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Snoon Booklet

Table of Contents Overview ....................................................................................................................... 2 Art and Design .............................................................................................................. 4 English .......................................................................................................................... 5 French ........................................................................................................................... 6 Geography .................................................................................................................... 7 German ......................................................................................................................... 8 History .......................................................................................................................... 9 Information Technology ............................................................................................. 10 Mathematics ............................................................................................................... 11 Music ........................................................................................................................... 12 Physical Education ...................................................................................................... 13 PSHE (Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education) ......................................... 14 Science ........................................................................................................................ 15

25th February 2013


Overview At St. George’s International School students in Key Stage 3 (Years 7-9) study a broad and balanced curriculum that builds on their learning in the primary school and prepares them for the examination courses which begin in Key Stage 4 (Years 10 -11). All students will study the following subjects: Maths, Science, English Modern Foreign Languages (French and German) The Arts (Music, Drama, Art) Humanities (History, Geography) Physical Education PHSE (Personal, Health and Social Education) ICT Students with particular needs will receive specialist support: English as an Additional Language (EAL) Learning Support – Maths and English Gifted & Talented students (Sport, Music, Art, Drama)

Assessment Assessment during Key Stage 3 is based on progression through the levels of performance stipulated in the National Curriculum of England and Wales. Assessment takes place informally through continual teacher assessment and also formally in end of year exams in the summer term. Average students are expected to make two levels of progress during Key Stage 3. Some students may make more progress, and others a little less depending on their individual needs and their aptitude for certain subjects. Each year students will also take a MidYIS test (Middle Years Information System) which is administered by Durham University in the UK. This provides the school with an assessment of the progress and potential of individual students and is also used internally to assist subject teachers when monitoring and tracking pupil progress through the Key Stage. Level 8 7 6 5 4 3 N/2

YEAR 7

Exceptional Performance Excellent Performance High Average Performance Low Average Performance Below Average Performance

YEAR 8 Exceptional Performance

YEAR 9 Exceptional Performance Excellent Performance

Excellent Performance

High Average Performance

High Average Performance Low Average Performance Below Average Performance

Low Average Performance Below Average Performance

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For further information on the Key Stage 3 programme please contact Mr G. Cooper (Assistant Head Teacher Key Stage 3) Parents of students wishing to join the school in Key Stage 3 are asked to contact Mrs Kerry Tranter, Admissions Officer (admissions@st-georges.lu).

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Art and Design An Art and Design course should encourage personal expression, imagination, sensitivity, conceptual thinking, powers of observation, an analytical ability and practical attitudes. It should lead to greater understanding of the role of the visual arts in the history of civilisations. It should widen cultural horizons and enrich the individual. It should combine a breadth and depth of study so that it may accommodate a wide range of abilities and individual resources.Art and Design complements literary, mathematical, scientific and factual subjects. It is especially concerned with the development of visual perception and aesthetics. It is a form of communication and a means of expressing ideas and feelings. Year 7 Unit 7A: Self-image – 2D, individual work, painting & collage. In this unit, pupils are to explore their personal identity as a starting point. They will create images that reflect their ideas of themselves, working from observation, memory and imagination. They will develop skills using traditional materials and processes. They will learn about the ideas, methods and approaches used by other artists who have made images of themselves and/or portrayed others. Unit 7C: Recreating cityscapes – 2D/3D, individual work, college/relief. In this unit, pupils will explore landscape as the starting point for two- and three-dimensional work. They will collect visual and other information by visiting a landscape around the school area and by studying the methods, approaches and intentions of artists and craftspeople who use the environment as inspiration. They will manipulate the visual and tactile qualities of materials to convey mood and feeling about a landscape. Year 8 Unit 8C: Shared view - 2D/3D, collaborative work, sculpture. In this unit, pupils are to explore and use natural and other materials to construct a temporary, site-specific work, which represents a shared view of their locality. They will work in groups to make a collective response. They will be expected to analyse examples of work from different times and cultures where ideas, beliefs and values are shared and communicated through art, craft and design. Unit 8A: Objects and viewpoints - 2D individual work, painting. In this unit, pupils will explore familiar objects from different viewpoints as the starting point for their work. They will develop their ideas by selecting and abstracting qualities of objects to use as the basis for a painting. They are to learn about the ideas and approaches of the cubists and their influences and make connections with other artists who worked from still life. Year 9 Unit 9A: Life events – 2D, individual work, collage, printmaking. In this unit, pupils will be expected to explore ideas and feelings about an event in their own life as the starting point for image making. They will analyse paintings, prints, photographs and digital images, including examples of photojournalism, to learn how visual qualities can be manipulated to evoke strong reactions and to represent ideas, beliefs and values. They will make connections between eighteenth- and nineteenth-century paintings and contemporary visual culture. Unit 9B: Change your style – 2D/3D individual design, drawing and painting techniques. In this unit, pupils will explore contemporary design and the ways in which artists take ideas from the work of others and synthesise these into new creative forms.

