotlight on Style file Your views Coming next month Purl about town

REVIEWS NEVER MISS AN ISSUE! Find your nearest shop that stocks Knitting with this handy postcode finder and never miss an issue again! seymour.magzene.com

Join Knitting on.. 2

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16 19

Books Yarn review

GALLERIES 23 Fashion 40 Home 42 Gifts

HOW TO 48 Techniques A-Z: double knitting 64 Slip stitch masterclass 72 Tunisian crochet 89 Abbreviations and stockists

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67

70 86

81 PATTERNS

MEN’S

50 55 58 60 62 65 67 71 74

56 Quiz Night 81 Shawl collar jumper

Gradually Lucinda Shades of Gradient Winter Cloud Fae Impact Nyla Northern Lights Susan

ACCESSORIES 54 69 70 72 79 79 80

Scalene poncho All Wrapped Up wrap Flower King hat Expanding Vees shawl Halfrek hairband Barley Twist headband Vella bag

KIDS’ 86 Pompom dog 86 Panda hat 87 Easygoing sweatshirt mini

HOME 75 Two-tone cushion pair 77 Little Black Dress tea cosy 78 Pearly Queen cafetière cosy 83 Monumental Moose

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23/11/2016 12:55


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FZ\abg^PZlaZ[e^GhpZoZbeZ[e^bg*2aZg]]r^]laZ]^l For more information please visit www.roosteryarns.com or email: sales@roosteryarns.com =blmkb[nm^][r

Home of Luxury Natural Fibre Yarns

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NEWS

Short rows...

We catch up on the latest yarns

ERIKA KNIGHT LAUNCHES SUPER BULKY XXL READER OFFER Love self-striping yarns? Then you’ll love Carol J Sulcoski’s new book, Self-striping Yarn Studio, which is packed full of hints, tips and projects for these striking yarns. We have three copies to give away, worth £16.99 each. For your chance to win, visit our competitions page at knittingmag.com.

PINING FOR PINEAPPLE Specialist wool wash brand Soak has released a new fragrance – Pineapple Grove. Subtitled “sweet on the inside”, Pineapple Grove is available in the UK as Soak wash and Flatter smoothing spray, and in the US as Handmaid hand cream. DAVID HUGHES/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Erika Knight has added a super bulky yarn to her eponymous range for retailer John Lewis. XXL is a pure wool made in Britain that knits up on 25mm needles and is priced at £20 for a 250g hank. It comes in three shades – Dusky Pink, Soft Grey and Blanc – and comes with three one-hank projects: a cable snood, pompom hat and a free festive stocking pattern available exclusively from johnlewis.com. An exclusive pattern collection has been launched for yarns in the Erika Knight for John Lewis range – which includes Baby DK, DK, Aran and Chunky as well as XXL. They include stylish garments and accessories for women as well as knits for babies and children. Erika says: “My ambition for the Erika Knight for John Lewis brand was to create a yarn that would be pleasurable to knit with and create beautiful garments. Made entirely in Britain by a heritage mill in Yorkshire, the yarns are all 100% pure wool with a concise and covetable colour palette. “The patterns adhere to a ready-to-wear look, while maintaining a simplicity and ease of instruction. Above all I think it is important that the projects are accessible to inspire the beginner knitter to experiment, then to build confidence in the craft to really enjoy the process of creating something with your hands. “I love the dedication and passion that crafters have and I think now more than ever it is a valuable experience to teach people to take the time to create their own slow clothes, respect the natural world and sustain its resources.”

JOIN A NEW YARN FESTIVAL IN THE MIDLANDS Would you like to host a stand at a brand new wool and yarn fair in the Midlands? Wool@J13 is set to take place on May 13-14 and is looking for exhibitors. The event will feature wool craft workshops, individual and team competitions, fleece sales, live music, street food and more. Find out more at wool-j13.co.uk. knit tingmag.com

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NEWS

Designer Yarns has signed up Amano Yarns, a producer of alpaca-based yarns from the Peruvian Andes. The brand is inspired by the Andean native Incas, and each of its yarns is named in the Inca language Quechua. It says: “With Amano we want to bring back those magical beliefs to our time and through our hands, with creativity, feel the natural resources of the Peruvian Andes ourselves. Amano is luxury in its purest expression.” The range is made up of undyed Apu, meaning mountain god in Quechua, made from 100% imperial alpaca, a super-fine fibre comparable to fine cashmere; Mayu, meaning river, is a blend of 60% royal alpaca, 20% cashmere and 20% mulberry silk that comes in a palette of 14 solid colours; Puyu, meaning cloud, is a light chunky

blend of 70% baby alpaca and 30% mulberry silk in a range of nine natural shades; Puna, meaning Andes mountain, is made from 100% baby alpaca and comes in a range of 11 heathered shades, plus five undyed colours in the Eco Puna range. Ayni, meaning exchange system, is a blend of 80% baby alpaca and 20% silk in a palette of 14 colours; Warmi, meaning woman or union, blends 70% alpaca with 30% Merino and comes in 14 heathered shades; Mamacha, meaning mummy, is a chunky alpaca and Merino blend in 11 shades, and Colca, named after a region in the Andes, is a mixture of 56% baby llama and 44% silk in 12 lustrous solid shades. Amano, which first launched in 2015, has also created two pattern collections for women across its yarns, including garments and larger and smaller accessories.

INTS VIKMANIS/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

YARNS FROM THE PERUVIAN ANDES

LATVIAN KNITTING TOURS Yarn and knitting shop Hobbywool, in the Latvian capital Riga, has launched a travel service designed to introduce fibre-loving tourists to traditional Latvian crafts. Autumn and winter mittens tours mixed sightseeing with workshops on how to knit traditional Latvian colourwork mittens, while weaving and handdyeing tours are lined up for spring and summer, along with pottery, gastro and wine trips. Owner Ieva Ozolina says: “With My Hobby Travel we want to share with you our passion and love for Latvian crafts – mitten and sock-knitting traditions, yarn making and dyeing, pottery, ceramics and a lot more.” Find out more at myhobbytravel.com.

GET CRAFTY TO SUPPORT MENTAL HEALTH Mental health charity Mind is calling on crafters to get together and raise cash to support people living with mental health problems. The charity is asking people to hold craft-themed events called Crafternoons in their homes, schools or places of work. Community and events manager Karen Bolton says: “Creative activities are particularly therapeutic because they help you switch off from day to day pressures, turn negative thoughts or feelings into something positive and give people the opportunity to socialise. “Crafternoons help to improve your mental wellbeing, while supporting Mind and its lifechanging work. Every penny raised will make a huge difference – just £50 could help Mind fund a day of outdoor therapy to support somebody battling anxiety or depression.” Find out more at mind.org.uk/crafternoon.

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28/11/2016 10:05


NEWS

NEW US-GROWN YARN FOR BROOKLYN TWEED Designer and photographer Jared Flood’s company Brooklyn Tweed has released a new US-grown wool – Arbor. Designed to be a “workhorse yarn”, the DK-weight wool comes from purebred Targhee sheep from Montana and South Dakota, which Brooklyn Tweed says have the softness of Merino made more durable by longwool genetics. The 3 ply yarn is worsted spun for extra strength and stitch definition, making it great for cables. It comes in a palette of 30 solid shades, dyed at the organically certified Saco River Dyehouse near the historic Jagger Brothers mill in southern Maine where the wool is spun. A Brooklyn Tweed spokesman says: “Thanks to its worsted construction, Arbor produces a denser, sturdier fabric than our woollen-spun yarns. The fibres have been combed straight and carefully aligned before spinning, rather than jumbled to trap air. Garments knitted from Arbor will weigh more and drape more heavily than those knitted with [existing yarns] Loft or Shelter.”

JANUARY 8 LADY SEW AND SEW WAREHOUSE SALE Check out hundreds of bargains on craft items including yarn in this big winter sale in Henley-onThames. ladysewandsew.co.uk

Meet suppliers and brand new companies demonstrating and selling a variety of hobby craft products, materials kits and designs in Farnborough. exhibitions.co.uk

MARCH

15 WALTHAM ABBEY WOOL SHOW

2-5 THE KNITTING & STITCHING SHOW

See a fantastic range of exhibitors and their luxurious yarns and accessories plus beautiful handmade items. walthamabbeywoolshow. co.uk

Enjoy a great day out with stitching workshops and craft shows at Olympia, London. theknittingandstitchingshow. com

28-29 CRAFTING LIVE SANDOWN Visit a vast range of exhibitors stocking stamps, dies, decoupage, fabric, ribbon and much more at Sandown Park. craftinglive.co.uk

2-5 HOBBYCRAFTS A day filled with endless supplies, new product launches, demonstrations and workshops designed to inspire your creativity in Glasgow. hobbycraftshows.co.uk

FEBRUARY

Waterfalls and frozen water inspired a Brighton student who has won the Campaign for Wool’s student hand knitting award. Rachel Graham (pictured), who is studying dying for a degree in textiles and business studies at the University of Brighton, took the idea for her awardwinning design from frozen waterfalls in Bergen, Norway, and other structures created by frozen water. Her brief was to create a hand-knitted garment in a pure wool or wool-rich yarn that showed sculptural form or 3D knitting techniques celebrating the colours of a British autumn. Rachel tells Knitting: “I was absolutely amazed to hear that I had won. I submitted my designs at the end of the summer term as I thought that it would be a great experience, and it was a shock to be selected for the final.” Rachel specialises in knitted textiles and knitwear design and is particularly interested in lace, crochet and knitting. She says: “I was taught to knit by my mum, but only the basics such as knit and purl. I learned the more advanced stuff earlier this year at uni.”

2-4 THE STITCHING, SEWING & HOBBYCRAFTS SHOW A day filled with endless supplies, new product launches, demonstrations and workshops designed to inspire your creativity in Manchester. stitchandhobby.co.uk

16-18 CRAFT4CRAFTERS Get the chance to pick up loads of supplies, many great bargains and see the latest must-haves from the crafting world. craft4crafters.co.uk

17-19 UNRAVEL The three-day festival features a programme of talks, demonstrations and workshops led by UK and international experts. craft.farnhammaltings.com

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24-25 MAKE IT/ KNIT AND STITCH IT 2017

KANUMAN/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

WATERFALLS INSPIRE AWARDWINNING STUDENT KNITTER

What’s on

10-11 EDINBURGH YARN FESTIVAL A celebration of all things related to yarn, wool and hand knitting in Edinburgh, Scotland. edinyarnfest.com

16-19 FASHION & EMBROIDERY Find a wealth of materials, threads and an array of exhibitions all under one roof at the NEC, Birmingham. fashionembroidery.co.uk

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SIBLING

Monochrome is hot off the catwalk and making it’s way on to your high street this season. From Margaret Howell’s crisp workwear to Antonio Berardi’s and Sophia Webster’s vampy lace and velvet details, these contrasting colours are super versatile in the world of fashion. Patterned knitwear is still a style staple, with Holly Fulton and Sibling featuring bold and embellished knits in their latest runway shows.

Noro Tennen

ANTONIO BERARDI

PREEN

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD NNE W

ook Get the L

ERDEM

PETER PILOTTO

HOLLY FULTON

MARGARET HOWELL

MARY KATRANTZOU

12 1 205 05 1205

PHOTOGRAPHY: BRITISH FASHION COUNCIL SHAUN JAMES COX, SAM WILSON, EEVA RINNE, KRIS MITCHEL, KENSINGTON LEVERNE

OILILY

SOPHIA W WEBSTER

OILILY

&

BLACK WHITE

MULBERRY

SPOTLIGHT ON...

Isager Jensen

Bliss Debbie d Aran Falklan

Skirt, £32, River Island • Jacket, £165, Phase Eight • Necklace, £9.99, New Look Jumper, £65, Gerry • Bag, £35, Simply Be

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18/11/2016 10:01


SHOPPING

I

KNITTING

This month’s makers’ must-haves

Boyd hot water bottle £100, amara.com

Diffuser £19.50, marksandspencer.com

Piña clutch £114, teaandtequilatrading.com

Knitting workshop £21.50, stitchandstory.com

Ceramic button drawer knobs £2.99, oakroomshop.co.uk

Helena Puiccomitta knitting needle gauge £11.56, etsy.com/shop/Succaplokki

Stoneware yarn bowls £25-28, etsy.com/shop/wendyfowlerpottery

Ship Ahoy extra large project bag by Danica Studio £28, kettleyarnco.co.uk

Blithe and Bonny moth-repellent cedar sachets, £14, loopknittingshop.com

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18/11/2016 10:04


SHOPPING

2

1

Susan by Drops Design in Drops Karisma Page 74 Knit for £28-£42

3

Baby Romper by Erika Knight in Erika Knight for John Lewis Baby Double Knit Available from John Lewis Knit for around £13.50

Longline waistcoat by Stylecraft in Stylecraft Batik Knit for £21.50

10 KNITS

4

for under Fyberspates Starsky and Hutch tea cosy kit by Charlotte Walford Available from purlescence.co.uk Knit for £21

6

Dotty Mittens by Jo Hazell-Watkins From Six One-Ball Projects by Rooster Yarns, available on Ravelry Knit for under £6

8

The Boyfriend by Pat Menchini in King Cole Big Value Recycled Cotton Aran From Knitting issue 160, October 2016 Knit for £21-£27

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5 £50

January is a time for tightening belts – but there’s no need to cut down on your knitting Prices are for yarn only and are approximate

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Vella by Jo Allport in Cygnet Seriously Chunky Page 80 Knit for around £17

Arwen by Verity Castledine in Coop Knits Socks Yeah! From The Sock Drawer by Verity Castledine Knit for around £11

7

Bethel by Amy Herzog in Rowan Kid Classic From Rowan Loves 5 Knit for around £21

10

Simple Tank by Debbie Bliss in Debbie Bliss Cashmerino Aran Tonals From Autumn Winter 16-17 pattern collection Knit for around £48

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18/11/2016 10:09


GUEST COLUMN

Is knitting like Marmite? Novice crafter Naomi Marks recounts her journey from knitwear-admiring bystander to enthusiastic process knitter

I

’d always considered knitting to be something of a Marmite activity – you either loved it or hated it, and which side of the fence you sat on was determined at a fairly young age, and would stay with you for the rest of your life. I was in the latter group. Note that I am referring to the activity of knitting here – the process rather than the product. I’ve always had great admiration for all things knitted. I just believed myself to be one of those people for whom a love of knitting-theprocess was not to happen. I’d learned how to do a basic knit stitch as a child. Like most of my generation (1960s vintage), I had a mother and grandmothers who were all accomplished knitters. However, I found knitting tricky. And you had to sit down for far too long. Now I come to reflect a little on the subject, I may have been warming to knitting-theprocess for some time. A few years ago a friend of mine, a creative and talented type, knitted me some socks. I was secretly envious of her talents. On holiday in Greece I was thrilled with the brightly-coloured knitwear the beachfront lampposts wore. Now that made knitting look fun. However, it took a weekend as a moderately reluctant parent-helper on a children’s craft camp last summer for me to find myself holding knitting needles for the first time in

40-plus years. Seated on the grass, with the sun warming the back of my neck, I rediscovered the knit stitch working with strips of torn-up plastic bag. I was surprised how easily it came back to me. I was surprised by the calming place it took me to. I was most surprised though that I now really wanted to be a knitter. Once home, a local charity shop supplied me with my first needles, together with some purple wool, or yarn as I now know to call it. The woman serving showed me how to cast on and cast off. “Baby steps, baby steps,” she advised. My first project was a scarf for my cat. She wore it (briefly) with grace. My second was to be a longer, personlength scarf in a lovely blue sequinned yarn I’d just had to buy. It remains on the needles,

LESSONS LEARNT BY THE NOVICE KNITTER • How to spell purl (who would have known?) • How upset some knitters can get when you say you’re perfectly happy with a knitting technique that sees your hand looping the loop big-time with every stitch • That neighbours don’t mind being pounced upon and asked, “Do you knit? Can you help?” • That knitting is definitely NOT a Marmite activity.

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half-complete, as the shop stopped stocking the lovely blue sequinned yarn. That’s a lesson learned. My third was a hat, knitted on circular needles using the gorgeous De Rerum Natura’s Cyrano, in Granit. So thrilled was I with this hat, which one son has sportingly said he will wear, that my fourth and fifth projects have also been hats. A fortnight’s holiday saw me in need of a longer project, and so I embarked upon a cushion cover in two colours. I soon realised I had actually only (re) mastered the knit stitch and had no idea how to purl, which the pattern demanded. YouTubers came to my help. Nine 72-stitch rows of single-rib though nearly broke me. As I didn’t (and still don’t) know how to “unknit”, the perfectionist in me saw me starting again with every mistake made – and I made plenty. My family became accustomed to the wails which punctuated every holiday evening. This project is now nearly finished – though, I have since discovered, with an interesting, “twisted” version of purl. I am having to stick to this aberration of a stitch on this project to maintain consistency, while re-learning it, correctly this time, for the wash mitt from the October edition of Knitting that I am also now working on. I think I am slow learner. But I will get there. Naomi Marks is a freelance journalist and communications consulant specialising in the not-for-profit sector. When not working she enjoys her allotment, re-learning the piano and, now, knitting.

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28/11/2016 10:11


FEATURE

LENINA11ONLY/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Live your craft Have you ever wished you could make a living from knitting? Meet some of the women who do THE RETAILER

Anna Feldman What do you do to make ends meet? I run a knitting shop in Hackney, east London, called Wild and Woolly. I host classes and late-night knit-ins for local knitters, provide private tuition, and for the last year I’ve been developing the business online, selling products and services through the website. Making ends meet is not easy, but I am managing to cover costs and two-and-a-half years after setting up the business, things are less of a struggle. How much do you earn? Enough to pay the rent on the shop, cover the monthly business loan repayments, and I’ve started to draw a small salary. It is a balancing act between wanting to contribute

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to the household and wanting to re-invest shop profits in growing the business. How did you get where you are today? My professional background is as a project manager on non-profit website development projects. After 15 years I became increasingly disenchanted with my digital project work. As a seriously hobbying knitter, the idea of opening a wool shop was a slightly comical fantasy I’d had for years. I was searching for something new, and it wasn’t showing up in the job ads I was trawling through. I kept coming back to the wool shop in my head and giving it more detail. It had a name and a spirit and it was making me increasingly restless. Many of the skills and expertise from my old project management job have gone into setting up this business, such as planning, networking and now teaching and support for customers. The shop I’ve created has threads of continuity that go all the way back to my granny teaching me to knit when I was nine, my social science studies

at university and my work in electronic networking for social change. Was there one thing that made it possible for you to make a living from knitting? A couple of very concrete things for which I am thankful every day. My husband has a regular salaried job that we have found a way to just about manage on. We took out a mortgage 15 years ago which is much less crippling than the mortgages and rents that people have now. Less concrete but equally important has been the way that my children and husband have got behind the shop project, supported what I’m doing, had faith in my ability to do it, and consequently been up for living more modestly and having less money for extras. What is the most difficult or challenging thing about trying to make a living from knitting, and how do you overcome it? The things I find most difficult are decisionmaking and planning. Every day I have to make business choices, and often I’m making them on the basis of a hunch rather than experience. Choosing new ranges of wool is often about what I like as a knitter rather than hard data about whether it will sell well. Sometimes it can feel like I’m walking in the dark and just hoping that the next step will be on firm ground. Thankfully my eyes are adjusting to the light, or maybe there’s more light shining in. I’m more confident than I was at the beginning and that is reflected in a more coherent range of wool that defines a much clearer profile for the shop. There will always be further to go, but what has been really important is the unbelievably generous-spirited network of dyers, designers, writers and teachers from east London who have given the shop the benefit of the doubt, and enthusiastically collaborated with me on projects and ideas. It’s not only stopped me feeling isolated in the business, it also means there’s much more wisdom going into the choices I make. What advice would you give avid knitters who would love to give up their jobs and knit for a living? It’s important to be realistic about how it’s going to go. That might mean getting to grips with some scary figures on spreadsheets, and thinking in advance about how to get through foreseeable challenges. I would definitely encourage anyone who has a dream about making knitting their livelihood, to put faith in that. Doing what you love is an incredibly powerful force for managing and succeeding. It generates more energy than you can imagine. And of course you will have the most wonderful community of crafters right behind you.

knit tingmag.com

28/11/2016 10:21


FEATURE

SCOTT WILSON FOR CONTINUOUSCRAFTER.CO.UK

THE BROADCASTER

Vickie Howell What do you do to make ends meet? Working as a professional knitter, crocheter and crafter means juggling a lot of yarn balls. You have to want it badly enough to hustle. A lot. Even after almost a decade and a half on this path, I still go at it full speed. It’s a challenge, but also wonderful. Most days I feel like the ultimate maker, because I’ve created what is, for me, the dream career – one that ebbs and flows like creativity itself. How ends meet can change in any given month, but over all I do a combination of the following: design for magazines and yarn companies; teach online courses; develop cobranded products; author craft books; host and produce sponsored podcasts, videos and live streams; blog for various companies; partner with publishers on columns, kits and more; speak at live events; host TV shows and specials; act as a spokesperson or ambassador for various brands, and act as a creative and social media consultant. For me, the key has been diversifying experiences and being open to any and all opportunities. I discuss this – as well as give tactical advice on steps to create a career in craft – in my course, Monetise Your Craft, on creativelive.com. How much do you earn? It can vary greatly, but I’m fortunate enough to consistently cover at least of half of our family of five’s living expenses, as well as take us on annual (short) vacations. How did you get where you are today? With a whole lot of hustle! Thirteen years ago I had the somewhat random opportunity to pitch myself as the host of a knitting TV series (what would become DIY Network’s Knitty Gritty). I got the gig and hosted the show for eight seasons. From minute one, I realised what a gift that opportunity was and vowed to myself to not waste it. Within weeks of landing the job, I also pitched a book. From there, anytime I could get myself in a room to talk crafty collaboration, I did so. To day I continue to do that. this d What is the most difficult W or challenging thing o about trying to make a a living knitting, and liv ving from f how w do you overcome it? The constant flux of the financial state th of the industry is a o cchallenge, as is the

What advice would you give avid knitters who would love to give up their jobs and knit for a living? First off, I’d say wanting it badly enough to really work for it is a great start. After that, I suggest setting up a blog and Instagram accounts as soon as possible, and then other social media platforms after that, to act as your living resumé and body of work. We’re in a time when finding talent is at any publisher, editor, producer or executive’s fingertips – so why not be ready for them to find you?

THE INDIE DYER

Verity Castledine Top: Inside Wild and Woolly Above: Vickie Howell’s sock design

fact that (at least in the US) designers are largely still paid the same rates that were set in the 1980s. This is not a living wage, which lends to reality that we must all be Jills (or Jacks) of all trades to survive. The overarching issue, though, is the societal view that needle arts are “women’s work”, which unfortunately lessens their perceived value. All I can do is continue to break stereotypes. I’ve found that I get very different reactions when I tell someone I’m a professional knitter, if I add that I’ve done three television series, written 12 books and have my own product lines – it’s my hope that in some small way shattering people’s expectations of where the craft can lead will ultimately benefit all hardworking professional needlecrafters. I continue to collaborate with companies who give me a larger voice to affect change, and try to create opportunities for fellow creative types whenever I can.

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What do you do to make ends meet? I dye yarn which I sell online and take to shows. I write patterns that I sell via Ravelry and at shows, and occasionally I’m paid to design for magazines. There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes – planning for events and yarn club boxes, invoicing customers, packing parcels, plus lots of social media to keep people interested and help develop our brand. My husband works very hard at the digital side of things – advertising, promotion, developing packaging and products. We also have two young children, so life is hectic. How much do you earn? usiness pays for everything – rent, fuel, food, clothes, toys, entertainment, and of course buying new stock. We’re successful without having to scrimp and save, but mindful that it might not last forever.

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FEATURE

THE DESIGNER

Jo Allport What do you do to make ends meet? I work very hard! My main business is to produce knitwear designs. I do this for various magazines, other clients and I also self-publish designs. I run knitting workshops, assist with knitting charity coffee mornings and help out at knitting shows. I’ve even been on TV. How much do you earn? The challenge with being self-employed is that income comes in peaks and troughs. I earn enough to keep my family comfortable, but I don’t think I’ll be buying my husband his coveted Aston Martin any time soon. How did you get where you are today? I have had a number of different careers in the past, which have all set me up for what I do today. While crafting has always been important to me, it was not a natural career path, so I’ve come into design work quite late. It’s lovely to do something that I’m truly passionate about, and I think about it almost every waking minute.

How did you get where you are today? Five years ago I was a second-year PhD student with a six-month-old baby and my dad suddenly passed away. I learned to crochet that weekend to take my mind off everything, and quickly I was making things for friends and family. Thanks to word of mouth and social media, people started getting in touch asking to buy things, and the business just sort of happened. I quit university six months later, learned to knit, started designing and dipped my toe into yarn dyeing. From then things snowballed, and my husband left his head chef job 18 months ago so we could build the business together. Gradually it became enough to support our family. Was there one thing that made it possible for you to make a living from knitting? Social media. All it takes is for someone to post in a group about the yarn they bought, or the pattern they’re making, and then new people find me and want to try the yarn or designs themselves. My customers make my business possible, and they’re so supportive and encouraging. They take time to send me photos of their projects and travel to see me when I’m exhibiting at shows. I couldn’t do it without my husband. He’s so supportive, he’s thrown himself wholeheartedly into this crazy world and he has as many ideas as I do about products and plans. Customers love talking to him at shows, and having both of us at home to take care of the kids makes it much easier to balance things. What is the most difficult or challenging thing about trying to make a living from knitting, and how do you overcome it? Finding the time for everything, and finding

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Was there one thing that made it possible for you to make a living from knitting? My family’s support and encouragement are invaluable. Having a good team around me is vital too – both to help with knitting, and to keep me sane. The other key thing is a love of maths. Above left: Verity Castledine Above and below right: Jo Allport’s designs

the balance between work and home life. We’re fortunate that things are very busy for us at the moment, but it does make it hard to fit everything in. My head is full of ideas, but there are not enough hours in the day for everything. Prioritising is important – I make lots of lists.

What is the most difficult or challenging thing about trying to make a living from knitting, and how do you overcome it? I end up with too much to do, and it’s all down to me, so juggling my workload sometimes becomes a bit of a challenge. It may sound mad, but I walk the dog to get my head around things. It also helps me prioritise and think creatively.

What advice would you give avid knitters who would love to give up their jobs and knit for a living? As much I’d love to say, “just give it all up and go for it”, the sensible side of me says take things slowly. The way our business developed was perfect, without any period of debt or uncertainty. Letting things happen organically seems to be a fairly nice and stress-free way of building a business around your life, rather than having to fit your life in around a business. Ultimately though, if it’s what makes you happy, and you can afford to throw everything at it, then why the hell not?

