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Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

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Town’s ‘Too Asian?’ complaint too late? ‘Don’t (my children) have the right to be called Canadians like everyone else?’: Councillor Joe Li BY L.H. TIFFANY HSIEH

thsieh@yrmg.com

Can it be too late to say no to “Too Asian?” “My only concern is it may be

delayed,” said Regional Councillor Joe Li, who tabled his “Too Asian?” motion in council chamber Tuesday night only to have it referred back to general committee in two

weeks. Mr. Li’s motion, seconded by Councillor Alex Chiu, calls on Maclean’s magazine to issue a comprehensive and unqualified

public apology for the “negative stereotyping” of the Asian-Canadian community it suggests in a See COUNCILLOR’S, page 7.

HEADED FOR HOME

Disruption in Milliken cited BY L.H. TIFFANY HSIEH

thsieh@yrmg.com

Call it a community vs. legacy tradeoff. In the latest round of Pan Am venue shuffling, Markham council voted Tuesday to replace a triple gymnasium previously identified for the Milliken Mills Community Centre and Library with a Pan Am badminton field house/gymnasium facility in an undisclosed location in Markham Centre. The decision came after councillors turned down a staff recommendation to relocate the Pan Am water-polo pool to Milliken Mills for better financial and operating synergies, instead opting to build both the pool and the gymnasium facility in Markham Centre pending a land deal between the town and the landowner, estimated at $10.5 million. Ward 8 Councillor Alex Chiu voted in favour of the Markham Centre site because he said it would be a nightmare for Milliken Mills residents once construction starts at the community centre. “If you go to Milliken Mills High School on a Saturday, traffic there is like a zoo,” he said. Mr. Chiu said the community

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The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 2

TOWN: Asbestos found in upper library, arena, community hall, main entrances

More delays to Thornhill Community Centre BY L.H. TIFFANY HSIEH

thsieh@yrmg.com

You’ll have to wait a while longer before the Thornhill Community Centre and Library’s $6-million facelift is complete. The project — a major renovation and expansion aimed to meet the increasing demands on the facility — has been delayed yet again due to the asbestos abatement in the upper library, arena, community hall and main entrances. The project broke ground last

April and was originally scheduled to finish in December. The date was later changed to March 31 and now June 15. However, the temporary library is scheduled to open in February and the permanent library in March. Ward 2 Councillor Howard Shore asked during Monday’s general committee meeting why asbestos wasn’t accounted for due to the age of the 1970s-era building. According to Glen Taylor, the

town’s senior manager of infrastructure and special projects, staff did anticipate finding asbestos, but initial tests for the hazardous substance came back negative. “It was the lab, not the consultant,” Mr. Taylor said. “It was an unfortunate situation.” However, Mr. Shore insisted the asbestos should have been identified. He said the extra three months of delay is the community’s lost time. “Regardless who screwed up...

somebody erred here,” he said, adding he’s not pointing a finger at staff. “This is not a natural disaster, this was negligence,” Mr. Shore said. Councillor Colin Campbell echoed those concerns and commented it was “absolutely unbelievable that they missed the asbestos”. Mr. Campbell said the town shouldn’t use the company again. Another town project that has been delayed is the outdoor ice

rink at the Markham Civic Centre. Billed as the largest outdoor artificial rink in the GTA, the completion of the 25,000 sq. ft. ice rink has been postponed to July 7. Town staff had initially hoped to open the rink this winter in time for Family Day. Mr. Taylor said the delay has to do with weather, as heavy rain at the end of November saturated the ground. The wet conditions were followed by a deep freeze and that meant pipe work didn’t get done on time, he said.


BY KIM ZARZOUR

kzarzour@yrmg.com

ayden Stachowski and Titus Layton hop up and down with excitement, reaching for the iPods in their teacher’s hands. Heather Jelley has just asked them if they’d like to play “Whiteboard” and their body language is all the answer she needs. Within seconds, the five-year-olds have plopped to the carpet for a digital tete-a-tete, pudgy fingers tracing pictures on the pads in their palms. Ms Jelley doesn’t break the news to them that this isn’t really “play” and isn’t entirely a “game”. Does it really matter? They’re learning, she says. The elementary classroom of the 21st century seems to be all about contrast: a blend of old and new, work and play, innocence and sophistication. The game the two Keswick kindergarten students are playing is all about building communication skills: One finger-draws on the iPod and without showing his classmate, describes it, while the second attempts to follow instructions and the handheld shows them how close they have got. While they work on this thoroughly modern task, others work the old-fashioned way, gluing sparkles on gingerbread. Elsewhere in this Jersey Public School classroom, students grip handhelds in candy-coloured cases, tracing the alphabet on iPads or listening to stories with earphones. Others build with Lego or view a video of Cookie Monster showing how to write a letter. “This is their world,” Ms Jelley says. In 24 years as a kindergarten teacher, she’s watched her profession transform. In the old days, teachers pulled out standard units on random topics, such as whales, then “plopped kids in”. Today, she says, the focus is on the “here and now” — including, if possible, digital technology.

K

CONNECT TO THEIR WORLD “We try to find ways to make lessons connect to their world.” Rather than a lesson on penguins, for example, she’ll opt for a unit on recycling. “You can still play house or build with blocks. And there’s still phonics, but not in isolation because then it has no meaning for them.” IPods and iPads are great for this age, she says, because children’s fine motor skills aren’t developed yet. They can focus on writing a letter, not struggling to hold a pencil. “When we hand them this piece of technology, there’s immediate engagement.” It’s obvious who has access to handhelds at home, based on how well they can manoeuver the devices, but even those who don’t, pick it up quickly. “They have no fear. They aren’t worried as we are about ‘what if I press the wrong button’?”

STAFF PHOTO/MIKE BARRETT

Lake Simcoe Public School student Simon McLachlan works intently on his iPad in a classroom that melds old-fashioned books with modern tools.

CONNECTING

GEN-Z A seven-part series on how today’s children are learning in new ways.

THE SERIES JAN. 13, PART 1: Introduction to the e-revolution taking place in our schools

JAN. 20, PART 2: Students at Beverley Acres P.S. use handhelds in class

JAN. 27, PART 3: Keswick primary students spend their days on iPads and iPods

It’s an egocentric age and the digital camera is this teacher’s lifeline. Photographs she has taken of the students are sprinkled through the room — seeds for stories and discussion. She took photos at the community’s Santa Claus parade, then posted them on the Smart board. Students noticed two Santas, one in the sleigh, the other handing out candies. Which was the real Santa? “The discussion that flowed out of that was phenomenal.” Equally passionate discussion is flowing from the Smart board display at Lake Simcoe Public School, a few blocks away. The Grade 3 students discuss a newspaper recipe feature. They tap the big screen and read the ingredients, discuss the headline and where it’s found — online or in print. Teacher Angie Harrison taps the screen and a new display appears: a light-dappled wintery night scene. It reminds one child of the class Chanukah lesson, another of Diwali. The teacher reads the story on the screen and when she comes to the words “winter

le i m S y h t l a e H A Something to Smile About

FEB. 3, PART 4: Some high schools toss the paper, take up videogames to learn

FEB. 10, PART 5: Digital technology helps special ed students

FEB. 17, PART 6: Controversies and Challenges: Debate over distractions, dangers

FEB. 24, PART 7: Where do we go from here? Who will pay for it all? Visit www.yorkregion.com for more stories.

solstice”, she clicks on them and a short video about the solstice appears. “We’ll bring out the Puppet Pal app and be ready to do some really good publishing this afternoon,” she says. First, it’s storytime. In a flashback, eight-year-olds sit crosslegged on the rug, peering up at teacher’s picture book. The humble softcover amid modern software seems almost quaint, small in size next to the looming Smart board, yet the students are transfixed — partly because they

have a job to do. They must decide if this is a story or an informational text. When the last page is turned, she asks them to close their eyes and think about the proof they have for their conclusion. Then they turn to their partners and explain. The next task will be to tell the class what their partner thinks, so they listen closely. Ms Harrison, who has taught for 18 years, is as enthused as a newbie about the technology. She uses a variety of tools — from Smart board to document camera to iPad and iPod, with short bursts of instruction. The focus is less teacher talk, more student talk. The classroom juxtaposes old and new — one poster says don’t bully, another says never post personal information online. A hand-crank pencil sharpener grinds in one corner, a video plays in another. Social skills lessons swerve from remember to tuck in your chair to share finger-tapping duties on the Smart board. When group work is over, they break into smaller clusters for independent work. Children with iPads slide their fingers across the screen spelling out words — some in the form of magnetic letters, others, like an airplane writing words in the sky. It’s Latteral Blair’s favourite device. “It’s interesting,” the boy says. “It grabs your attention and I want to know more words.” Classmate Kayla Sheppard’s favourite is the Smart board “because Mrs. Harrison lets me write on it”. Tida Son is working on another computer, looking at the Nintendo Wii sensor bar extension on the Toys R Us application. The students have learned about this, how businesses market in in print flyers and iPhone apps. They understand why prices aren’t listed on the apps, (kids are the audience) but are in print (for the parental audience). “They’re going to encounter so many different texts in their world and it’s our job to make sense of it,” Ms Harrison explains. “They see it on the page, on smartphones, iPads, books. We have to build bridges and help them see the similarities. At the same time we want them to be critical thinkers and be aware of what they’re reading.” Back at Jersey Public, Ms Jelley wishes parents could see what the children are doing. “If they saw the devices being used here in a purposeful way, not just playing Gameboy games and shoot-em up, they’d realize they are learning. “These kids are brilliant. They really are. They make brilliant connections to things.” The recess bell rings and she’s back to the perennial problem: finding matches for mittens and unsticking snowsuit zippers — Canadian winters being one thing technology has not yet resolved.

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3, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Modern classroom study of contrasts


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 4

MARKHAM CIVIC CENTRE 101 TOWN CENTRE BOULEVARD MARKHAM, ONTARIO L3R 9W3 905-477-7000 WWW.MARKHAM.CA

Markham Council Markham Council and Standing Committee meetings take place at the Markham Civic Centre and are open to the public. Log on to www.markham.ca to view the agendas and listen live by audio stream. Monday, January 31, 2011: 9 a.m. – General Committee 1 p.m. – Budget Sub-Committee Tuesday, February 1, 2011: 9 a.m. – Development Services Committee 1 p.m. – Budget Sub-Committee 6:45 p.m. – Water and Wastewater Public Meeting 7 p.m. – Planning Public Meeting

Markham Environmental Sustainability Fund

For more information, please contact the Clerk’s Department at 905-475-4744 or visit www.markham.ca.