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English The work in KS3 is designed to practise and continue the development of skills taught in KS1 and 2.There are three main sections in the Year 7, 8 and 9 course with a fourth, subsidiary, section on drama. The three principal areas are speaking and listening, reading, and writing. Work throughout the subject generally ensures that these areas are integrated. In addition language study – grammar and the development of language – are also incorporated within the three main sections.

What will students learn? Speaking and listening Students should be able to: Speak fluently and appropriately in different contexts, adapting their skills to the situation and audience Listen, understand and respond critically to texts Participate effectively in group discussion discussing and evaluating evidence in order to arrive at a considered viewpoint Reading Both class study and individual reading should enable students to: Develop a deeper appreciation and understanding of texts – for example they should be able to extract meaning beyond the literal and decide how language and style affects implied and explicit meaning. Students are presented with a wide range of literature, plays, poetry, fiction and non fiction including both traditional and modern writers. Writing There is particular emphasis on planning and redrafting in year 7 so the skill is embedded for use as early as possible. Various study skills are included as the programme progresses. These are: skimming and scanning, paragraphing and main points, summarising, planning, self checking and some revision and memory techniques. They will be able to produce formal essays in standard English within a specified time, writing fluently and legibly and maintaining technical accuracy when writing at speed.

Homework Homework follows the school homework timetable and will be set twice a week. Assessment Assessment is continuous and based on the criteria of the national curriculum.

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French What will the course be like? Pupils are taught in ability groups and with different objectives in mind: these differences normally reflect their previous experience of French. Students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing in the target language. They are encouraged to work independently, in pairs, in groups or as a class on various tasks. The course promotes the learning of grammar in context and the ability to communicate. It also affords an insight into the culture and civilisation of the francophone world with the use of authentic material. Pupils will be expected to participate actively in all their lessons and do homework on a regular basis. The four linguistic skills will be tested at the end of each unit of work. How will the students be assessed? Pupils will be continually assessed through regular tests in all skill areas. These assessments will help teachers decide which IGCSE level is most suitable for them. This includes tests of speaking, listening, reading and writing at basic and/or higher level (Core and/or Extended Curriculum). The curriculum is based on the following points: Linguistic competence Developing the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in a range of situations and contexts. Applying linguistic knowledge and skills to understand and communicate effectively. Knowledge about language Understanding how a language works and how to manipulate it. Creativity Using familiar language for new purposes and in new contexts. Using imagination to express thoughts, ideas, experiences and feelings. Intercultural understanding. Appreciating the richness and diversity of the French culture.

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Geography Key Stage 3 Geography begins by concentrating on the area around us, and seeing how the familiar relates to basic geographical principles, such as drawing plans to scale, using keys, planning a route on a map and accurate use of an atlas by way of grid references. As the course progresses students will be expected to use the common practises on locations they are less familiar with, giving them a solid foundation, both in geographical techniques and knowledge of different global locations. Reccurring themes such as climate, development, natural hazards, ecosystems, industrialisation and environmental impact will be reinforced throughout the 3 years, giving each student the opportunity to further their understanding and expertise in what is a very broad subject. Year 7 Topics Making Connections Settlements Exploring Britain Rivers Floods Plate Tectonics Year 8 Topics Coasts Weather Ecosystems Global Warming Energy Resources Brazil Year 9 Topics Development China USA Globalisation Tourism Oceans Homework Homework is given once a week and can take a variety of forms relating to work in the class. Assessment Assessment is continuous and based on class work, participation in discussions and homework.