What advice would you give avid knitters who would love to give up their jobs and knit for a living? Be totally committed. Know your strengths, come up with a plan and stick to it. Don’t be disheartened when it doesn’t go right, these things will happen, and you can use these experiences to learn how to do it better next time. Above all, enjoy it.

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PROFILE

WE DID IT What Knitting For All franchisees have to say “Being part of a franchise gave me the confidence to set up my own business doing my dream job. I get to be part of a national network of likeminded knitters but have my own local identity and autonomy.” Eilidh Scott, Portobello “It’s lovely to have the flexibility to fit it around my own family and home life.” Maddie Harvey, Corstorphine & Murrayfield “This is my dream job! I have done many different jobs in my life, but this is the first where I actually look forward to going to work. As a creative person who has to be making, it is so much fun, and so rewarding. The Kids Knit programme is so well thought out, it’s great to work with.” Fiona Campbell, Cramond & Blackhall

Knitting for life Former art and design teacher and mother of four Kerry Kimber turned her love of knitting into a business teaching others the craft

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erry Kimber (pictured above) always wanted to teach her four children to knit, but she hadn’t expected to enjoy it as much as she did when she sat down with her eldest two in 2010 and showed them how. The process was such a success that she went on to develop the Kids Knit programme to teach other youngsters the craft. She soon had to recruit other teachers, and add courses for adults and teenagers to the programme, which became a franchise running classes across the UK and Ireland under the name of Knitting For All. Knitting For All franchisees own their own businesses teaching classes in the group’s three programmes and running events, supported by the core business. Kerry tells Knitting: “There are so many good things about encouraging others to be creative, and teaching knitting is especially rewarding. Whether it’s children, adults or teenagers, there’s nothing quite like that eureka moment when someone realises they can do it.

“Since Knitting For All was founded in 2010 the business has grown, with more franchisees realising their dreams of running their own knitting business. Every lesson is rewarding, seeing pupils release their creative juices and realise their potential. For our teachers, seeing friendships knit together is one of the most rewarding outcomes of our classes. There is something very special about knitting and being creative together, and close friendships easily form. “Many people dream of the day when they might be able to give up their nine-to-five job and work as a knitting teacher, but as soon they start to seriously consider it, they are intimidated by the many questions and challenges they face. “Where will they find good quality, lowcost materials and equipment? How will they provide an endless supply of attractive patterns and projects that will keep their customers engaged and wanting more? Then there’s insurance, police disclosure checks and health and safety issues. They wonder

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what they will do if a child misbehaves or falls ill during class. “This is where Knitting For All comes in. We have established successful ways of doing things to take the stress out of running your own business. As part of the franchise, our teachers own the rights to teach our courses and use our registered trademarks. Our support package has been put together so that you have everything you need to run successful and enjoyable knitting classes. “We supply the business knowhow, and our teachers bring their creativity and passion. We’re always looking for more dedicated and enthusiastic teachers. Whether you want to teach a few classes a week, or stuff your agenda with classes, parties and events, owning a Knitting For All franchise could be exactly what you need to fulfil your dreams of becoming a knitting teacher. Our franchisees are all at different stages of life and are making the most of the flexibility a Knitting For All franchise offers.” Find out more at knittingforall.com.

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REVIEWS Christine Boggis and Katie Holloway check out what’s hot right now

TAKE A SEAT Jemima Schlee Finding the perfect seat for your home (especially to knit in) can be hard work: it has to be comfortable, but also must fit in with your décor. Jemima Schlee solves the issue with this creative book, showing us how to take a number of different seats, sofas and chairs and transform them into something special. The projects include upcycling and simple reupholstery, with some lovely crocheted pieces too. With step-by-step photos, and a comprehensive techniques section at the back of the book, these beautiful projects are very achievable. We love the granny square garden bench! KH £12.99, GMC Publications, available from thegmcgroup.com

A BIRD IN THE HAND Sue Stratford

YARNTELIER HANDKNIT VOLUME ONE Louisa Harding Yarntelier is the new brand Louisa Harding has been working on with Yorkshire’s finest yarn specialists. The result is two beautiful cashmere yarns that are soft, rich and luxurious. Handknit Volume One is the first collection of patterns designed specially for these yarns, although the patterns are also available individually and as digital downloads. Beautifully photographed and elegantly styled, each knit showcases what is best about these yarns. The patterns include a mix of accessories and garments, with styles suited to all seasons. We love delicate Zephine, the cover star, which can be worn in multiple ways, and we know we’ll be wearing the Birdie cardigan with everything come spring. KH £15, Yarntelier

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This sweet book contains 12 patterns to knit your own birds, from parrots to seagulls, and even comes with a bonus pattern booklet with three extra hedgerow birds to knit. The birds themselves are charming, and are simply photographed, allowing us to see the details clearly. We particularly like the charming little puffin. The patterns are well laid-out and easy to follow, and there are even yarn kits available on Sue’s website, containing all the materials you need, including British wool, to knit each individual bird. Adults and children alike will be won over by these cute feathered friends. KH £12.99, suestratford.co.uk

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REVIEWS

COOP KNITS SOCKS YEAH! VOLUME ONE Rachel Coopey It-girl sock knitter Rachel Coopey has released a book of 12 fun and quirky sock designs in her own yarn brand, featuring cool colourwork, clever cables and lovely lace. The neat and elegant patterns are sized to fit small, medium or large feet, and the book winds up with a handy set of tips for sock knitters and howto picture guides to the long-tail cast on, afterthought heels and Kitchener stitch. There’s plenty of fuel for all you avid sock knitters out there, and there’s more to come too: Rachel says that for every sock she designs, she gets ideas for three more – so look out for more volumes of Socks Yeah! in the future. CB £18, coopknits.co.uk

SELF-STRIPING YARN STUDIO Carol J Sulcoski Carol J Sulcoski got hooked on the joys of self-striping yarn the first time she knitted with Noro Kureyon, and she hasn’t looked back since. Her new book looks into the best ways to work with these striking yarns, and how to match them to different projects based on the different ways different types of “stripers” work, as well as fibre and yarn weight. Then there are 25 patterns designed for different types of self-striping yarn, with innovative ways of showing off the colour palettes such as a jumper in hexagons, which picks out different parts of the colour in each hexagon and then contrasts them with the stripe pattern in plain knitted sleeves. As well as jumpers and shrugs there are plenty of accessories and smaller projects to help use up odd balls of self-striping yarn. CB £16.99, Lark Crafts, available from thegmcgroup.com

PEOPLE KNITTING Barbara Levine Self-styled “knitter-watcher” Barbara Levine – an artist, collector and curator of vernacular photography – has pulled together an intriguing book of, quite simply, people knitting. There are 100 snapshots, studio portraits and newspaper cuttings, as well as posters, advertisements and postcards from the 1860s to the 1960s, with the odd quote or snippet of writing thrown in for good measure. There are men, women, boys and girls, starlets between movie takes and prisoners of war, tiny toddlers and elderly grandparents, and all of them knitting. It is a fascinating book for knitters and non-knitters alike, although there are a couple of images of people knitting from unwound hanks of yarn that were deeply disturbing to this reviewer, and maybe to anyone else prone to woolly tangles. In the introduction Barbara writes: “To watch people knit is to be invited into their private world of contemplation and innermost creative expression.” This is a book you could read over and over again. CB £9.99, Princeton Architectural Press, available in the UK from Abrams & Chronicle

A YEAR BETWEEN FRIENDS 3191 MILES APART Maria Alexandra Vettese and Stephanie Congdon Barnes This beautiful book is the story of a year in the lives of art director and photographer Maria Alexandra Vettese, of Portland, Maine, and her friend, photographer and stylist Stephanie Congdon Barnes, who lives 3,191 miles away in Portland, Oregon. Each month, each of the pair writes a letter to the other and shares it in the book along with beautiful snapshots from their lives, recipes, craft projects and hints and tips for enjoying the season and life in general. The year marks Maria becoming a mother, and includes moving and helpful tips on pregnancy and the first 100 days with a newborn baby. A perfect gift for someone you love, or yourself. CB £14.99, Abrams & Chronicle

MAD COLOUR Alexa Ludeman and Emily Wessel The duo behind Tin Can Knits’ modern, seamless knitwear collections has released a book celebrating their love of colour. It is a rainbow of designs in stripes, spots, Fairisle, intarsia and slip stitch colourwork as well as cables, lace and plenty of other knitting delights. Designed for experimentation, these simple yet effective patterns are sized from tiny babies to extra-large adults, and include fantastic stashbusters from garments to small accessories like hats and mittens. With plenty of hints and tips, the 16 designs in this book seem like many more. Among my favourites are the Undertone cowl, Bumble jumper and Burnished shawl. But it is the Swatchtastic Bunting that has really changed my life – since discovering it I have actually enjoyed swatching for the first time, and I don’t need to worry what to do with those pesky little squares anymore! This is one of those books that makes your fingers itch to start knitting. CB Patterns are available individually, as an e-book (CAN$18) or a printed book (CAN$23 plus shipping) from tincanknits.com

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Beautiful designs for you, from the world’s best designers.

From international names, to newly emerging talent. Inspired by the brand, our designers create patterns with you in mind.

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REVIEWS

YARN REVIEW Jeanette Sloan tries out an array of black and white yarns

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NORO TENNEN Made from 50% wool, 25% silk, and 25% alpaca, Noro Tennen is a slub yarn that’s lightweight yet beautifully warm to the touch, with thickness variations ranging from 2 to 5mm in width. I started out using the recommended 4.5mm needle, but after a few rows I found the fabric too stiff, and 5.5mm needles gave me much softer results. It’s best to swatch before starting your project. This yarn has interesting changes in colour, creating a gentle striped effect that doesn’t detract from the stitch definition. There’s a choice of eight natural shades, and shade 28, pictured here, has light honey tones that add warmth to its ivory base. Pattern support can be found in the Natural Style booklet by Jenny Watson, featuring 12 designs for accessories and ladies’ garments. Hand-wash and dry flat or dry-clean with care. Composition: 50% wool, 25% silk, 25% alpaca Weight: 100g Length: 250m Rec needle size: 4-4.5mm Tension (10cm): 16-18 sts x 2426 rows RRP: £19.75 Contact: Designer Yarns T: 01535 664222 E: enquiries@designeryarns. uk.com

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DEBBIE BLISS FALKLAND ARAN

ROWAN CASHMERE

ISAGER JENSEN YARN

Debbie Bliss Falkland Aran is spun from three plies of 100% extra-fine Falkland Merino wool from sheep farmed organically in the Falklands. Part of the Pure Bliss brand, this yarn is produced in the UK by Laxtons of Yorkshire. It has a rich, lustrous appearance and a squishy quality when in hank form. It has a smooth handle and knits up evenly, producing crisp stitches, which makes it the perfect yarn for knitting traditional Aran patterns. There are 16 shades to choose from, including fresh spring shades like Apple (09) as well as classic Black (02) shown here. Pattern support for all the family is available in the Falkland Aran booklet, which marries contemporary garment and accessory designs with a variety of classic stitches. Machine-wash at 30ºC on a gentle setting. Dry flat. Do not tumble-dry. Dryclean with care.

Five ends of fibre made by blending 95% cashmere with 5% wool are plied and twisted together to produce limited edition Rowan Cashmere. It’s a high-quality yarn with a smooth, rounded finish which knits to a DK tension and produces an even finish with a soft handle. When it comes to the colour palette, Rowan has chosen natural shades like Marl Grey (53, shown here), along with some soft pastels. This is an exceptional, luxurious yarn that you’ll want to use only for very special projects. There are two collections of designs by Martin Storey available as free downloads – four patterns for children’s sweaters and cardigans and five understated designs for women’s garments and accessories. Machine-wash at 30ºC on a gentle setting. Dry flat. Do not tumble-dry or wring. Dry-clean with care.

Isager’s Jensen Yarn is named after Danish designer Åse Lund Jensen, as it was one of only two yarns she would work with. Made from three plies of 100% wool that’s been spun, dyed and twisted in Denmark, it’s a strong yarn with a light quality. Although it has a slightly hairy appearance, this yarn has a smooth, rounded handle. There are lots of options for working with Jensen, so you could knit it single on smaller needles or go up a couple of sizes and pair it with other yarns from the range. I knitted the sample shown here using a single end on a 4mm needle. Colours are based on natural plant dyes such as madder and indigo, with 19 shades to choose from including shade 3, shown here. Pattern support can be found on Isager’s website. Hand-wash and dry flat or dryclean with care.

Composition: 100% wool Weight: 100g Length: 180m Rec needle size: 5mm Tension (10cm): 19 sts x 26 rows RRP: £8.95 Contact: Designer Yarns T: 01535 664222 E: enquiries@designeryarns. uk.com W: designeryarns.uk.com

Composition: 95% cashmere, 5% wool Weight: 25g Length: 75m Rec needle size: 4.5mm Tension (10cm): 20 sts x 28 rows RRP: £9.95 Contact: Rowan T: 01484 950630 E: mail@knitrowan.com W: knitrowan.com

Composition: 100% pure new wool Weight: 100g Length: 250m Rec needle size: 3.5-4mm Tension (10cm): depends on your desired effect RRP: DDK 69 (around £8.34 at time of writing) Contact: Isager T: +45 989 31593 E: isager@isagerstrik.dk W: isagerstrik.dk

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RICO LINEA BOTANICA Rico Linea Botanica is made from 100% virgin wool and has a plied and twisted construction. Produced in Italy, it has a bouncy texture and is made to Rico’s usual high quality standards. This is a soft yarn that knits up evenly without any snagging or splitting, and the knitted fabric fills out nicely when given just a touch of steam. Rico has chosen a botanical theme for this organic yarn, with a palette of six colours including Alba (01), shown here. Because of the natural dyeing method used, you may find that there are more colour variations occurring from one hank to another, so it may be worth working with a couple of hanks and alternating every couple of rows to avoid banding. Pattern support can be found in the Linea Botanica collection of ladies’ designs. Hand-wash and dry flat. Do not tumble-dry. May be dry-cleaned with care. Composition: 100% virgin wool Weight: 50g Length: 130m Rec needle size: 5mm Tension (10cm): 19 sts x 23 rows RRP: £9.50 Contact: The Black Sheep T: 01925 764231 W: blacksheepwools.com or rico-design.co.uk

KETTLE YARNS BASKERVILLE

RICO FASHION ALPACA DREAM

Baskerville is a fingering weight blend of 60% British Exmoor Blueface, 25% British Gotland and 15% silk. This is a 2 ply yarn with a gentle twist, and because it’s worsted spun, it has a smooth finish and wonderful strength. It has a slightly hairy texture that gives it a subtle halo, while the touch of silk and Blueface give it a gentle sheen, handle and drape. A number of different effects can be achieved by knitting it on anything from 2.5-4mm needles. I particularly like the slightly open fabric produced by knitting on a larger size. There are four hand-dyed shades available. The sample shown was knitted using a 4mm needle in Dawn. Pattern support can be found in the Dawn to Dusk collection of four designs (three knit and one crochet) and is available in both print and digital forms. Hand-wash only.

Rico Fashion Alpaca Dream is a chunky blend of 64% virgin wool, 30% alpaca and 6% polyamide. The knitted tubular construction snakes easily through the fingers, producing a chunky but lightweight fabric with squashy stitches that are soft and warm. Because it has a gently blurred appearance I’d avoid using it for subtle stitch details, but it would work well for large cables and broad ribs. There are nine shades available (08 Grey is shown here). Pattern support can be found in a selection of loose leaflets for garments suc as cabled cardigans and ponchos and accessories. Although the patterns currently cater specifically to women, this yarn will definitely appeal to men too, and could be your go-to yarn for a quick hat and scarf set. This yarn hangs beautifully after a gentle steam. Hand-wash and dry flat. Do not tumble-dry. Dry-clean with care.

Composition: 60% British Exmoor Blueface, 25% British Gotland, 15% silk Weight: 100g Length: 400m Rec needle size: 2.25-4mm Tension (10cm): 18 sts x 26 rows RRP: £24 Contact: Kettle Yarns W: kettleyarnco.co.uk

Composition: 64% virgin wool, 30% alpaca, 6% polyamide Weight: 50g Length: 120m Rec needle size: 8mm Tension (10cm): 14 sts x 20 rows RRP: £5.50 Contact: The Black Sheep T: 01925 764231 W: blacksheepwools.co.uk or rico-design.co.uk

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SIRDAR CABOODLE Sirdar Caboodle is a brightlycoloured blend of 64% acrylic and 36% polyester. It has a twisted construction that combines a solid base with a variegated slub and the resulting yarn has a dense, brushed appearance with a nubbly feel. This fun yarn produces a soft, lightweight fabric that is scattered with large splodges of colour. Watch out, as due to the close texture of this yarn it is easy to accidentally drop stitches. There’s a palette of five shades, each with plenty of variation, including shade 151 Harlequin, shown here. There’s a selection of eight single leaflet patterns, with designs ranging from hats, scarves and cowls to sweaters, waistcoats and home accessories. Machine-wash at 40ºC on a wool cycle. Do not iron or tumble-dry. Dry-clean with care. Composition: 64% acrylic, 36% polyester Weight: 50g Length: 55m Rec needle size: 6.5mm Tension (10cm): 14.5 sts x 17 rows RRP: £4.74 Contact: Sirdar E: enquiries@sirdar.co.uk T: 01924 371501 W: sirdar.co.uk

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Image: © Shutterstock/Andrey_Kuzmin

READ ANYWHERE! DOWNLOAD FOR

ONLY £3.99 PER ISSUE

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Fashion gallery

GRADUALLY Boadicea Binnerts Yarn Madelinetosh Tosh Chunky Skill level Advanced Pattern page 50 With graded colour blocks taking you from charcoal to ecru, each in a different texture to test your knitting skills, this oversized cardigan, worked in one piece from the bottom up, is right on trend – and it’s super-cosy to wear too.

is on trend e m o r h c o n o and white: m d a hip gallery of knits k c a l b in , is Here it ve collecte o you can knit a h e w d n a – right now e and shades of grey s ed of colour, p in black, whit the latest fashion. Strip ever – and, of your way into tails stand out more than e the knitted d l go with everything. course, they’l 23

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Fashion gallery

SCALENE Georgia Farrell Yarn Rowan Big Wool Skill level Beginner Plus Pattern page 54 This stylish shaped poncho is quick to knit in Rowan’s classic Big Wool, and will keep you warm on those cold winter days.

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Fashion gallery

LUCINDA Pat Menchini

Up to ze U K si 28

Yarn Rico Essentials Alpaca Blend Chunky Skill level Beginner Plus Pattern page 55 This simple knitted jumper shows off bold black-and-white stripes in a textured pattern with a flattering polo neck, in a soft and chunky alpaca, wool and acrylic blend yarn.

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Fashion gallery

QUIZ NIGHT Pat Menchini Yarn Rico Creative Melange DK, Rico Essentials Merino Plus DK Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 56 With a simple Fairisle pattern set against a self-patterning yarn, this soft and cosy jumper is fun to knit and perfect to wear to the pub.

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SHADES OF GRADIENT Maisie Smith Yarn Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino Skill level Beginner Plus Pattern page 58 OmbrĂŠ gradient tones are really big right now, and this neat, fitted jumper with a stylish slash neck is a simple knit that will flatter your figure and show off (not quite 50) shades of grey.

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Fashion gallery

WINTER CLOUD Georgia Farrell Yarn Lang Yarns Malou Light Skill level Beginner Plus Pattern page 60 This alpaca-dominated jumper is as soft and light as a cloud on a dry January day, straightforward to knit and a joy to wear.

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Fashion gallery FAE Jo Allport Yarn Sublime Extra Fine Merino DK Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 62 This striking jumper is created using a deceptively simple slip stitch technqiue, which you can learn all about in designer Jo's masterclass on page 64.

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Fashion gallery

IMPACT Pat Menchini Yarn Rico Essentials Merino DK Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 65 Tapping into the trend for ombrĂŠ and gradient shading, this stylish cardigan is perfect for day to evening wear.

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Fashion gallery

NYLA Marie Wallin Yarn Rowan Cocoon Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 67 A beautiful Fairisle design in a soft and chunky wool, this shortsleeved over-top can be dressed up or down to keep you cosy in any situation.

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Fashion gallery

ALL WRAPPED UP Helga van Impelen Yarn Any super chunky wool Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 69 Keep cosy and stylish in this warming wrap with a neat basketweave stitch and a centre split that makes it really easy to wear, as well as quick to knit.

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Fashion gallery F FLOWER KING Anna Maltz A Y Yarn Navia Trio SSkill level Intermediate Pattern page 70 P Researching her book Penguin: R A Knit Collection, Anna became ffascinated with the similarity between king penguins' feathers b aand knit stitches – featured here magnified in a Fairisle design. m

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Fashion gallery NORTHERN LIGHTS DesignEtte Yarn DesignEtte Hokkaido Skill level Intermediate crochet Pattern page 71 Tunisian crochet is an exciting technique that creates an almost woven look in a fabric – try it out in this stylish coat.

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Fashion gallery

EXPANDING VEES Sharon H Silverman Yarn Any 4 ply yarn Skill level Intermediate crochet Pattern page 72 Create striking stripes in this Tunisian crochet triangle shawl – there's a how-to guide in our pattern instructions from page 73.

et croch n a i Tunis ecial sp

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Fashion gallery

SUSAN Drops Design Yarn Drops Karisma Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 74 Keep out the winter chill with this gorgeous yoke jumper in 100% warming wool.

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Unravel your creativity Rico Creative Melange chunky

www.rico-design.co.uk

Knitting idea compact 468

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FASHION

STYLE FILE SCALENE IN ROWAN BIG WOOL

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CONCRETE

BLACK

WINTER CLOUD IN LANG YARNS MALOU LIGHT

96

17

25

IMPACT IN RICO ESSENTIAL MERINO DK

DARK BLUE, COBALT BLUE & SMOKEY BLUE

38

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PEBBLE, POWDER & SAND

MULBERRY, BERRY & CARDINAL

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28/11/2016 10:50


FASHION

Lauren Goodchild suggests alternative colourways and styling ideas for three knits from this month’s gallery Surely a new year means new clothes? Treat yourself to these monochrome essentials and stay in style this season and next. Chunkyknit poncho Scalene will be sure to add personality to your workwear and weekend wardrobes. Wear Impact with a pair of grey trousers and flat shoes for a sleek and sophisticated look, perfect all year round. If you’re a fan of cosy jumpers, then Winter Cloud is for you. Layer up with a faux fur scarf and neutral coat to keep you warm in the winter frost.

DRESS £150, Jaeger

TIGHTS £34, Wolford

HAT £12, F&F

GLOVES £45, Dune London

SCARF £69, Jigsaw

COAT £399, Hobbs

BRACELET £16, People Tree

BAG £27.50, Marks and Spencer

TROUSERS £28, Dorothy Perkins

SHOES £45, Debenhams

BAG £35, Very

EARRINGS £15, East

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18/11/2016 10:52


Home gallery

toriiaan c i ic V e g a t n i in v m o r f , style home y n a r o f k o o l t a e a gr Black and white iss rn, stark Scandi interiors. e tiles to ultra-mod

TWO-TONE CUSHION PAIR Christine Boggis Yarn Debbie Bliss Roma Skill Level Beginner/Beginner Plus Pattern page 75 Inspired by the black-and-white style of the late-1970s ska revival, these cushions will look super-cool in any monochrome home. The stripy one is an ideal fi rst knit, while the retro checkers pattern makes a brilliant introduction to Fairisle. 40

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18/11/2016 11:07


Find g for m ifts to m e a you f n, kids a ke rom p n age 4 d 2

LITTLE BLACK DRESS Charmaine ine Fletcher Fle Yarn Sirdar Hayfi H eld Bonus DK Skill level Intermediate termediate Pattern pagee 77 The inspiration ation for this elegant cosy is a staple of every woman’s wardrobe – the little black dress. This is new take on a classic sic design incorporates rates the fashion designer Coco Chanel’s ’s love of texture and a stylish trademark camellia. lia.

PEARLY QUEEN Jemma Langworthy Yarn Any cchunky wool or wool-blend yarn Skill levell Beginner page 78 Pattern p design continues a tradition that dates back This des than 130 years, for Cockneys from London’s more th End to decorate their clothes with mother-ofEast En buttons sewn in intricate patterns. pearl b

GET THE LOOK

London Funk Cloth Tile £1.80 per tile, bakedtiles.co.uk

K163_P40-45_Gallery 02.indd 41

Hyde Side Table £429, houseology.com

Colours Shimmer black-and-white stripe glitter wallpaper, £12, B&Q

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22/11/2016 12:06


Gifts gallery

BARLEY TWIST Hilary Grant Yarn Jamieson’s of Shetland Spindrift Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 79 Try out double knitting with this pretty headband with a cable-style twisted plait, and Jeanette Sloan’s how-to guide on page 48.

One Ball e Challeng

HALFREK HAIRBAND Christine Boggis Yarn Designette Princess Silk Skill level Beginner Plus Pattern page 79 This beautiful 100% silk yarn dotted with Swarovski crystals is perfect for lace patterns. A simple feather-and-fan design gives this neat hair band its lovely scalloped edge.

42

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18/11/2016 11:08


VELLA BAG Jo Allport

Gifts gallery

Yarn Cygnet Seriously Chunky Skill level Beginner Plus Pattern page 80 Take this generous cross-body bag anywhere with you. Designed to be worn slung low, it’s stylish as well as useful.

SHAWL COLLAR JUMPER Drops Design Yarn Drops Nepal Skill level Intermediate Pattern page 81 Get ready for winter with this cute patterned jumper in a super-soft wool and alpaca blend yarn, perfect for chilly walks on snowy days or après ski.

43

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18/11/2016 11:08


Gifts gallery

your Test skills et croch

POMPOM DOG Alison Howard Yarn Any DK yarn Skill level Beginner Pattern page 86

MONUMENTAL MOOSE Taylor Hart Yarn Any worsted weight yarn Skill level Intermediate crochet Pattern page 83

Upright and alert with a shiny nose and bright button eyes, this little dog seems like the ideal pet. A length of broken bracelet makes a perfect choke chain.

Great pr oj for kidsect

This gentle giant is the biggest critter in Taylor Hart’s new book Crochet Taxidermy – but he’s well worth all the hard work and dedication, and once he’s mounted and hung on your wall you’ll feel all the pride of the big game hunter, and none of the guilt. 44

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18/11/2016 11:08


Gifts gallery PANDA HAT Sirdar Yarn Sirdar Baby Bamboo DK Skill level Beginner Pattern page 86 Black and white isn’t just for grownups: this super-cute hat comes in sizes from babies up to age 7 and will keep little animal lovers warm and happy.

