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There is a lift at the front of the building to The Venue and disabled toilets in the foyer area. Patrons with disabilities and their essential carers may obtain two tickets for the price of one – via the LICS Essential Carer Scheme – details from the Box Office 0113 224 3801. Support dogs are welcome. Please let us know when booking of any special access requirements you may have.

The Venue is equipped with an infra-red system for the hard of hearing.

Seating area

Area A

Area B

Full price

£19.50

£17.50

Over 60s

£17.50

£15.50

Under 18s/student/unwaged

£9.75

£8.75

Book by telephone 0113 224 3801

The booking line is open from 10am – 6pm Monday to Saturday.

TAKE OUT A SUBSCRIPTION TO ALL SIX CONCERTS &

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Book online

There is a designated disabled car park beside Leeds College of Music which has spaces for at least ten cars.

Book in person or by post City Centre Box Office

The Carriageworks, The Electric Press, 3 Millennium Square, Leeds LS2 3AD Email: boxoffice@leeds.gov.uk To order a copy of this brochure in an alternative format, please contact 0113 247 8336 or email music@leeds.gov.uk.

The Box Office is open to personal callers from 10am – 6pm Monday to Saturday. Cheques should be made payable to Leeds City Council. Please enclose a stamped addressed envelope if you would like your tickets sent to you.

Booking dates 29 July: For existing chamber subscribers

Please note: this is a separate subscription from the Endellion String Quartet series.

Requests for seat changes by existing subscribers will be processed on a first-come-first-served basis from 5 – 9 August and can be returned to the Box Office any time from 29 July. 12 August: For new subscribers 17 August: General booking*

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Tuesdays at 7.30pm

The Venue

www.leedsconcertseason.com

Please note a booking fee of £1 per ticket applies. We regret that subscriptions cannot be booked online.

The Venue

Quarry Hill, Leeds, LS2 7PD

Ticket Prices & Booking Information

Quarry Hill, Leeds Talk to us! If you have any questions or comments about Leeds International Concert Season please contact us: Leeds International Concert Season Leeds Town Hall, The Headrow, Leeds, LS1 3AD General Enquiries: 0113 247 8336 Email: music@leeds.gov.uk Whilst every effort is made to avoid changes, Leeds International Concert Season reserves the right to change artists and programmes without notice if unavoidable. * Booking fees may apply

@LeedsConcerts Leeds International Concert Season

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12/07/2013 09:34


When the opportunity came along to curate another concert series for Leeds International Chamber Season, I knew immediately which theme I would like to present. Dance music ranging from Bach to Fitkin has always played a major part in the repertoire I’ve performed, but more recently, I started to think about all the fantastic music which has been choreographed and everything seemed to grow from there! Isn’t it wonderful to hear music that literally makes you tap your toes or imagine the elegant dance moves of centuries ago? We will have all of that to look forward to throughout the series besides more melancholic moods from Piazzolla. This compact exploration of dance is a whirlwind of countries, styles and formations. Beginning in Jacobean England we will dance our way through France, Spain, Moravia, Russia, Argentina and Norway with instruments ranging from the harpsichord to the bandoneon and oboe to guitars. Culturally, dance is an integral part of life all around the globe and it’s a pleasure to share just some of that with you over the coming season. I’ll also be performing some of my all time favourite music and I can’t wait for our evening devoted to Diaghilev, Nijinsky and co – can you imagine how thrilling it is to perform La Mer on two pianos not to mention The Rite of Spring? My fingers will certainly be dancing that evening! Come and join all the wonderful musicians I’ve invited for this series – it promises to be a great adventure. Kathryn Stott Artistic Director

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1 October 2013

5 November 2013

10 December 2013

28 January 2014

25 February 2014

25 March 2014

Mahan Esfahani

Kathryn Stott

Haffner Wind Ensemble

Isabelle van Keulen Ensemble

Katona Twins

Kathyrn Stott

Nicholas Daniel oboe Joy Farrall clarinet Emer McDonough flute Sarah Burnett bassoon Stephen Bell horn Hannah Lawrence bass clarinet with Kathryn Stott piano

Isabelle van Keulen violin Christian Gerber bandoneon Rüdiger Ludwig double bass Ulrike Payer piano

harpsichord

Gibbons Pavan and Galliard: Lord Salisbury Dowland Captain Digorie Piper’s Galliard (with divisions by John Bull) Gibbons Peascod Time, or The Hunt’s Up  JS Bach French Suite No 6, BWV 817 WF Bach Sonata in D Major, Fk 3 Rameau Pieces in E minor, from Pieces de Clavecin

We begin our exploration of dance in music in Jacobean England with works by Orlando Gibbons and John Dowland, the secular music of these Renaissance period composers being dominated by the dance forms of the day. JS Bach’s French Suites form part of his education material for his pupils and are made up of heavily stylised interpretations of the courtly dances, such as the Courante, Sarabande and Gavotte. By the time of his son WF Bach the representation of the dances is less direct, though the influence still remains. Praised by The Times for his “daring and fiery performances” and by Opera Today as “the leading harpsichordist of his generation,” the Iranianborn Mahan Esfahani is the first harpsichordist to be named a BBC New Generation Artist and to be awarded a fellowship prize by the Borletti-Buitoni Trust.