The Markham Environmental Sustainability Fund (MESF) provides financial assistance to Markham Community Groups that promote environmental responsibility and innovation, and enhance the Town’s natural resources. Eligibility for project funding includes: Energy/water efficiency Climate change reduction Wildlife habitat restoration Cleanup activities Tree planting

Your project could be one of them! Apply today! For moreinformation, information, visit www.markham.ca. For an For more visit www.markham.ca. For an application form, application form,Environmental contact thePolicy Manager, Environmental contact the Manager, and Program Development 905-415-7502. at 905-415-7502. Policy and Program atDevelopement

Spring application deadline: February 18, 2011

February is Black History Month Seeking Nominations for Community Awards The Markham African Caribbean Association (MACA) is seeking nominations for Community Awards. The nominees must: • be of African heritage • have contributed to our community through their field of expertise • have brought honour to Markham • have been recognized beyond Markham. Award recipients will be honoured with a Certificate of Appreciation at a special ceremony by Markham Council in Council Chambers on Monday, February 28, 2011. Submission deadline Tuesday, February 15, 2011 at 5 p.m. Nomination forms available at Information Markham – Anthony Roman Centre (Markham Civic Centre), 101 Town Centre Blvd. (Hwy 7 & Warden). For more information, call MACA at 905-294-5033, fax 905-294-5033.

Join us for an evening of pure enchantment and beautiful music

ANGUS GLEN YOUTH CENTRE PRESENTS:

Free Games & Movie Night Friday, February 4, 2011 Games: 5:30 – 7p.m. • Movie: 7– 9 p.m. Ages: 8 – 14

Angus Glen C.C. – Youth Centre (3990 Major Mackenzie Drive East) Come out and enjoy a fun and supervised evening with other Markham youth! Games include table tennis, air hockey, foosball, and pool.

Feature Movie: Despicable Me Popcorn and light refreshments will be served. There is no need to pre-register. For more info, e-mail Nick Chung at NChung@markham.ca or call Susan Stiles at 905–477–7000 ext. 7120.

Sign up now for summer day camps in Markham. Pick up your flyer and registration form at any community centre or culture location or visit www.markham.ca

Enjoy wonderful music and songs from across the years - sung for you by this renowned York Region choir - with special guest soloist - Sarah Marie.


BY L.H. TIFFANY HSIEH

thsieh@yrmg.com

Three Markham council members were appointed to the PowerStream board of directors Tuesday. While Mayor Frank Scarpitti and Regional Councillor Jim Jones were reappointed, Ward 8 Councillor Alex Chiu was appointed to the board for the first time. A fourth independent director position was given to former Ward 6 councillor Dan Horchik, who was defeated in the regional councillors’ race at the Oct. 25 municipal election. Mr. Scarpitti said Mr. Horchik was appointed by council members because of his past experiences with the Ontario Energy Board and the PowerStream board as a director and chairperson of its audit and finance committee. The mayor said Mr. Horchik will fill the position until the end of June, after which an “open, transparent” process in search of a publicmember director would begin. He said Mr. Horchik will be able to apply then, too. The 13 PowerStream directors each receive a yearly stipend of $14,000, the vice-chairperson gets $15,000 and the chairperson $18,000.

Search continues for missing realtor Han Peel Regional Police continue to search for two men, including a Markham real estate agent, missing for a week. The probe began last Thursday after officers visited a luxury home on Featherston Drive in Mississauga while searching for HomeLife Landmark Realty Inc. real estate agent Jiangou “Tony”

Each member also receives $650 per meeting they attend. That’s at least four quarterly meetings plus special meetings as required throughout the year. In Vaughan, which co-owns PowerStream with Markham and Barrie, members appointed to the board include Mayor Maurizio Bevilacqua, regional councillors Deb Schulte, Gino Rosati and Michael Di Biase, Thornhill Councillor Alan Shefman and West Woodbridge Councillor Tony Carella, who is the only member to be reappointed after winning back his seat last October. In Barrie, new Mayor Jeff Lehman has been appointed, while Councillor Lynn Strachan and public member Ron Stevens were reappointed. Markham’s Mr. Chiu, who is also seeking appointment and election for the Federation of Canadian Municipalities board of directors this year, said six councillors from Markham council expressed interest in being appointed to the PowerStream board. He said he was honoured fellow councillors cast their votes for him. “I thought, after all these years, maybe I should be more involved,” Mr. Chiu said. “I got it at second ballot.” — With files from Caroline Grech

Han, 44. Mr. Han is a real estate agent with the Markham office of HomeLife Landmark Realty Inc. The $2.4-million home is listed for sale by Mr. Han, according to his blog. Mr. Han was travelling in a black four-door Mercedes Benz sedan, which was found Sunday near Don Mills Road and Lawrence Avenue in Toronto. Neither police, nor family, have heard from Mr. Han.

Peter J. Lewarne, Lawyer Family Law, Commercial Law, Notary Public Ext. 28 • peter@lewarnebarristers.com

Heather Ellis, Law Clerk

CARA CARA

ROASTING

CHICKEN ORANGES ¢ 99 WHAT’S FOR DINNER! There are oranges, and then there are Cara Cara oranges – and then there are these Cara Caras! Big, thin-skinned, sweet and juicy. It’s all good this week in /LB the land of oranges.

We’re going to feature our really large Air-Chilled Chickens. To start with, these chickens run loose in really large barns... but by definition these are not free-range because they have no access to the outdoors, not that they’d want it this time of the year anyway. They eat as much or as little as they want, usually a lot, of corn and grain. The air-chilled part refers to the de-feathering process, and after. Rather than using really hot water to remove the feathers and with them, the outside layers of skin, cooler water is used, which leaves the skin, and unfortunately the odd feather, with the bird... a bit of a trade-off really. Then they are left to chill-down in circulating air rather than an ice-bath. A lot of the flavour of poultry comes from the skin, partially explaining why the anemic white chickens you see are generally flavourless, and wet, from the ice-pack. Ours are dry and flavourful... and our guys usually get all the feathers before you do! These chickens average about 5lb in size, give or take, and will feed 6 people easily, and usually more. THIS WEEK Reg. $3.29 lb

THIS WEEK

There are a few choices this week, all beginning with our great chicken. We use soft-scald, air-chilled chicken, boneless breasts in this case. We poach them, slice them and serve them up in one of three amazing made from the beginning sauces, much like you’d do at home, if you had the time. The flavours available are Lemon, Orange and a fabulous Porcini Mushroom sauce. The portion size allows a regular serving for three or an % OFF abundant serving for two. THIS WEEK Reg. $18.95

1/3 OFF

S

25

AGE & ONION

SAUSAGES We’ve made these since we started in our little store in

PACIFIC SNAPPER

Markham so many years ago. Our thinking at the time was to make a sausage that tastes like our very popular stuffed pork loin, which uses my mother-in-law’s old-time bread stuffing. That’s the way we make this... and it tastes just as good, for sure. If you have a problem with garlic, this would be a good choice because it’s % OFF made without THIS it. WEEK Reg. $4.99lb

This snapper (or rockfish) has a delicate, nutty sweet flavour. The meat is lean and medium firm in texture with a fine flake. These are well-suited to baking rather than grilling, and will remain moist when cooked in this way. Recipes will be available as /LB THIS usual.

$

25

B

AKING

– THIS WEEK –

MUSHROOM This is made with fresh shiitakes, button mushrooms, sweet onions, some pureed veggies including potatoes, chicken stock, cream and ‘spices’. It’s one of my favourite soups, going back a long % way. OFF THIS Reg. $6.99/ container WEEK Serves 3-4

25

The theme of the week is ‘Black and White’ – this inspired by our now famous ‘black and white’ cakes. We’ll be making...

For all those who have been inquiring, Doreen is coming along splendidly and is looking forward to being back in action here real soon!

Oreo Cakes This is a chocolate cake with white icing and crushed Oreos between the three layers, dressed with mini Oreos, Oreo crumbs and white icing. This cake should appeal to the inner child in most of us, and real children too! We’ll be making two sizes. Reg. $14.95 and $22.95.

Chocolate Reverse Cookies

...WHAT ELSE

BSALAD O G DINNER? QUINOA

IS FOR

...

If you read the label on the Quinoa, you would find out that “whole grain Quinoa is the most nutritious of all grains. It’s high in fibre, a good source of iron, and has all eight essential amino acids, making it an excellent source of non-meat protein. It’s got a delicate nutty flavour that goes well with dried cranberries. But we don’t stop there. We add almonds, parsley and diced peppers, white onions, then dress it up in a brandied cranberry dressing. Since we don’t have an established retail, we’ll feature this at... /100g ~ and ~

$

1.29

THIS WEEK

We’ll be making Turkey and Rice Soup, but with a difference! We’ll be using smoked turkey – which will provide a whole new dimension. Apart from the turkey, there will be sweet onions, chicken stock, a whole bunch of veggies, the rice of course, and ‘spices’. OFF From the fresh counter. THIS WEEK Reg. $7.95/container

%

25

We’ll be making some Cheese Tortellini in a Carbonara Sauce. This sauce is amazing because it has chunks of our bacon in it, and when that’s warmed a bit, it’s at its best. This is available in the 4”x5” foils at the deli.

$

5.95each WHAT’S

BLOOMING! This week you’ll see loads of fresh and bright flowering plants, bulbs and bulb gardens that will help remind you that winter won’t last forever! This week, to celebrate the coming change of season we’re going to offer our tulip bulb pots for only $3.99! Enjoy them for several weeks while they bloom indoors, and in the spring you can plant them in your garden for years of future enjoyment. This weekend expect to see a nice selection of our little, stylized orchid arrangements. They are long-lasting and are perfect for brightening up any room of the house.

These are made with rich, dark, full bore chocolate and white chocolate chunks. Reg. $7.95 per container.

Black and White Cakes These are made with white and dark chocolate mousses layered together with white and chocolate cake. Topped with ganache and chocolate-dipped strawberries – and chocolate curls, too. Reg. $22.95

Brownies These are our now famous TripleChocolate Brownies, all drizzled with white chocolate. I am informed that soon we will have these in a flourless and gluten-free format – just so you know. Reg. $2.99 ea.

Chocolate Loaves These are rich, moist loaves baked with chocolate chunks inside and drizzled with white chocolate on the outside. Reg. $5.99

Flourless Chocolate Cake This is more of a flan that’s topped with a combo of whipped and sour cream. Reg. $12.95

%

25

All these items will be featured this week at P.S. Under develop- Off Our Regular Price ment are Biscotti in different flavours and styles, as well as a full range of Macarons.

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5, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

PowerStream gets new board members


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 6

EDITORIAL 905-294-2200 Fax: 905-294-1538 ADVERTISING 905-294-2200 Classified: 1-800-743-3353 Fax: 905-853-4626 DISTRIBUTION 905-294-8244

EDITORIAL Editor Bernie O’Neill boneill@yrmg.com

ADVERTISING Marketing Manager Mike Banville mbanville@yrmg.com

Advertising Manager Stephen Mathieu smathieu@yrmg.com

ADMINISTRATION Office Manager Melanie Lambier mlambier@yrmg.com

DISTRIBUTION Circulation Carrie MacFarlane cmacfarlane@yrmg.com

PRODUCTION Manager Jackie Smart jsmart@yrmg.com

INTERACTIVE MEDIA Marketing & Advertising Manager Dawna Andrews

O

Editor in Chief Debora Kelly

OPINION

MAR KHAM

ECONOMIST & SUN 9 Heritage Rd., Markham, Ont. L3P 1M3 www.yorkregion.com

Publisher Ian Proudfoot

Business Manager Robert Lazurko Director, Operations Barry Black

Director, Advertising, Distribution Nicole Fletcher Director, Regional Products, Classified, Today’s Homes Debra Weller

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Let’s tackle snow clearing problems head on Re: Task force to plow through windrow issue, Jan. 20. As the owner of a corner property, my home gets the lion’s share of the snow and ice from our street. The snowplow actually backs up repeatedly to clear the street around the corner — then piles the entire load at the foot of our driveway! Other neighbours have minimal windrow — ours is always quadruple the size and I believe all corner-house owners suffer this problem. We’ve been dealing with this for 17 years now, but it’s getting worse as we get older and health issues interfere with our ability to clear this. We bought a high-powered snowblower, but if the mountain at the bottom of our driveway freezes before we have a chance to get out there, the snowblower isn’t capable of putting a slight dent in it.