Knit you first jum r per

rn Newbo 7 e to ag

EASYGOING SWEATSHIRT MINI Amy Herzog Yarn Rowan Softknit Cotton Skill level Beginner Plus Pattern page 87 Integrated-sleeve sweaters can often cause a lot of head-scratching during the knitting process, as newer knitters struggle to imagine how the lumpy piece of fabric they’re creating will ever turn into a sweater. Never fear! This mini gives you a quick, fun look at how one single piece of knitting can turn into a super-comfy garment. Worked in a soft, kind-to-the-hands cotton yarn, this child’s sweatshirt features simple garter stitch trim and a fast gauge. 45

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18/11/2016 11:09


YOUR VIEWS

ASK JEANETTE

Your queries answered by Jeanette Sloan STARER T LET

yarn in the design should be back in stock in the UK some time in the coming weeks. Designer Brian Smith recommends Cascade Heritage in Charcoal (5631) and Cascade Heritage Paints in Tortoiseshell (9784), or self-striping Louisa Harding Amitola with any solidcoloured yarn in a matching gauge, as alternatives. I hope one of these works out for you – let us know how you get on.

NEW YEAR’S RESOLVE Every new year I make a list of things that I either resolve to give up (mindless eating of food, particularly chocolate) or take up (any type of exercise). But last year, yet again, I spectacularly failed at both by around the end of January. So instead I’ve decided to do things differently and make some craft resolutions for next year. I’ve avoided crochet like the plague for years, so learning that is definitely top of the list. But what would make your list for 2017? Niamh Ellson, by email

AUTUMNAL SWERVE I received my copy of Knitting issue 161, November 2016, this morning and immediately fell in love with Brian Smith’s Autumnal Curve shawl. But I was very disappointed to find out that some of the yarn to knit it – Classic Elite’s Alpaca Sox – is out of stock and is now not likely to be replenished for a number of weeks. I really do feel disappointed as I was looking forward to knitting it. Please could you suggest an alternative yarn, as other readers will face the same problem. Venita Parry, by email

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Sorry to hear you haven’t been able to get hold of the yarn for this beautiful and popular design. Knitting always tries to make sure that the yarns we feature in the magazine are available to all our readers, but because of the delay between going to press and publication, we can’t always be aware of out-of-stocks. We’ve got a couple of suggestions for you. Betsy Perry of Classic Elite recommends Superfine 400, from Classic Elite’s sub-brand Yarn And Soul, which ships worldwide from yarn.com and comes in a wide range of colours. Alternatively, the original

Oh dear, the dreaded new year’s resolutions! I must admit that while I avoid making a long list of things that I’ll inevitably fail to stick to, I do try to earmark a couple of things I’d like to achieve before the year is out. At the beginning of 2016 I resolved to get fit, and at one point was spinning at the gym three times a week. (Sorry, no yarn involved). Sadly I had to stop for health reasons, but you’ve inspired me to look to 2017 – so here are my three resolutions: 1. Fairisle – I’ve been spending too much time drooling over other people’s Pinterest boards and now need to actually knit

a brightly coloured Fairisle cardigan. Thankfully I’ve got a good stash of Jamieson & Smith’s 2 ply Jumperweight, so I look forward to many hours of experimenting with stitch motifs and colourways before finally getting started. 2. Top-down knitting – I bought a copy of Barbara G Walkers Top Down Knitting more than a year ago, and this is a technique I’d definitely like to use for a garment. 3. Machine knitting – I can hear the sharp intakes of breath already. Having moved into a new house last summer, I have a new office space with a new home for my Brother 950i knitting machine and ribber attachment. Although it seems ancient now, it was used a lot when I produced accessories under my Duppdupp label, and I’m feeling a bit guilty that I haven’t used it for a few years now. You can produce much more creative fabrics than plain stocking stitch on a knitting machine, so there’s lots of experimenting to be done there. You’ve mentioned crochet and that’s another craft that I’ve dipped my toe into but not really explored a great deal, so there’s another challenge for me. I hope you and all the other readers enjoy getting to grips with a new challenge in 2017. You’ll love the thrill of gaining new skills rather than giving something up. Happy new crafting year!

knit tingmag.com

18/11/2016 11:13


YOUR VIEWS

ASK JEANETTE STAR LETTER PRIZE Venita Parry asked this month’s star question. Venita wins a copy of MillaMia’s book Country Escape and 16 balls of MillaMia Naturally Soft Merino in a colour of her choice to make the Charlie Cardigan, courtesy of LoveKnitting.

YOUR LETTERS Share your thoughts through Facebook, Twitter or email for your chance to win

STARER T LET RINGING THE CHANGES

If you have a question for Jeanette, email jeanettes@ thegmcgroup.com or write to Ask Jeanette, Knitting, GMC Publications, 86 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XN. Note: Jeanette regrets that she cannot enter into any personal correspondence with readers and can only answer letters that are chosen for publication in Knitting.

Your interview with Nicky Epstein (issue 160) was interesting – and, for me, revealing, because it points up the differences between knitting today and in the 1980s. The main advance, for me, is in the variety of exciting yarns available today, which just weren’t around in the 1980s (and which Knitting showcases very well). There are also more interesting magazines around, like Knitting, though we have lost most of those, like Mon Tricot, that gave perspectives on knitting in other countries (French, in the case of Mon Tricot, which was

translated into English). I think, however, that it is far more difficult for a designer, however talented (as Nicky very definitely is), to make a career today and, when I am looking for interesting facts about knitting, especially traditional knitting, I always go to my many books from the 1980s (some of which are now back in print). What I find now is that many of the books published are variations on a theme, and there is now, to counterbalance interesting ideas, an obsession with techniques, which was just not there in the 1980s, when knitters like Nicky experimented with whatever they were interested in. Her Unicorn in the Garden is technically difficult, but knitters who liked it, as I do, just knitted it or got friends to knit it – there was far less feeling of “oh, that’s too difficult, so I won’t try it”. I know that I regret not trying to publish a book on my particular interest, Russian knitting, then because it is now next to impossible unless, like me, you are self-publishing and selling to acquaintances, for interest rather than profit, or good at marketing. Catherine Maslova, via Facebook

NEW YEAR, NEW YOU What is your knitting new year’s resolution? Knittingg readers are such a generous lot. More than a third of you have made a new year’s resolution to knit more for others – more than any other resolution in our Twitter poll. Another 32% have vowed to sort out their stash in 2017 – good luck with that! A quarter want to keep up to date with social media like Ravelry, and another 7% have other crafty plans – Suzanne Yandle wants to start sock knitting, while @yvonnejinx is going to learn Fairisle and try out some more complex patterns.

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STAR LETTER PRIZE Catherine Maslova wrote this month’s star letter. Catherine wins a copy of 50 Knitted Gifts for Yearround Giving by the editors of Sixth & Spring Books, worth £14.99, available from thegmcgroup.com. Share your thoughts for your chance to win.

Don’t be a stranger Twitter: @KnittingMag Facebook: KnittingMagazine Pinterest: knittingmag1 Instagram: knittingmagazine Email: christine.boggis@ thegmcgroup.com Post: Christine Boggis, Knitting, GMC Publications, 86 High Street, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 1XN

Other 7% 25% Update my Ravelry page

36% Knit more for others

32% Sort my stash

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28/11/2016 10:52


Jeanette Sloan’s A-Z of Knitting Techniques

D IS FOR DOUBLE KNITTING Part 1: Casting on, single-colour knitting and horizontal stripes

T

his is a clever technique that initially can appear more complicated than it actually is. It produces a doublethickness fabric with stocking stitch on both sides that is extremely warm, making it perfect for accessories, particularly scarves, as it doesn’t curl up at the sides. Although it

can of course be worked in a single colour, I thought working with two contrasting colours would not only be fun but would also make it easier to identify the different sides of the fabric. For this tutorial I’ll be starting with the two-colour braided cast on which we

1

2

1. Holding both yarn A and yarn B together in your preferred hand, make a slip knot (leaving a long tail) and place it on the needle. This counts as your first stitch. This swatch will be 20 stitches wide, so cast on 18 stitches, alternating colours as you go, and remembering to rotate the yarns in the same direction so that you get a neat, candy cane-like braid of colours at the bottom of your cast-on edge. For the final stitch, cast on using the same technique but holding both of the yarns together.

3. After the first doubled loop, the colour of the first stitch in yarn A determines the colour of this side of the knitting. Thread the yarns over your hand with yarn A over your forefinger and yarn B over your middle finger.

K163_P48-49_A-Z Techniques.indd 48

2. Both edge stitches should be made with both yarns held together, while the stitches in between should be single ends with the two different colours alternating.

4

3

48

covered in Knitting 160, October 2016. If, like me, you normally hold the yarn in your left hand and knit continental-style you’ll find it easier to work this technique, but it can of course be worked using the Scottish or traditional method with the yarn in the right hand.

4. With both yarns at the back of the work, slip the first stitch, then knit the next stitch using yarn A only.

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18/11/2016 11:16


Jeanette Sloan’s A-Z of Knitting Techniques Next month: double knitting from a chart 5

6

5. Bring both yarns to the front of the work and this time purl the next stitch using yarn B only.

7

6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until you reach the last stitch, then bring both yarns to the front of the work and, holding them together, purl the last stitch. 8

7. When you come to work the following row, yarn B will be dominant so when holding the yarns they should be reversed so that yarn B is threaded over your forefinger and yarn A is over your middle finger.

8. Beginning once more with a knit stitch, and using yarn B, work as before, alternating between the colours with knit and purl.

10

9

9. The completed fabric should be totally reversible with marled edges where the stitches have been slipped and purled in both colours.

11

10. For horizontal stripes, work the required number of rows and then on the following row work the yarn A stitches in yarn B and the yarn B stitches in yarn A. Because each of the end stitches is worked in both colours, there are no annoying floats up the sides of the fabric, which means you can make the stripes as deep or as narrow as you like. 12

11. If you’d prefer a double-faced fabric in a single colour, simply use the same technique as above but using with two ends of the same colour. In this case, still working from two separate balls of yarn.

12. To cast off, knit the first stitch then knit the knits and purl the purls, keeping the colour sequence as set. On the two-colour fabric, this produces a two-colour cast-off that matches the cast-on edge.

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cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1

GRADUALLY BY BOADICEA BINNERTS

3

ABBREVIATIONS 4

Sl1wyib = slip 1 with yarn in back Sl1wyif = slip 1 with yarn in front

For more abbreviations see page 89 5 2

PATTERN NOTES

6

Garment is designed with 20cm (8in) positive ease. Keep patterns correct after shaping. Where stitches are left over after pattern repeats have been completed, continue in pattern even though the repeat will be incomplete.

7 3 8

WAFFLE STITCH 1 9

Rows 1 and 3: *P1, k2*, repeat from * to *. Row 2: *P2, k1*, repeat from * to *. Row 4: Knit.

10 4

TWO-COLOUR REVERSE LINEN STITCH

11 12 5 13 14

SIZES

15 6 16 17 7 18

To fit: UK size 8-10[12-14:16-18:20-22] 81-86[91-97:102-107:112-117]cm (32-34[36-38:40-42:44-46]in) Actual measurement: 110[120:130:140]cm (43¼[47¼:51:55]in) Length to shoulder: 78[80:82:84]cm (30½[31¼:32¼:33]in) Sleeve length: 55cm (21½in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

19

YOU WILL NEED

20 8 21 22 9 23 24 25 10

Madelinetosh Tosh Chunky 100% Merino wool (approx 150m per 100g) 2[3:3:3] x 100g skeins Dirty Panther (A) 2[3:3:4] x 100g skeins Pelican (B) 3[3:3:4] x 100g skeins Optic (C) 3[3:3:3] x 100g skeins Antler (D) Set each 5mm and 5.5mm circular needles Stitch holders 4 x stitch markers 3 x 3.25mm lightweight white/transparent press studs 1 x 1.25mm lightweight black press stud Sewing thread to sew on the press studs Wool needle and sewing needle Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

26

TENSION

27 11 28

16 sts and 24 rows to 10cm (4in) over Waffle St 1 using 5.5mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

29

50

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 50

Row 1 (RS): With colour 1, *p1, sl1wyib*, repeat from * to *. Row 2: With colour 2, *k1, sl1wyif*, repeat from * to *. Row 3: With colour 2, *p1, sl1wyib*, repeat from * to *. Row 4: With colour 1, *k1, sl1wyif*, repeat from * to *.

WAFFLE STITCH 2

Row 1: *K1, p2*, repeat from * to *. Row 2: *K2, p1*, repeat from * to *. Row 3: Knit. Row 4: Purl.

WAFFLE STITCH 3

Rows 1 and 3: *K3, p3*, repeat from * to *, end with p1. Row 2: K1, *k3, p3*, repeat from * to *. Rows 4 and 6: P1, *p3, k3*, repeat from * to *. Row 5: *P3, k3*, repeat from * to *, end with k1. Repeat these 6 rows.

BODY

With 5.5mm circular needle and A, using the long tail method, cast on 189[205:221:245] sts. Row 1 (RS): Sl1, (p1, k1) 3 times (sets the 7 front band sts), k1[1:0:0], work 40[44:49:57] sts in Waffle Stitch 1, pm, work 93[101:109:117] sts in Waffle Stitch 1, pm, work 41[44:49:57] sts in Waffle Stitch 1, k0[1:0:0], (k1, p1) 3 times, k1 (sets the 7 front band sts). Row 2: Rib 7 front band sts, p0[1:0:0], work in Waffle St 1 to last 8[8:7:7] sts, p1[1:0:0], rib 7 front band sts. These 2 rows set the patt. Cont in Waffle St 1, working the front bands in 1/1 rib at each edge until garment measures 18cm (7in), ending with row 3 of Waffle St 1. Change to B and work Row 4 of Waffle St 1. Using A and B, work Two-colour Reverse

Linen St as folls: Row 1(RS): Using A, rib 7 front band sts, p1, work in Reverse Linen St, sm as you go along, until 7 sts rem, rib 7 front band sts. Row 2: Using B, rib 7 front band sts, k1, work in Reverse Linen St, sm as you go along, until 7 sts rem, rib 7 front band sts. These 2 rows set the patt. Cont in Twocolour Reverse Linen St and rib until a total of 8 rows have been worked, then cut A. Next row (WS – Body decrease row): Using B, rib front band, knit until 3 sts before marker, ssk, k1, sm, k1, k2tog, knit across back until 3 sts before marker, k1, ssk, sm, k1, k2tog, knit across front ending with front band. 185[201:217:241] sts total. Using B, cont in Waffle St 2 as folls: Row 1: Rib 7 front band sts, k0[1:1:1], work in Waffle St 2 to last 7[7:8:8] sts, k0[0:1:1] rib 7 front band sts. Row 2: Rib 7 front band sts, p0[0:1:1], work in Waffle St 2 to last 7[8:8:8] sts, rib 7 front band sts. These 2 rows set the pattern. Cont in Waffle St 2 until garment measures 38cm (15in), ending with row 3 of Waffle St 2. Using C, work row 4 of Waffle St 2. Using B and C, work Two-colour Reverse Linen st as folls: Row 1 (RS): Using B, rib 7 front band sts, p1, work in Reverse Linen St, sm as you go along, until 7 sts rem, rib 7 front band sts. Row 2: Using C, rib 7 front band sts, k1, work in Reverse Linen St, sm as you go along, until 7 sts rem, rib 7 front band sts. These 2 rows set the patt. Cont in Reverse Linen St and rib until a total of 8 rows have been worked, then cut B. Next row (WS – Body decrease row): Using C, rib front band, knit until 3 sts before marker, ssk, k1, sm, k1, k2tog, knit across back until 3 sts before marker, k1, ssk, sm, k1, k2tog, knit across front ending with front band. 181[197:213:237] sts total. Continue with C and Waffle St 3 as folls: Row 1: Rib 7 front band sts, p1[0:0:0], work in Waffle St 3, sm as you go along, until 11[10:8:8] sts rem, k3[3:0:0], p1[0:1:1], rib 7 front band sts. Row 2: Rib 7 front band sts, k1[0:1:1], p3[3:0:0], work in Waffle St 3, sm as you go along, until 8[7:7:7] sts rem, rib 7 front band sts. These 2 rows set the pattern. Cont in patt until Body measures 58cm (22¾in), ending with row 3 of Waffle St 3. Using C, work row 4 of Waffle St 3. Using D and C, work Two-colour Reverse Linen St as folls: Row 1 (RS): Using D, rib 7 front band sts, p1, work in Reverse Linen St, sm as you go along, until 7 sts rem, rib 7 front band sts. Row 2: Using C, rib 7 front band sts, k1, work in Reverse Linen St, sm as you go along,

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22/11/2016 12:12


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1 3

Measurements are given in cm

4 5 2 6 7

55 3 8 9 4

78 [ 80 : 82 : 84 ]

10 11 12 5 29

19 20 8 21 22 9 23 24 25 10 26

27 11 28

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 51

51

7 18

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17

Sleeves are worked in pattern as folls, with colour changes matching those for the Body, and increasing on every 10th rnd as detailed below: Work 15cm (6in) in Waffle St 1. Work 8 rnds in Two-colour Reverse Linen St in A and B.

Note: Please read all Yoke pattern before starting, as shaping is given after pattern details but must be worked at the same time. Set-up row (WS): With WS of work facing and using a separate ball of D, rib 7 front band sts, knit Left Front until 2 sts before marker, p1, k1, sm, k1, p1, knit first Sleeve until 2 sts before marker, p1, k1, sm, k1, p1, knit Back until 2 sts before marker, p1, k1, sm, k1, p1, knit second Sleeve until 2 sts before marker, p1, k1, sm, k1, p1, knit Right Front, rib 7 front band sts. 244[258:278:300] sts.

16

Set Sleeve pattern

YOKE

Note: When there are fewer than 4 sts before or after the raglan st, work a shorter loop of 3, 2, or 1 sts. Working the raglan sts as set and starting neck shaping (see below) 14[15:15:16]cm (5½[6:6:6¼]in) after start of Yoke, cont in Loop Stitch as folls: Row 1 (RS): Sl7 front band sts, then using separate ball of D, *p1, sl3wyif*, rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, p1, sl7 front band sts. Row 2 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *sl1wyib, k3*, rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, sl1wyib, rib front band. Row 3 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. 236[250:270:292] sts. Repeat rows 1 to 3 nine more times, ensuring that you start each row 1 on the RS of work. You will now have 10 Loop St repeats. 164[178:198:214] sts. Row 31 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *p1, k3*, rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, p1, rib front band. Row 32 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk*, rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 33 (work on RS): Sl7 front band sts, using separate ball of D, *p1, sl3wyif*, rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, p1, sl7 front band sts (loop row 11). Row 34 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *sl1wyib, k3*, rep from * to * until

6

Notes: Please read all Sleeve pattern before starting, as pattern and increases are worked at the same time but detailed below separately. Sleeves can be knitted flat if preferred. If knitting flat, add 1 st on either side for the seam. To shorten Sleeve, shorten the Waffle St 1 block by required amount. Using A and 5.5mm circular needles, cast on 39[42:45:48] sts and join to work in the round, placing a marker at the start of round.

Loop Stitch

15

SLEEVES (MAKE 2)

Cont in Waffle St 2 and B until work meas 35cm (13¾in). Work 8 rnds in Two-colour Reverse Linen St in B and C. Cont in Waffle St 3 and C until work meas 55cm (21½in). AT THE SAME TIME shape the sides on every 10th row, working the increased sts into the pattern as folls: Increase rnd: Sm, k1, m1, work to 1 st before m, m1. Rep this increase rnd as set either side of marker every 10 rnds 13[14:15:16] more times. 69[73:77:81] sts. Cont without shaping until Sleeve meas 55cm (22in) from cast-on edge, ending with a RS row. Next row (WS): Using D, knit one rnd, casting off 1[2:2:3] sts either side of marker. 67[69:73:75] sts. Leave sts on a spare needle. Work second Sleeve in the same way.

14

until 7 sts rem, work 7 front band sts. These two rows set the patt. Cont in Reverse Linen St and rib until a total of 8 rows have been worked, then cut C. Body meas 60cm (24in) from cast-on edge. Shape armholes Next row (WS): Using D, rib front band, knit to 1[2:2:3] sts before marker, cast off next 2[4:4:6] sts, knit to 1[2:2:3] sts before next marker, cast off next 2[4:4:6] sts cont to last 7 sts, rib front band. 177[189:205:225] sts in total (45[48:52:59] sts for each Front, 87[93:101:107] sts for Back). Leave sts on a spare needle.

13

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cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1 3 4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14 15 6 16 17 7 18 19 20 8 21 22 9 23 24 25 10 26 27 11 28

8 sts rem, sl1wyib, rib front band. Row 35 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 36 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, purl until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 37 (RS – raglan dec): With first D ball rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 38 (work on RS): Sl7 front band sts, using separate ball of D, *p1, sl3wyif*, p1, sl7 front band sts (loop row 12). Row 39 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *sl1wyib, k3*, rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, sl1wyib, rib front band. Row 40 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 41 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, purl until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 42 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 43 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *p1, k3*, rep from *to* until 8 sts rem, p1, rib front band. Row 44 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 45 (WS) Using first ball of D, rib front band, purl until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 46 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 47 (work on RS): Sl7 front band sts, using separate ball of D, *p1, sl3wyif*, rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, p1, sl7 front band sts (loop row 13). Row 48 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *sl1wyib, p3*, rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, sl1wyib, rib front band. Row 49 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, purl until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 50 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 51 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, purl until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 52 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band.

29

52

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 52

Row 53 (WS): Using first ball of D, rib front band, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 54 (RS – raglan dec): Using first ball of D, rib front band, *knit until 3 sts before marker, k2tog, p1, sm, p1, ssk* rep from * to * 3 more times, knit until 7 sts rem, rib front band. Row 55 (work on RS): Sl7 front band sts, using separate ball of D, *p1, sl3wyif,* rep from * to * until 8 sts rem, p1, sl7 front band sts (loop row 14). Repeat last 9 rows.

Shape neck

At the same time, shape neck as folls: When work meas 14[15:15:16]cm (5½[6:6:6¼] in) from start of yoke, ending on a WS row, cast off 10[11:12:13] sts at beg of next 2 rows. Cast off 3 sts at beg of next 2 rows, 2 sts at beg of next 4 rows, 1 st at beg of next 2[2:4:4] rows. Keeping neck edge straight, cont to work raglan shaping, until all the sts for each Front have been cast off. Cast off the rem sleeve and Back neck sts.

NECKBAND

Using 5mm needles and D, with RS facing, pick up and knit the sts around the Right Front neck, along the Back neck and around the Left Front neck. Work the 7 sts at beg and end of the row in 1/1 rib and the rest in Reverse Linen St. After 8 rows have been worked, cast off the front band sts in rib and the remaining sts pwise.

TO FINISH

Join underarm seams and darn in ends. Soak and block if desired. Sew on the white/transparent press studs at 2cm, 17cm, 33cm (¾in, 6½in, 13in) from the top and the black press stud at 48cm (19in) from top. ●

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29/11/2016 15:39


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11/28/16 3:51 PM


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1

SCALENE BY GEORGIA FARRELL

3

Front 4 5 2 6 7

Back 3

8 9 10 4 11 12 5

SIZES

13 14 15 6

To fit: S/M[M/L] Front length approx: 101[112]cm (40[44]in) Back length approx: 46[52]cm (18[20½]in) Width: 72[80]cm (28[31½]in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to both sizes.

16

YOU WILL NEED

17 7 18 19

Rowan Big Wool 100% Merino wool (approx 80m per 100g) 6[7]x 50g balls 56 Glum 1 pair 9mm needles 2 stitch markers Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

20

TENSION 8

21 22

10.5 sts and 17 rows to 10cm over g st using 9mm needles after blocking. 10.5 sts and 16 rows to 10cm over st st using 9mm needles after blocking. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

9 23

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

24

BACK

25 10 26 27 11 28

Cast on 24 sts. Rows 1 to 5: Knit. Row 6: K3, p1, pm, k16, pm, p1, k3. Now work in patt as folls: Row 7: K3, m1, k to last 3 sts, m1, k3. Row 8: K3, p to marker, k to next marker, p to last 3 sts, k3. Rows 7 and 8 form pattern. Work in patt until you have 76[84] sts, ending with a row 8.

29

54

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 54

Keeping blocks of g st and st st as set, cast off 3 sts at beg of every row until 10[12] sts rem. Cast off.

RIGHT FRONT

Cast on 3 sts. Row 1 (RS): K1, kfb, k1 (4 sts). Rows 2 to 4: Knit. Row 5: K2, kfb, k1 (5 sts). Rows 6 to 8: Knit. Row 9: K3, m1, k2 (6 sts). Rows 10 to 12: Knit. Row 13: K3, m1, k3 (7 sts). Row 14: K3, p1, k3. Row 15: Knit. Row 16: As row 14.

Set increase pattern 1

Row 1 (RS): K to last 3 sts, m1, k3. Row 2: K3, p to last 3 sts k3. Row 3: Knit. Row 4: As row 2. These four rows form increase pattern 1. Cont in patt until you have 16 sts, ending on row 4.

Set increase pattern 2

Row 1 (RS): K to last 3 sts, m1, k3. Row 2: K3, p5, k to last 8 sts, p5, k3. Row 3: Knit. Row 4: As row 2. These four rows form increase pattern 2. Cont in patt until you have 38[42] sts, ending on row 4. Keeping blocks of g st and st st as set, cast off 3 sts as beg of every RS row until 5[6] sts rem. Work one WS row. Cast off.

LEFT FRONT

Cast on 3 sts. Row 1 (RS): K1, kfb, k1 (4 sts). Rows 2 to 4: Knit. Row 5: K1, kfb, k2 (5 sts). Rows 6 to 8: Knit. Row 9: K2, m1, k3 (6 sts). Rows 10 to 12: Knit. Row 13: K3, m1, k3 (7 sts). Row 14: K3, p1, k3. Row 15: Knit. Row 16: As row 14.

Set increase pattern 1

Row 1 (RS): K3, m1, k to end. Row 2: K3, p to last 3 sts, k3. Row 3: Knit. Row 4: As row 2. These four rows form pattern. Cont in patt until you have 16 sts, ending on row 4.

Set increase pattern 2

Row 1 (RS): K3, m1, k to end. Row 2: K3, p5, k to last 8 sts, p5, k3. Row 3: Knit. Row 4: As row 2. These four rows form pattern. Cont in patt until you have 38[42] sts, ending on row 4. Keeping blocks of g st and st st as set, cast off 3 sts as beg of every WS row until 5[6] sts rem. Cast off.