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German What will the course be like? Pupils are taught in ability groups and with different objectives in mind: these differences normally reflect their previous experience of German. Throughout the course students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. They are encouraged to work independently, in pairs, in groups or as a class on various tasks. The course promotes the learning of grammar in context and the ability to communicate. It also affords an insight into the culture and civilisation of the German speaking world with the use of authentic material. Pupils will be expected to participate actively in all their lessons and do homework on a regular basis. The four linguistic skills will be tested at the end of each unit of work. How will the students be assessed? They will be continually assessed through regular tests in all skill areas. These assessments will help teachers decide which IGCSE level is most suitable for them. This includes tests of speaking, listening, reading and writing at basic and/or higher level (Core and/or Extended Curriculum).

The curriculum is based on the following points: Linguistic competence Developing the skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in a range of situations and contexts. Applying linguistic knowledge and skills to understand and communicate effectively. Knowledge about language Understanding how a language works and how to manipulate it. Creativity Using familiar language for new purposes and in new contexts. Using imagination to express thoughts, ideas, experiences and feelings. Intercultural understanding. Appreciating the richness and diversity of the German culture.

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History KS3 builds on and consolidates the knowledge, skills and understanding developed during KS2. What do students learn? In Year 7, 8 and 9 students will follow an adaptation of the National Curriculum of the UK which states that History fires pupils' curiosity and imagination, moving and inspiring them with the dilemmas, choices and beliefs of people in the past. Our fun courses help pupils develop their own identities through an understanding of history at personal, local, national and international levels. It helps them to ask and answer questions of the present by engaging with the past. Pupils find out about the history of their community, Britain, Europe and the world. They develop a chronological overview that enables them to make connections within and across different periods and societies. Students are also encouraged to develop the ability to discuss the causes and significance of important historical events learning how to make an argument supported by evidence in order to reach an analytical conclusion. Themes studied include: Year 7: The Middle Ages, the Romans and a family history project Year 8: The Reformation, the Renaissance, and slavery. Year 9: Industrial Revolution, French Revolution and World War One

Homework Homework follows the school homework timetable and will be set once a week. Assessment Assessment is based on six major pieces of extended writing per year as well as role-play and presentation tasks.

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Information Technology The work in Year 7, 8 and 9 is completed individually or as part of a team and as far as possible is cross curricular. What will students learn? Students attend a double lesson each week. This course introduces students to a range of software and builds on skills already acquired in Key Stages 1 and 2. Hardware: digital cameras, scanners, memory storage devices Word processing: keyboard familiarisation, text entry and format, editing, proof reading, printing Databases – creating, sorting and searching Desk-top Publishing (DTP) – design, change of format, text manipulation, graphics Spreadsheets – enter text and formulae to complete calculations and charts Presentation – layout, graphics, animation and sound. Animation – creating animations using symbols, key frames, layers and tweens. Google Sketch up – creating 3D animations of buildings. Scratch - using a programming language to create interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art. This work is often project based using real situations such as producing a newspaper, ecological surveys etc.

Homework Homework is usually research based, acquiring information for class projects. This can be through extended internet use, paper based research and/or observations of real life systems and processes. Assessment Assessment is done through continuous assessment whereby each piece of work is awarded a grade.

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Mathematics What will students learn? The Year 7, 8 and 9 curriculum continues in the same style as in Year 6. The students will learn to: Apply their knowledge and skills to problem solving using appropriate strategies’ Enjoy maths and develop a confident and positive approach to the subject. Develop their “mental mathematics” and logic skills. We also encourage students to participate in the European Council of International Schools’ Maths Competitions, World Maths Day and to join Maths Club. In Years 7, 8 and 9 all students follow the National Curriculum for Mathematics: using a Cambridge Framework including Using and Applying Mathematics to solve problems Solve demanding problems and evaluate solutions Numbers and the Number Systems Integers, powers and roots Fractions, decimals, percentages and proportion Calculations Make and justify estimates and approximates of calculations Calculator methods Use standard written methods for all operations Algebra Resources We are lucky to have access to a wide range of resources within the Mathematics department. We encourage ICT integration with maths through the use of the teaching and learning website www.myimaths.com among other. Please feel free to use it to revise or play some maths games. Username: sgis Password: pentagon13 Homework Homework is set at teacher’s discretion. Some homework’s are set as short nightly assignment to reinforce learning and encourage practice; others are set as a longer homework to encourage independent study and cooperative learning. Assessment Review tests are set to assess the student’s understanding through the year and a more formal examination of knowledge is set at the end of the year which is used to assess a student’s national curriculum level.