I know of other municipalities that attach a special gadget to their plows to clear each driveway as they clear the road. When it comes to Mayor Scarpitti’s concern about phone calls, why not simply be upfront about the fact that patience is needed because windrow clearing for everyone takes time and the town isn’t prepared to accept phone calls about it. Period. I’d rather have the service available than to not have it just because of a fear of getting too many phone calls. There would be no need to consider any alternate plan for windrow clearing if we could just aim at looking into a way of outfitting our present snowplows with a fixture that will clear windrows while plowing the roads. Let’s not allow this issue to get brushed under the floorboards.

DONNA MARRIN MARKHAM

dandrews@yrmg.com

Aflockalypse Now: Die-offs and the extinction crisis The Economist & Sun is published every Thursday and Saturday, and is part of the York Region Media Group, a division of the Metroland Media Group Ltd., a whollyowned subsidiary of Torstar Corporation. The Metroland family of newspapers is comprised of 100 community publications across Ontario. The York Region Media Group includes The Liberal, serving Richmond Hill and Thornhill, Vaughan Citizen, The Era (Newmarket), The Banner (Aurora), Stouffville Sun-Tribune, Georgina Advocate, North of the City, yorkregion.com and York Region Printing.

LETTERS POLICY All submissions must be less than 400 words and include a daytime telephone number, name and address. The Economist & Sun reserves the right to publish or not publish and to edit for clarity and space. Write: Letters to the Editor, The Economist & Sun, Markham, ON L3P 1M3 Email: boneill@yrmg.com Ontario Press Council Canadian Circulations Audit Board Member

O

n New Year’s Eve, 5,000 redwinged blackbirds dropped out of the sky in Beebe, Arkansas. Necropsies revealed no evidence of poisoning but did indicate the birds had suffered massive internal trauma. Days later, fisherman observed schools of fish floating belly up on Chesapeake Bay. In England, tens of thousands of dead crabs washed up on local beaches, and reports come in almost daily of penguins, turtles, and even dolphins dying unexpectedly in the wild. Are these events signs of the “aflockalypse”, as the media have dubbed the recent die-offs? The answer is yes. And no. Our inherent love and respect for the natural world compels us to take notice when animals die in large numbers, but observations going back more than a century suggest that the massmortality events of recent weeks aren’t as unusual as we might think, and they are often the result of natural causes, such as adverse weather, disease outbreaks, or stress associated with longdistance migration. In analyzing bird counts, journal records, and other observations dating back to the late 19th century, European researchers found frequent reports of deaths of birds in the hundreds and

David Suzuki with Faisal Moola thousands. One massive kill occurred in spring 1964, when an estimated 100,000 king eiders, representing nearly a tenth of the species’ western Canadian population, perished in the Beaufort Sea. These large, beautiful ducks starved when pools of open water among the sea-ice re-froze suddenly, preventing them from getting to the food in the water below. More recently, an estimated 40,000 individual birds from 45 different species were killed on April 8, 1993, when a tornado crossed their migration routes off the coast of Louisiana. While the sudden death of wildlife in great numbers is alarming, the unravelling of entire food webs is happening all around us and every day — but in a far

less obvious manner. With every patch of forest cut, wetland drained, or grassland paved, our ongoing destruction of wildlife habitat is leading to population declines, and even driving some species to extinction. According to the experts, more than 17,000 plants and animals are threatened with extinction because of human activity, mostly through habitat loss. This includes 12 per cent of all known birds, nearly a quarter of known mammals, and a third of known amphibians. Climate change is predicted to sharply increase the risk of species extinction within our own children’s lifetime. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 20 to 30 per cent of plant and animal species assessed will likely be at increased risk of extinction if global average temperatures continue to rise with escalating emissions of carbon pollution. This wildlife crisis has been described as a silent epidemic by scientists like famed Harvard entomologist E.O. Wilson, because it receives so little attention from governments. The David Suzuki Foundation recently released a study of government records showing that nearly half of all known wildlife species in British Columbia are at risk, including grizzly bears, caribou, and orca whales. Yet, B.C. has no endangered species law to protect its wildlife and habitat from logging, min-

ing, urban sprawl, and other human activity. Canada has a federal endangered species law, but the government is dragging its feet on implementing it. As a consequence, some wildlife populations, like the northern spotted owl in southwestern B.C., have declined precipitously under the watch of our politicians and are now on the verge of extinction in Canada. The unsettling events of recent weeks reveal the inherent vulnerability of wildlife to sudden and dramatic population declines, often as a result of natural causes. This is all the more reason to ensure we don’t exacerbate the challenges faced by wildlife in an increasingly busy world. We need to reduce the environmental stressors that we impose on wildlife, so that they can better cope with and survive the challenges they face every day. We need to eliminate dangerous pesticides and other toxic materials, protect the habitat of endangered plants and animals like caribou, and get serious about tackling climate change. It’s good that people are concerned about the recent animal die-offs, but if we really care about the future of wildlife, we need to start paying more attention to our own role in the extinction crisis — and urge our elected officials to take concrete steps to protect the biological richness with which our planet is blessed.


From page 1.

recent article titled “Too Asian?”. Mr. Li said he went out of his way before the holidays to purchase and supply council members with copies of the controversial November Maclean’s issue. He said he reached out to all members again last week, but two councillors have “personal reservations” about supporting his motion in that they strongly believe in freedom of the press, Mr. Li said. “They have a different view, they don’t think the article is offensive,” he added. “They say the article praises Asian students for being hard-working.” But Mr. Li questioned why the word “Asian” had to be used in the article. “My children, who are born in Canada, are going to be called Asian for the rest of their lives. Don’t they have the right to be called Canadians like everyone else?” he said, adding he fears the article may rekindle the “old wound” of the Chinese head tax about “children from the yellow race”. Mr. Li’s motion has garnered official support from the Chinese Canadian National Council and Civic Engagement Canada, an independent, non-partisan group of citizens based in Markham. As well, six deputations in favour

JOE LI: Rookie councillor condemns Maclean’s article. of the motion were heard Tuesday, including residents from Toronto. Albert Fong said the “Too Asian?” article is often compared to the CTV’s W5 program in 1979 called “Campus Giveaway”. “Both rely heavily on stereotyping in a university setting,” Mr. Fong said, adding CTV apologized 31 years ago. Nirmala Armstrong, who spoke as president of the Wismer Ratepayers Association, said Maclean’s adopted a “neoconservative style of journalism” with unidentified sources and no corroborative evidence or data.

“It’s important that we act today, because if we don’t, it implies that we agree with the article,” Ms Armstrong said. However, Mayor Frank Scarpitti and the majority of councillors opted to refer the motion to general committee in order for an “entire package” and a made-in-Markham motion to come forward. The mayor said he doesn’t think it goes far enough to just pass the motion like councils in Toronto, Victoria and Vancouver did. He made it clear that Markham council is “deeply concerned and upset” about the article, which “missed the opportunity to highlight diversity”, but said there has been a number of suggestions from councillors that he hasn’t heard. “I got a sense from councillors that there’s a willingness to do more,” Mr. Scarpitti said. “As Canada’s most diverse community, we have a greater responsibility.” Councillor Howard Shore said he liked what the mayor said and feels strongly there’s a broader issue at hand. He said he’s “personally sensitive” to what’s written in the article and hopes the town can involve students, teachers and the town’s race relations committee to accomplish something “real and tangible”. The referral didn’t sit well with the motion’s seconder, Mr. Chiu,

who argued it would simply prolong the process. “I don’t know what more we are trying to achieve — I’ve heard enough,” Mr. Chiu said. However, Mr. Li said instead of

showing division, he’d rather show leadership. “My gut feeling is that if I forced the vote, I would get it,” he said. “You never know. Maybe down the road, we need each other.”

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7, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Councillor’s motion garners support outside Markham


The Markham Economist & Sun, â–  www.yorkregion.com â–  Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 8

Markham Centre ‘superior site’: Campbell From page 1.

centre may have lost a triple gymnasium to Markham Centre — a motion he moved — but the library will still undergo an expansion, the existing family changing room will get fixed up and there will be a new addition of a senior/youth facility. The new Markham Centre location is a six-acre site. Total cost to the town to construct the facilities here is about $57 million, including land costs.

While the Milliken Mills option would have meant $300,000 in annual savings for the town, Commissioner Brenda Librecz said renovation of an existing building has risks and could run into delays. Earlier in general committee, Mayor Frank Scarpitti questioned if the $300,000 savings will be there in the end, saying there are other ways to save money. Councillor Howard Shore said he’s in favour of Markham Centre because the town has an obligation

and opportunity to show the rest of the world where Markham is. “It’s a much superior site,� echoed Councillor Colin Campbell. Meanwhile, Regional Councillor Jim Jones introduced a motion during the council meeting to ask the town for $51,000 to complete a concept for Canadian Sports Centre Ontario, an international training centre in Markham Centre. Mr. Jones said the concept is similar to that of the Pan Am aquat-

ic centre and Canadian Sport Institute Ontario complex Markham undertook as part of York’s failed bid for the 2014 Commonwealth Games and now proposed for the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus. “It’s time to bring it home,� Mr. Jones said. He said it’s not a new initiative, but one he’s been working on for a long time. “I’ve never given up,� he said. “I can’t quit until it’s over.�

ALEX CHIU: Milliken councillor votes in favour of Markham Centre location.

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9, The Markham Economist & Sun, â&#x2013;  www.yorkregion.com â&#x2013;  Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Rate hike about preserving system: mayor Mayor Frank Scarpitti says he may sound like a broken record, but the town needs to proactively preserve its water system â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at a cost of a proposed 10-per-cent water and wastewater rate increase to you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The good news is that we are making an investment ... I know I sound like a broken record,â&#x20AC;? Mr. Scarpitti said at Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s council meeting. The proposed rate increase translates to about $61.05 more per family this year and will kick in April 1, if approved. Mr. Scarpitti noted the increase rides on charges passed on from the City of Toronto and the Region of Peel, from where York purchases water. Markham owns and operates its water and wastewater system, but purchases water

supply and wastewater treatment from the region. The mayor said the proposed increase is a problem that concerns all members of council. In particular, Deputy Mayor Jack Heath said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concerned with the continuously increased rates of 9 to 12 per cent every year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a solution, but 10-per-cent (increase) forever is not acceptable,â&#x20AC;? Mr. Heath said. You can have your say about the proposed increase at a public meeting scheduled for Tuesday at 6:45 p.m. at the Markham Civic Centre. For more information, visit www. markham.ca.