TO FINISH

Weave in any loose ends and block to finished measurements. Sew cast-off edges of Left and Right Fronts to cast-off edge of Back using mattress st. Sew up a 13cm (5in) section of the two fronts, 47[52]cm (18½[20½]in) from cast-on edges, using mattress st. Sew in ends. ●

knittingmag.com

18/11/2016 11:20


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1

LUCINDA BY PAT MENCHINI 3 4 5

2 6

50% acrylic, 30% virgin wool, 20% alpaca (approx 90m per 50g) 3[3:3:4:4:4] x 50g balls 08 Black (A) 7[7:8:8:9:9] x 50g balls 01 Cream (B) 1 pair each 5mm and 6mm needles 2 stitch holders Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

7

TENSION

3 8 9

14 sts and 19 rows to 10cm over st st using 6mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

FRONT

5 13 14 15 6 16 17 7 18 19

12

Rico Essentials Alpaca Blend Chunky

11

YOU WILL NEED

4

To fit: UK size 6-8[10-12:14-16:18-20:22-24:2628] 76-81[86-91:97-102:104-109:114-119:124-129] cm (30-32[34-36:38-40:41-43:45-47:49-51]in) Actual measurement approx: 94[105:118:126:137:149]cm (37[41½:46¼:49½:54¼:58¾]in) Length to shoulder: 59[60:60:60:61:61]cm (23¼[23½:23½:23½:24:24]in) Sleeve length: 34cm (13½in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

10

SIZES

Using 6mm needles and A, cast on 65[73:81:87:95:103] sts. ** Work patt band as folls: Row 1 (RS): P2, (wyif sl1p, p1) to last st, p1. Row 2: Purl. Row 3: P3, (wyif sl1p, p1) to last 2 sts, p2. Row 4: Purl. Rows 5 to 7: As rows 1 to 3. Break A. Join in B. Beg with a p row for WS, work 6 rows in st st. Break B. Join in A. Next row: Purl.** Work Rows 1 to 7 again. Break A. Join in B. Beg with a p row for WS, work straight in st st until Front meas 30cm (11¾in) from beg, ending after a k row. Break B. Join in A. Next row: Purl. Work from ** to ** twice. Work rows 1 to 7 again. Break A. Join in B for remainder and beg with a p row for WS, work in st st until Front meas 53cm (21in) from beg, ending after a p row.

20

15

8 21 9 23

53

24 25

59[60:60:60:61:61]

22

34

10 26

47[52.5:59:63:68.5:74.5]

55

29

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 55

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

11 28

knittingmag.com

27

Measurements are given in cm

18/11/2016 11:20


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1 3

QUIZ NIGHT BY PAT MENCHINI

Shape neck

4 5 2

Next row: K29[32:36:38:41:45], turn and cont on this group of sts for left half of neck. Dec 1 st at neck edge on next 5 rows, then on 3 foll alt rows. 21[24:28:30:33:37] sts. Work 0[2:2:2:4:4] rows straight, ending at side edge. NB: On right half of neck work 1[3:3:3:5:5] rows here.

6

Shape shoulder

7 3 8 9

Cast off 4[5:6:6:7:7] sts at beg of next row and 3 foll alt rows. Work 1 row. Cast off rem 5[4:4:6:5:9] sts. With RS facing sl next 7[9:9:11:13:13] sts (centre sts) on to a holder and leave. Rejoin B to rem 29[32:36:38:41:45] sts and k to end of row. Complete to match left half of neck.

10 4

BACK

11

Omitting neck shaping, work as Front to shoulder shaping, ending after a p row.

Shape shoulders 12 5 13

Cast off 4[5:6:6:7:7] sts at beg of next 8 rows, then 5[4:4:6:5:9] sts at beg of next 2 rows. Slip rem 23[25:25:27:29:29] sts on to a holder and leave.

14

SLEEVES

15 6 16 17 7 18 19

Using 6mm needles and A, cast on 53[57:61:65:69:73] sts. Using A, work rows 1 to 7 of patt band as given on Front. Break A. Join in B. Beg with a p row for WS, work in st st until Sleeve meas 20cm (8in) from beg, ending after a k row. Break B. Join in A and purl one row. Work from ** to ** as given on Front twice. Now work rows 1 to 7 again. Next row: Purl in A. Cast off loosely.

SIZES

To fit: UK size S[M:L:XL:XXL] 86-91[97-102:107-112:117-122:127-132]cm (34-36[38-40:42-44:46-48:50-52]in) Actual measurement: 98[108:117:127:137]cm (38½[42½:46¼:50:54]in) Length to nape: 64[65:67:69:71]cm (25¼[25½:26½:27:28]in) Sleeve length: 47[47:48:48:48]cm (18½[18½:19:19:19]in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

POLO NECK 20 8 21 22 9 23 24 25

Join left shoulder. Using 5mm needles and B, RS facing, k23[25:25:27:29:29] sts of Back, pick up and k17[18:18:18:20:20] sts evenly down left Front neck, k7[9:9:11:13:13] centre sts increasing 2[3:3:4:5:5] sts evenly, finally pick up and k17[18:18:18:20:20] sts evenly up right Front neck. 66[73:73:78:87:87] sts. Beg with a p row, work in st st until work meas 4cm (1½in). Change to 6mm needles and cont until work meas 15cm (6in) from beg. Knit 8 rows. Cast off loosely and evenly.

YOU WILL NEED

10

Rico Creative Melange DK 53% virgin wool, 47% acrylic (approx 200m per 50g) 6[6:7:7:8] x 50g balls 08 Black Grey (A) Rico Essentials Merino Plus DK 50% Merino, 50% acrylic (approx 125m per 50g) 2[3:3:3:4] x 50g balls shade 01 (B) 1 pair each 3.25mm and 4mm needles Set of four 3.25mm double-pointed needles 2 stitch holders Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

26

TO FINISH

TENSION

27

Join right shoulder and polo neck. Stitch Sleeve tops to upper sections of yoke. Join side and Sleeve seams. Press seams foll pressing instructions. ●

11 28

25 sts and 25 rows to 10cm over st st using 4mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

29

56

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 56

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18/11/2016 11:20


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14 6

15

Cast on 47[47:49:49:51] sts and work as Back to **. Next row: P2[2:4:2:3], (m1p, p6[6:8:4:5]) 7[7:5:11:9] times, m1p, p to end. 55[55:55:61:61] sts. Change to 4mm needles and beg with a k row for RS, work Chart rows 1 to 10, rep 6 patt sts 8[8:8:9:9] times across, starting and ending on st 6. These 10 rows only set patt for Sleeves. Cont in patt, shaping Sleeve by inc 1 st at each end of next row, then on every foll 4th[alt:alt:alt:alt] row until there are 81[61:69:75:87] sts, then on every foll 6th[4th:4th:4th:4th] row until there are 91[97:103:109:115] sts, taking extra sts into patt. Cont straight until Sleeve meas 47[47:48:48:48]cm (18½[18½:19:19:19]in) from beg, measured through centre of work, ending after a WS row.

8

Next row: K1A, skpo in A, work across 11[11:11:12:13] sts, turn. Cont on this group of 13[13:13:14:15] sts for various sizes for left half of neck. Sizes 1, 2 and 3 only Work 5 rows, dec 1 st at neck edge on every row and at raglan edge on RS rows only (6 sts). Size 4 only Work 5 rows, dec 1 st at neck edge on every row and dec 1 st at raglan edge on next 2 rows, then on the foll RS row (6 sts). Size 5 only Work 5 rows, dec 1 st at neck edge on every

SLEEVES

3

Shape neck

7

***Rows 1 and 2: Cast off 4[5:6:7:8] sts, work to end. 113[123:133:143:153] sts. Row 3: K1A, skpo in A, work to last 3 sts, k2togA, k1A. Row 4: K1A, p2tog A, work to last 3 sts,

Work as Back until 51[53:55:59:63] sts rem in the raglan shaping, ending after a WS row.

6

Shape raglan

FRONT

2

Using 3.25mm needles and A cast on 107[119:131:143:155] sts. Row 1 (RS): K2, (p1, k1) to last st, k1. Row 2: K1, (p1, k1) to end. Rep these 2 rows until rib meas 8cm (3¼in), ending after row 1.** Next row (WS): P8[7:7:6:6], (m1p, p7[8:9:10:11]) 13 times, m1p, p to end. 121[133:145:157:169] sts. Change to 4mm needles and beg with a k row for RS, work in st st from Chart: Work rows 1 to 24 of Chart repeating 6 patt sts 19[21:23:25:27] times across. These 24 rows set patt. Cont in patt until work meas 42cm (16½in) at centre, ending after a WS row.

5

BACK

row and dec 1 st at raglan edge on first 4 of these rows (6 sts). All sizes Keeping neck edge straight, dec 1 st at raglan edge on every RS row until 2 sts rem. Work 1 row. Cast off. With RS facing, slip centre 23[25:27:29:31] sts on a holder and leave. Rejoin yarns. Next row: Work to last 3 sts, k2togA, k1A. Complete to match left half of neck.

4

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

p2tog tblA, k1A. Rows 5 and 6: As rows 3 and 4. Row 7: As row 3. Row 8: K1A, p1A, work to last 2 sts, p1A, k1A. (On rows 3 to 8 ten sts will have been decreased.) *** Rep last 6 rows 5[6:7:8:9] more times, ending after row 8 (53 sts). Next row: K1A, skpo in A, work to last 3 sts, k2togA, k1A. Next row: K1A, p1A, work to last 2 sts, p1A, k1A. Rep last 2 rows until 37[39:41:43:45] sts rem, ending after a WS row. Slip sts on to a holder and leave.

3

Carry colour not in use loosely across WS over not more than 3 sts at a time. There is no need to break off B, simply carry B loosely up side of work on the rows where it is not used. The 2 or 3 sts at side edge of raglan shapings should always be worked in A only.

1

PATTERN NOTES

16

Front and Back Chart

17 7 18

64[65:67:69:71]

19 20

Sleeve Chart

8 21

42

47[47:48:48:48]

22 9 23 24

8 49[54:58.5:63.5:68.5]

25 10 26 27 11 28

Measurements are given in cm

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 57

57

29

knittingmag.com

18/11/2016 11:21


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1 3

SHADES OF GRADIENT BY MAISIE SMITH

4 5 2 6 7 3

Work as Back from *** to *** noting that there will be 83[87:91:95:99] sts after rows 1 and 2 have been worked. Rep last 6 rows 3[3:3:3:2] more times, ending after row 8. 43[47:51:55:69] sts. Sizes 1, 2 and 5 only Work 3 more rows, dec at raglan edges on every row. 37[41:63] sts. Work 1 row straight. All sizes Dec 1 st at each end of every RS row only until 13[13:15:15:17] sts rem. Work 1 row. Slip sts on to a length of yarn and leave.

8

NECKBAND 9 10 4 11 12 5 13

Join raglan shapings except the right Back raglan. Using 3.25mm needles and A, k37[39:41:43:45] sts of Back neck, k13[13:15:15:17] sts of left Sleeve, pick up and k12 sts evenly down left Front neck, k across centre 23[25:27:29:31] sts dec 1 st evenly, pick up and k12 sts evenly up right Front neck, finally k13[13:15:15:17] sts of right Sleeve. 109[113:121:125:133] sts. Beg with row 2, work 18 rows in rib as on Back. Cast off loosely in rib.

14

TO FINISH

15 6 16

Omitting ribbing press work lightly on WS foll pressing instructions. Join side and Sleeve seams. Fold neckband in half to WS and hem neatly in place. Press seams. ●

SIZES

17

To fit: UK size 8[10:12:14:16:18:20] 81[86:91:97:102:107:112]cm (32[34:36:38:40:42:44]in) Actual measurement: 82[89:94:101:107:114:120]cm (32¼[35:37:39¾42:44¾:47¼]in) Length to shoulder: 53[54:55:56:57:58:59]cm (20¾[21¼:21¾:22:22½:22¾:23¼]in) Sleeve length: 52cm (20½in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

7 18 19 20 8

YOU WILL NEED

21

Debbie Bliss Baby Cashmerino 55% wool, 33% microfibre, 12% cashmere (approx 125m per 50g) 6[6:7:7:7:8:8] x 50g balls 300 Black (A) 1 x 50g ball 100 White (B) 1[1:1:2:2:2:2] x 50g balls 12 Silver (C) 1[1:2:2:2:2:2] x 50g balls 09 Slate (D) 1[1:2:2:2:2:2] x 50g balls 58 Dark Grey (E) 1 pair each 3mm and 3.25mm needles 2 stitch holders Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

22 9 23 24 25 10 26

TENSION

27

25 sts and 34 rows to 10cm over st st using 3.25mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

11 28 29

58

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 58

knittingmag.com

18/11/2016 11:21


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 3 8 9 10 4

NECKBAND

Join right shoulder seam. With 3mm needles and A, pick up and k8 sts down left Front neck edge, k42[43:46:47:50:51:54] sts from Front neck holder, pick up and k8 sts up right side of Front neck, 8 sts down right Back neck, k42[43:46:47:50:51:54] sts at centre Back neck, pick up and k8 sts up left Back neck. 116[118:124:126:132:134:140] sts. Rib row: (K1, p1) to end. Cut off A. Join in C. Rib 1 more row. Cast off in rib.

11 12 5 13 14 15 6 16

TO FINISH

17

Join left shoulder and Neckband. Join side and Sleeve seams. Sew in Sleeves. ●

19

Measurements are given in cm

7 18

With 3mm needles and C cast on 48[51:54:57:60:63:66] sts. Row 1 (RS): K0[1:0:1:0:1:0], (p1, k1) to end. Row 2 (WS): (P1, k1) to last 0[1:0:1:0:1:0] sts, p0[1:0:1:0:1:0]. Cut off C. Join in A. Work a further 42 rows in rib. Change to 3.25mm needles. Beg with a k row, work in st st. Work 2 rows. Inc row: K3, m1, k to last 3 sts, m1, k3. Work 7 rows. Rep last 8 rows 12 more times and inc row again. 76[79:82:85:88:91:94] sts.

7

SLEEVES

6

With 3mm needles and C, cast on 104[113:120:129:136:145:152] sts. Row 1 (RS): K0[1:0:1:0:1:0], (p1, k1) to end. Row 2 (WS): (P1, k1) to last 0[1:0:1:0:1:0] sts, p0[1:0:1:0:1:0]. Cut off C. Join in A. Work a further 4 rows in rib. Change to 3.25mm needles. Beg with a k row, work in st st. Work 2 rows. Dec row: K8, skpo, k to last 10 sts, k2tog, k8. Work 3 rows. Rep last 4 rows 6 more more times and dec row again. 88[97:104:113:120:129:136] sts. Work 11[13:13:15:15:17:17] rows straight, ending with a p row. Working in stripe sequence, shape side as folls: Inc row: K5, m1, k to last 5 sts, m1, k5. Work 9 rows. Rep last 10 rows 6 more times and inc row again. 104[113:120:129:136:145:152] sts. Work straight until work meas 34[34:35:35:36:36:37]cm (13¼[13¼:13¾:13¾:14¼:14¼:14½]in) from caston edge, ending with a p row.

Next row: K18[20:22:24:26:28:30], turn and work on these sts for first side of neck shaping. Dec 1 st at neck edge on next 8 rows. 10[12:14:16:18:20:22] sts. Cast off. With RS facing, slip centre 42[43:46:47:50:51:54] sts on to a holder, rejoin yarn to rem sts, k to end. Dec 1 st at neck edge on next 8 rows. 10[12:14:16:18:20:22] sts. Cast off.

Cast off 6[7:7:8:8:9:9] sts at beg of next 2 rows. 64[65:68:69:72:73:76] sts. Next row: K1, skpo, k to last 3 sts, k2tog, k1. Next row: Purl. Rep last 2 rows 10[10:11:11:12:12:13] times more. 42[43:44:45:46:47:48] sts. Next row: K1, skpo, k to last 3 sts, k2 tog, k1. Work 3 rows. Rep last 4 rows 4 more times. 32[33:34:35:36:37:38] sts. Next row: K1, skpo, k to last 3 sts, k2 tog, k1. Next row: Purl. Rep last 2 rows once more. 28[29:30:31:32:33:34] sts. Cast off 3 sts at beg of next 4 rows. 16[17:18:19:20:21:22] sts. Cast off.

2

BACK AND FRONT (BOTH ALIKE)

Shape top

5

Shape neck

Cont straight until Sleeve meas 52cm (20½in) from cast-on edge, ending with a p row.

4

10 rows A 6 rows B 4 rows A 18 rows C 4 rows A 30 rows D 4 rows A 42 rows E Then cont in A only.

Cast off 6[7:7:8:8:9:9] sts at beg of next 2 rows. 92[99:106:113:120:127:134] sts. Next row: K3, skpo, k to last 5 sts, k2tog, k3. Next row: Purl. Rep last 2 rows 6[7:7:8:8:9:9] more times. 78[83:90:95:102:107:114] sts. Cont straight until work meas 50[51:52:53:54:55:56]cm (19¾[20:20½:21:21¼:21¾:22]in) from cast-on edge, ending with a p row.

3

STRIPE SEQUENCE

Shape armholes

1

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

20 8 22

52 25 10 26

50[51:52:53:54:55:56] 54 6]

24

7 6 3 34[34:35:35:36:36:37]

9 23

53[54:55:56:57:58:59]

21

41[44.5:47:50.5:53.5:57:60]

27 11 28

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 59

59

29

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cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1

WINTER CLOUD BY GEORGIA FARRELL

3 4

These 2 rows form rib. Work another 9 rows in rib, ending with a WS row. Change to 4.5mm needles. Row 12 (RS): P30[32:35:38:41], k43[48:52:56:60], p30[32:35:38:41]. Row 13 (WS): k30[32:35:38:41], p43[48:52:56:60], k30[32:35:38:41]. Rep rows 12 and 13 a further 17[18:19:20:21] times more.

5 2 6 7

Set Diagonal Eyelet Pattern

3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5

SIZES

13

To fit: UK size S[M:L:XL:XXL] 81-86[91-97:102-107:112-117:122-127]cm (32-34[36-38:40-42:44-46:48-50]in) Actual measurement: 101[112:122:132:142]cm (40[44:48:52:56]in)

14 15

Length to armhole: 35.5[37.5:39.5:41.5:43.5]cm

6

(14[15:15½:16½:17]in) Sleeve length: 48.5[49.5:50.5:51.5:52.5]cm (19[19½:20:20¼:20½]in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

16 17 7 18

YOU WILL NEED

19

Lang Yarns Malou Light 72% baby alpaca, 16% polyamide, 12% wool (approx 190m per 50g) 6[6:7:8:9] x 50g balls Shade 03 (A) 1 pair each 4mm and 4.5mm needles 1 circular 4mm needle 40cm long 2 stitch holders 1 stitch marker Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

20 8 21 22 9 23

TENSION

24

20 sts and 30 rows to 10cm over st st using 4.5mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

25 10

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

26

BACK

27

Using 4mm needles, using long tail method, cast on 103[112:122:132:142] sts. Row 1 (WS): P1, (k1, p1) to end. Row 2 (RS): K1, (p1, k1) to end.

11 28 29

60

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 60

Row 1 (RS): P29[31:34:37:40], k2tog, yo, k41[46:50:54:58], yo, ssk, p29[31:34:37:40]. Row 2: K29[31:34:37:40], p45[50:54:58:62], k29[31:34:37:40]. Row 3: P28[30:33:36:39], k2tog, yo, k43[48:52:56:60], yo, ssk, p28[30:33:36:39]. Row 4: K28[30:33:36:39], p47[52:56:60:64], p28[30:33:36:39]. Row 5: P27[29:32:35:38], k2tog, yo, k45[50:54:58:62], yo, ssk, p27[29:32:35:38]. Row 6: K27[29:32:35:38], p49[54:58:62:66], k27[29:32:35:38]. Row 7: P26[28:31:34:37], k2tog, yo, k47[52:56:60:64], yo, ssk, p26[28:31:34:37]. Row 8: K26[28:31:34:37], p51[56:60:64:68], k26[28:31:34:37]. Row 9: P25[27:30:33:36], k2tog, yo, k49[54:58:62:66], yo, ssk, p25[27:30:33:36]. Row 10: K25[27:30:33:36], p53[58:62:66:70], k25[27:30:33:36]. Row 11: P24[26:29:32:35], k2tog, yo, k51[56:60:64:68], yo, ssk, p24[26:29:32:35]. Row 12: K24[26:29:32:35], p55[60:64:68:72], k24[26:29:32:35]. Row 13: P23[25:28:31:34], k2tog, yo, k53[58:62:66:70], yo, ssk, p23[25:28:31:34]. Row 14: K23[25:28:31:34], p57[62:66:70:74], k23[25:28:31:34]. Row 15: P22[24:27:30:33], k2tog, yo, k55[60:64:68:72], yo, ssk, p22[24:27:30:33]. Row 16: K22[24:27:30:33], p59[64:68:72:76], k22[24:27:30:33]. Row 17: P21[23:26:29:32], k2tog, yo, k57[62:66:70:74], yo, ssk, p21[23:26:29:32]. Row 18: K21[23:26:29:32], p61[66:70:74:78], k21[23:26:29:32]. Row 19: P20[22:25:28:31], k2tog, yo, k59[64:68:72:76], yo, ssk, p20[22:25:28:31]. Row 20: K20[22:25:28:31], p63[68:72:76:80], k20[22:25:28:31]. Row 21: P19[21:24:27:30], k2tog, yo, k61[66:70:74:78], yo, ssk, p19[21:24:27:30]. Row 22: K19[21:24:27:30], p65[70:74:78:82], k19[21:24:27:30]. Row 23: P18[20:23:26:29], k2tog, yo, k63[68:72:76:80], yo, ssk, p18[20:23:26:29]. Row 24: K18[20:23:26:29], p67[72:76:80:84], k18[20:23:26:29]. Row 25: P17[19:22:25:28], k2tog, yo, k65[70:74:78:82], yo, ssk, p17[19:22:25:28]. Row 26: K17[19:22:25:28], p69[74:78:82:86], k17[19:22:25:28]. Row 27: P16[18:21:24:27], k2tog, yo,

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cm

in

1

Instructions

2 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14 15 6 16 17 7 18 19 20

Using 4mm needles and long tail method cast on 42[44:47:52:58] sts.

SLEEVES

8 21 22 9 23 24

35.5[37:39.5:41.5:43.5]

48.5[49.5:50.5:51.5:52.5]

25 10 26 27

Measurements are given in cm

11 28

50.5[56:61:66:71]

61

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6

Keeping blocks of st st and rev st st as set by previous rows, dec 1 st at each end of every RS row and on 6th[4th:-:3rd:-] WS row and 2[every:5:every:every] foll 7th[5th:5th:4th:5th] WS rows, 3 sts in from edge. Use ssk/ssp at start and k2tog/p2tog at end, where appropriate to blocks as set. 42[46:48:52:54] rows of shaping before neck, 10[10:12:12:14] rows of neck shaping and raglan tog. When 49[52:56:56:62] sts rem and with RS facing for next row, begin Front neck shaping as folls: Row 1 (RS): K3, ssk, k10[11:13:13:15], turn and work on these 14[15:17:17:19] sts first. Row 2 (WS): Cast off 1 st at beg of row, p to last 5 sts, dec 0[1:1:0:0] st, p to end. 13[13:15:16:18] sts. Row 3: K3, ssk, k to end. 12[12:14:15:17] sts. Row 4: Cast off 2 sts at beg of row, p to end. 10[10:12:13:15] sts. Row 5: K3, ssk, k to end. 9[9:11:12:14] sts. Row 6: Cast off 1 st at beg of row, p to last 5 sts, dec 0[0:0:0:1] st, p to end. 8[8:10:11:12] sts. Row 7: K3, ssk, k to end. 7[7:9:10:11] sts. Row 8: Cast off 2[2:2:2:1] sts at beg of row, p to last 5 sts, dec 0[0:0:1:0] st, p to end. 5[5:7:7:10] sts. Row 9: K3, ssk, k to end. 4[4:6:6:9] sts. Row 10: Cast off 1[1:1:1:2] sts at beg of row, p to end. 3[3:5:5:7] sts. Sizes S and M only Cast off. Sizes L, XL and XXL only Row 11: K3, ssk, k to end. 4[4:6] sts. Row 12: Cast off 1 st at beg of row, p to end. 3[3:5] sts.

2

Shape raglan

5

Work as given for Back to **

4

Keeping blocks of st st and rev st st as set by previous rows, dec 1 st at each end of every RS row and on -[-:11th:5th:3rd] WS row and -[2:1:every:every] foll -[10th:10th:6th:6th] WS rows, 3 sts in from edge. Use ssk/ssp at start and k2tog/p2tog at end, where appropriate to blocks as set. 50[54:58:62:66] rows of raglan shaping before Back neck, 8 rows of Back neck and raglan shaping tog. When 47[48:50:50:54] sts rem, with RS facing for next row, begin Back neck shaping as folls: Row 1 (RS): K3, dec 1 st, k4[4:5:5:6], turn and work on these 8[8:9:9:10] sts first. Row 2 (WS): Cast off 1 st at beg of row, p to end. 7[7:8:8:9] sts. Row 3: K3, dec 1 st, k to end. 6[6:7:7:8] sts. Row 4: Cast off 0[0:1:1:1] st at beg of row, p to end. 6[6:6:6:7] sts. Row 5: As Row 3. 5[5:5:5:6] sts. Row 6: As Row 2. 4[4:4:4:5] sts. Row 7: K2, dec 1 st. 3[3:3:3:4] sts. Row 8: Cast off 0[0:0:0:1] st at beg of row, p to end (3 sts). Cast off. Slip centre 29[30:30:30:32] sts on to holder and rejoin yarn to rem 9[9:10:10:11] sts ready for RS row. Row 1 (RS): Cast off 1 st at beg of row, k to last 5 sts, dec 1 st, k3. 7[7:8:8:9] sts. Row 2 and all foll WS rows: Purl. Row 3: Cast off 0[0:1:1:1] st at beg of row, k to last 5 sts, dec 1 st, k3. 6[6:6:6:7] sts. Row 5: Cast off 1 st at beg of row, k2tog, k2.

