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Thirty Minor Upanishads the (wise) thoughts like the above and by its own supreme illumination. The outer burning (of body as done in the world) is no burning at all. When the wordly wisdom is destroyed, Praṭyagāṭma that is in the ḍahara (ākāś or ether of the heart) obtains vijñāna, diffusing itself everywhere and burns in an instant jñānamaya and manomaya (sheaths). After this, He himself shines always within, like a light within a vessel. That muni who contemplates thus till sleep and till death is to be known as a jīvanmukṭa. Having done what ought to be done, he is a fortunate person. And having given up (even) the state of a jīvanmukṭa, he attains viḍehamu.kti (emancipation in a disembodied state), after his body wears off. He attains the state, as if of moving in the air. Then That alone remains which is soundless, touchless, formless, and deathless, which is the rasa (essence), eternal, and odourless, which has neither beginning nor end, which is greater than the great, and which is permanent, stainless, and decayless. Thus ends the Upanishaḍ. Footnotes 1 In this Upanishaḍ are stated the ways by which the Kuṇdalinī power is roused from the navel upwards to the middle of the eyebrows and then up to sahasrāra in the head: this being one of the important works of an adept to master the forces of nature. 2 Chiṭṭa is the flitting aspect of Antaḥkaraṇa. 3 Lit., the moving of śakṭi which is Kuṇdalinī. 4 Regarding the quantity to be taken, one should take of solid food half of his stomach: of liquid food, one quarter, leaving the remaining quarter empty for the air to percolate. 5 Mūlakanḍa is the root of kanḍa, the genital organ.

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Thirty minor Upanishads  

Yoga eBook Collection

Thirty minor Upanishads  

Yoga eBook Collection

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