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The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 10

THIS WEEK’S SMILE This Week’s Smile belongs to Cathy Horlick, who works in the early intervention program of Community and Health Services for the Region of York. Cathy’s is the first face families who have young children with special needs see when they visit the office. ‘Her happy face and lovely smile can cheer up anyone and the children respond to her with waves and hugs and ‘Hi Cathy’,’ writes Linda Rosner, who nominated her. ‘Seeing Cathy’s smile can lift your spirits.’ If you know someone with a winning smile and a winning way with the public, nominate them as our Smile of the Week by sending an e-mail to boneill@yrmg.com or call 905-294-2200, ext. 274. STAFF PHOTO/SJOERD WITTEVEEN


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11, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

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13, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 14

TOWN: Funding for special circumstance

Mayor hopes funding boost doesn’t open floodgates BY L.H. TIFFANY HSIEH

thsieh@yrmg.com

One community group will receive more money than originally allocated, but that doesn’t mean your group will, too, the mayor said. “If we proceed with the increase, I hope it’s not the case that others can come and ask for more,” Mayor Frank Scarpitti said. “I really don’t think we have the money to do that.” Town council voted in favour of giving the Markham African Caribbean Association, which puts on the town’s Black History Month celebrations, $1,000 more on the spot during Tuesday night’s council meeting. The motion, moved by Deputy Mayor Jack Heath, asks that the town give the association $3,000 instead of $2,000 it has been giving the event annually for the last decade or so. Mr. Heath’s motion came after the association’s vice-president, Pat Howell, made a deputation and informed councillors that it took $2,829.01 to put on the event last year. Ms Howell said her association has been picking up the extra costs and asked for con-

sideration of a grant increase. Budget chief Regional Councillor Gordon Landon said the budget committee has been under pressure to streamline the grants and is still looking at a 2- to 3-percent tax increase for the year. “I can’t promise you this year that I can increase your grant, but we will review it,” he said. Councillor Don Hamilton, who didn’t support the increase, reiterated his concern about the fixed pot — about $250,000 — being used up as more requests come forward. He asked if he should be advising the Unionville festival committee to come forward with their request now. “I’m just concerned we won’t have enough money,” Mr. Hamilton said. Last week, the town’s general committee approved the first batch of this year’s Celebrate Markham grants for Black History Month ($2,000), Chinese New Year Celebrations ($10,000) and the Tony Roman Hockey Tournament ($6,000) at previous year’s level of funding. The latter two events didn’t receive funding increase during the council meeting.

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MARKVILLE CELEBRATES • Chinese New Year Celebrations run Feb. 1 to 6 at Markville Shopping Centre. Celebrate the Year of the Rabbit on Feb. 6 at 1 p.m. Markville’s Centre Court will host a lion dance perforFeb. mance to the beat of festival drums, led by awardwinning Master Sammy Cheng. The lion is tradi7 to 8:30 p.m. tionally seen as a guardian creature and it —Angus Glen Library hosts a Chinese paint- is thought his ceremonial acrobatic dance will summon good luck and fortune to all. ing and calligraphy Feb. Also, during the New Year, the colour red demonstration, a symbolizes good luck. Pick up your lucky Fashion/QiPao show, red envelope at guest services from Feb. 1 Korean New Year rituto 6. Guest Services is on the lower level als, prize drawing, folk behind Roots, next to Entrance No. 10. dancing and riddles Feb. 5, 2 to 3:30 p.m. MAYOR’S DINNER —Join students from Milliken Mills High • The Markham MayFeb. School to celebrate with various fun activities. Learn about interesting aspects of Chi- or’s dinner is Feb. nese culture. The activities include: Trying on 17 in honour of traditional costumes and having your photos Chinese Valentine’s taken, learning to make festive lanterns and Day. It will be at The Markham Event working on riddles. The Chinese New Year Celebration Series is planned and carried out Centre at 95 Duffield Dr. in the Kennedy in partnership with the Centre for Information Road and 14th Avenue area. and Community Services, Catholic Community Services of York Region and Milliken — Send your community events to Simone Mills High School Newcomer’s Club through Joseph at sjoseph@yrmg.com

Keeping you in touch with what’s going on in Markham Music Competition), who will be playing An Lun’s Chinese Rhapsody No. 5. You can also take in the soothing Xiao Min hymns performed by Vocal Horizons and Alata Harmonia Chorus, arranged for choir and orchestra by An Lun Huang. Enjoy the inspiration of a CHORAL CELEBRATION peasant farmer who composed more than The Vocal Horizons Chamber Choir celebrates 1,000 hymns. Chinese New Year with a performance at the Markham Baptist Church is at 9580 WoodMarkham Baptist Church Jan. 29 at 7:30 bine Ave. Go to the Vocal Horizons website p.m. This celebration at www.vocalhorizons.com where tickets are Jan. will feature emotional available for $20. works by An Lun Huang and Kevin Lau, OTHER CELEBRATIONS performed by Sneak • The Markham Public Library hosts a New Peek Orchestra. The Year Celebration Series. It’s a collection of music of these Chinese Canadians will take the audience on a special events featuring Chinese culture, trajourney from east to west by playing eastern dition and arts: musical styles on western instruments. Expe- —The Unionville Library hosts story time rience violinist Bin Huang (winner of the sil- and a paper cutting demonstration and ver medal in the Prague Spring International instruction by artist Grace Long Jan. 27 from children carrying lanterns in a parade. Markham is home to plenty of Chinese New Year celebrations. Here is a selection of events:

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15, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

GUNG HEY FAT CHOY The Chinese New Year is just around the corner. This year, it falls on Feb. 3 and will ring in the Year of the Rabbit. However, preparations for the new year begin well before. By New Year’s Eve, people celebrating the new year will often have cleaned their homes to dispose of everything associated with the old year and paid Feb. debts and settled differences with loved ones, friends and acquaintances. Those celebrating often buy red money envelopes, oranges and/or tangerines, flowers, a new set of clothes and shoes for children. They place money into red envelopes, called a lee see or lucky money envelope. On New Year’s Eve, people often gather with close family members, pay respect to ancestors and household gods and open every door and window in their homes at midnight to let go of the old year. On New Year’s Day, people decorate their homes with symbols of good fortune, such as items that are bright red representing happiness or gold or orange, symbolizing wealth and happiness. On New Year’s Day, you are supposed to greet others by saying “Gung Hey Fat Choy” which means “Wishing You Prosperity and Wealth”. The new year ends on the full moon 15 days later. The 15th day of the new year is called the Lantern Festival, which is celebrated at night with lantern displays and


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235-375ml

lb 4.37kg

Fresh, Wild Caught

SAVE UP TO 1/2 PRICE

1 • Antibiotic Free • Hormone Free • No Animal By-Products • Certified Organic Feed

Microwave Popcorn

1/2 PRICE

3’s or 4’s

98

Certified Organic Lean Ground Beef

• Antibiotic Free • Hormone Free • No Animal By-Products

98

500g

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Beretta Farms

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48

Crofters Organic or Waterbridge

454g

Beretta Ranch, Naturally Raised

lb 10.98kg

Janes

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Jordans Organic 100% Whole Grain Rolled Oats

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DF GE O

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Boneless Stewing Beef Cubes

Only 1 in 4 Angus cattle meets the highest standards to become the Certified Angus Beef brand, making it Angus beef at its best

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Oasis 100% Pure

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lb 7.34kg

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AY

Only 1 in 4 Angus cattle meets the highest standards to become the Certified Angus Beef brand, making it Angus beef at its best

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lb 2.16kg

Mixed Veggie Stir Fry

Extra Large Mangoes

Planters

D

Beef Leg Cutlets

98

Fresh, Cut Daily

Fresh from South America Sweet’N Juicy Each

3

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A

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lb 2.16kg

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lb 8.77kg

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lb 7.34/kg

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Aged for 28 Days, Cut from Certified Angus Beef

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The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 16

1

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17, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Product of South America Sweet

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WINNER

JOSEPH’S PICK OF THE WEEK


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 18

8 bands ready to battle in Markham Youth bands from across York Region auditioned to compete in the second annual Battle of the Bands at the Markham Theatre for Performing Arts. Eight talented groups were selected, including Crisis Sanford, Commonwealth, Kennedy Clarke, My Texas Funeral, Sykopath, The Nobel Truths, Trading Hearts, and Radio Genocide. The competition will take place Feb. 5 from 6 to 10 p.m. The grand prize to be awarded to the winning band is $1,000 as well as a 12-hour Epik Productions studio recording package. Scoring the bands based on creativity, audience involvement, talent, and overall impression will be celebrity judges Joanne Wilder

and Al Joynes of Q107 FM Classic Rock. Also present will be Stacey Englehart, onair host at Z103 and 88.5 The Jewell, who will emcee the event. Pyramid Theorem was the champion of the first Battle of the Bands and will give a special guest performance. Since their success last year, they have progressed in the music industry and plan to release their first full length album sometime this year. Funds raised at the event will be donated to Bereaved Families York Region, a registered charity which supports youth bereavement programs. Tickets can be purchased for $15 by emailing bfoyr_info@bellnet.ca or by calling 905-989-6265 or 1-800-969-6904.

Pyramid Theorem is one of the eight groups competing in the Battle of the Bands at Markham Theatre.

WISHING WELL

Made with lean ground beef!

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While you were cursing the bitter cold on the weekend, the folks at Markham’s old-fashioned outdoor ice rink, Cedarena, were asking people for colder thoughts. After a delay in opening due to not-cold-enough temperatures, Cedarena is at last scheduled to open for public skating at 7:30 p.m. tonight. Located on the banks of the Rouge River at 7373 Reesor Rd. north of Steeles Avenue, Cedarena is operated by the Cedar Grove

Community Club and is open to the public for skating and ice rentals. Admission prices are $5 for adults 16 years and older and $2.50 for children 15 and under. Hours of operation are Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 7:30 to 10 p.m., Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. and adults only on Tuesday from 7:30 to 10 p.m. The rink has the following events planned in February: Feb. 1, 7:30 to 10 p.m.: Cedare-

na’s 84th annual birthday skating party. For adults 18 years and older only. Admission is $7 per person. Feb. 14, 7:30 to 10 p.m.: Valentine’s Day public skate. Feb. 20, 7:30 to 10 p.m.: a special late Sunday night skate. Feb. 21, 1 to 4 p.m.: Family Day public skate. Cedarena doesn’t rent skates so make sure you bring your own. For more information, call 905294-0038 or visit www.cedarena.ca — L.H. Tiffany Hsieh

More charges have been laid this week against grocery stores for opening during the recent holidays. Foody Mart and First Choice Supermarket have been charged with violations of the Retail Holiday Business Act that prohibits opening on New Year’s Day, York

police confirmed. Foody Mart, at McCowan Road and Hwy. 7 was earlier charged for opening on Christmas Day. Representatives for Foody Mart will appear in court Feb. 18. First Choice, on Kennedy Road, will be in court Feb. 25. — L.H. Tiffany Hsieh

Community and International Education Services &RQWLQXLQJ(GXFDWLRQ

Night School, General Interest, English as a Second Language, Beginner Driver Education, Adult Day School, Personal Support Worker, Virtual Schooling

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Online registration begins Monday, January 24, 2011 – Register early to avoid disappointment. Walk-in registration February 16 from 6:30 - 8:00 p.m. at the schools offering the courses.