FRONT

Sizes L and XL only Cast off. Size XXL only Row 13: K3, ssk, k to end (4 sts). Row 14: Cast off 1 st at beg of row, p to end (3 sts). Cast off. Slip centre 19[20:20:20:22] sts on to holder and rejoin yarn to rem 15[16:18:18:20] sts ready for RS row. Row 1 (RS): Cast off 1 st at beg of row, k to last 5 sts, dec 1 st, k3. 13[14:16:16:18] sts. Row 2: P to last 5 sts, dec 0[1:1:0:0] st, p to end. 13[13:15:16:18] sts. Row 3: Cast off 2 sts at beg of row, k to last 5 sts, dec 1 st, k3. 10[10:12:13:15] sts. Row 4: Purl. Row 5: Cast off 1 st at beg of row, k to last 5 sts, dec 1 st, k3. 8[8:10:11:13] sts. Row 6: P to last 5 sts, dec 0[0:0:0:1] st, p to end. 8[8:10:11:12] sts. Row 7: Cast off 2[2:2:2:1] sts at beg of row, k to last 5 sts, dec 1 st, k3. 5[5:7:8:10] sts. Row 8: P to last 5 sts, dec 0[0:0:1:0] st, p to end. 5[5:7:7:10] sts. Row 9: Cast off 1[1:1:1:2] st at beg of row, k to last 0[0:0:0:5] sts, dec 1 st, k to end. 3[3:5:5:7] sts. Row 10: Purl. Sizes S and M only Cast off. Sizes L, XL and XXL only Row 11: Cast off 1 st at beg of row, dec 1 st, k to end. 3[3:5] sts. Row 12: Purl. Sizes L and XL only Cast off. Size XXL only Row 13: Cast off 1 st at beg of row, dec 1 st, k to end (3 sts). Row 14: Purl. Cast off.

3

Shape raglan

4[4:4:4:5] sts. Row 7: Cast off 0[0:0:0:1] st at beg of row, k2tog, k2 (3 sts). Work WS row. Cast off on RS.

1

k67[72:76:80:84], yo, ssk, p16[18:21:24:27]. Row 28: K16[18:21:24:27], p71[76:80:84:88], k16[18:21:24:27]. Row 29: P15[17:20:23:26], k2tog, yo, k69[74:78:82:86], yo, ssk, p15[17:20:23:26]. Row 30: K15[17:20:23:26], p73[78:82:86:90], k15[17:20:23:26]. Sizes M, L, XL and XXL only Row 31: P16[19:22:25], k2tog, yo, k76[80:84:88], yo, ssk, p16[19:22:25]. Row 32: K16[19:22:25], p80[84:88:92], k16[19:22:25]. Sizes L, XL and XXL only Row 33: P18[21:24], k2tog, yo, k82[86:90], yo, ssk, p18[21:24]. Row 34: K18[21:24], p86[90:94], k18[21:24]. Sizes XL and XXL only Row 35: P20[23], k2tog, yo, k88[92], yo, ssk, p[20:23]. Row 36: K20[23], p92[96], k20[23]. Sizes XXL only Row 37: P22, k2tog, yo, k94, yo, ssk, p22. Row 38: K22, p98, k22. All sizes Next row (RS): P15[16:18:20:22], k73[80:86:92:98], p15[16:18:20:22]. Next row: K15[16:18:20:22], p73[80:86:92:98], k15[16:18:20:22]. Rep these two rows 14[15:16:17:18] times more. Cont as set, cast off 3[3:5:5:8] sts at beg of next two rows. 97[106:112:122:126] sts **

22/11/2016 12:13


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1 3

FAE BY JO ALLPORT

4 5 2 6

Work 33 rows in rib, starting with a WS row as for Back. Change to 4.5mm needles. Working in st st throughout, inc 1 st at each end of the -[first:-:-:6th] RS row and every [every:first 4 out of every 5:first 4 out of every 5:every] foll 4th[4th:3rd:3rd:3rd] RS rows to 70[74:79:84:96] sts, then on foll -[-:-:3rd:-] RS row, ending with a WS row. Work 0[0:4:0:10] rows without shaping.

Shape raglan 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14

Cast off 3[3:5:5:8] sts at beg of next two rows. 64[68:69:76:80] sts. Work 0[0:0:2:0] rows in st st. Dec 1 st at each end of first 5[4:3:4:3] of every 6[5:4:5:4] RS rows, 3 sts in from edge as on for Front and Back raglan shaping, to 20[22:23:26:28] sts ending with WS rows and RS facing. Right Sleeve Only Cont in st st throughout, cast off 5[5:5:6:7] sts at beg of first foll RS row, cast off 5[5:6:6:7] sts at beg of next RS row and 5[6:6:7:7] sts at beg of next RS row. 5[6:6:7:7] sts. Work one WS row. Cast off on RS. Left Sleeve Only Cont in st st throughout, cast off 5[5:5:6:7] sts at beg of first foll WS row, cast off 5[5:6:6:7] sts at beg of next WS row and 5[6:6:7:7] sts at beg of next WS row. 5[6:6:7:7] sts. Cast off.

SIZES

15

To fit: UK size 8[10:12:14:16:18:20:22] 81[86:91:97:102:107:112:117]cm (32[34:36:38:40:42:44:46]in) Actual measurement: 91[97:103:110:116:123:129:135]cm (35¾[38¼:40¾:43¼:45¾:48¼:50¾:53¼]in)

6

MAKING UP

16 17 7 18

Weave in all loose ends and block to finished measurements. Using mattress st, sew all four raglan seams. Then sew Sleeve and side seams using mattress st, starting at cuffs and hems and working in to armhole.

Length to shoulder: 45[46:47:48:49:50:51:51]cm (17¾[18:18½:19:19¼:19¾:20:20]in)

Sleeve length: 43[46:46:46:46:47:47:48]cm (17[18:18:18:18:18½:18½:19]in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

NECKBAND 19 20 8 21 22 9 23 24

Using 4mm 40cm circular needles, pick up and k8 sts between sts on hold at Back neck and left Back raglan seam, 19[21:22:25:27] sts between left raglan seams, 14[14:17:17:22] sts between Front left raglan seam and sts on hold at Front neck, work across sts on hold at Front neck, pick up and k14[14:17:17:22] sts before right Front raglan seam, 19[21:22:25:27] sts between right Sleeve raglan seams, 8 sts between right Back raglan seam and sts on hold at Back neck, then work across sts on hold. 130[136:144:150:168] sts. Join to a round, pm for start of rnd. Work 11 rnds in 1 x 1 rib. Cast off in rib. ●

YOU WILL NEED

Sublime Extra Fine Merino DK 100% Merino wool (approx 116m per 50g) 10[10:11:12:13:13:14:15] x 50g balls 03 Alabaster (A) 3[3:4:4:5:5:6:6] x 50g balls 13 Jet Black (B) 1 pair each 3.5mm and 4mm needles 2 stitch holders 4 stitch markers Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

25 10

TENSION

26

25 sts and 50 rows to 10cm over Mosaic Pattern using 4mm needles. 22 sts and 28 rows to 10cm over st st using 4mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

27 11 28 29

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1

Instructions

2

Cont in A and st st and cast off 5[6:6:7:7:8:8:9] sts at beg of next 1[4:2:3:1:3:1:3] RS rows. Cast off 6[7:7:8:8:9:9:10] sts at beg of next 4[1:3:2:4:2:4:2] RS rows. ▼

6 3 8

15

43[46:46:46:46:47:47:48]

11 12 5 13 14

5

4

25

10

45[46:47:48:49:50:51:51]

9

33

BACK

5

45.5[48.5:51.5:55:58:61.5:64.5:67.5]

15 6 16 17

**With A and 3.5mm needles, cast on 105[111:117:125:131:137:143:149] sts. Work in Broken Rib from row 1 across all sts for 5cm (2in), ending with a RS row. Change to 4mm needles and work the foll inc row: Next row (WS) (inc): P8[6:7:4:6:9:5:12], (m1p, p10[9:8:9:8:7:7:6]) to last 7[6:6:4:5:9:5:11] sts, m1p, p7[6:6:4:5:9:5:11]. 115[123:131:139:147:155:163:171] sts.

7

Measurements are given in cm

MOSAIC PATTERN

(multiples of 8 sts + 3 over 24 rows) Mosaic knitting is a really useful technique which produces a two-colour pattern, but only one colour is worked on each row, slipping stitches in the other colour. Each of the squares in the Chart represents 2 rows. Start with yarn A and knit across row 1, slipping the B sts with yarn at the back. Row 2, a WS row, is also knitted in A, slipping the B sts with yarn at the front. On rows 3 and 4, work in B and slip A. Continue in this way changing colour every 2 rows and slipping the opposite colour. See page 64 for a how-to guide with pictures.

Shape shoulder

2

Odd number of sts and 2 rows Row 1 (RS): K1, (p1, k1) to end. Row 2: Purl.

Cont in A and st st as folls: Next row (RS): K34[36:38:42:44:47:49:52], turn and put rem sts onto a holder. Dec 1 st at the neck edge on next and every WS row until there are

5

BROKEN RIB PATTERN

Shape left neck

29[31:33:37:39:42:44:47] sts. Cont straight in st st as set until work meas same as Back to shoulders, ending with a WS row.

4

When working dec 1 work ssk at beginning and k2tog at end of a knit row, and p2tog at beginning and p2tog tbl at end of a purl row.

Work from ** to ** as for Back. Cont in st st in A only until st st section measures 5cm (2in), ending with a WS row.

3

PATTERN NOTE

FRONT

1

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

Set Chart

7 18

Work in Mosaic Pattern across all sts in colours as in Chart, starting with A, as detailed above. Cont in Mosaic Pattern until work meas 25cm (10in) from cast-on edge, ending with a WS row. Pm at each end of next row. Cont in patt as set and when work meas 33cm (13in) from cast-on edge and ending with a WS row, work foll dec row in A: Next row (RS) (dec): K7[6:6:4:6:9:5:11], (k2tog, k9[8:7:8:7:6:6:5]) to last 9[7:8:5:6:10:6:13] sts, k2tog, k7[5:6:3:4:8:4:11]. 105[111:117:125:131:137:143:149] sts. ** Cont in st st in A only until work meas 45[46:47:48:49:50:51:51]cm (17¾[18:18½:19:19¼:19¾:20:20]in), ending with a WS row.

19 20 8 21 22 9 23 24

Shape shoulders

25

Cont in A and st st, cast off 5[6:6:7:7:8:8:9] sts at beg of next 2[8:4:6:2:6:2:6] rows. 95[63:93:83:117:89:127:95] sts. Cast off 6[7:7:8:8:9:9:10] sts at beg of next 8[2:6:4:8:4:8:4] rows. Put rem 47[49:51:51:53:53:55:55] sts on to a holder.

10 26 27 11 28

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1

Instructions

2 1

INTRODUCTION TO SLIP STITCH PART FOUR: MOSAIC KNITTING

3 4 5 2

Mosaic knitting produces a complex-looking two-colour pattern where only one colour is worked at a time on each row. The technique produces a dense material as it is based on garter stitch. Once mastered, it is an easy technique that produces fabulous results. Each colour is worked for two rows, so there is no need to cut and weave in ends. In mosaic charts, each row of squares represents two rows of knitting, with the first and last square indicating the colour to be used on the row. Once the first row has been knitted (and stitches slipped as the chart shows), the WS row knits the same stitches and slips the same stitches as the row before. Remember to stretch out your knitting as you slip the stitches to keep the elasticity of your work.

Quick Technique by Jo Allport

6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11

1

12 5 13

1. Using A (white) and starting with row 1, read the chart from right to left. Note the first box of the chart shows the first colour to start with. Knit the stitches represented by the white boxes.

2

3

2. Still on row 1, slip, with yarn at the back, the B (black) stitches, as shown on the chart.

3. On row 2 and still using A, knit the stitches you have already knitted on row 1. Once you get to a B stitch (the stitch to be slipped), bring the yarn to the front and slip the B stitch.

14 15 6 16 17 7 18

4 19 20

4. Still on row 2, slip the B stitch, then take the yarn to the back of your work and knit the next stitch.

5

6

8 21

5. Change to B and knit the stitches represented by the black boxes on the chart, reading it from right to left. When you get to a white box, slip the A stitch, with yarn at the back.

6. Row 4, a WS row. Knit the stitches represented by the black boxes using B. Yarn is at the back.

22 9 23 24 25 10 26

7

27

7. Still on row 4, when you get to a white stitch bring the yarn to the front and slip the A stitches.

8

9

8. Further on row 4, after slipping the A stitch, take the yarn to the back ready to knit the next B stitch.

9. On row 5, work in A and slip the B stitches, with yarn at the back. Continue in this way throughout the 24-row pattern.

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1

1

IMPACT BY PAT MENCHINI

Shape right neck

3 4

With RS facing, leave centre 37[39:41:41:43:43:45:45] sts on a holder and rejoin yarn at neck edge. K to end. 34[36:38:42:44:47:49:52] sts. Dec 1 st at neck edge on next and every WS row till there are 29[31:33:37:39:42:44:47] sts. Cont straight in st st as set until work meas same as Back to shoulders, ending with a RS row.

in

Instructions

5 2 6

Shape shoulder

7

Cont in A and st st and cast off 5[6:6:7:7:8:8:9] sts at beg of next 1[4:2:3:1:3:1:3] WS rows. Cast off 6[7:7:8:8:9:9:10] sts at beg of next 4[1:3:2:4:2:4:2] WS rows.

3 8 9

SLEEVES

10

With A and 3.5mm needles, cast on 53[53:55:57:59:59:61:61] sts. Work in Broken Rib from row 1 across all sts for 5cm (2in), ending with a RS row. Change to 4mm needles and cont in st st in A only. Arm inc row (RS): K1, m1, k to last st, m1, k1. Work 3 rows in st st. Rep last 4 rows until there are 81[85:89:93:79:79:81:81] sts. Sizes 5, 6, 7 and 8 only Inc as set on every alt row until there are 99[103:107:107] sts. All sizes Cont without shaping in st st until Sleeve meas 43[46:46:46:46:47:47:48]cm (17[18:18:18:18:18½:18½:19]in), ending with a WS row and measured from cast-on edge. Cast off all sts.

4 11 12 5 13 16 17 7 18 19

Sew right shoulder seam. With RS facing, 3.5mm needles and A, pick up and k18 sts along left Front neck, k37[39:41:41:43:43:45:45] sts from Front holder, pick up and k18 sts along right Front neck, k47[49:51:51:53:53:55:55] sts from Back holder. 120[124:128:128:132:132:136:136] sts. Work in Broken Rib as folls: Row 1 (WS): Purl. Row 2 (RS): (K1, p1) to end. Rep these 2 rows until neckband meas 15cm (6in), ending with a RS row. Cast off in patt on WS.

6

NECKBAND

15

To fit: UK 6-8[10-12:14-16:18-20:22-24:26-28] 76-81[86-91:97-102:107-112:117-122:127-132]cm (30-32[34-36:38-40:42-44:46-48:50-52]in) Actual measurement approx: 88[98:109:121:132:142]cm (34½[38¾:43¼:47½:52:56¼]in) Length to shoulder approx: 53[54:55:56:57:58]cm (20¾[21¼:21¾:22:22½:23]in) Sleeve length: 44cm (17½in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

14

SIZES

YOU WILL NEED

21 22 9 23

Sew left shoulder and neckline. Sew Sleeve caps between markers. Sew Sleeve and side seams. Block lightly and weave in ends. ●

8

TO FINISH

20 24 25

Rico Essentials Merino DK 100% Merino (approx 120m per 50g) 4[4:5:5:5] x 50g balls 90 Black (A) 3[3:4:4:4] x 50g balls 47 Grey Brown (B) 3[3:4:4:4] x 50g balls 24 Grey (C) 2[2:3:3:3] x 50g balls 60 Natural (D) 1 pair each 3.25mm and 4mm needles 1 stitch holder Stitch markers 16 small buttons 6 larger buttons Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

10

27

22 sts and 28 rows to 10cm over st st using 4mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

26

TENSION

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Instructions

2 1

TIP

3

Carry yarn not in use loosely up side of work.

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89 4

RIGHT FRONT 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13

Using 3.25mm needles and A, cast on 47[53:59:65:71:77] sts. Knit 7 rows in g st, noting that first row will be WS of work. Change to 4mm needles, join in B and beg with a k row cont in st st and stripe patt as folls: Rows 1 to 4: Work in B. Rows 5 and 6: Work in A. These 6 rows form stripe sequence. Rows 7 to 42: Rep rows 1-6 six times. Rows 43 to 46: Work in B. Break off B. Rows 47 and 48: Work in A. Join in C. Rows 49 to 52: Work in C. Rows 53 to 94: Rep rows 47-52 seven times. Break off C. Rows 95 and 96: Work in A. Join in D. ** Rows 97 to 99: Work in D, ending at side edge. Pm at centre of last row.

14

Shape armhole

15

Next row: Using D, loosely cast off 4[6:8:9:11:13] sts, work to end. 43[47:51:56:60:64] sts.

16

17[18:19:20:21:22]

6 17

Shape neck

Cast off loosely 11[12:13:13:14:15] sts at beg of next row. 25[27:29:31:33:35] sts. Dec 1 st at neck edge on next 5 rows. 20[22:24:26:28:30] sts. Cont straight until Front meas 17[18:19:20:21:22]cm (6¾[7:7½:8:8¼:8¾]in) from marker, ending at armhole edge.

Shape shoulder

Cast off loosely 7[7:8:9:9:10] sts at beg of next row and foll alt row. Work 1 row. Cast off rem 6[8:8:8:10:10] sts.

LEFT FRONT

Work as Right Front to **. Rows 97 and 98: Work in D, ending at side edge. Pm at centre of last row.

Shape armhole

Next row: Using D, loosely cast off 4[6:8:9:11:13] sts, work to end. 43[47:51:56:60:64] sts. Next row: Work in D. Complete as Right Front, working from *** to end.

BACK

Using 3.25mm needles and A, cast on 95[107:119:131:143:155] sts and work as Right Front to **. Rows 97 and 98: Work in D.

Shape armholes

19 20

Using D, loosely cast off 4[6:8:9:11:13] sts at beg of next 2 rows. 87[95:103:113:121:129] sts. Cont in stripe sequence to match Fronts, dec 1 st at each end of next 5[5:7:7:9:9] rows, then on every foll alt row until 73[79:85:89:95:101] sts rem. Cont straight until armhole meas same as Left Front to shoulder, ending after a WS row.

36

7 18

53[54:55:56:57:58]

*** Cont in stripe sequence using D and A for remainder. Dec 1 st at armhole edge on next 5[5:7:7:9:9] rows, then on every foll alt row until 36[39:42:44:47:50] sts rem. Cont straight until Front meas 10[10:11:11:12:13]cm (4[4:4¼:4¼:4¾:5]in) from marker, ending at front edge.

8 21

Shape shoulders 22

44[49:54.5:60.5:66:71]

24 25 10 26 27

Measurements are given in cm

9 23

Loosely cast off 7[7:8:9:9:10] sts at beg of next 4 rows, then 6[8:8:8:10:10] sts at beg of next 2 rows. Slip rem 33[35:37:37:39:41] sts on to a holder.

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Shape top

Loosely cast off 4[6:8:9:11:13] sts at beg of next 2 rows. 60[62:62:64:66:68] sts. Work 0[2:4:6:8:10] rows without shaping. Dec 1 st at each end of next row, then on every foll k row until 32[34:34:36:40:42] sts rem, then on every row until 22[24:24:26:30:32] sts rem. Cast off loosely using colour of last row.

NECKBAND

Join shoulders. Using 3.25mm needles and A, RS facing, pick up and k29[32:33:35:36:39] sts evenly round Right Front neck, k across sts on st holder, finally pick up and k29[32:33:35:36:39] sts evenly round Left Front neck. 91[99:103:107:111:119] sts. Knit 6 rows in g st. Cast off evenly knitwise, working firmly round front corners of neck where shaping was worked.

BUTTONHOLE BAND

Using 3.25mm needles and A, RS of Right Front facing, pick up and k4 sts from g st border, then pick up and k105[105:108:108:110:112] sts evenly up st st section, then pick up and k4 sts from neck edge. 113[113:116:116:118:120] sts. Rows 1 and 2: Knit. Row 3 (WS): K3, (cast off 2 sts, k12[12:13:13:14:14] sts (including st on RH needle after cast off) 5 times, cast off 2 sts, k to end. Row 4: Knit, casting on 2 sts in each place where sts were cast off. Rows 5 and 6: Knit. Cast off.

BUTTON BAND

Work Button Band as for Buttonhole Band, omitting buttonholes.

SLEEVES

44

50[52:56:58:60:64] sts. Work 3[7:3:3:3:3] rows without shaping. Forty-six rows in all have now been worked in stripe sequence. Break off B, and using C in place of B for remainder of Sleeves, inc 1 st at each end of foll 7th[next:5th:3rd:3rd:3rd] row, then on every foll 10th[8th:8th:6th:6th:6th] row until there are 66[68:66:66:82:92] sts, then finally on every foll 10th[10th:8th:8th:8th:6th] row until there are 68[74:78:82:88:94] sts. Work straight until Sleeve meas approx 44cm (17½in), ending after 2 rows A, 2 rows C.

Using 3.25mm needles and A, cast on 40[42:44:44:46:48] sts and work as Right Front until row 6 of stripes has been worked. Cont in stripes as set, shaping Sleeve by inc 1 st at each end of next row, then on 2[3:2:4:4:3] foll 8th[8th:6th:6th:6th:4th] rows. 46[50:50:54:56:56] sts. Cont in stripes AT SAME TIME inc 1 st at each end of every 10th[8th:8th:6th:6th:6th] row from previous inc until there are

TO FINISH

Press work on WS foll according to ballband instructions. Sew in Sleeve tops. Join side and Sleeve seams. Sew 8 small buttons to each 2-row A sections of Sleeves, as in photograph. Sew rem 6 larger buttons to Left Front band to correspond with buttonholes. Press seams. ●

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Instructions

2 1

NYLA BY MARIE WALLIN 3

5 13 14 15 6 16 17 7 18 19 20 8 21 22 9 23 24 25 10 26

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Next round: Patt across first 35[39:43:47:53] sts of Body. Keeping patt correct as set by sts just worked, patt across 46[54:54:62:62] sts of first Cuff, patt across next 70[78:86:94:106] sts of Body. Keeping patt correct as set by sts just worked patt across 46[54:54:62:62] sts of second Cuff, then patt rem 35[39:43:47:53] sts of Body. 232[264:280:312:336] sts.

11

Using set of double-pointed 5mm needles

Shape yoke

4

CUFFS (MAKE 2)

(worked in one piece to underarm) Using 5mm circular needle and A, cast on 152[168:184:200:224] sts. Taking care not to twist cast-on edge, work in rounds as folls: Round 1 (RS): *K1, p1, rep from * to end. This round forms rib. Place marker at end of last round (to denote beg and end of rounds) – this marker sits at centre Back. Work in rib for a further 7 rounds. Change to 7mm circular needle. Beg and ending rounds as indicated, using the Fairisle technique and repeating the 8 st patt repeat 19[21:23:25:28] times in each round, cont in patt from Chart A, which is worked entirely in st st (knit every round), as folls: Work all 11 rounds from Chart A. Break off contrasts and cont using A only. Change to 6mm circular needle. Cont straight until Body measures 24[25:28.5:29.5:33]cm. Change to 7mm circular needle. Beg and ending rounds as indicated, using the Fairisle technique and repeating the patt repeat 19[21:23:25:28] times in each round, cont in patt from Chart B, which is worked entirely in st st (knit every round), as folls: Work rounds 1 to 15[15:11:11:7]. Keeping patt correct, cont as folls: Next round: Patt 35[39:43:47:53] sts, cast off next 6 sts (for left underarm), patt until there are 70[78:86:94:106] sts on right needle after cast-off (for front), cast off next 6 sts – one st on right needle after cast-off (for right underarm), patt rem 34[38:42:46:52] sts. Do NOT break yarn.

10

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

9

15 sts and 18 rows to 10cm over st st using 6mm needles. 15 sts and 16 rows to 10cm over st st using 7mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

8

TENSION

3

Rowan Cocoon 80% Merino wool, 20% mohair (115m per 100g) 4[4:4:5:5] x 100g balls 805 Mountain (A) 1[2:2:2:2] x 100g balls 801 Polar (B) 1 x 100g ball 802 Alpine (C) 2 x 100g balls 804 Shale (D) 5mm circular needle no more than 90cm long 6mm circular needle no more than 90cm long 7mm circular needle no more than 90cm long Set of four 5mm double-pointed needles Set of four 7mm double-pointed needles Stitch holder Stitch markers Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

7

YOU WILL NEED

6

To fit size: S[M:L:XL:XXL] To fit bust: 81-86[91-97:102-107:112-117:122127]cm (32-34[36-38:40-42:44-46:48-50]in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

2

SIZES

5

BODY

4

and, A cast on 52[60:60:68:68] sts. Distribute sts evenly over 3 of the 4 needles and, using 4th needle and taking care not to twist cast on-edge, work in rounds as folls: Round 1 (RS): *K1, p1, rep from * to end. This round forms rib. Place marker at end of last round (to denote beg and end of rounds) – this marker sits at underarm. Work in rib for a further 6 rounds. Round 8: Cast off first 3 sts, rib to last 3 sts, cast off rem 3 sts. Break yarn and leave rem 46[54:54:62:62] sts on a holder.

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Instructions

2 1 3 4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14

Now work the patt repeat 29[33:35:39:42] times in each round, beg with Chart round 18[18:14:14:10] and keeping patt correct across all sts, cont in patt from Chart B as folls: Cont straight until Chart round 20 has been completed. Note: As the number of sts decreases, change to double-pointed needles. Round 21: *Patt 6 sts, sl1, k1, psso, rep from * to end. 203[231:245:273:294] sts. Work Chart rounds 22 to 29. Round 30: *Patt 5 sts, k2tog, rep from * to end. 174[198:210:234:252] sts. Work Chart rounds 31 to 36. Round 37: *Patt 4 sts, sl1, k1, psso, rep from * to end. 145[165:175:195:210] sts. Work Chart rounds 38 to 42. Round 43: *Patt 3 sts, k2tog, rep from * to end. 116[132:140:156:168] sts. Work Chart rounds 44 to 53. Round 54: *Patt 2 sts, sl1, k1, psso, rep from * to end. 87[99:105:117:126] sts. Now rep Chart round 55 5[7:5:7:5] times. Break off contrasts and cont using yarn A only. Change to set of double-pointed 5mm needles. Next round: *K2tog, p1, rep from * to end. 58[66:70:78:84] sts. Work in rib as given for Cuffs for 3 rounds. Cast off loosely in rib.