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Music Music in Year 7,8 and 9 builds on the skills and knowledge developed in Key Stage 2 and uses them to develop the student’s abilities in composing their own pieces of music based on different stimuli. They will use the classroom instruments as well as learning the use of computers and computer programs in music composition. What will students learn? Listening – students are required to listen to extracts of music of varying styles and to analyse and comment on selected aspects of the work. They will also study the way in which music from other cultures is structured. Composing – the student’s own abilities and knowledge are used to create pieces of their own composition based on different stimuli and using cross-curricula materials Performing – students are expected to take part in various productions during the school year. They continue to sing songs of increasing musical complexity although the composition aspects take a greater part in the Key Stage 3 curriculum. These three elements join together to broaden the student’s knowledge of: How music is structured, The different instruments used The various styles of music composed. This will enable the students to understand and enjoy a wide variety of music, both in and out of school. Homework This is usually a piece of composition, theory or research and is given from time to time to reinforce or broaden the work done in class. Assessment There are no formal examinations; assessment is done informally in class to ascertain individual progress. Instrumental Lessons Individual instrumental lessons are available on a variety of instruments from visiting teachers to St George’s school. These lessons are charged separately and are not included in the school fees. Enquiries about lessons, instruments and timetabling can be directed to Mr Heley at music@st-georges.lu.

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Physical Education What will students learn? The main aim of Physical Education is to promote physical development and appreciation of a healthy life style. At present the students travel to off-site facilities including those at the INS and the Coque during their PE lessons The students follow a programme of study across the Key Stage (Y7-9) that includes: Swimming, personal survival skills and diving (Year 7 only) Team sports including Basketball, Rugby, Hockey and Football. Individual activities including Badminton, Dance and Athletics

All students will be formally assessed against the National Curriculum objectives in each activity and also encouraged to evaluate and improve their own performance. Students will have the opportunity to study Physical Education as a GCSE option in KS4.

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PSHE (Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education) What will students learn? PSHE is cross curricular and is continuous in its promotion of personal and social development. It gives students the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to lead confident, healthy, independent lives and to become informed, active and responsible citizens. Students are encouraged to take part in a wide range of activities across and beyond the curriculum. In doing so they: Recognise their own worth, Contribute to the life of the school community Become increasingly responsible for their own learning Learn to reflect on their own experiences Understand how they are personally developing Homework Homework is given once a week and can take a variety of forms. Assessment Assessment is continuous and based on classwork, participation in discussions, oral presentations and homework.

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Science During Key Stage 3 pupils build on their scientific knowledge and understanding and make connections between different areas of science. They use scientific ideas and models to explain phenomena and events and to understand the positive and negative effects of scientific and technological developments on the environment and in other contexts. In Key Stage 3 this subject is taught as an integrated programme. What will students learn? Problem solving skills, mainly through planning, carrying out and evaluating their practical work. The ability to use scientific apparatus and materials safely and with increasing confidence. IT skills. To recognise there are hazards in living things, materials and physical processes and to assess the risks and take action to reduce these risks to themselves and others. To use scientific language conventions and symbols. Topics studied in Year 7 include: Safety Variation and classification Solar system Solutions Reproduction Forces and their effects Acids and alkalis

Simple chemical reactions Energy sources Electrical circuits Environment and feeding relationships Solids, liquids and gases

Topics in Year 8 include: Food and Digestion Respiration Microbes and Disease Ecological Relationships Atoms And Elements Light

Compounds and Mixtures Rocks and Weathering The Rock Cycle Heating and Cooling Magnets and Electromagnets Sound and Hearing

Topics in Year 9 include: Inheritance and selection Fit and Healthy Plants and Photosynthesis Plants for food Reaction of Metals and Metal Compounds Patterns of reactivity Environmental Chemistry Using Chemistry Energy and electricity Gravity and Space Speeding Up

Pressure and Moments

Homework There are usually two pieces of homework per week which can be in a variety of forms though often in a homework booklet. Assessment A range of activities are used to continually assess student progress including: classwork, homework, verbal contributions, level assessed tasks and end of unit tests. 15


NOTES

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KS3 curriculum guide