Night School – classes begin the week of February 7, 2011 at:

Classes start the week of February 28, 2011, at: • • • • •

Alexander Mackenzie High School, 300 Major Mackenzie Dr W, Richmond Hill Dr. G.W. Williams Secondary School, 39 Dunning Ave, Aurora Huron Heights Secondary School, 40 Huron Heights Drive, Newmarket Keswick High School, 100 Biscayne Blvd, Keswick Unionville High School, 201 Town Centre Blvd, Unionville The complete Program Guide is available online at www.yrdsb.edu.on.ca/coned

DAY SCHOOL CREDIT COURSES

FOR

ADULTS

Dr. Bette Stephenson Centre for Learning, 36 Regatta Avenue, Richmond Hill L4E 4R1 Information / Registration Dates Quad Dates

February 3 - April 19

Registration for new students 21 & over

January 21 - February 7 excluding January 26 & February 3

Registration for new students 18-20

January 27 - February 7 excluding February 3

Registration Times: 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. On February 2 Only 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. What if English is not My First Language? You must make an appointment at the School for an English language assessment. The cost of the assessment is $30.00. Pre-registration is necessary. What Documents are needed for Registration? See details online.

• Bayview Secondary School, 10077 Bayview Ave, Richmond Hill • Maple High School, 50 Springside Road, Maple • Milliken Mills High School, 7522 Kennedy Road, Unionville • Sir William Mulock High School, 705 Columbus Way, Newmarket See details online.

PERSONAL SUPPORT WORKER PROGRAM

Graduates find employment in homes for the aged, retirement and nursing homes, private and group homes, and community agencies. Information / Registration Dates January 25

1:00 p.m. or 6:00 p.m.

Dr. Bette Stephenson Centre for Learning 36 Regatta Avenue, Richmond Hill

January 31 Georgina Trades Training Inc. or 6:00 p.m. 5209 Baseline Rd., Sutton West February 9 Full time and part time classes are available. You must pass an English Comprehension Test, which will take place at registration. What Documents are needed for Registration? See details online. Adult English as a Second International Education Language – Day and Night classes Programs www.yrlc.on.ca 905-731-9557 Beginner Driver Education International Languages 905-884-3434 / 1-877-280-8180 Elementary and Secondary 905-731-2997 Ext. 301 Citizenship classes 905-731-9557 Prior Learning Assessment and LINC – Language Instruction for Recognition Newcomers to Canada 905-884-2046 905-731-2997 Ext. 341 Literacy and Basic Skills Virtual Schooling 905-731-9557 Ext 307 www.virtualschooling.yrdsb.edu.on.ca

www.yrdsb.edu.on.ca/coned For more information call (905) 884-3434

19, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Cedarena set to open tonight More charges for grocers over holiday openings


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 20

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Story and photos by Jim Robinson Metroland Media Carguide Magazine

Lexus thinks it’s got a grip on what Canadian consumers want with the 2011 IS 350 AWD (allwheel-drive). Canadians are increasingly opting for AWD, partly because of our changing climate, but also for the sense of security that comes with knowing there are four tires with traction, not just two.

The IS 350 AWD is a new model for 2011 and joins the IS 250 rear drive, IS 250 AWD, and IS 350 rear drive. The IS 350 AWD pricing starts at $44,950. A 2.5-litre DOHC V6 producing 204 hp and 185 lb/ft of torque powers the IS 250. The IS 350 gets a 3.5-litre DOHC V6 making 306 hp and 277 lb/ft of torque. The IS 250 rear drive comes with either a six-speed manual or a sixspeed automatic transmission Please turn to page 23

WHEELS ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Lexus IS 350 AWD: luxury no matter what the weather

New for 2011 is the all-wheel-drive (AWD) version of the Lexus IS 350. Visual changes for 2011 include a revised grille and the inclusion of HID headlights with LED daytime running lights.

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21, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■

OT Deals. . .

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The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ WHEELS ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 22

Ward’s top 10 engines announced for 2011 Metroland Media Carguide Magazine

Ward’s 10 Best Engines, North America’s only award program honoring excellence in vehicle powertrains, have been announced for 2011. The list suggests the hype surrounding two electric- propulsion systems making headlines across North America is well deserved. Both the Nissan Leaf electric vehicle and Chevrolet Volt extended-range EV earn their way onto the 2011 list, as selected by Ward’s editors after evaluating 38 vehicles with new or significantly improved engines for the ‘11 model year. But fuel efficiency and environmental friendliness are not the most important criteria for eligibility this year, as seen by recognition of the new 5.0L V8 in the Ford Mustang GT, 5.0L V8 in the Hyundai Genesis and the 3.0L supercharged V6 in the Audi S4. This year’s winners and the applications tested:

• 3.0L TFSI Supercharged DOHC V6 (Audi S4) • 3.0L N55 Turbocharged DOHC I-6 (BMW 335i) • 1.6L Turbocharged DOHC I-4 (Mini Cooper S) • 3.6L Pentastar DOHC V6 (Dodge Avenger) • 5.0L DOHC V8 (Ford Mustang GT) • 1.4L DOHC I-4/111kW Drive Motor (Chevrolet Volt) • 5.0L Tau DOHC V8 (Hyundai Genesis) • 80kW AC Synchronous Electric Motor (Nissan Leaf) • 2.0L DOHC I-4 Turbodiesel (Volkswagen Jetta TDI) • 3.0L Turbocharged DOHC I-6 (Volvo S60) Now in its 17th year, the Ward’s 10 Best Engines competition is designed to recognize powertrains that set new benchmarks in their respective vehicle segments. To be eligible for the competition, each engine must be available in a regular-production U.S.specification model on sale no later than firstquarter 2011, in a vehicle priced no more than (US)$55,000, a price cap indexed to the average cost of a new vehicle.

WINTER SERVICE SPECIAL RECEIVE FREE INCLUDES: • Lube, Oil & Filter • Tire Rotation • Brake Inspection • 15-pt. Inspection

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Must present coupon for offers. Applies to most GM vehicles. Includes up to 5L of 5W30 GM approved oil. Offer on select wiper blades. Fits most vehicles. While supplies last. Offer expires Feb 28/11

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The interior of the 2011 Lexus IS 350 AWD is fully leather trimmed. Note the paddle shifters that can be used for sequential manual shifting.

2004 CHEVROLET IMPALA V6, AUTO, A/C, PWR WINDOW & LOCKS, ALLOYS, SPOILER, CLEAN CAR, OPTIMUM WARRANTY, STK# P4820

2009 FORD FOCUS SEDAN 4 DOOR, AUTO, A/C, PWR WINDOW & LOCKS, CD, BALANCE OF FACTORY WARRANTY, PREVIOUS RENTAL, 43,785KM, STK# P4816

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2009 PONTIAC MONTANA 7 PASS, V6, AUTO, A/C, PWR WINDOW & LOCKS, TILT WHEEL, CRUISE, ABS, STABILITY CONTROL, REMOTE START, BALANCE OF WARRANTY, 53,145KM STK #P4794A

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A 3.5-litre DOHC V6 producing 306 hp and 277 lb/ft of torque through a six-speed automatic transmission provides power for the IS 350 AWD.

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2006 CHEVROLET HHR AUTO, A/C, PWR WINDOW & LOCKS, CD, ALLOYS, MOON ROOF, 47,895KM STK# P4793

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SALE PRICES ARE PLUS APPLICABLE TAX,BI WEEKLY PAYMENTS ARE WITH ZERO DOWN PAYMENT ON APPROVED CREDIT,COST OF BORROWING - $10,000 OVER 60 MONTHS AT 7.9% INTEREST IS $2,151.20. LICENCE EXTRA. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS

• Manufacturer’s warranty • 30-day 2500 km no-hassle exchange privilege • 150+ point inspection • 24-hour roadside assistance • $500 student rebate for qualified buyers The trunk of the 2011 Lexus IS 350 has 378 litres (13.3 cu ft) of cargo space.

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WHEELS ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

while the other three models are all equipped with a six-speed automatic. The IS 350 AWD as tested gets 11.4/7.8/9.8L/100 km city/highway/combined. Both AWD models come standard with Lexus’ Vehicle Dynamics Integrated Management (VDIM) system which combines all current driver aids such as stability control, traction control, antilock brakes, electronic brake force distribution into one system. Styling has been revised on all four models with a new front grille and fog lamps while the rear gets new taillights and a different exhaust pipe design. All models are sold with a long list of standard features like dual zone climate control, driver and front passenger knee airbags, the Lexus Premium Sound System with 13 speakers and smart access entry with push button start. The IS 350 AWD as tested gets a bevy of extras like heated leather front seats including eightway power adjust for the driver, leather trim throughout, front headlight washers and HID headlights with LED daytime running lights. But of course the big standard feature is the AWD system with 30/70, front/rear torque split. On a wet and windy day with low cloud, I took the IS 350 AWD for a spin on cottage country roads and as expected, I could not tell where the torque was going. Suffice it to say this is what you want an AWD system to do, be transparent and get the job done. The very handsome gated shifter includes a slot for sequential manual shifting. This can be done by nudging the shifter lever or using the steering wheel mounted paddle shifters. I tried it out on narrow and slick cottage roads and, while not a big fan of paddle shifters; gear engagement up or down was near instantaneous. Later on a major highway heading back south, the Lexus felt like well, a Lexus, with great feedback through the steering wheel. By its very nature, AWD tends to give a sensation through the wheel of being numb on centre. There was some of it on the Lexus but not much. There are a lot of little detail things that are pleasing. An example is how the tweeter enclosures of the premium sound system are integrated into the A-pillar. I also tried the back seat. With the front seat all the way back, I found it tight at the knees but getting in and out was not a problem. As might be expected, the quality and finish of the paint was about as good as it gets. With the 2011 IS 350 AWD, Lexus is making it possible for more luxury car buyers to enjoy their car no matter what the weather or the season.

CHEVROLET • BUICK • GMC

23, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■

Lexus AWD system works seamlessly to improve traction


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ WHEELS ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 24


The all-new 2012 Ford Focus is the first beneficiary of a new class-exclusive Ford technology that employs downhill skiing and snowboarding moves to increase vehicle stability in turns. Engineered to increase novice driver confidence by adding a finer sense of control in curves, the next-generation Focus will please enthusiast drivers as well with the addition of a vehicle stability control system previously reserved for premium sports cars. Just as a downhill skier or board rider shifts weight to their outside edge in transition from schuss to edge – adding balance and stability to carve through a turn – torque vectoring control provides slight braking force to the wheel and the tire that is subject to potential slippage to help the driver and vehicle gracefully negotiate the curve. The slight braking pressure applied to just one driven wheel is imperceptible to the driver. The behind-the-wheel experience is an improved sense of stability and control throughout the curve. This increased vehicle stability in cornering situations is sure to please enthusiast drivers yet serves as a confidence builder for novice drivers as well. Torque vectoring control uses the Focus braking system to imitate the effect of limited-slip differential, constantly balancing the distribution of engine output between the driven front wheels to suit driving conditions and road surface. When accelerating through a tight corner, the system applies an imperceptible degree of braking to the inside front wheel, so that more engine torque goes to the outside wheel, providing additional traction, better grip and improved vehicle handling. The all-new 2012 Ford Focus goes on sale in early 2011.