Chart B

Key

Chart Key

A B C D

15

Chart A A Chart

6

TO FINISH

16

Press according to ballband instructions, then join sets of 6 cast-off sts at each underarm using back stitch, or mattress stitch if preferred. Weave in ends. ●

8 st patt rep

17

11 10

7 18 19 20 8 22

62 [64: 66: 68: 70] cm (24½ [25: 26: 27: 27½] in)

21 9 23

4 cm (1½ in)

24 25 10 26 27

50.5 [56: 61.5: 66.5: 74.5] cm (20 [22: 24: 26: 29½] in)

11 28 29

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Instructions

2 1

ALL WRAPPED UP BY HELGRID VAN IMPELEN 50(20)

50(20) 5(2)

5

SMALL BASKETWEAVE PATTERN

Right front

3

150(60)

7

Work the Small Basketweave Pattern from the Chart over multiples of 6 stitches + 2. RS rows are knitted right to left, WS rows left to right. The two arrows mark the six-stitch pattern repeat. Begin with the stitches before the first arrow, repeat the pattern between the arrows and finish with the stitches after the second arrow. For clarity, three pattern repeats are shown. Work from the bottom of the Chart up and keep repeating rows 1-12.

Left front

6

70(28)

2

The wrap is knitted in a single piece, beginning at the back hem and ending at the front hem.

4

PATTERN NOTE

10(4)

3

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

8

70(28)

9

Back

10 11

5(2)

4

110(44)

WRAP

Start working from the Chart, repeating rows 1–12 throughout. Start the round with 2 stitches for the start of the pattern, then work 14 repeats of the 6 stitches between the arrows.

Small Basketweave Pattern Chart

Back

Knit

Purl

20

Left Front

8

Rejoin yarn to 36 sts for Left Front and work from * to * as for Right Front.

21

TO FINISH

22

Darn in ends. ●

9 23 24 25 10 26

Pattern from Big Needles, Chunky Knits by Helga van Impelen, published by Dorling Kindersley

27 11 28

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Chart Key

19

8 stitches and 12 rows to 10cm (4in) over st st

Leave 36 sts for Left Front on a spare needle and work on 36 sts for Right Front only. *Cont in patt as set until work meas 145cm (58in). Next row: K1, p1 to end. This row sets 1/1 rib. Cont in rib for 5cm (2in), then cast off.*

7 18

TENSION

Fronts

17

The yarn originally used for this design (Classic Elite Toboggan, 70% Merino wool, 30% alpaca, approx 80m per 100g, in shade Black) has been discontinued, so we would suggest the following possible alternatives: Lang Yarns Merino 50 98% Merino wool, 2% polyester (approx 90m per 100g) in shade 70 or 5. Schulana Grandino 100% wool (approx 100m per 100g) in shade 10 Schwarz or 13 Anthrazit. Patons Merino Extrafine Big 100% wool (approx 40m per 50g) in shade 399 Black. Phildar Terre Neuve 100% wool (approx 42m per 50g) in shade 67 Noir. Some of these yarns may need larger needles to make the gauge. Always take care to swatch to match tension when substituting yarns.

16

YARN NOTE

When work measures approximately 75cm (30in), after an 8th row of the Chart, cast off the centre 10 stitches. (Patt 36, cast off 10 sts, patt 36).

6

Any super chunky wool Approx 500g (400m) in black or charcoal 10mm circular needle, 100cm long Spare circular needle Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

Shape neck opening

15

YOU WILL NEED

14

To fit: One size – generous Actual measurement: 110 x 150cm (44 x 60in)

13

SIZE

5

Measurements are given in cm (inches in brackets)

12

Cast on 86 stitches and work 5cm (2in) in k1/ p1 rib.

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Instructions

2 1

FLOWER KING BY ANNA MALTZ

3 4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12

SIZE 5

13 14

One size To fit head circumference: 56-58cm (22-22¾in) Finished height (excluding pompom): 24cm (9½in)

YOU WILL NEED 15 6 16 17 7 18 19 20 8

Navia Trio 100% wool (approx 120m per 50g) 1 x 50g ball 37 Black (A) 1 x 50g ball 31 Natural White (B) 1 x 50g ball 336 Curry (C) 1 x 50g ball 32 Light Grey (D) for pompom 4mm circular needle 40cm long 4.5mm circular needle 40cm long 4.5mm double-pointed needles or 100cmlong circular needle for magic loop. Stitch marker Tapestry needle 3cm/1¼” pompom maker (optional) Note: Yarn amounts give are based on average requirements and are approximate.

21

TENSION

22 9 23

20 sts x 24 rows to 10cm over colourworked st st on 4.5mm needles after blocking. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

ABBREVIATIONS 24 25 10 26

m1L = make 1 left-leaning stitch by lifting the horizontal strand from the row below between the freshly knitted stitch on your right needle and the next stitch on your left needle. Lift the stitch with your left needle, inserting from front to back, then knit into the back of it with your right needle

For more abbreviations see page 89 27

PATTERN NOTES 11 28

To keep colour dominance consistent, make

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sure to always hold yarn colours in the same place. I recommend you keep the contrast colour dominant. There are long floats in this hat (the longest is 17 sts in the crown). You can catch your floats longer than 5 sts, or not, as it is unlikely they would get snagged, but you may find that catching the floats will help you regulate your tension when doing colourwork. Be careful to not catch floats in the same place each round. If you need to adjust the number of repeats in the feather section, either to change the length of the hat or because your row tension is different, you can add (or subtract) full or half feather repeats. To add a full repeat of feathers (looks like 2 rounds of feathers staggered above each other), replace round 29 with rounds 21 to 29. To subtract, stop at 20, then work round 29 instead of round 21. If you need to add half a repeat of feathers (looks like one full round of feathers), replace round 29 with round 21 and work to round 25, working sts 6 and 16 in yarn A. To subtract, stop at round 25, working sts 6 and 16 with yarn A. The first 3 yarn C sts should fall in the middle of the gap between two feathers, as illustrated in the Chart. I have chosen not to include instructions for additional sizes as I think this one is a good standard adult size, but as you will see, sizing this pattern up or down is fairly straightforward. With the specified yarn, I feel the following adjustments will make a very small or very large hat, but they may be worth considering if you want to knit the hat in either a chunkier or finer weight of yarn. You can make a baby version by casting on 72 sts, then increase (k9, m1L) to a total of 80 sts and work 4 repeats of the colourwork Chart round the hat. This will result in a very small hat, but the numbers are also

worth knowing if you want to knit the hat in a chunkier weight of yarn. For a larger hat, cast on 100 sts and increase (k5, m1L) to a total 120 sts and work 6 repeats of the Chart (also useful if you wish to knit with a finer weight of yarn).

HAT

Using 4mm needles, yarn A and the alternate cable method or a tubular method suitable for 1x1 rib, cast on 90 sts. Join to work in the round, being careful not to twist sts. Pm to indicate beginning of round. Round 1: (K1, p1) to end. Work in 1x1 rib as set by round 1 for a further 11 rounds.

Main Body

Change to larger needles. Next round (increase): (K9, m1L) to end (100 sts). Changing colours and decreasing as indicated, work rows 1-49 of the Chart, working the 20-st repeat 5 times around the hat. When Chart is complete, 10 sts remain. Break yarn and fasten off by drawing it through the remaining sts.

TO FINISH

Weave in all loose ends. Wash and gently pull the hat into shape before leaving to dry. Make a pompom in yarn D and attach. ● Pattern from Penguin: A Knit Collection by Anna Maltz, available from annamaltz.com. Photography by Elle Benton. Flower King modelled by Ania Grzymajlo.

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Instructions

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NORTHERN LIGHTS BY DESIGNETTE

Key

3

TIP

4

This garment should be dry-cleaned.

10 4 11 12 5 13 14 15 6 16

Shape Sleeves

17 19

Inc 2 sts at each end of next 3 rows. 56[60:64:70:74:80:86] sts. Cast on 21[21:21:21:22:22:22] sts at each end of next row. 98[102:106:112:118:124:130] sts. Continue straight until work meas 71[73:75:76:78:80:82]cm (28[28¾:29½:30:30¾:31½:32¼]in).

7 18 20

LEFT FRONT

8

With 9mm Tunisian crochet hook and 2 strands of each of yarn held together (4 strands in all), work 26[28:30:33:35:38:41]ch. Work straight in Tss until work meas 47[48:49:49:49:49:49]cm (18½[18¾:19¼:19¼:19¼:19¼:19¼]in).

21 22 9 23 10 26

Shape neck

11 28

Next row: Work forward pass to last 10[10:10:10:11:12:12] sts, work return pass leaving these 10[10:10:10:11:11:12] sts

27

For more abbreviations see page 89

25

Tss = Tunisian simple stitch: see below for instructions and page 73 for a how-to guide with photos

Inc 2 sts at beg of next 3 rows. 32[34:36:39:41:44:47] sts. Cast on 21[21:21:21:22:22:22] sts at beg of next row. 53[55:57:60:63:66:69] sts. Cont straight until work meas 63[65:67:67:69:71:72]cm (24¾[25½:26¼:26¼:27¼:28:28]in).

24

ABBREVIATIONS

71

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9

To fit head circumference 56-58cm 22-22 3/4”

With 9mm Tunisian crochet hook and 2 strands of each of yarn held together (4 strands in all), work 44[48:52:58:62:68:74]ch. Work straight in Tss until work meas 47[48:49:49:49:49:49]cm (18½[18¾:19¼:19¼:19¼:19¼:19¼]in).

Shape Sleeve

9.5 sts and 9 rows to 10cm over Tunisian simple st using 9mm Tunisian hook. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension. Finished height (excluding pompom): 24cm 9 1/2”

8

TENSION

3

DesignEtte Hokkaido 100% raw silk (approx 250m per 50g) 8[8:9:11:11:13:14] x 50g balls Ecru DesignEtte Andrea Di Bonaiuto 70% superkid mohair, 30% silk (approx 220m per 25g) 9[10:12:13:14:16:17] x balls Black 9mm Tunisian crochet hook with wire (100cm long) Stitch markers Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

7

YOU WILL NEED

BACK

6

To fit: XS[S:M:L:XL:2XL:3XL] Actual measurement: 92[100:109:122:130:142:156]cm (36¼[39½:43:48:51¼:56:61½]in) Length to shoulder: 71[73:75:76:78:80:82]cm (28[28¾:29½:30:30¾:31½:32¼]in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

2

Tunisian crochet is a blend of knitting and crochet. A long crochet hook is used, often with a long cable for working with large stitch counts. To start, work a crochet chain. Then work in rows back and forth, but always from the right side left, pulling the yarn through every stitch on the row as for knitting (forward pass), leaving a long row of stitches sitting on the hook. On the back row (the return pass), work from left to right in the same way as a regular double crochet, leaving the very last stitch on the hook. The texture is quite different from both knitting and crochet, making an interesting change from the more familiar techniques. If you are not familiar with Tunisian crochet there are a number of excellent tutorials on YouTube. A few books on the subject are also available. One row consists of the forward pass and the subsequent return pass. See page 73 for more instructions and photos.

SIZES

Schematic

5

PATTERN NOTES

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Instructions

2 1 3

EXPANDING VEES BY SHARON H SILVERMAN

4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10

unworked. 43[45:47:50:52:54:57] sts. Sizes 1 to 6 only Next row: Work forward pass to last 2 sts, work return pass. 41[43:45:48:50:52] sts. Rep last row 1[2:2:2:2:2] more times. 39[39:41:44:46:48] sts. Size 7 only Next row: Work forward pass to last 3 sts, work return pass (54 sts). Next row: Work forward pass to last 2 sts, work return pass (52 sts). Rep last row once more (50 sts). All sizes Next row: Work forward pass leaving last st unworked, work return pass. Rep last row 4[3:3:4:4:4:4] more times. 34[35:37:39:41:43:45] sts. Cont straight until work meas 71[73:75:76:78:80:82]cm (28[28¾:29½:30:30¾:31½:32¼]in).

4

RIGHT FRONT 11

Work as for Left Front, reversing all shaping.

12

MAKING UP 5

13 14 15 6 16 17 7 18

Join all seams from the right side of the work using mattress stitch. Locate centre point of top edge of Back by folding Back piece lengthwise along centre. Pm. Measure 14[15:15:16:17:18:19]cm (5½[6:6:6¼:6¾:7:7½]in) from this point outwards to each side, towards Sleeves, and also mark these 2 new points to show beg of shoulder seam join point. Adjust and hold in the Front/Back shoulder/ Sleeve edges when joining seams, since one edge is longer than the other. Sew bottom 8 sts of Sleeve seams from WS for fold-up cuffs. Fold up bottom 7cm (2¾in) of Sleeves to RS for cuffs. Leave cuffs loosely folded do not fasten them to main Sleeve.

SIZE

126 x 71cm (49½ x 28in)

YOU WILL NEED

Any 4 ply yarn Approx 562m (200g) in black (A) Approx 281m (100g) in cream (B) 6.5mm Tunisian crochet hook, 56cm (22in) long 6mm crochet hook Removeable stitch markers Yarn needle Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

COLLAR 19 20 8 21

Beginning and ending 8cm (3¼in) from each Front edge, and using 9mm Tunisian crochet hook and 2 strands of each yarn held together, work 60[62:62:66:70:72:78] sts along neck edge. Work 8[8:8:9:9:9:10]cm (3¼[3¼:3¼:3¾:3¾:3¾:4]in) straight in Tss. ●

TENSION

16 Tss and 13 rows to 10cm (4in) over pattern using 6.5mm Tunisian hook. Use larger or smaller hook if necessary to obtain correct tension.

22

Measurements are given in cm

9 23

PATTERN NOTES

10 26

47[48:49:49:49:49:49]

25

71[73:75:76:78:80:82]

24

Each row is made up of two instructions. The forward pass is worked from right to left, the return pass is worked from left to right: Forward pass: Work stitch in pattern instruction to end (see image 1). Return pass: Yarn over and draw through one loop on hook (ch 1 made) (2), *yarn over and draw through 2 loops on hook; rep from * to end (3) (one loop left on hook). The stitch count on each row increases by 4 sts. The increases are made after the first vertical bar, on each side of the middle stitch, and before the last stitch. A marker is

27 46[50:54.5:61:65:71:78]

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Instructions

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TO FINISH

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Weave in all ends. Block to size if required. ● 11 12 5 13 7 18

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17

2

16

5

6

1

15

Pattern from Tunisian Shawls by Sharon H Silverman, published by Leisure Arts. Available from thegmcgroup.com

14

With Tunisian hook and B, ch 7. Foundation Row (RS): Pull up a loop in horizontal bar of second ch from hook and each ch across, work return pass (1-3) (7 Tss). Row 1: Skip first vertical bar, m1, 2 Tks, m1, 1 Tks, pm around loop just made, m1, 2 Tks, m1, 1 Tks, work return pass (11 sts). Rows 2-16: Skip first vertical bar, m1, work Tks to marked st, m1, remove marker, 1 Tks, pm around loop just made, m1, work Tks to last st, m1, 1 Tks, work return pass (71 sts). Row 17: Skip first vertical bar, m1, work Tks to marked st, m1, remove marker, 1 Tks, pm around loop just made, m1, work Tks to last

2

SHAWL

Rnd 1: With standard crochet hook, skip first vertical bar, dc in each st to marked st, remove marker, dc in next sp, dc in next st, pm around dc just made, dc in next sp, dc in each st to last st, 3dc in last st, work dc evenly across end of rows on top of Shawl, 3dc in corner st, join with sl st to first dc. Fasten off. Rnd 2: With WS facing, join A with dc at position of the join from previous rnd, dc in each dc across top of shawl to centre dc of first 3dc group, 3dc in centre dc, dc in each dc to marked dc, 3dc in marked dc, remove marker, dc in each dc to centre dc of next 3dc group, 3dc in centre dc, dc in last dc, join to first dc with sl st. Fasten off.

5

For more abbreviations see page 89

Trim

4

dc = double crochet: insert hook in next space, yarn over and pull up a loop, yarn over and draw through both loops on hook sl st = slip stitch Tss = Tunisian simple stitch: insert hook from right to left under next vertical bar (4), yarn over and pull up a loop Tks = Tunisian knit stitch: insert hook from front to back between front and back vertical bars of next st (5), yarn over and pull up a loop m1 = make one: insert hook from front to back under horizontal bar between two sts (6), yarn over and pull up a loop

Rows 69-70: As row 2 (287 sts). Do not cut B.

3

ABBREVIATIONS

st, m1, 1 Tks, work return pass changing to A in last st (7) (75 sts). Cut B. Rows 18-22: Skip first vertical bar, m1, work Tss to marked st, m1, remove marker, 1 Tss, pm around loop just made, m1, work Tss to last st, m1, 1 Tss, work return pass (95 sts). Row 23: Skip first vertical bar, m1, work Tss to marked st, m1, remove marker, 1 Tss, pm around loop just made, m1, work Tss to last st, m1, 1 Tss, work return pass changing to B in last st (99 sts). Cut A. Rows 24-25: As row 2 (107 sts). Row 26: Skip first vertical bar, m1, work Tks to marked st, m1, remove marker, 1 Tks, pm around loop just made, m1, work Tks to last st, m1, 1 Tks, work return pass changing to A in last st (111 sts). Cut B. Rows 27-34: As row 18 (143 sts). Row 35: As row 23 (147 sts). Cut A. Rows 36-37: As row 2 (155 sts). Row 38: As row 17 (159 sts). Cut B. Rows 39-49: As row 18 (203 sts). Row 50: As row 23 (207 sts). Cut A. Rows 51-52: As row 2 (215 sts). Row 53: As row 17 (219 sts). Cut B. Rows 54-67: As row 18 (275 sts). Row 68: As row 23 (279 sts). Cut A.

1

placed on the middle st of each row, moving it from row to row as you work.

19 20 8 21 22 9 23 24

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Instructions

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SUSAN BY DROPS DESIGN

3 4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12

SIZES 5

13 14 15 6 16

To fit: S[M:L:XL:2XL:3XL] Actual measurement: 90[98:106:116:124:132] cm (35½[38½:41¾:45¾:48¾:52]cm) Length to shoulder: 60[62:64:66:68:70]cm (23¾[24½:25¼:26:26¾:27½]in) Sleeve length: 44cm (17¼in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

YOU WILL NEED 17 7 18 19 20 8 21

Drops Karisma 100% wool (approx 100m per 50g) 11[12:13:14:16:17] x 50g balls 53 Anthracite (A) 3[3:3:4:4:4] x 50g balls 01 Off White (B) 3mm and 4mm circular needle 80cm long 1 set each of 3mm and 4mm double-pointed needles 2 stitch markers Stitch holders Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

on 196[216:236:256:276:292] sts. Rib rnd: (K2, p2) to end. Rep last rnd for 8cm (3in). Change to 4mm circular needle. Next rnd: Knit, dec 24[28:32:32:36:36] sts evenly around. 172[188:204:224:240:256] sts. Place first marker at beg of round and second marker after 86[94:102:112:120:128] sts (to indicate side seams). Continue in st st, taking care to work to tension and slipping markers as they appear until piece meas 15cm (6in). Inc rnd: *K1, m1, k to 1 st before marker, m1, k1, sm; rep from * once more. 176[192:208:228:244:260] sts. Rep inc rnd every 5cm (2in) 3[3:4:4:4:4] more times. 188[204:224:244:260:276] sts. Cont without shaping until work meas 39[40:41:42:43:44]cm (15¼[15¾:16¼:16½:17:17¼]in). Cast off 8[8:8:10:10:10] sts on each side for armholes (ie 4[4:4:5:5:5] sts on each side of both markers). 172[188:208:224:240:256] sts. Put piece aside and work Sleeves.

SLEEVES

With 3mm dpns and A, cast on 56[56:56:60:60:64] sts. Rib rnd: (K2, p2) for 8cm (3in). Change to 4mm dpns. Dec rnd: Knit, dec 4 sts evenly around. 52[52:52:56:56:60] sts. Place marker mid under Sleeve. Work 10 rows of Chart 1, stranding yarn loosely across WS of work. Cont in A only once Chart is worked. AT THE SAME TIME when Sleeve meas 12[12:11:11:13:13]cm (4¾[4¾:4¼:4¼:5:5]in), inc 1 st on each side of marker mid under Sleeve as for Body. Inc on every 6[5:5:5:4:4]th round a total of 14[16:18:18:19:19] times. 80[84:88:92:94:98] sts. When Sleeve meas 44cm (17¼in), cast off

8[8:8:10:10:10] sts mid under Sleeve (ie 4[4:4:5:5:5] sts on each side of marker). 72[76:80:82:84:88] sts. Put piece aside and work second Sleeve.

YOKE

Slip Sleeves to same circular needle as Body where armholes were cast off. 316[340:368:388:408:432] sts. Insert marker mid Back, work to marker, this is now new start of round position. Knit 1 round in A, AT THE SAME TIME dec 10[16:8:10:12:18] sts evenly around. 306[324:360:378:396:414] sts. Knit 0[1:4:7:10:12] rounds in A. Work Chart 2, working patt rep 17[18:20:21:22:23] times around. 119[126:140:147:154:161] sts. Piece should meas approx 60[62:64:66:68:70] cm (23½[24½:25¼:26:26¾:27½]in) up to shoulder. Cont in A to end as folls: Dec rnd: Knit, dec 31[34:44:43:46:49] sts evenly around. 88[92:96:104:108:112] sts. Then work an elevation in the Back as folls: Next rnd: K to 7 sts past marker, turn, tighten thread, p14 sts back, turn, tighten thread and k21 sts. Cont to work 7 sts more in st st on every turn until a total of 70[70:70:84:84:84] sts from last turn have been worked. Turn, knit 1 rnd over all sts until mid Back.

Neckband

Change to circular 3mm needle or dpns. Inc rnd: Knit, inc 16[16:16:12:12:12] sts evenly around. 104[108:112:116:120:124] sts. Cont in (k2, p2) rib for 10cm (4in). Cast off in rib.

TO FINISH

Sew the openings under the Sleeves together. Darn in ends.●

9 23 24

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

25

TIP 10

26

Tension needs to be the same over the yoke so it is advisable to work a tension square over yoke pattern as well as st st.

27

BODY

11 28

Worked in the round on circular needle. With 80cm 3mm circular needle and A cast

29

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45[49:53:58:62:66]

39[40:41:42:43:44]

21 sts and 28 rows to 10cm over st st using 4mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

60[62:64:66:68:70]

22

TENSION

8 41[45:49:53:57:61]

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Instructions

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TWO-TONE CUSHION PAIR BY CHRISTINE BOGGIS

Chart 1

3 4 5 2 6 7

Chart 2

3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14

SIZE

To fit 50x50cm (20x20in) cushion pad. 15 6

YOU WILL NEED

16 17 7 18 19 20 8 21

Debbie Bliss Roma 70% wool, 30% alpaca (80m per 100g) Stripes: 3 x 100g balls in 01 Ecru (A) 1 x 100g ball in 02 Black (B) 4 buttons, 4cm (1½in) diameter Checkers: 3 x 100g balls in 02 Black (B) 2 x 100g balls in 01 Ecru (A) 4 buttons, 4cm (1½in) diameter For both: 8mm needles Tapestry needle 50x50cm cushion pad Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

22

TENSION

9 23

11 sts and 16 rows to 10cm over st st.

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89 24

STRIPES

With A, cast on 54 stitches.

K2tog

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75

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Anthracite

26

Off White

Row 1: (K1, p1) to end. Row 2: (P1, k1) to end. These two rows set m st patt. Repeat rows 1 and 2 four more times. Next row: Knit. Next row: Purl. These two rows set st st. Cont in st st until

10

Key

25

Moss stitch button band

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Instructions

2 1 3

piece meas 25cm, ending with a WS row. Next two rows: Purl.

Start stripe pattern 4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10

Note: Carry yarn not in use up the side of the work, stranding it in behind the working yarn on every knit row. Next row (RS): Join B and cont in st st in B for 4 rows. Next row (RS): Drop B and cont in st st in A for 4 rows. These 8 rows set stripe patt. Repeat these 8 rows 7 more times. Work one more four-row stripe in B, ending with a WS row. Piece should now meas approx 71cm (28in). Cut B and switch to A. Next 3 rows: Knit. Next row: Purl. Cont in st st until piece meas approx 92cm (36¼in).

4

Moss stitch buttonhole band

11 12 5 13 14

Row 1: (K1, p1) to end. Row 2: (P1, k1) to end. Repeat rows 1 and 2 once. Next row: (Patt 9 st, cast off 2 st) 4 times, patt to end. Next row: (Patt to cast off sts, cast on 2 sts over cast off sts) 4 times, patt to end. Repeat rows 1 and 2 two more times. Cast off.

These two rows set st st. Cont in st st until piece meas 25cm, ending with a WS row. Next two rows: Purl.

Start checkers pattern

Note: Carry yarn not in use across the back of the work, stranding it in behind the working yarn on every other stitch. Row 1 (RS): Join A and work as folls: (K3A, k3B) to end. Row 2: (P3B, p3A) to end. Rows 3-4: As rows 1-2. Row 5: (K3B, k3A) to end. Row 6: (P3A, p3B) to end. Rows 7-8: As rows 5-6. These 8 rows set checkers patt. Repeat these 8 rows 7 more times. Piece should now meas approx 75cm (29½in). Cut A and cont in B. Next 3 rows: Knit. Next row: Purl. Cont in st st until piece meas approx 92cm (36¼in).

Moss stitch buttonhole band

CHECKERS

Row 1: (K1, p1) to end. Row 2: (P1, k1) to end. Repeat rows 1 and 2 once. Next row: (Patt 9 st, cast off 2 st) 4 times, patt to end. Next row: (Patt to cast off sts, cast on 2 sts over cast off sts) 4 times, patt to end. Repeat rows 1 and 2 two more times. Cast off.

Moss stitch button band

TO FINISH

15

With B, cast on 54 stitches. 6

16 17 7 18

Row 1: (K1, p1) to end. Row 2: (P1, k1) to end. These two rows set m st patt. Repeat rows 1 and 2 four more times. Next row: Knit. Next row: Purl.

Weave in ends. Sew side seams to button band, then sew side seams to buttonhole band so buttonhole band sits over button band. Sew on buttons to match buttonholes. Insert cushion pad. ●

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Instructions

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LITTLE BLACK DRESS TEA COSY BY CHARMAINE FLETCHER 3

Moss stitch section

4

Row 1: P1, k1 to end. Row 2: K1, p1 to end. These two rows form the moss stitch pattern. Rep for a further 18 rows until this new moss stitch segment measures 5cm (2in), ending with a RS row. Cast off.

5 2 6 16 17 7 18 19 20 8 21 22

STAMEN

24 25 10 26

Using 3.75mm double-pointed needles, cast on 6 sts. Knit a row, but do not turn. With yarn at back, push sts along needle and knit them again. Rep until work measures approx 4cm (1½in). Cut yarn, leaving a long tail. Thread tail on to a tapestry needle. Thread through rem sts and draw together very gently to keep the top stitches tidy. Draw the darning needle down through the middle of these stitches and unthread. Neaten and fasten off cast-off row.