piano

Elizabeth Burley piano

Debussy (arr Ravel) Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune Stravinsky The Rite of Spring Debussy (arr Caplet) La Mer Ravel La Valse

Stravinsky (arr for oboe and piano by Nicholas Daniel) Suite Italienne Janácˇek Moravian Dances Janácˇek Mládi Dvorˇák (arr for wind quintet and piano by David Jolly) Piano Quintet Our two pianos recital celebrates the melting pot of artists, particularly composers and choreographers, who were working in Paris in the early part of the 20th Century. Debussy’s Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune, depicting the ‘desires and dreams of the faun in the heat of the afternoon’, was choreographed by Nijinsky for the Ballet Russes in 1912. The following year Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, choreographed by Diaghilev also for the Ballet Russe, was premiered at the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées heralding the birth of modern ballet. The jerky movements of the ‘knockkneed and long-braided Lolitas’ caused a scandal at the time, but since then The Rite of Spring has become one of the most influential pieces of music of the 20th Century. Ravel’s La Valse, subtitled poème chorégraphique pour orchestre, was premiered in 1920 and has been described as a tribute to the waltz. It was first performed as a ballet in 1926, with perhaps the most famous choreography being by George Balanchine.

Here we focus on the links between music, dance and folklore. Janácˇek was deeply influenced by Slavic folk music and especially that of his native Moravia. Rather than using his collected folk music in a purely imitative way, he took an analytical approach to the material and developed his own style from the patterns and rhythms of the original tunes. The Moravian Dances are characteristic of the melodies and rhythm of the folk music of his native Moravia. Dvorˇák was also influenced by folk music, creating his own original melodies in the style of his collected song and dance material. The second movement of Dvorˇák’s Piano Quintet is marked Dumka, literally meaning ‘thought’. With origins in Slavic folk music the Dumka is characterised by melancholy themes alternating with fast exuberant passages. The third movement is based on the fast Bohemian folk dance the Furiant before the spirited polka of the finale.

A celebration of the tangos of Astor Piazzolla, including favourites Libertango, Oblivion and Adios Nonino.

We welcome the Isabelle van Keulen Ensemble to our series to explore a very different area of music and dance. The tango originated in the 1890s in the border region between Argentina and Uruguay, it soon spread around the world developing many local variations. Piazzolla is perhaps the most famous modern exponent of the genre. A virtuoso bandoneon player who grew up in New York and studied classical music in Paris he combined jazz and classical influences to create nuevo tango. The use of passacaglia techniques, counterpoint and fugue all show influences of Baroque music. The 1974 Libertango is one of Piazzolla’s most famous works. A portmanteau of Libertad (liberty) and Tango, it marks the composer’s transition from traditional tango to nuevo tango. Adios Nonino was written in 1959 in memory of Piazzolla’s father, who had died a few days previously. Both pieces have captured the imaginations of musicians worldwide and have been recorded in numerous different arrangements and by a variety of ensembles.

Boccherini (arr Katona) Introduction and Fandango Albéniz (arr Katona) Mallorca Rodrigo Invocation et Danse Bizet (arr Katona) Carmen Suite (excerpts) Albéniz (arr Katona) Córdoba Tchaikovsky (arr Katona) Tarantella and Spanish Dance de Falla (arr Katona) Spanish Dance​ Peter Katona Meditation and Passacaglia de Falla (arr Katona) El amor brujo (excerpts)​ This concert by the Katona Twins focuses on Spanish dance, featuring both music composed by Spanish composers Rodrigo, Albéniz and de Falla and music from beyond Spain but with a Spanish influence. Italian composer Boccherini lived and worked in Spain from 1761 until his death in Madrid in 1805. Originally written for guitar quintet his Fandango has a strong Spanish flavour. Despite never travelling to Spain, French composer Bizet’s most famous work is his opera set in Spain, Carmen, for which he sought out Spanish folk material to give an authentic feel to the music. Albéniz’s Córdoba celebrates the moods and atmospheres of the city of Córdoba, home to Spain’s Great Mosque. The second section of the piece evokes the sounds of flamenco dancers. The concert ends with the Ritual Fire Dance from de Falla’s ballet El amor brujo. Its composition was inspired by a traditional ceremonial dance around a fire in order to banish a ghost.

piano

Bach Prelude and Fugue No 1 Grieg Holberg Suite Op 40, No1  Rachmaninov Variations on a

theme of Corelli Shostakovich Prelude and Fugue No 24 Ravel Le tombeau de Couperin

The final programme of our season explores the old and the new, how composers throughout the ages have been inspired by older styles to create something new. Many composers have written sets of 24 Preludes and Fugues, one for each of the twenty four major and minor keys, many of whom were inspired by the two sets of Bach’s The WellTempered Clavier. Tonight we hear Bach’s first Prelude and Fugue and Shostakovich’s last. Grieg’s Holberg Suite and Ravel’s Le tombeau de Couperin are 19th and 20th century works respectively which both use the form of the Baroque dance suite as their inspiration. The Holberg Suite was written in 1884 to commemorate the birth 200 years previously of the playwright Holberg, whilst Ravel dedicated each movement of the suite to the memory of friends who died during the First World War.

12/07/2013 09:34


Leeds International Chamber Season 2013/14: Dance!