WHEELS ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Metroland Media Carguide Magazine

25, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■

New technology helps Focus ‘carve’ through turns


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 26

Three renowned dance troupes — Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal, Nrityagram Dance Ensemble and Paul Taylor Dance Ensemble – will perform at Markham Theatre.

You don't have to be on the street! Are you 15-19 years old and need a place to stay while you sort things out? Contact us at Pathways at (905) 471-7877

With Osteoporosis Call 1-800-463-6842 a fractured hip could for more information be a life sentence.This message brought to you as a community service of The Markham Economist & Sun

This message brought to you as a community service of The Markham Economist & Sun

PLEASE RECYCLE

Dance troupes kick off new year The Markham Theatre rings in the New Year with a dance presentation featuring a trio of internationally acclaimed ensembles ranging in style from an eclectic mix of modern ballet, contemporary jazz to classical Indian dance. The Fabulous Footwork Series begins with a performance by Canada’s own Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal tomorrow followed by India’s acclaimed Nrityagram For tickets to tomorrow night’s Dance Ensemble show, call 905-305-SHOW (7469) March 24 and concludes with a perfor- Box Office Hours: Mon to Sat. 11 mance by celebrated a.m. to 6 p.m. New York based Paul Taylor Dance Ensem- www.markhamtheatre.ca ble April 28. Established on the international dance scene, Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal continues to evolve with the vitality and openness that have been the company’s hallmark since its inception in 1972. Called funky, hot and charmingly innocent, this Canadian troupe wows audiences with an up-tempo, innovative and contemporary program that pays homage to its jazz roots as well as the dancers’ rigorous classical training. The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble is much more than a dance company. At Nrityagram, dance is a way of life. The founder, Protima Gauri — an exquisite Odissi dancer herself — converted ten acres of farmland into an ideal setting for the study, practice and teaching of classical dance. Nrityagram Dance Ensemble blends Odissi, a classical Indian dance form, with contemporary concepts to transport audiences to enchanted worlds of magic and spirituality. Now in its 55th year, The New York Times calls Paul Taylor Dance Company, “One of the most exciting, innovative, and delightful dance companies in the entire world. Highly respected and sought-after, the company made its debut when founder, dance maker Paul Taylor first presented his choreography with five other dancers in Manhattan on May 30, 1954. That modest performance marked the beginning of a half century of unrivaled creativity, and in the decades that followed, Paul Taylor became a cultural icon and one of history’s most celebrated artists, hailed as part of the pantheon that created American modern dance”. Subscriptions for the dance series can be purchased with a Create Your Own Entertainment Package which offers patrons up to 25 per cent off the regular single ticket prices. Markham Theatre offers value priced tickets for students. The EYE GO to the Arts program aimed at high school students offers $5 tickets, while college and university students can purchase UGO tickets for $20.

NEED MORE?


BY JOHN CUDMORE

jcudmore@yrmg.com

For Vanessa Crone and partner Paul Poirier, it was an opportunity to step into the void left the the king and queen of Canadian ice dancing. They did not disappoint. Nor did they fail to deliver the goods, capturing their first Canadian title with a clutch performance in the freeskate program at the 2011 BMO Canadian figure skating championships Sunday in Victoria, B.C. With Olympics and three-time Canadian champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir sidelined and not competing in the event, the door was open for last year’s Canadian runners-up to move up a step on the podium. Crone, a former Aurora resident and Aurora Skating Club member, and Poirier of Unionville, took a miniscule advantage into the final day of the two-skate competition ahead of Kailtlyn Weaver and Andrew Poje. And once again, the York Region couple edged past their rivals by scoring 98.41 for an overall 164.21 score. Weaver and Poje, who will accompany Crone and Poirier to the world championships in Tokyo thanks to the second-place finish, earned an overall score of 163.18. They scored 97.54 with their freestyle program. “We just focused on ourselves and didn’t get caught up in it all,” Crone told CBC-TV following their win. “We stayed with our plan.” Skating last and with the title within grasp, the couple showed no sign of nerves as they delivered a winner with the their Eleanor Rigby program. “We’re very confident with our program,” Poirier said. “We’ve had success all season and kept going back to that.” Crone and Poirier won gold earlier this season at Skate Canada and followed that result with a silver at Skate America and a third-place finish at the Grand Prix championships in Beijing.

BASKETBALL MARKHAM UNIONVILLE MINOR BASKETBALL ASSOC. Major bantam girls Bradford Tournament, Jan. 22-23 Kanata 49 vs. MUMBA 34 (Caitlin Hebert 10); MUMBA 35 vs. Collingwood 24 (Hannah Taylor 12); MUMBA 63 (Sarah Brough 11) vs. Max Academy (Newfoundland) 25; Quarter-final: Nepean 35 vs. MUMBA 14 (Maeve Furlong 4).

HOCKEY MARKHAM WAXERS Novice AA JAN. 22: Markham 5, (Carter Loney 2, Carson Sabo, James Marrin, Jacob Ardagh. Shutout by Joseph Solarino) vs. Aurora 0. Peewee AA First round, best-of-five OMHA playoffs Game Three JAN. 20: Waxers 4 (Thomas Ingram, Chase Harrison, David Matheson, Harrison Ahn) vs. Newmarket 3. Game Four JAN. 21: Waxers 4 (Ben Baker, Thomas Ingram, Harrison Chase, Scotty Wyatt) vs. Newmarket 2. Game Five Jan. 23: Waxers 4 (Myles Ambrozic 2, Harrison Ahn, Chris Christidis) vs. Newmarket 2. Waxers win series. Minor Atom AAA JAN. 22: Waxers 4 (Austin Brimmer 2, Michael Palandra, Cole Burtch) vs. Ajax Pickering 2. JAN. 23: Markham 4 (Ben Reeves, Christos Rodis, Thomas Munro and Cole Burtch) vs. Barrie 2.

UNIONVILLE JETS Mite Select JAN 22: Richmond Hill 6 vs. Unionville 2 (Adam Izumi 2). Minor Atom Select JAN 21: Unionville 0 vs. Leaside 0. JAN 23: Unionville 12 (Jack Ducheck 4, Erik Siksna 4, Chris Middleton 2, Brendan Pence, Andres Varela) vs. York Mills Blue 0.

UNIONVILLE MINOR HOCKEY ASSOC. House league Novice JAN. 22: Vipe Vipers 4 (Ronan Sumi, Scott Kozak, Ronan Sumi, Ewen Crawford) VS. Kids Kitchen 3 (Nicholas Chu, Nicholas Chu, Ariz Lalani); End to End 0 (Shutout Carmen Marrelli) vs. Puroclean 0 (Shutout Alexander Petti).

Aurora’s Vanessa Crone and Unionville’s Paul Poirier captured the 2011 BMO Canadian Figure Skating ice dance title in Victoria, B.C., last weekend.

Bantam JAN. 22: Etc 2 (Matthew Wong, Austin Jones) vs Prestige Trophy 1 (Joshua Sofer); Mazda 5 (Thomas Lex 3, Kyle McKay, Reid Bethell) vs AASTRA 4 (Quentin Chin, Michael Rieck, Charlie Billings, Robert Bahensky); Cutting Edge 6 (Matthew Zielonko 3, Comrie Ward, Jeremy Koch, Christopher Chow) vs Fineline 5 (Alex McIlymoyle, Jesse Tocchet, Nickolas Christidis, Arthur Wong 2); Pickle Barrel 6 (Mario Berardi 3, Michael Armes, Calvin Wong, Lucas Morra) vs. Cofax 4 (David Tepelenas 3, Stavros Lefas).

27, The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Ice dancers strike gold

SPORTSBOARD

E-MAIL: mhayakawa@yrmg.com


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 28

Waxer AE team wins Robinson tourney The Markham Waxers minor peewee AE hockey team brought home the tournament trophy from last weekend’s Amesbury Bert Robinson Tournament. The Waxers had a perfect record in round robin play with wins over Oakville, North York and Brampton. The team earned a trip to the championship game in a rematch

with the Oakville Hound Dogs, with a team effort leading to a 3-1 win. The team includes Gian Luca Alaimo, Joseph Bigioni, Carter Collins, Wyatt Dobson, Dawson Elliott, Jonathan Henriques, Kiro Kirovski, Nicholas Kotsopoulos, Imran Lalani, Dillon Lee, Cole McCarthy, Cameron Murray, Alexi Payant, Jordan Quan, Neel Sheth, Jonathon Vander Zee and Adrian Volpe.

We are YOUR Community Soccer Club

As a dedicated community-minded club, we provide youth and adult soccer programs for boys and girls U3-U18, men and women. OPEN REGISTRATION FOR OUR YOUTH HOUSE LEAGUE IS THIS SATURDAY, JANUARY 29th FROM 10AM-1PM @ Mount Joy Indoor Soccer Centre

ALL STAR

What Makes for a Good Church?

Hebrews 10:25,26 says it well – “Assembling ourselves together, let us consider how to stimulate one another to love and good deeds… encouraging one another; and all the more as you see the day (of the Saviour’s return) drawing near.”

There are many verses in the New Testament that include the phrase “one another,” describing true ministry and fellowship. Jesus instructed us to “love one another” just as He loves us because this would identify us as His disciples (John 13:34,35). The Apostle Paul indicated that in a true church its members would “be devoted” to praying for and caring for each other, compassionately bearing one another’s burdens. For example, see Romans 12:5-15; Galatians 6:2; Ephesians 4:32; and I Peter 3:8. The result is the kind of fellowship that anyone would delight

to be part of, sharing joy in times of blessing and empathy in times of trial. (See: Rom.12:5-15; Gal.6:2; Eph.4:32; and I Pet.3:8) Is there a way to have these characteristics in the church we attend? The answer is “yes” since each of us can be a source of practicing these qualities. And this will be pleasing to God and an encouragement to others. - Paul Fawcett

A warm invitation to

St. Philip’s on-the-hill Anglican Church

Jan 30 11:00am Jan.7 26 7:00pm 7:30pm Feb

Fellowship Luncheon Pace of Grace Speaker Series – “ASeminars New Canadian Veteran of the Afghanistan War Speaks” with Dr. Niles Master Corporal Winnick, of the Own Rifl es. ALL WELCOME Jan. 30 12:15pm Queen’s Free Organ Recital: Wed & Sat Kumon Math & Reading School Dan Amorim, Guest Organist 905.415.8666 Mon - Fri AM St. Andrew’s Playschool 905.472.1996

9400 Kennedy Road (just north of 16th Ave.) Unionville 905.477.1991

January 30

32 Main St. Markham Rev. Dr. John Niles

8:15 a.m. Quiet Service of Holy Communion

905-294-0351

standrewsmarkham.com

Truth Tabernacle Pentecostal Church

717 Highglen Ave (at Markham Road) Sundays: 10:30am - Sunday School (all ages) 11:30am - Divine Worship 7:00pm - Evening Praise

www.truthtab.ca • 905.201.1400

GRACE

The Scriptures are quite clear as to what should characterize a local church. It’s not the beauty of the building or the sanctity of the auditorium. Instead the Biblical emphasis is on the quality of the teaching (Col.3:16) and the fellowship of its people (I Jn.1:7).