9 23

27

Row 1 (RS): K to end. Row 2: P to end. Row 3 (eyelet row): K4, (yrn, k2tog, k3) to last 4 sts, yrn, k4 (44 sts). Row 4: P to end. Row 5: K to end.

6

Eyelet section

15

To place beads, take bead to where it is to be placed, as close to next st as possible. Slip this st on to right needle, place bead, take yarn back and knit the next st. Ensure the bead is positioned over the slipped st, and keep the tension medium to tight to prevent it from working through to the back.

14

PATTERN NOTE

13

For more abbreviations see page 89

5

P1tbs, p1tfs = Purl through the back of the (next) st, then purl through the front of this st to increase “invisibly” PB = Place bead (see Pattern Note)

12

ABBREVIATIONS

11

22 sts and 28 rows to 10cm over moss stitch on 4mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain the correct tension.

4

TENSION

10

Sirdar Hayfield Bonus DK 100% acrylic (280m per 100g) 1 x 100g ball in 965 Black (A) 1 x 100g ball in 812 Cream (B) 20 x 5mm and 8 x 4mm cream-coloured pearls 90cm of 2.5cm wide cream ribbon 1 pair 4mm bamboo needles 1 pair 3.25mm bamboo needles 1 set of 3.75mm double-pointed needles Sewing needle and thread Tapestry needle Dressmaker’s pins Clear nail varnish

Thread 20 x 5mm pearl beads on to a strand of A, using sewing cotton and a sewing needle. Using 4mm needles, A and the thumb method, cast on 42 sts. Push the beads along the yarn until they are needed. Row 1: P to end. Row 2: K to end. Row 3: P to end. Row 4 (picot row): K2, (yrn, k2tog) to last 2 sts, yrn, k2 (43 sts). Row 5: P to end. Row 6: K to end. Row 7: P to end. Change to B. Row 8: K to end. Row 9: K to end. Change to A. Row 10: K to end. Row 11: P to end. Row 12 (bead row): K3, PB on the next st, (k3, PB) to last 3 sts, k3. Row 13: P to end. Change to B. Row 14: K to end. Row 15: K to end. Change to A. Row 16: K to end. Row 17: (P1, k1) to last st, p1. Row 18: Repeat row 17. Rows 17 and 18 form moss stitch patt. Rep these two rows until the moss stitch segment measures 15cm (6in), ending on a WS row.

9

YOU WILL NEED

SIDES (MAKE 2)

8

To fit average teapot

3

SIZE

Note: Working the dec 1 st in from the edge gives the flower its characteristic curved petal. Leave long tails at the beg and end for assembly and stitching. Using 3.25mm needles, thumb method and B, cast on 2 sts. Row 1: K2. Row 2: P1, p1tbs, p1tfs (3 sts). Row 3: K to end. Row 4: P1, p1tbs, p1tfs, purl to end (4 sts). Row 5: K to end. Row 6: P1, p1tbs, p1tfs, purl to end (5 sts). Row 7: K to end. Row 8: P1, p1tbs, p1tfs, purl to end (6 sts). Row 9: K to end. Row 10: P1, p1tbs, p1tfs, purl to end (7 sts). Row 11: K to end. Row 12: P1, p1tbs, p1tfs, purl to end (8 sts). Row 13: K to end. Row 14: P to end. Row 15: K to end. Row 16: P to end. Row 17: K to end. Row 18: P1, p2tog, p5, purl to end (7 sts). Row 19: K to end. Row 20: P1, p2tog, p4, purl to end (6 sts). Row 21: K to end. Row 22: P1, p2tog, p3, purl to end (5 sts). Row 23: K to end. Row 24: P1, p2tog, p2, purl to end (4 sts). Row 25: K to end. Row 26: P1, p2tog, p1, purl to end (3 sts). Row 27: K to end. Row 28: P1, p2tog (2 sts). Row 29: K to end. Rep rows 2–29 three more times (4 petals in all). Cast off, leaving two long tails.

7

CAMELLIA

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Instructions

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PEARLY QUEEN BY JEMMA LANGWORTHY

TO FINISH

3

Camellia

4 5

Rejoin yarn to rem sts and cast off 7 sts.* Next row: Work from * to *. Rejoin yarn to rem sts and cast off 7 sts. Work last tab on rem 5 sts, from * to *. Fasten off.

2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11

With the work on its side, thread through the first row of sts along the end opposite curved petals, gathering and overlapping as necessary to produce flower effect. Fasten off but do not cut yarn. Using cast-on tail, work along the same row in the opposite direction to pull the flower centre even closer together. Fasten off but do not cut yarn. Place stamen in centre of flower, bend to the left and secure to the first petal on left using one of the tail threads; do not cut thread. Split one of the tail threads, and thread one of the sections on to a regular needle. Manoeuvre to lower left side of the right petal as follows: attach a 4mm bead, rep until 8 beads form a semicircle at the bottom of the stamen. Fasten off and cut. Take rem tail back and forth two or three times across the centre back of flower to form a short loop. Neaten loop using buttonhole stitch and fasten off.

TO FINISH

Sew in ends of yarn. Using sewing thread, attach press studs to back of tabs and cover, lining up carefully. Attach 3 large matching buttons to front of tabs. Arrange smaller buttons on cover, either randomly or forming traditional patterns. Sew in place.

Tip If you decide to attach your buttons in patterns, use a small dab of fabric adhesive behind each one when they are in place to hold them while you sew them on.●

12

Cosy 5

13 14 15 6 16

Join sides using mattress stitch, leaving gaps for handle and spout. Leave a gap in each seam of eyelet row to form two extra eyelets. Fasten off. Thread ribbon through, beg at centre eyelet on right side. Draw up and form a bow. Loop the right-hand ribbon and thread through loop on back of flower. Turn cosy upside-down and finish tying bow so the ribbon tails face the bottom of cosy. Trim ribbon and coat ends with clear nail varnish to prevent fraying.

17

Tip

7 18

Make sure the ribbon matches the cream yarn exactly, as any variation will make the yarn look dirty.●

SIZE

To fit standard cafetière

YOU WILL NEED

Standard chunky wool or wool-blend yarn 1 x 50g ball black 1 pair 5mm needles 3 press fasteners Selection of small buttons (mother-of-pearl if possible) 3 x large matching buttons Sewing needle and black thread

Pattern from Coffee Cozies published by GMC Publications, available from thegmcgroup.com

19

TENSION

20

16 sts to 10cm (4in) over moss stitch. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension 8

21

PATTERN NOTE

The cosy is worked sideways in moss stitch, making fastening tabs just before casting off.

22

COSY

9 23

Cast on 29 sts. Row 1: (K1, p1) to end. Row 1 repeated forms m st. Cont in m st until cosy is long enough to reach round cafetière.

24

Shape tabs 25 10 26

Pattern from The Big Book of Tea Cozies published by GMC Publications, available from thegmcgroup. com

27 11 28 29

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Next row: * K5, turn and work on these 5 sts only. Work 4 rows in m st. Next row: Keeping patt correct, work 2 sts tog, m st 1, work 2 sts tog. Work 1 row in m st. Next row: Sl1, k2tog, psso. Fasten off.

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18/11/2016 11:28


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Instructions

2 3

BARLEY TWIST HEADBAND BY HILARY GRANT

1

HALFREK HAIRBAND BY CHRISTINE BOGGIS

4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14 15

SIZE

6

Circumference: 50cm (19¾in) Width: 10cm (4in)

16

YOU WILL NEED

25 10 26

27 29

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K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 79

24

Weave in ends and block to required size.●

This pattern is knitted in the round and

This is worked flat, in double knitting, and has a cable-style twisted plait. The twist is worked by separating the knitting into two cables, which are plaited, and then joined back together. Find out more about double knitting in Jeanette Sloan’s Techniques A-Z on page 48. Each square on the chart represents a pair of stitches, a knit and a purl. For each square, knit with the colour shown on the chart, then purl with the other colour. Before you knit, you should bring both yarns to the back of the work, then before you purl, you should bring both yarns to the front of the work. At the start of each row, the yarns should

9 23

TO FINISH

PATTERN NOTES

22

PATTERN NOTES

22 sts x 29 rows to 10cm

21

22.5 stitches and 24 rows to 10cm over lace pattern after blocking.

Cast on 90[108]sts and join in the round, taking care not to twist sts. Place marker to mark start of round. Rows 1-3: Knit. Row 4: *(P2tog) 3 times, (k1, yfwd) 5 times, k1, yrn, (p2tog) 3 times. Repeat from * around. Rows 1-4 set feather-and-fan pattern. Repeat rows 1-4 six times. Knit two rows. Cast off.

TENSION

8

TENSION

HAIRBAND

20

Designette Princess Silk 100% reeled silk with Swarovski crystals (160m per 25g) 1 skein Black with black crystals 4mm circular needle 100cm long (for magic loop method) OR set of 4mm doublepointed needles Stitch marker Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

19

YOU WILL NEED

can be done on a circular needle using the magic loop method, or on double-pointed needles. The hairband is designed to have negative ease so the stitch pattern will stretch and show well when worn.

7 18

To fit head circumference (measured around where hairband sits): 53cm[61cm] (21in[24in]) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

17

SIZES

Jamieson’s of Shetland Spindrift 100% Shetland wool (105m per 25g) 1 x 25g ball 315 Heron (MC) 1 x 25g ball 104 Natural White (CC) 1 pair 3.75mm needles 1 set 3.75mm dpns 2 stitch holders Waste yarn

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Instructions

2 1

VELLA BAG BY JO ALLPORT

3 4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5

be twisted around each other once to prevent the work from gaping at the edge.

finish one row short of a full repeat of the Chart.

HEADBAND

TO FINISH

13 14

Using waste yarn and a provisional method, cast on 44 sts. Using the double knitting method, work through the Chart for 55 rows.

Work twist

15 6 16 17 7 18

From the next row you will be working over the first half of the sts only. Slip the remaining half of the sts to a stitch holder for ease of working. Continuing to use the double knitting method, work 32 rows of the Chart. Slip sts to a stitch holder. Break off yarns and rejoin at the start of the remaining sts, and complete as for the first half. Cross the two halves over once as shown in photo.

Separate the front and back sides on to two needles. Remove provisional cast on and place sts on a knitting needle, separating the front and back sts. Using the dominant colour, graft the two front sets of sts together. Repeat for the back sets. Darn over the sts with the contrast colour so that the pattern continues all the way round. Sew in ends and block.●

Pattern from Knitting From The North by Hilary Grant, published by Kyle Books. Photography by Caro Weiss

Join the two halves

19

Transfer all the sts to one needle. You will now work over all sts. Work 56 more rows following the Chart. If you want to shorten or lengthen the headband here, you should

20 8 21

12 11

22 9 23 24 25 10

4

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3 2

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1

11 28

18

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16

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

TENSION

9.5 sts and 21 rows to 10cm (4in) over slip st pattern using 10mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

SLIP STITCH PATTERN

5

19

Cygnet Seriously Chunky 100% acrylic (48m per 100g) 4 x 100g balls Black 217 (A) 3 x 100g balls Cream 288 (B) Pair each of 9mm and 10mm needles Small amount of toy stuffing Yarn needle Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

9

6

20

YOU WILL NEED

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

7

21

22 x 32cm (8¾ x 12½in)

10

8

22

SIZE

Two colours and multiples of 10 sts plus 7 sts and 8 rows. Row 1 (RS): With B, *k7, sl3 wyib; rep from * to last 7 sts, k7. Row 2: With B, *k7, sl3 wyif; rep from * to last 7 sts, k7. Row 3: As row 1. Row 4: As row 2. Row 5: With A, k2, *sl3 wyib, k7; rep from * to last 5 sts, sl3 wyib, k2. Row 6: With A, k2, *sl3 wyif, k7; rep from * to last 5 sts, sl3 wyif, k2.

1

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Instructions

2 1 3

SHAWL COLLAR JUMPER BY DROPS DESIGN

Row 7: As row 5. Row 8: As row 6.

BAG

4

Front and Back (both alike) With A and using 10mm needles, cast on 37 sts. Work in Slip Stitch Pattern across all sts, working in the colours as stated and starting with row 1. Work 6 full 8-row repeats, ending with a WS row. Working in A only from now on, change to 9mm needles and knit 3 rows. Cast off all sts in A on the WS.

5 2 6 7 3 8 9

HANDLE AND GUSSET

10

With A and 9mm needles, cast on 11 sts. Row 1 (RS): With A, knit. Row 2: With A, knit. Row 3: With B, knit. Row 4: With B, knit. Rep the last 4 rows until handle measures 155cm (61in).

4 11 12

BUTTON

5

With 9mm needles and B, cast on 3 sts. Row 1 (RS): Knit. Rows 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10: Purl. Row 3: K1, m1, k1, m1, k1 (5 sts). Row 5: K1, m1, k3, m1, k1 (7 sts). Row 7: Knit. Row 9: Ssk, k3, k2tog (5 sts). Row 11: Ssk, k1, k2tog (3 sts). Row 12: Purl. Cast off all sts. Leave a long tail and use this to sew a running stitch around the edges of the button. Pull to form a sphere and stuff with a small amount of toy stuffing. Pull tight and sew to the centre of the front cast-off edge.

13 14

SIZES

6 16 17 7 18 19

TO FINISH

15

To fit: S[M:L:XL:2XL:3XL] Actual measurement: 92[100:108:122:128:142]cm (36¼[39½:42½:48:50½:56]in) Length to shoulder: 66[68:70:72:74:76]cm (26[26¾:27½:28¾:29¼:30]in) Sleeve length at underarm: 54[54:53:51:50:48]cm (21¼[21¼:21:20:19¾:18¾]in) Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

YOU WILL NEED

8 21 22 9 23 24

Drops Nepal 35% alpaca, 65% wool (approx 75m per 50g) 11[13:14:15:16:18] x 50g balls 100 Off White (A) 3[3:3:3:4:4] x 50g balls 500 Light Grey (B) 2 x 50g balls 517 Medium Grey (C) 4mm and 5mm circular needle 80cm long 1 set each of 4mm and 5mm double-pointed needles Stitch holders Stitch markers Row counter Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

20

Attach the handle and gusset to the front and back as follows: Sew the cast-on and cast-off edges together to form the gusset. Place the seam to the centre of the bottom of the front. Pin and sew the gusset in place. Repeat for the back of the bag. Using A and blanket stitch, sew a loop to the back of the bag in the centre of the cast-off edge. Weave in ends. ●

25 10

TENSION

▼ 81

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K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 81

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ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

26

17 sts and 22 rows to 10cm over st st using 5mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

18/11/2016 11:30


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Instructions

2 1

PATTERN NOTE

3

When working from Charts, strand yarn not in use loosely across wrong side of work.

SLEEVES

Chart 2

Next rnd: Cast off 3 sts for armhole, work 24[27:30:36:39:45] sts, cast off 25 sts for neck, work 24[27:30:36:39:45] sts, cast off 6 sts for armhole, work 73[79:85:97:103:11] sts for Back and cast off last 3 sts for armhole. Finish each part separately.

Worked in rnds on dpns, switch to circular needle when needed. Using 4mm dpns and C, cast on 48[52:56:56:60:60] sts. Join in B and work in (k2, p2) rib according to Chart 1. When Chart 1 has been worked once, change to 5mm dpns. Next rnd: Knit in A, dec 9[7:11:11:9:9] sts evenly around. 39[45:45:45:51:51] sts. Insert marker at beg of round (at mid under Sleeve) and work Chart 2, noting patt begs and ends the same way mid under Sleeve. AT THE SAME TIME when work meas 8[8:8:8:10:10]cm (3¼[3¼:3¼:3¼:4:4]in), inc 1 st on each side of marker mid under Sleeve – working inc sts in patt. Rep inc row every 4.5[5:4:3:3:2.5]cm (1¾[2:1½:1¼:1¼:1]in) a total of 11[10:12:14:13:15] times. 61[65:69:73:77:81] sts. When Sleeve meas 54[54:53:51:50:48] cm (21¼[21¼:21:20:19¾:18¾]in) (shorter measurements in larger sizes because of longer sleeve cap and broader shoulder width), cast off 6 sts mid under Sleeve (ie 3 sts on each side of marker). Cont back and forth on needle and AT THE SAME TIME cast off for Sleeve cap at beg of every row in each side: 2 sts 2[2:2:3:3:4] times and 1 st 3[3:3:4:4:5] times. Cast off 2 sts on each side until work meas 61cm (24in), then cast off 3 sts on each side. Cast off rem sts. Work should meas approx 62cm (24½in).

BACK

SHAWL COLLAR

4

BODY

5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13

Worked in the round on circular needle. With 4mm circular needle and C, cast on 196[212:228:256:272:304] sts. Join in B and work in (k2, p2) rib according to Chart 1. When Chart 1 has been worked once, change to 5mm circular needle. Next rnd: Knit in A, dec 46[50:54:58:62:70] sts evenly around. 150[162:174:198:210:234] sts. Insert first marker at beg of rnd and second marker after 75[81:87:99:105:117] sts (to denote side seams). Work Chart 2 in st st, taking care to work to tension when stranding yarn. When work meas 15cm (6in), inc 1 st on each side of both markers – work inc sts in A. Rep inc rnd when piece meas 30cm (11¾in). 158[170:182:206:218:242] sts. Cont until work meas approx 46[47:48:49:50:51]cm (18[18½:19:19¼:19¾:20]in), ensuring that at least one rnd in A has been worked and not ending after a pattern rnd.

Shape armhole 14 15 6 16 17 7 18 19 20 8 21 22 9 23

Working on 73[79:85:97:103:11] sts for Back, cont to work Chart 2 and AT THE SAME TIME cast off for armholes at beg of every row on each side: 3 sts 0[0:0:0:1:1] time, 2 sts 1[1:2:3:3:4] times and 1 st 2[2:3:4:4:5] times. 65[71:71:77:77:83] sts. Cont without shaping until work meas 64[66:68:70:72:74]cm (25¼[26:26¾:27½:28½:29¼]in), then cast off middle 23 sts for neck. Finish each shoulder separately. Cont to cast off 1 st on next row from neck. 20[23:23:26:26:29] sts. Cast off when work meas 66[68:70:72:74:76]cm (26[26¾:27½:28¾:29¼:30]in).

RIGHT FRONT 24 25 10 26

Rejoin yarn to 24[27:30:36:39:45] sts for Right Front. Cast off for armhole as for Back. 20[23:23:26:26:29] sts. Cont without shaping until work meas 66[68:70:72:74:76]cm (26[26¾:27½:28¾:29¼:30]in). Cast off on same row in pattern as on Back.

27

LEFT FRONT 11 28

Work as Right Front but reversed.

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Sew shoulder seams. Start mid front on left side of sts cast off for neck. Using 4mm circular needle and A, knit up 34 to 44 sts up to shoulder, then knit up 24 to 26 sts in back of neck and finally 34 to 44 sts down along left side of neck. 92 to 114 sts. (Do not knit up sts at front of neck where sts were cast off.) Knit 1 row from WS while AT THE SAME TIME inc evenly to 126[130:134:138:142:146] sts. Work in rib according to Chart 3 as folls (from RS): k2 edge sts on all rows, (k2, p2) to last 4 sts, k2, then k2 edge sts. Work 2 edge sts at sides of beg and end of each row in k, cont until Collar meas approx 6cm (2¼in). Inc 12 st evenly across back of neck rib section, only working incs as follls: (p1, m1, p1, k2). 138[142:146:150:154:158] sts. Cont until Chart 3 has been worked once, change to C then loosely cast off in rib. Collar should meas approx 15cm (6in).

Chart 1

Chart 3

Key Off White Light Grey Medium Grey 38-42-42-45-45-49 15

62-62-62-62-62-62 8-8-9 11-12-14

7

46-50-54-61-64-71

TO FINISH OFF

Place Collar double (right side over left side) at bottom of neck opening and sew to neck line through both layers. Sew in Sleeves. ●

44-48-51-58-62-69

Measurements are given in cm

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22/11/2016 12:15


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Instructions

2 1

MONUMENTAL MOOSE BY TAYLOR HART 3 4 5

2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14 15 6 16 24

83

10

Set-up: Using yarn A, ch 2, 6 dc in 2nd chain from the hook. Rnd 1: 2 dc in each st around. Pull tail tight to close hole (12 dc). Slip stitch in first stitch of rnd, cut yarn, leaving a 30.5cm (12in)-long tail for later use, and draw the tail through the loop on the hook to fasten off.

29

NOSE ROUNDIES (MAKE 2)

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K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 83

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dc2tog = double crochet 2 together: insert hook into the next stitch and pull a loop of yarn through (2 loops on hook). Insert hook into next dc and pull through another loop (3 loops on hook). Yarn over and pull yarn through all 3 loops (dec 1) sl st = slip stitch: with your last stitch on your

21

ABBREVIATIONS

Set-up: Using yarn A, ch 2, 6dc into the 2nd ch from hook. Don’t pull tail tight; leave a small hole where you can later insert the eye. Place a split-ring stitch marker to mark beginning of each rnd in the pattern, and move this marker up as you work each rnd. Rnd 1: *2 dc in each st around * (12 dc). Slip stitch in first stitch of rnd, cut yarn, leaving a 30.5cm (12in)-long tail for later use, and draw the tail through the loop on the hook to fasten off.

8

Not critical

EYE ROUNDIES (MAKE 2)

20

TENSION

For more abbreviations see page 89

19

Any aran weight yarn 1 x 100g ball brown (A) 1 x 100g ball tan (B) 3.75 mm crochet hook Two 18mm clear plastic animal safety eyes Split-ring stitch marker Yarn needle Toy stuffing Precut, predrilled dowel: 10cm-diameter circle cut from a pine board Prepared 29cm (11½in) x 21.5cm (8½in) scalloped plaque

YOU WILL NEED

hook, insert your hook through the space or chain where you want to place a slip stitch, yarn over, and pull a loop through the stitch and the loop on your hook with no further yarn over

7 18

47cm wide x 30.5cm long x 28cm deep (18½in x wide x 12in long x 11in deep)

17

SIZE

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Instructions

2 1

EARS

3 4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4

Make 2. Set-up: Using yarn A, ch 2, 6 dc in 2nd chain from the hook. Rnd 1: 2 dc in each st around. Pull tail tight to close hole (12 dc). Rnd 2: *Dc in next st, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (18 dc). Rnd 3: *Dc in next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (24 dc). Rnd 4: *Dc in next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (30 dc). Rnd 5: *Dc in next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (36 dc). Rnd 6: *Dc in next 5 sts, 2 dc next st; repeat from * around (42 dc). Rnd 7: *Dc in next 6 sts, 2 dc next st; repeat from * around (48 dc). Rnd 8: *Dc in next 7 sts, 2 dc next st; repeat from * around (54 dc). Rnd 9: *Dc in next 8 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (60 dc).

11

Closing the Ear

12 5 13 14 15 6 16

Slip stitch in first stitch of round, cut yarn, leaving a 30.5cm (12in)-long tail for later use, and draw the tail through the loop on the hook to fasten off. Note: Because of the way you increased, the disk is hexagonal. Fold the ear so that the points align. When you sew the ear partially closed, begin at the fold and stitch across half of one of the six sides and then across the next whole side, leaving one and one-half sides open (see photo of finished Moose for guide).

unattached nubs (four pieces in all). Now we are going to join the whole Moose Rack, and this is where things get kind of tricky. Join a new length of yarn B to one of the joined nubs at the joint, just after your last whipstitch (1).

4

1

1 Two nubs whipstitched together to begin crocheting the new opening 2

2 Crocheting around two joined nubs 3

17 7 18

The Moose’s rack is made up of six nubs, four of which are sewn together in pairs and two are left single. Each of the singles is sewn to a paired nub after they are stuffed.

Nubs (make 6) 19 20 8 21 22 9 23 24

Joining the nubs 25 10 26 27 11 28

Position two of the completed nubs side by side. Whipstitch together, joining 2 stitches from each nub. Draw your yarn through the last stitch to fasten off and weave in loose end. (20 dc remain open, 10 dc from each small nub). Repeat with two other nubs. You now have two pairs of nubs that have been sewn together and two single,

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4 Finished three nubs Rnd 35: Dc in each st around, stuffing firmly with toy stuffing as you work (24 dc). Slip stitch in first stitch of round, cut yarn, leaving a 30.5cm (12in)-long tail for later use, and draw the tail through the loop on the hook to fasten off. Make sure this piece is stuffed all the way to the top. Join the remaining single nub with the other joined pair as described above.

HEAD

RACK (MAKE 2)

Set-up: Using yarn B, ch 2, 6 dc in 2nd chain from hook. Rnd 1: 2 dc in each st around. Pull tail tight to close hole (12 dc). Rnd 2: *Dc in next st, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (18 dc). Rnds 3–7: Dc in each st around (18 dc). Stuff with toy stuffing about halfway to the top. Rnd 8: *Dc in next st, dc2tog; repeat from * around (12 dc). Rnd 9: Dc in each st around (12 dc). Slip stitch in first stitch of round, cut yarn, leaving a 30.5cm (12in)-long tail for later use, and draw the tail through the loop on the hook to fasten off. Stuff up to the top.

firmly with toy stuffing as you work (26 dc). Rnd 19: *Dc in next 11 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (4) (24 dc). Rnds 20–34: Dc in each st around (24 dc). Stuff firmly with toy stuffing as you work. Switch to yarn A.

3 Whipstitching third nub onto rack Rnd 10: *Dc in 9 sts around one of the nubs until you get to the joint, dc2tog at the joint (one stitch from the first nub and one stitch from its partner), dc in the next sts around the second nub, dc2tog at the joint (2), joining the last and first stitches of the round (18 dc). Rnds 11–14: Dc in each st around (18 dc). Stuff firmly to the top with toy stuffing. Position one of the single nubs as shown and whipstitch about 2.5cm (1in) along the edges to join the single nub to the larger piece, using 3 whipstitches (3). Draw the yarn through the last stitch and weave in the loose end. Rnd 15: Beginning at the end of the whipstitching, dc in next 15 sts, dc2tog (at the joint), dc in the next 9 sts, dc2tog (at the joint) (26 dc). Rnds 16–18: Dc in each st around, stuffing

Set-up: Using yarn A, ch 2, 6 dc into 2nd chain from hook. Rnd 1: 2 dc in each st around. Pull tail tight to close hole (12 dc). Rnd 2: *Dc in next st, 2 dc into next st; repeat from * around (18 dc). Rnd 3: *Dc in next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (24 dc). Rnd 4: *Dc in next 3 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (30 dc). Rnd 5: *Dc in next 4 sts, 2 in next st; repeat from * around (36 dc). Rnd 6: *Dc in next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (42 dc). Rnd 7: *Dc in next 6 sts, 2 dc next st; repeat from * around (48 dc).

