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Thirty Minor Upanishads him, after practising and enjoying all, and having the body alone remaining, through jñāna and vairāgya, in the realisation of the Reality. A karma-sannyāsin is one who, though he has no vairāgya, becomes an ascetic by regularly passing from one āśrama to another, from the celibate, to the householder and then to the forester. A vairāgyasannyāsin is one who becomes an ascetic from the celibate order (directly), being as nature made him. "(There is another fourfold classification.) The four kinds are: viḍvaṭsannyāsa, jñāna-sannyāsa, viviḍishā-sannyāsa and karma-sannyāsa. In karma-sannyāsa, there are two (sub-) divisions, nimiṭṭa (causal) and animiṭṭa (non-causal). Āṭura-sannyāsa (on account of the cause of approaching death, disease, etc.), is nimiṭṭa-sannyāsa. The krama (regular) sannyāsa is animiṭṭa. Āṭura-sannyāsa is on account of defective karmas. When sannyāsa is taken at the time of death, it is called nimiṭṭa. Animiṭṭa is that when one becomes duly a sannyāsin when the body is strong, (after being convinced) that all created things are subject to destruction, that body and others should be given up, that all Āṭmās (souls)—each one shining in the pure Akās, dwelling in all, moving in the anṭariksha (middle world) as of the form of vāyu, in the sacrificial pit as of the form of fire, in the moon, in all men, in the supreme angels, in the form of truth, in ākāś, in the form of the conch, pearl, fish, etc., in water, in the form of grain, etc., on earth, in the form of the limbs of Veḍas, in the form of the rivers from the mountains, in the form of truth and the great one—are no other than Brahman and that others are but perishable. "There are six classes of sannyāsins—kutīchaka, bahūḍaka, hamsa, paramahamsa, ṭurīyāṭīṭa and avaḍhūṭa. Kutīchaka is one who wears the tuft of hair, holy thread, staff, bowl, loin-cloth and tattered cloth, who worships mother, father, and teacher, who has potsherd and sling, who is uttering manṭras, who takes food in one and the same place, who wears, vertically, the white earth (on the forehead as sect-mark) and who has a staff. Bahūḍaka is one who, like kutīchaka, wears the tuft of hair, tattered cloth, etc., as well as the three (sect-) marks, but who eats eight morsels 180 of 318

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Thirty minor Upanishads  

Yoga eBook Collection

Thirty minor Upanishads  

Yoga eBook Collection

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