GRACE ANGLICAN CHURCH 19 Parkway Ave., Markham

905·294·3184

www.graceanglican.ca The Rev. Canon John A. Read

SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP 8:15 Holy Eucharist 9:15 Eucharist in the Round 10:15 Parish Eucharist with childrenʼs program & nursery

10:30 a.m. Sung Eucharist Growing Children’s Program Infants – Seedlings – Kornerstone Kids & Fusion (Students in Grades 6-8) during the 10:30 a.m. service

Grow in Faith and Share our Hope in Christ


29, The Markham Economist & Sun, www.yorkregion.com Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

Ashgrove Spa is hiring

Part-Time Receptionist & Esthetician Please call (905)201-0343 or email: info@ashgrove spa.com

Paslode is a leading manufacturer and supplier of specialty fasteners and tools to the construction & industrial sector. We have the following full-time position available in our Markham nail manufacturing facility: INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE Duties: Maintain, service and troubleshoot high speed production equipment that produces nails for our tool products. Perform service & quality checks on plant and production equipment. Requirements: Post secondary training in a recognized industrial maintenance program, along with at least 2 years Industrial/Plant Experience. Strong communication skills, ability to work in a team environment and availability for shift work. Join an industry leader that offers a comprehensive salary & benefits package. Please forward your resume to: E-mail: hrapply@itwconstruction.ca Fax: 905-471-7208 We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

N.E. Scarborough Warehouse seeking reliable Warehouse Shipper and Silk Screener. Spoken and Written English is essential. Fax resume to 416-297-0109.

F/T RECEPTIONIST,

toy company. Ideally bilingual Eng/Fr. Professional telephone manner. Word/Excel. Woodbine/14th Ave. Send resumes to: staffing@ borgfeldt.ca

Data Operators Require keyboarding & computer skills. 8,000+K/S. Must be able to work at a fast pace. English skills required. Hwy 7 & Warden Ave. Please fax to: 905-475-2227, or e-mail: cindy@ajddataservices.com

Don't forget

EXPERIENCED BOOKKEEPER CA requires experienced bookkeeper, full-time/part-time for a variety of clients. Must be proficient in Simply Accounting. Must have excellent communication skills and must be fluent in English. Contact: Joe @ 416-665-9112

Remember

your online presence. to include your web address.


The Markham Economist & Sun, www.yorkregion.com Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 30

162

Since 1899, Miele has remained a family owned appliance business, designing and manufacturing high quality residential and professional appliances. Miele entered the Canadian market in 1988 and has been on a steady path of growth ever since. Miele is proud to be recognized in the top 15 Best Small & Medium Employers in Canada both in 2009 and 2010. Miele was also named one of the Best Employers in the Greater Toronto Area 2010 by the Toronto Star. We presently require the following:

Part-Time Merchandiser/ Brand Ambassador Toronto, Montreal, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver

Work/ Life Balance! This position is perfect for the business professional who only wants to work 25 to 30 hours per week! Miele Ambassadors will be assigned specific territories responsible for supporting our sales team to achieve company objectives. Travelling to our Agent locations and 'wearing different hats', Ambassadors will assist with product information, training, merchandising and sales. Base Requirements: • Ability to work retail-type hours including evenings, with a focus on a Thursday to Sunday weekly schedule. Ability to commit to up to 30 hours per week • Comfort with being flexible in terms of availability e.g. hours per week may fluctuate based on season and promotional activity; Summer months less hours • Exclusive access to a reliable vehicle • Comfort with technology • High-speed internet access at home Ideal Qualifications: • Post-Secondary education background preferred -solid business sense • Excellent relationship building and customer service skills • Strong sales skills - Retail Sales experience an asset • High Quality Orientation/Attention to Detail/Work Standards • Presentation skills • Persuasive, tenacious This is a 1 year contract with the option to renew. $16 to $20/hour plus a $500/month car allowance We will supply lap top, iPad and cell phone If you are interested please send your resume to: Human Resources Department hr@miele.ca NO AGENCIES PLEASE We appreciate your response; however, only candidates under consideration will be contacted.

BILINGUAL CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE ITW CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS, a Canadian division of a diversified, multi-national Fortune 200 corporation is a leading supplier of fastening and industrial tool products to the construction and industrial sector. We currently require a dynamic and energetic customer service representative to join our team for our business unit located in Markham. As a key member of our customer service sales team your objective is to ensure our customer orders are processed in a timely manner and to manage the customer order cycle from the receipt of the order through to the delivery of the order. You will also resolve customer issues, provide product pricing and delivery information and act as a liaison with the sales and marketing team. Your profile will be proactive, goal-oriented and self-motivated, with excellent communication and problem-solving skills. Candidates must be fully bilingual with the ability to write and speak French and English fluently. A good working knowledge of computers in the Windows environment is essential. Post secondary education and a customer service background is required. Join an industry leader that offers a challenging career, excellent compensation, benefit and pension package. Please reply in confidence to: hrapply@itwconstruction.ca Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Senior Real Estate Law Clerk Vaughan law firm requires a full-time senior law clerk with at least 5 years work-related experience. Applicants should have experience with all forms of re-sale (including the drafting of all documents relating thereto), and a full working knowledge of Conveyancer, Lawyer Done Deal, Title Ins, Teranet, PCLAW software. Salary commensurate with experience. Benefits! Please e-mail resumes to toni@parenteborean.com

Classified Hotline: (800) 743-3353

Professional Planning and Engineering Opportunities Planner Reporting to the Manager of Development Planning, you are a results-oriented Planner who will be responsible for the analysis and review of development applications, including; Official Plan Zoning, Plan of Subdivision, Condominium, Site Plan, and Committee of Adjustment applications. As Planner you will be responsible for interpreting planning documents including Official Plans, conducting background research, and preparing planning reports, amendment documents and other planning related correspondence for file accountability. The Planner will also attend Council and Committee of Adjustment meetings to present the reports as required. The successful candidate will have formal academic training in a Planning related discipline, a minimum of two years of relevant professional planning experience preferably at a municipal level, possess provisional or full membership in the Canadian Institute of Planners, have a thorough knowledge of the Ontario Planning Act regulations and procedures, the Provincial Policy Statement, Ontario Municipal Board processes, Condominium Act and other related legislation. Development Planning Engineer Reporting to the Director of Planning and Development Services, you will be responsible to review and comment on the municipal servicing components of development applications, including Plans of Subdivision, Site Plans, Official Plan and Rezoning Amendment applications; assess water/storm/sanitary sewers, roads, storm water management, lighting, noise abatement, sidewalk, drainage, grading and other matters related to engineering design and consideration to ensure compliance with sound engineering principles and practices and Town standards; other responsibilities include administration of special projects/technical studies, associated research, report-writing and liaison duties. The Development Planning Engineer will be required to attend Council meetings to present reports as required. The successful candidate for this position will have formal academic training in Civil/Municipal Engineering, professional accreditation or eligibility for same in the Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario, demonstrated experience in municipal services engineering, project management and the municipal planning process as well as thorough working knowledge of municipal infrastructure design, development review, subdivision and site plan development, storm water management and experience with engineering related software packages including GIS, asset management and inventory management programs. Both positions require candidates to possess excellent analytical, research/report writing, problem solving skills and the ability to deal courteously and effectively with developers, consultants, the general public, contractors, other departments/levels of government, builders and utilities, plus a valid Class "G" driver's license and a reliable vehicle to use on Town business. If you are interested in joining our dedicated team of municipal professionals, indicate the position of interest and forward your resume to: Human Resources, Town of Aurora, 1 Municipal Drive, Box 1000, Aurora, ON, L4G 6J1 or email to: hr@e-aurora.ca by February 14, 2011. The Town of Aurora is an equal opportunity employer that is committed to recognizing and celebrating the diversity of opinion, talent and expertise that make each person unique. We thank all applicants and advise that only those selected for an interview will be notified by March 4, 2011.

BOOKKEEPER Required for Markham based accounting firm. Quickbooks experience is essential. Forward your resume to: peter.tadros@bellnet.ca

ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVE required for a progressive, independent employment firm that rewards hard work. As a motivated sales producer you will help generate new business in South York Region. Experience with cold calling and outside sales req'd. Call/Email: 905-737-1600 pdi@staffingsrvs.com

A Acting/Modeling Opportunities Have you always wondered how people get into Sears catalogues, Zellers flyers, McDonalds TV commercials, movies, magazine ads, music videos and more? It’s no secret – many of those people got their start by attending a StarCast Search. The film and advertising industry is booming. Scouting all looks, shapes, sizes and ethnicities. 4 years and up. Experience not required. Don’t miss your opportunity!

Markham • Tuesday, February 1st Howard Johnson Hotel 555 Cochrane Drive Attend anytime between 5pm-8pm Registration fee $39 +HST. Refunded if not selected. For info visit

SUPERINTENDENT for full time position. 5 days a week. Responsibility includes landscaping, trash pickups, and general repairs. Please fax resume to 905-944-8312 MAIL Room Clerk This position is responsible for opening, sorting and distributing the mail, and getting the mail out. This will require the use of a postage machine. Skills: fast learner, professional, detail oriented. Send resume to: careers@mcateer.ca

www.StarCastScouting.com ng.com

Seeking F/T Level II Dental Assistant/ Receptionist & P/T Hygienist in new dental office on Main Street Markham. Dental experience required. Email resume to: mcrossingdental@gmail.com or Fax: 9052942788

Advanced Tent Rental has immediate openings for day shift/night shift positions, LEAD HANDS to WAREHOUSE WORKERS. Forklift license an asset. Pay based on exp. Email resumes: matt@advancedtent.com or fax: (905) 660-7425

LIGHT ASSEMBLY

Delta Markham is seeking Maintenance Worker - FT Email resume to: jmiller@deltamarkham.com or fax 905- 477-2026 Only candidates selected for Interview will be contacted.

KNOW it all KNOW it now

LOCAL NEWS

F/T Warehouse position, toy

work for growing first aid company in Newmarket. Accuracy and reliability essential. Monday to Friday 35hrs. Must have good communication skills.

company. Pickingpacking orders. Loading-unloading up to 60 lbs. Ideally with RC exp. Woodbine/ 14th Ave. Send resumes to:

Fax resume to 905-953-8351

staffing@ borgfeldt.ca

Stay up-to-date on all the local news, sports, arts & entertainment, and columns from our panel of regular writers.

LOCAL NEWSLETTERS TO THE EDITORCOMMUNITY CALENDARARCHIVES CLASSIFIEDCROSSWORDSHOROSCOPESMOVIE REVIEWSRECIPES

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yorkregion.com .com

www. www.

Insurance

AUTO insurance problem? A bad driving record? Take advantage of our 1 year insurance premium package. Starting at $700-$2200 a year. Get your quote now at www.security insuranceinc.com or call 1800-508-6630 some conditions may apply.

$$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages to 95% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-282-1169 www.mortgageontario.com

WARDEN/ Hwy.7 - 1 Bdrm Condo w/Parking, Locker, S.S.Appls, Granite, Eng. Hrdwd, $1300+ Hydro. Tiffany Lee, Re/Max 905477-7766.