Attaching the Nose Roundies Position the nose roundies equal widths apart in the middle of the moose’s snout and whipstitch them securely in place. Rnd 8: *Dc in the next 7 sts, 2 dc in the next st; repeat from * around (54 dc). Rnd 9: *Dc in the next 8 sts, 2 dc in the next st; repeat from * around (60 dc). Rnds 10–15: Dc in each st around (60 dc). Rnd 16: *Dc in next 8 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (54 dc). Rnd 17: *Dc in next 7 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (48 dc). Rnd 18: *Dc in next 6 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (42 dc). Rnd 19: *Dc in next 5 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (36 dc). Rnd 20: *Dc in next 4 sts, dc2tog; repeat

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Instructions

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It’s time to add the final touch to your moose — the chin scruff! Cut ten 30.5cm (12in)-long pieces of yarn A. To create the scruff, fold each length of yarn in half and use a crochet hook to draw the folded end through the fabric at the chin, as shown below. When you have a little loop, draw the cut ends through the loop and pull tight, just like making fringe on a scarf. After you’ve attached as much yarn as you want for your scruff, you may want to give it a little trim (or you can leave it long, if you prefer). Take all the pieces of yarn in your hand, as though you were trimming someone’s hair, and cut the scruff into a V shape.

Attaching the Ears

5

Position one ear right in front of each part of the rack, whipstitching them directly into the round in front of the rack. Draw your yarn through the last stitch to fasten off, trim yarn, and weave in the tail on the wrong side.

2 6 7

CHIN SCRUFF

3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14

5

15 6 16 17 7 18

5 Creating the chin scruff 19

TO FINISH

Mount the head on to prepared plaque. ● 20 8 21

Position the eyes and eye roundies an equal distance apart at the top of the head just above the base of the snout as shown and attach them securely. Thread a yarn needle with matching yarn and whipstitch the eye roundies to the head, drawing the yarn through your last stitch to fasten off on the wrong side of the head. Weave in the tail. Rnds 46–50: Dc in each st around (60 dc). Stuff firmly to the top. Rnd 51: *Dc into next 8 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (54 dc). Rnd 52: *Dc in next 7 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (48 dc). Rnd 53: *Dc in next 6 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (42 dc). Stuff the Head all the way to the top. Insert the pre-cut, pre-drilled dowel into the head with the screw hole facing out. Add more stuffing around the dowel, if necessary, to hold it firmly in place. You’re in the home stretch now — it’s time to close up this moose! Rnd 54: *Dc in next 5 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (36 dc). Rnd 55: *Dc in next 4 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (30 dc). Rnd 56: *Dc in next 3 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (24 dc). Rnd 57: *Dc in next 2 sts, dc2tog; repeat from * around (18 dc). Slip stitch in first stitch of round, cut yarn, leaving a 15cm (6in)-long tail, draw the tail through the loop on the hook to fasten off, and weave it in on the wrong side.

4

Attaching the Eyes and Eye Roundies

3

Note: Take extra care to position the two parts of the rack so that they are exact mirror images of one another. I’ve sewn on my rack only to find out later that I had sewn them on incorrectly and then had to redo them, which is no fun!

1

from * around (30 dc). Rnds 21–35: Dc in each st around (30 dc). Rnd 36: *Dc in next 4 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (36 dc). Rnd 37: *Dc in next 5 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (42 dc). Rnd 38: *Dc in next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (48 dc). Rnd 39: *Dc in next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (54 dc). Rnd 40: *Dc in next 8 sts, 2 dc in next st; repeat from * around (60 dc). Rnds 41–45: Dc in each st around (60 dc).

22

MAKING UP

24 25 10 27

Pattern from Crochet Taxidermy by Taylor Hart, published by Storey. Photography by Mars Vilaubi

11 28

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Now it’s that fun time when you attach the moose’s rack to the head. You may want to stuff the rack pieces more thoroughly at this point. They should be firmly packed so that they are upright and not floppy. Position one of the rack pieces at the top of the head just above one of the eyes. The third small nub should be on the outside of both racks (see photo). Use whipstitch to sew the rack in place, draw yarn through the last stitch at the back of the head to fasten off, and weave in the ends. Repeat with the second rack.

9 23

Attaching the Rack

28/11/2016 10:54


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1

POMPOM DOG BY ALISON HOWARD

PANDA HAT BY SIRDAR

3 4

6. Turn the dog upside-down and trim each of the four small pompoms to produce a flat base for the dog to sit on.

5

7. Insert the point of a pencil into the pile of the head just above the nose, where you want to place the eyes. Squeeze a blob of adhesive into each indentation and, using the tweezers, carefully position the eyes. Allow the adhesive to dry.

2 6 7 3

8. Make an indentation where you want to place the nose. Squeeze in a blob of adhesive and insert the nose, pushing it in well.

8 9 10

9. Cut two rectangles of cream felt, each about 1.5 x 3cm (¾ x 1¼in). Curve the end of each rectangle to form an ear shape.

4 11 12

YOU WILL NEED 5

13 14 15 6 16 17

Very small, small, medium and large pompom makers Any DK yarn in cream Triangular toy nose 2 x 5–6mm black beads Scrap of cream felt All-purpose adhesive Sharp scissors Large darning needle Pointed tweezers Short length of chain Clothes pegs Pencil

7 18

DOG

10. Cover one side of each ear with adhesive and dip into the pompom trimmings, pressing well so the ear is coated with fluff. Set aside to dry. 11. Cut a rectangle of felt as before and shape to make a tail. You can make this any size or length you like. Coat with pompom trimmings, as for the ears. 12. Using the blade of the scissors, part the head pompom at the side where you want to place the first ear. Squeeze in adhesive and insert the ear, pinching the pompom over the join to secure. Repeat with the other ear. Allow to dry, holding the ears in place with pegs if necessary.

19 20 8 21

1. Make one large and one medium pompom. Trim well, leaving the ends of yarn used to tie them off long.

13. Insert the tail between the two rear leg pompoms, following the method used for the ears.

2. Knot the pompoms firmly together. Thread the ends of the yarn, one at a time, on to the darning needle and run them back and forth through both pompoms several times to secure.

14. When the dog is completely dry, go over it with scissors to make sure you are happy with the shape.

22 9 23

3. Make four small pompoms, leaving the ends used to tie them off long. Attach the pompoms to the base of the large pompom by sewing them in securely.

24 25 10

4. Make a very small pompom, using a little less yarn than usual so it is not too spherical. Attach to the head to form a nose. The angle at which you place this pompom will determine which way your dog’s head faces.

26 27 11 28

5. Using sharp scissors, trim the dog carefully into a pleasing shape. Trim the nose so that it is fairly flat and wide. Do not throw away the trimmings, as you will need them for the ears and tail.

29

86

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 86

SIZE

To fit age: 0-6 months[6-12 months:1-2 years:2-3 years:4-5 years:6-7 years] Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

YOU WILL NEED

Sirdar Baby Bamboo DK 80% bamboo, 20% wool (95m per 50g) 1[1:2:2:2:2] x 50g balls in Liquorice 103 (A) 1[1:1:1:1:1] x 50g ball in Cream 131 (B) This pattern is also suitable for Sirdar Snuggly DK, Sirdar Snuggly Pearls DK and Sirdar Snuggly Baby Cotton DK. Amounts may vary. Pair of 4mm knitting needles Pair of 3.25mm knitting needles Small amount of black and white felt Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

TENSION

15. Place a length of chain round the neck, closing it using the pliers.

22 sts and 28 rows to 10cm over stocking stitch on 4mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

TIP

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

A broken bracelet or an old narrow leather watch strap make good collars. ●

PATTERN NOTE: INTARSIA

When working with different balls of yarn the colour to be used should be twisted round the colour just used to link the colours together and avoid holes. Pattern from Pompom Crafts by Alison Howard, published by GMC Publications. Available from thegmcgroup.com

HAT

Using 3.25mm needles and thumb method, cast on 31[33:35:39:39:42] sts in A, 27[27:29:29:31:31] sts in B and 31[33:35:39:39:42] sts in A. 89[93:99:107:109:115]sts. Work in 1x1 rib and proceed as follows:

knittingmag.com

18/11/2016 11:31


cm

in

1

Instructions

2

Next row: K1, (k2tog, k6) 9[10:10:11:11:12] times. 64[71:71:78:78:85] sts. Work 3 rows straight. Next row: K1, (k2tog, k5) 9[10:10:11:11:12] times. 55[61:61:67:67:73] sts. Work 1[1:3:3:3:3] rows straight. Next row: K1, (k2tog, k4) 9[10:10:11:11:12] times. 46[51:51:56:56:61] sts. Work 1 row. Next row: K1, (k2tog, k3) 9[10:10:11:11:12] times. 37[41:41:45:45:49] sts. Work 0[0:0:0:1:1] rows straight. Next row: Patt 1, (patt2tog, patt 2) 9[10:10:11:11:12] times. 28[31:31:34:34:37] sts. Work 0[0:0:0:1:1] rows straight. Next row: Patt 1, (patt2tog, patt 1) 9[10:10:11:11:12] times. 19[21:21:23:23:25] sts. Next row: Patt 1, (patt2tog) 9[10:10:11:11:12] times. 10[11:11:12:12:13] sts. Next row: (Patt2tog) 5[5:5:6:6:6] times, p0[1:1:0:0:1]. 5[6:6:6:6:7] sts. Break off yarn, run yarn through rem 5[6:6:6:6:7] sts, draw up and fasten off.

4 5 2 6 7 3 8 9 10 4 11 12 5

EARS (MAKE 4)

To fit age: 1[2:3-4:5-6:7-8:9-10] year(s) Actual measurements: 51[61:67.5:72.5:76:82.5]cm (20[24:26½:28½:30:32½]in) chest Figures in square brackets refer to larger sizes: where there is only one set of figures this applies to all sizes.

6 16 17

YOU WILL NEED

7 18

Rowan Softknit Cotton 92% cotton, 8% polyamide (approx 105m per 50g) 4[5:6:7:8:9] balls 570 Cream 1 x 60cm (24in) or longer 4.5mm circular needle 1 set of five 4.5mm double-pointed needles for Cuffs Stitch markers Note: Yarn amounts given are based on average requirements and are approximate.

19

Join back seam. Join side and top edges of 2 ears to make 1 ear. Oversew cast-on edges of each ear. Sew ears in position on crown. Make 2 eyes using black and white felt as illustrated and sew to hat in position. Using A, embroider mouth and nose as illustrated. Cover with a damp cloth and leave until dry. See ball band for washing and further care instructions. ●

SIZES

15

TO FINISH

14

Using 4mm needles, thumb method and A, cast on 13 sts and work 7 rows in st st. Next row: P2tog, p9, p2tog (11 sts). Next row: K2tog, k7, k2tog (9 sts). Next row: P2tog, p5, p2tog (7 sts). Cast off rem 7 sts.

13

Row 1: K27[29:30:34:34:36] A, 21[21:23:23:25:25] B, 27[29:30:34:34:36] A. Row 2: P27[29:30:34:34:36] A, 21[21:23:23:25:25] B, 27[29:30:34:34:36] A. Rep last 2 rows once more. Row 5: K28[30:31:35:35:37] A, 19[19:21:21:23:23] B, 28[30:31:35:35:37] A. Row 6: P28[30:31:35:35:37] A, 19[19:21:21:23:23] B, 28[30:31:35:35:37] A. Rep last 2 rows once more. Row 9: K29[31:32:36:36:38] A, 17[17:19:19:21:21] B, 29[31:32:36:36:38] A. Row 10: P29[31:32:36:36:38] A, 17[17:19:19:21:21] B, 29[31:32:36:36:38] A. ** Work 2[2:4:4:6:6] more rows, working 2 sts fewer in B and 2 sts more in A as before in next and every foll 0[0:2nd:2nd:2nd:2nd] row. Work 4 more rows, working 2 sts fewer in B and 2 sts more in A as before in every row. Cont in A and st st until hat measures 11[12:12:12:12:12]cm, (4¼[4¾:4¾:4¾: 4¾:4¾]in), ending with a RS row. Next row: Purl to end, dec 2[0:2:2:4:0] sts evenly across row for 1st, 3rd, 4th and 5th sizes only and inc 2 sts evenly across row for

Shape crown

EASYGOING SWEATER BY AMY HERZOG

3

Shape face

2nd size only. 73[81:81:89:89:97] sts.

1

Row 1: Rib 31[33:35:39:39:42] A, rib 27[27:29:29:31:31] B, rib 31[33:35:39: 39:42] A. Row 2: Rib 31[33:35:39:39:42] A, rib 27[27:29:29:31:31] B, rib 31[33:35:39: 39:42] A. Work 5 rows more in rib. Row 8: Using A and B as before, p1[3:3:2:2:4], p2tog, (p5[5:4:5:5:4], p2tog) 4[4:5:5:5:6] times, p1[1:0:0:2:2], p2tog, (p6[6:7:7:7:7], p2tog) 3 times, p2tog, (p5[5:4:5:5:4], p2tog) 4[4:5:5:5:6] times, p1[3:3:2:2:4]. 75[79:83:91:93:97] sts. Change to 4mm needles and proceed as follows: Next row: K26[28:29:33:33:35] A, 23[23:25:25:27:27] B, 26[28:29:33:33:35] A. Next row: P26[28:29:33:33:35] A, 23[23:25:25:27:27] B, 26[28:29:33:33:35] A.

20 8 21 22

TENSION

9 23

21 sts and 32 rows to 10cm in st st using 4.5mm needles. Use larger or smaller needles if necessary to obtain correct tension.

24

PATTERN NOTES

27 11 28

87

29

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 87

26

knittingmag.com

10

ABBREVIATIONS SEE PAGE 89

25

Pullover is intended to be worn with at least 10cm (4in) ease in the chest. This child’s sweatshirt is worked in one piece from the front hem to the back hem, with sleeve stitches added (and later removed) in a series of cast-on and bind-off rows.

22/11/2016 12:16


cm

in

1

Instructions

2 1

FRONT

3 4 5 2 6

Cast on 53[63:69:75:79:85] sts. Work straight in g st (knit every row) for 2.5 cm (1in). Cont in st st (knit on RS, purl on WS), working straight until piece measures 23:25:26:32:34.5:37cm (9[9¾:10¼:12½:13½:14½]in) from the beginning, ending with a WS row. Next row (RS): K26[31:34:37:39:42], pm, k1, pm, knit to end.

7 3

SHAPE GARTER INSERT AND SLEEVES

8 9 10 4 11 12 5 13 14 15 6

Note: Garter Insert and Sleeves will be shaped at the same time. Please read entire section through before beginning. Next row (WS): Purl to 1 st before first marker, pm, k1, remove marker, knit to next marker, remove marker, k1, pm, purl to end. Knit 1 row. Repeat last 2 rows to beginning of neck shaping. AT THE SAME TIME, beginning on first RS row of Garter Insert shaping, work Sleeve shaping as follows: Continuing to shape Garter insert, cast on 6[7:7:6:7:6] sts at beginning of next 10[8:6:22:10:18] rows, then 5[6:6:5:6:5] sts at beginning of next 8[10:14:2:14:12] rows. 153[179:195:217:233:253] sts. Work straight until piece measures 30[32:33.5:40.5:43:47.5] cm (11¾[12½:13¼:16:17:18¾]in) from the beginning, ending with a WS row, removing markers on last row.

16

SHAPE NECK

17 7 18 19 20 8 21

Next row (RS): K65[77:84:94:101:109], join a second ball of yarn and cast off 23[25:27:29:31:35] sts, knit to end. Working both sides at the same time, decrease 1 st at each neck edge every RS row 2[2:3:3:3:3] times, as follows: on left neck edge, knit to last 2 sts, k2tog; on right neck edge, ssk, knit to end. 63[75:81:91:98:106] sts remain for each Shoulder/Sleeve. Work straight until short (outside) edge of Sleeve measures 6.5[7.5:8.5:8.5:9:9.5]cm (2½[3:3¼:3¼: 3½:3¾]in) from last cast-on row, ending with a WS row.

Work even until Back measures same as Front from underarm to beginning of bottom g st edging, ending with a RS row. Change to g st; work even for 2.5cm (1in), ending with a WS row. Cast off all sts.

rows along diagonal edges. Join for working in the round; pm for beginning of rnd. Purl 1 rnd, knit 1 rnd, purl 1 rnd. Cast off all sts.

MAKING UP

With RS facing, using dpns, pick up and knit sts around Sleeve opening, picking up 3 sts for every 4 rows. Join for working in the rnd; pm for beginning of rnd. Purl 1 rnd, knit 1 rnd, purl 1 rnd. Cast off all sts.

Block piece as desired. Sew side and Sleeve seams.

NECKBAND

With RS facing, using circular needle and beginning at Right Shoulder, pick up and knit sts around neck shaping, picking up 1 st for every cast-off st, 3 sts for every 4 rows along vertical edges, and 4 sts for every 5

CUFFS

TO FINISH

Weave in ends. ●

73.5[86.5:94.5:105:113:122.5]

70[76:81.5:95.5:101.5:112]

35[38:40.5:47.5:51:56]

26 27 11 28 29

K163_P50-88_Pattern instructions.indd 88

Measurements are given in cm

25.5[30.5:33.5:36:38:41.5]

5.5[5.5:6.5:7.5:7.5:9.5]

10

88

23[25:26:32:34.5:37]

25

Cast off 5[6:6:5:6:5] sts at beginning of next 8[10:14:2:14:12] rows, then 6[7:7:6:7:6] sts at beginning of next 10[8:6:22:10:18] rows. 53[63:69:75:79:85] sts.

24[26.5:29:32:33:38]

24

SHAPE SLEEVE

13.5[14:16:17:18:19.5]

5.5[7:7.5:7.5:8.5:9]

9 23

Next row (RS): Knit across left shoulder/ Sleeve sts, cast on 27[29:33:35:37:41]sts for Back neck, knit across right shoulder/Sleeve sts with same ball of yarn (cut second ball of yarn). 153[179:195: 217:233:253] sts. Work even until short edge of Sleeve measures 12.5[15:16.5:16.5:18:19]cm (5[6:6½:6½:7:7½]in) from last Sleeve cast-on row, ending with a WS row.

12.5[15:16.5:16.5:18:19]

22

BACK

24[28:30.5:34.5:37.5:40.5]

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22/11/2016 12:16


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m1p meas mm m st ndl p2tog p3tog patt pm psso

knit purl alternative begin/ning chain centimetre/s cable needle continue double crochet decrease double-pointed needle(s) follows/following gramme/s garter stitch (every row knit) inch/es increase knit two stitches together (decrease 1) knit three stitches together (decrease 2) knit into front and back of next stitch (increase 1) knitwise left hand/right hand make 1 stitch: pick up the loop lying between the two stitches and knit into the back of it (increase 1) make 1 purlwise measures millimetre/s moss stitch needle purl two stitches together (decrease 1) purl three stitches together (decrease 2) pattern place marker pass slipped stitch over

pwise rem rep rev st st

purlwise remain/ing repeat reverse stocking stitch (RS purl, WS knit) rnd round RS/WS right side/wrong side skpo slip one, knit one, pass the slipped stitch over (decrease 1) sk2po slip one, knit two together, pass slipped stitch over (decrease 2) s2kpo slip two stitches one at a time knitwise, knit one, pass two slipped stitches over (decrease 2) sp2po slip one purlwise, purl two together, pass slipped stitch over (decrease 2) sl1 slip one stitch sl1p slip one stitch purlwise sm slip marker ssk slip next two stitches one at a time, knitwise, to right-hand needle, insert tip of left-hand needle through both stitches and knit them together (decrease 1) st(s) stitch(es) st st stocking stitch tbl through back loop tog together tr treble crochet w&t wrap and turn wyib with yarn in the back wyif with yarn in the front yfwd yarn forward yo yarn over yrn yarn round needle y2rn yarn twice round needle

SKILL LEVELS EXPLAINED Beginner: If you’ve never knitted before, these are the projects to start you off. Look for tutorials online about casting on, casting off, knitting, purling, increasing and decreasing – watch them through a few times and you’ll soon be ready to go. Beginner Plus: You’re happy with the knitting basics but haven’t quite made that leap to knitting your first jumper. These are the projects for you. Intermediate: You know your knitting and are familiar with the language, but don’t want to take on something extremely complex or in-depth. These projects will develop your knitting skills and challenge you, but won’t be over-taxing. Advanced: These are the ones for all you knitting experts out there. Cables, lacework, fancy stitches – nothing is too tricky for you, so we’ve got plenty of challenging knits for real aficionados.

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The material looks like stylish tortoise shell

Clover Soft Touch Crochet hooks Customers’ favourite!

Has 8 pairs of needles sizes 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 7.0, 8.0mm. and 4 cables to make 60, 80, 100 & 120 cms circular needles.

Remember to state size. Available singly in sizes 2, 2.25, 2.5, 2.75, 3, 3.25, 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6mm £3.25ea For smaller than 2mm see our website or ring us. See left for a set in a case.

Knitting Needle & Crochet Cases Circular Needles case. Crochet hook case Two rows of pockets for circular Holds 8 hooks £7.95 needles, tips and cables £11.50

Knitting Needle Cases

Symfonie Starter set £21.50 Has 3 knitting tips sizes 4mm, 5mm, 6mm and 3 cables 60cm, 80cm and100cm.

Store up to 7 pairs of needles in each with a pocket for accessories. State size required. A) For 9” needles B) For 14” needles

£11.50 each

Clover Row counter £6.95

Pendant style for using with circular needles. Just click to change the number. Lockable.

Handeze Gloves Relieve pain from arthritis, tendonitis, carpel tunnel etc. while stitching or knitting. Available in beige or slate blue, with or without the extra wrist strap, which gives more support. Tail Catcher £21.95 To measure for size place hand on piece of Secures the end of your thread paper. Mark the paper each side of the when it is too short to use a knuckles, at the base of the fingers. Measure needle. Thread the loop through the distance between the 2 marks and select your stitching, hook the short size. thread into the loop & pull 2.0 - 2½” 51-64mm Size 2 through. 2½” - 3 ¼ ” 64 – 78 mm Size 3 Choose from Butterfly, Tortoise, 3¼” - 3 ¾” 78 – 91 mm Size 4 Celtic, Bee, Kingfisher 3¾ - 4½” 91 – 105mm Size 5 Not suitable for wool.

Regular £19.95 Wrist Support £20.95

Postage & packing. Orders up to £12 – £2.95 . Orders £12 to £25 - £3.95. Orders over £25 - £4.95

Order from Siesta Frames Ltd (Please make cheques payable to Siesta Frames Ltd) Unit D. Longmeadow Ind.Est. Three Legged Cross, Wimborne. BH21 6RD

Telephone. 01202 829461 www.coleshillaccessories.co.uk Other items available at www.siestaframes.com

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11/25/16 2:50 PM


PURL ABOUT TOWN

Laura ‘Purl Princess’ Parkinson is your film correspondent reporting from the red carpet of Yarn: the Movie. Lights! Camera! Knitting!

T

he yarn community is a vast and thriving one. When you start looking at our magazines, podcasts, blogs, shops, exhibitions and groups it’s easy to see that when we get together we know how to have a good time. So when I found out there was going to be a London premiere of the film Yarn with a live Q&A session and after-party, not to mention a marketplace, I scrambled to buy tickets with my friends. As we walked through the doors of the Hackney Picturehouse we found a dedicated knitting area with huge stitched banners and familiar faces of London dyers, designers and yarn shop the crowd. h owners iin th d It made d us feel lucky to be a part of this special, sold-out event. We headed into the screen and managed to nab the last few goodie bags at the door. These were Deramores-branded tote bags containing a ball of Vickie Howell’s new yarn, Mod Wool. Before the film began Vickie herself got up to introduce it and reminded us that low lighting would remain on to allow us to knit and crochet during the show. I was interested to see how that would pan out, but as the lights went down I found knitters happily stitching away all around me. In fact the lady next to me spent the two hours very productively – ripping out a huge scarf. Yarn is a documentary about four artists who o all use yarn as their medium: a crochet artist who creates ates installations and full body suits, a circus that uses ses tangled yarn as a metaphor for life, an artist who ho crochets interactive play apparatus for children, n, and an activist who yarnbombs wherever she goes for a variety of causes. I really enjoyed seeing the medium that I work with on a daily basis in a much more artistic light, and it was fascinating to find out about these individuals and their work. However, I felt it could have done with some e everyday yarn users for balance, plus more about yarn as a fibre and why these artists use it over any other medium. These women are the he more flamboyant of our kind being showcased, d, which is great, but it certainly wasn’t a rounded d representation of the community. After the film there was a Q&A session with two of the writers and producers. A heated discussion about craft versus art quickly broke out. It seemed I wasn’t the only one there who was wondering where the everyday yarn user fits into the world of this documentary. At the after-party we were offered a complimentary drink called Stitch on the Beach. I happily slurped at mine while chatting to people and perusing the fabulous selection of yarn and accessories on offer at the marketplace. When I got back to my friends, they all seemed surprised that I had managed to finish the apparently lethal cocktail, which they had all decided to leave after a few sips. This goes some way towards explaining why I left the marketplace with far too many purchases…

Overall the event was a great example of how our knitting community is so much more than knit and natter sessions in the local library. Those are also part of it, but there is so much more out there ready for you to get stuck into – even a bit of artistic debate! So with 2017 knocking at the door, why not make a resolution to explore the yarn community a little more? I promise there are exciting things happening out there, you just need to look for them.

MUST SEE:

If you didn’t manage to catch Yarn at the cinema, go to yarnfilm.com to find out how you can watch and make up your own mind about this interesting documentary.

MUST HAVE:

At the marketplace I had the pleasure of meeting the Little Grey Girl with her gorgeous array of knitting bags and pouches. I bought one of her cute pyramid bags in firework print just in time for the new year celebrations. Check out her range at thelittlegreygirl.com.

FOR MORE RAMBLINGS OF A PURL ABOUT TOWN CLICK ON DOWN TO PURLABOUT.BLOGSPOT.COM 96 to subs c r ib e v isit w w w.c r af t sins tit ute.c o m K163_P96_Purl About Town.indd 96

18/11/2016 11:59


Gorgeous knitting and crochet supplies

Happy Christmas and New Year from Loop! WWW.LOOPKNITTING.COM 15 CAMDEN PASSAGE, ISLINGTON, LONDON, ENGLAND

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11/18/16 2:25 PM


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11/18/16 2:29 PM


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