Page 187

Thirty Minor Upanishads

UPAḌEŚA VI Nāraḍa addressing Brahma asked: "O Lord! You said of abhyāsa (practice) according to the analogy of wasp and the worm. What is that practice?" To which the Grandfather replied thus:— "One (viz., an ascetic) should live with true speech and jñāna-vairāgya and with the body alone as the remaining (possession). Know jñāna alone as the body, vairāgya alone as prāṇa, śānṭi (mental control) and ḍānṭi (bodily control) as the eyes, manas alone as the face, buḍḍhi alone as kalā (parts of effulgence), the twenty-five ṭaṭṭvas as the limbs, the avasṭhās as the five great elements, karma, bhakṭi, jñāna, and vairāgya as the branches (or parts) and that the waking, dreaming, dreamless sleeping, and ṭurya avasṭhās and the fourteen organs as being of the nature of a pillar planted in the mud. Though such is the case, the man who masters these through his buḍḍhi like a boatman regarding the boat immersed in the mire, or the elephant-driver regarding the elephant (under his control), and has known that all else beside Self is illusory and destructible and become indifferent, should ever utter: 'I am Brahman alone.' He should not know anything as other than Self. A Jivanmukṭa who lives thus is a doer of that which should be done. He should not discourse that he is other than Brahman. But he should ever be discoursing: 'I am Brahman'. From the waking, dreaming and dreamless sleeping states, he should reach the ṭurya state and then ṭuryāṭīṭa (the state beyond ṭurya). The waking state is in the day; the dreaming in the night and the dreamless sleeping in tie midnight. Each avasṭhā (or state) has its sub-states. The functions of the fourteen organs, eye and others mutually dependent are the following: The eyes perceive forms; the ears, sounds; the tongue perceives tastes; the nose, odours; the vocal organ speaks; the hand lifts; the leg walks; the anus excretes; the sexual organ enjoys; the skin feels; the buḍḍhi perceives objects, being under the control of the organs; through buḍḍhi, he understands; through chiṭṭa, he thinks; through ahaṅkāra, he says I'. All these should be abandoned. 187 of 318

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Thirty minor Upanishads  

Yoga eBook Collection

Thirty minor Upanishads  

Yoga eBook Collection

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