BRIMLEY/ 14th Avenue- 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom, fully furnished. Maid service, kitchenette, internet/ cable included. Minimum 1 week. www.anandaliving.ca 905479-0072

FREE mortgage consultation. Call Now! (416)849HOME/ Condo Rentals 2225. Brokerage #11028 available in York Region. FREE yourself from debt Markham, Richmond Hill, Money for any purpose! Aurora, Newmarket. $1400 Debt consolidation 1st, 2nd and up. Call for a free list. and 3rd mortgages, credit Paola Lawrence, Royal lines & loans up to 90% LePage Signature Realty LTV. Self employed, mort- 416-443-0300 gage or tax arrears. Don't pay for 1yr program! Denison/ #10171 Ontario-Wide Fi- MARKHAM/ nancial Corp. Call 1-888- McCowan, main floor 3 bedroom, 1 !/2 baths, 3 307-7799 www.ontario-widefinancial. parking, $1,400 $230 utilities, no pets/ smoking. com Feb.1st. 905-472-4510, 647-706-0109

CHECK OUT FULL LISTINGS AND PICTURES ON

SOUTH of UxbridgeRenovated 4 bedroom farm house. Country kitchen, new windows, approx. 1 acre, barn. $1400+ Ross Gallo (905)640-1200 UNIONVILLE- Ashglen. 3 Bedroom Townhouse, 1.5 baths, finished basement, appliances, $1,375.+ March. 1st. 905-471-6927 x231, for more info.

WOODBINE/ Stouffville Rd.- 1 bedroom upper, $1500. 4 bedrooms, $1700. Non-smoking/ pets. Feb. 1st. Separate entrances. Andrew 416-508MARKHAM Village. Cen- 4190 tury home. 1 bedroom, hardwood floors, parking, many windows, quiet, large yard. Non-smoking/ pets. $850 inclusive. Doug 416- 16TH/ McCowan- Large, 618-2078 bright, clean furnished queen sized room, all faMARKHAM- 14 Dublin cilities, parking, transit, inStreet. One/ Two Bedroom ternet, $475. Smaller apartment in adult environ- room, $400. 416-670ment. Quiet clean building. 7728 Well maintained property. Check us out, ask for our Senior Incentives Superin- MARKHAM- Private bath. tendent 416-678-6937. Quiet home. Parking. Furnished. Internet. Suits sinMARKHAM- 2 bedroom gle. Non-smoker/ pets. basement, separate en- $595 inclusive. (416)712trance, shared laundry, no 9024 smoking/ pets. 1 car parking. Feb. 1st. $850 incluSTOUFFVILLE- room for sive. (905)201-6709 rent in best mansion, suits MARKHAMKennedy/ female $699 inclusive, fur647-402-0800, Highglen. 1 bedroom nished basement. Private en- www.viewit.ca vit#88114 trance. No pets. Immediate. $750. (negotiable). (905)477-7305/ (416)3332527 STOUFFVILLE- spacious MARKHAM- Large 1 bed- 1 bedroom basement. room basement, separate Non-smoking. A/C. Parkentrance, parking, TTC, ing, backyard, laundry, near amenities. $700. in- cable. $775 inclusive. Imclusive. Immediately. mediate. 416-302-3438 (905)472-3726 MARKHAM apartment building- Two 1 bedrooms available., indoor parking $930/ $940. No dogs. March 905-472-4124

MARKHAM/ 16th- 1 bedroom basement. Side entrance, appliances, cable, wireless internet, single. Non-smoking/ pets. $730. inclusive. Feb. 1st. 647283-3281, 905-201-6872

PLAN your vacation easily by searching 100s of unique holiday home rentals. Rates start as low as $47/night. Rent your own STOUFFVILLE- spacious private vacation home at 1 bedroom basement. www. Non-smoking. A/C. Park- myholidayhomerental.com ing, backyard, laundry, cable. $775 inclusive. Immediate. 416-302-3438 STOUFFVILLESenior apartments, 1 bedroom & bachelor apartments available in building w/elevator. Stove, fridge. (416)492-1510.


KNIGHT, Frederic Alan. Peacefully surrounded by his family on Monday, January 24th, 2011 in his 69th year. Beloved Dad to Jeff (Cary) and Greg (Tara). Proud Grandpa to Matthew and Andrew. Dearly loved brother to Jody (David) and her children Rick (Kim) and Andrew (Jenn). Al will be missed by his former wife Marie, extended family and his many friends. Memorial service will be held at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 143 Main St. North, Markham on Friday, January 28th, 2011 at 11am, with visiting 1 hour prior. Reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Markham-Stouffville Hospital Foundation who provided him with much support or St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Online condolences may be made at www.dixongarland.com.

Over 700 fine quality designer jewellery items. Swiss” watches – Swarovski” – Jewellery – Gold/silver appraised. Cert. - diamonds, semi precious & precious stone rings, earrings, pendants, chains, bracelets, bangles.

Over 300 lots to be sold! Canadian Estate Coin Collection *Gold coins *Silver bullion *Mint sets

Over 300 banknotes * Certified “iccs” coins Name brands * Home décor * Appraised jewellery * Diamonds * Gold * Sterling silver Electronics * Art * Bedding * Consumer goods Luggage * Designer purses

AUCTION SALE Sheraton Parkway Hotel 600 Hwy # 7 East, Richmond Hill

Sun., Jan. 30th 1:00pm start, Prev.12 noon Sports memorabilia collection Manufacturers must sell ! *New home furnishings & décor

www.auctioneer.ca 905-554-7007

310

Articles For Sale 2002 HONDA Odyssey322,000kms. Certified, Etested. Good condition. 4 Captains seats. $3,500. (905)640-9120

“My Kind of Florist”

Focus on Flowers “Let flowers say it for you” “Flowers for all Occasions”

905-471-7000 116 Main St. N., Markham (Just 4 Minutes from the Hospital)

To my family and friends, thank you for my 80th surprise birthday party! All the cards, gifts and flowers were wonderful. Thank you Blair for the horse and buggy ride, I really appreciated everything. Joyce Lapp

$300 Cash- Dead or alive cars/ trucks/ vans. Fast Free towing. We sell parts. 416-500-5050 CARPETS- I have several thousand yards of new stainmaster & 100% nylon carpet. Will do living room & hall for $389.00. Includes: carpet, pad, installation (25 yards). Steve 905-890-5552 www.carpetdeals.ca HOT Tub (Spa) CoversBest Price, Best Quality. All Shapes & Colours. Call 1-866-585-0056 www.thecoverguy.ca

POWER lift and reclinerWANTED: School pick & ACUPUNCTURE $25. Man's chair. 6 months old. drop, Warden & 16th Ave Body massage. $45. Re- Can be seen by phoning to P.E. Trudeau High flexology $28. Facial $25. 905-201-5320 School 416-275-1500 Bring this ad for discount. (905)415-1868

310 IMPROVE Math/ Science. Get tutored by experienced college/ university professor.†Special group/ sibling discounts 416-726-5327

Articles For Sale

GREENHOUSES for Sale18' x 200'. $1300 each. Won't last! Phone Ron at 416-705-9993

GERMAN Sheppard purebred puppies, born Dec. 25, 2010, no papers, beautiful puppies/ temperament. $499, 647-402-0800

GARAGE for rent- 15902 McCowan Rd. (N. of Aurora Sdrd) Approx. 1200 sq.ft. with electrical heating, washroom, well insulated, electric garage door. Lots of room around garage for parking, etc. $750/ month. Tony (416)5246636

HANDYMAN Service, home service repairs, maintenance and installations. Reasonable rates, guaranteed results. Call PJ at 647-210-6892

PARRIS Movers- long/ short, big/ small, residential/ condos/ commercial. Quality service. AfTHE Ontario Employment fordable/ reliable. 905-7582848, 416-677-2848 Agency offers Live-in /Liveout caregivers. ReaAdult sonable fee to employers. Entertainment Call 416-699-6931 info@oeanannys.com ANNIE Spa- Best Asian Pretty Girls. Nice environment. N/E corner Finch/ McCowan. 416-291-8879. A Crystal Cleaning experi- Website available. ence- Homes, Offices. JENNIFER- Very pretty Supplies provided. In- busty blonde, escort. 34 sured/ bonded. 15% dis- years, Hwy.7/ 404. Phocount. (647)500-2260 for tos available. 647-282details. 9765. AAAQUA Cleaning- 16% discount- home/ office. Supplies provided. Insured/ bonded. 100% guarantee. 647-402-0550 ABSOLUTELY amazing XLarge Cleaning, ecologically, healthy home/ work environment. 100% guarantee. insured/ bonded. www.xlargetoronto.com. 647-808-3662 EUROPEAN house cleaning ladies available to clean your house, weekly or bi-weekly, experienced, reliable. Reasonable prices: 5hr-95$ ;6hr-115$; 7hr-$130, 8hr-150$. Call Lina(647)863-3408

905

CEILINGS repaired. Spray textures, plaster designs, stucco, drywall, paint. We fix them all! www.mrstucco.ca 416-242-8863. GARAGE Door: New garage door $450. and up. Service and repairman. Opener installed. Reliable and professional. Excellent prices. www.22home.ca 416-268-6088

1/2 Price Junk Removal. Cheap. Fast Service. All loading/ cleanup. Free Estimates. John, 905-3105865 (local)

HANDYMAN SERVICES • Build • Install • Paint • Renovate • Assemble

647-984-0080

For rates and information on the Business & Professional Directory, contact Jan Black at 905-853-2527, ext. 262 jblack@yrmg.com

greg.traill@rogers.com

HAPPY 50TH GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY MOM AND DAD (Betty and Robin Mossman) January 27, 2011

love from your family, Mark, Laura, Michelle, Logan, Christopher, Shauna, Steve, Brittany, Kelsey & Kyle

31, The Markham Economist & Sun, www.yorkregion.com Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011

MAJOR JEWELLERY LIQUIDATION OF FINE JEWELLERY


The Markham Economist & Sun, ■ www.yorkregion.com ■ Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, 32

Sale, Sail, Buy, Fly EXTENDED UNTIL JAN 29

Every vehicle sold from Woodbine Chrysler will receive a 4 night / 5 day cruise for two to the Bahamas or Mexico or a 7 day All Inclusive Trip for 2 to Cuba*

16

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN LEFT Best Selling Minivan Ever!

5 LEFT AT $

17,999

Taxes & lic extra

CANADIAN VALUE PACKAGE

2011DODGE RAM QUAD SXT 4X4

$

27,999

Award Winning Truck of the Year!

Taxes & lic extra

2010 DODGE JOURNEY SE

9 LEFT AT

20 LEFT

$

17,999

Best Selling Crossover in Canada

Taxes & lic extra

Factory order may be required. All retail incentives have been applied to the above sale prices. Retail incentives include: lease to retail /Loyalty *Flights and taxes not included

905-415-2260 (Markham)

Proudly Serving Markham & Unionville Since 1983

WWW.WOODBINECHRYSLER.CA 8280 WOODBINE AVE., MARKHAM (SOUTH OF HWY. 7, WEST SIDE, ACROSS FROM COSTCO)


Markham Economist Jan. 27, 2011