Page 1

LSC 6140: Landscape Research Dissertation  Reg.Number:090127919  Supervisor: N.Dunnett 

   

“Building  Integrated  Agriculture:  A  qualitative  comparative  analysis  of  methods  for  commercial food production using buildings as an agricultural settlement.”                                                                     MA2 in Landscape Architecture, University of Sheffield, 2010‐11 

                     

DISSERTATION SUBMISSION INFORMATION 2010/2011 Student Name (or number): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Course (MLS, MA MLM) and Module Number: ................................................. ....... Advisor (supervisor): . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Dissertation


2


Photos on the cover (from left to right):        

Gotham Greens Hydroponic rooftop Farm. [electronic print] Available at: <  http://www.ecofriend.com/entry/brooklyn‐green‐rooftop‐greenhouse/>[Accessed 19 September 2011].      Foglia, L. (2009) Rooftop Farming on the Warehouses of North Brooklyn.[electronic print] Available at: <  http://blog.cunysustainablecities.org/2009/07/rooftop‐farming‐on‐the‐warehouses‐of‐north‐ brooklyn>[Accessed 19 September 2011].        

3


Acknowledgements         I would like to thank my thesis supervisor Dr.Nigel Dunnett who, through his inspiring lectures during our  master studies, broadened my perspectives as an architect and introduced me to the world of Ecological Design.  A special thanks to Zoe Dunsiger, who has always been available for further advice, consultation and discussion  regarding  my  thesis.  Moreover,  I  would  like  to  thank  Mr.  Dave  Richards,  an  urban  gardener  enthusiast,  who  showed me around RISC’s Green Roof garden in Reading and helped me to understand the basics of cultivating  food on Green Roofs.        Finally, I would like to thank my family for the support, encouragement and guidance on the topic I chose  for my research. Last but not least, I would like to thank the Bodossakis Foundation in Greece, for believing in  my potential and granting me an important scholarship which helped me follow and complete my studies in  Landscape Architecture at the University of Sheffield.             

               

4


A B S T R A C T           There  is  currently  a  growing  interest  in  cultivating  food  in  cities  (Rowe,  2011):  according  to  the  United  Nations  the  demand  for  food  is  expected  to  increase  in  the  future  as  the  global  population  living  in  urban  centres will reach more than a billion by 2025 (United Nations, 2008 cited in Satteerthwaite et al. 2010:2809).  Localisation  of  food  production  has  emerged  as  “a  widely  accepted  strategy  to  reduce  food  costs  and  to  facilitate access to healthy food” (Lyson, 2004 cited in Corrigan 2011:1232).         Food  related  strategies  have  become  part  of  “sustainable  built  environment  initiatives”  (Komisar  et  al.,  2009: 61) and agriculture, which was as far as architecture was concerned a remote field, is now seen as the  next  design  revolution  (Architectural  Design,  2005).  According  to  Graff  (2009)  and  Despommier  (2010  (b)),  vertical farming may be the future of Urban Agriculture. Rowe (2011) further supports the view that horizontal  surfaces,  such  as  rooftops,  are  potential  sites  for  food  growing.  Smit  and  Nasr  (1992)  argue  that  Building  Integrated  Agriculture  (BIA)  is  an  unexplored  case  and  it  has  not  been  realised  extensively  so  far;  thus  its  success is yet to be confirmed.        The paper will provide an overview of the BIA methods and it will investigate what it can be cultivated on  rooftops and inside buildings. Furthermore, it will examine the productivity, the benefits and drawbacks of  each method, with regard to the built, natural and human environment. Finally, it will highlight any issues  that  emerge  regarding  the  implementation  of  each  method,  so  as  to  assist  future  research  in  the  field  of  Building Integrated Agriculture.        The  paper  firstly  sets  the  general  framework  for  Urban  Agriculture  and  then  it  focuses  on  the  methods  currently  used  for  cultivating  food  on  rooftops  and  inside  buildings.  The  research  uses  a  qualitative  comparative analysis methodology based on case studies of already realised farming projects on buildings so as  to further conclude which  BIA method has the future potential for implementation in cities.        The  paper  highlights  that  there  is  a  variety  of  crops  that  can  be  cultivated  on  and  inside  buildings:  from  herbs to leafy vegetables. The most productive methods are Hydroponics and Vertical farming, however, soil‐ based  practices  (Green  roof  Agriculture  and  Containerised  farming)  have  more  benefits  to  offer.  Finally,  the  research concludes  that  among  all  BIA practices,  Green  Roof  agriculture  is  the  most  promising  method,  with  5 


the highest potential for development and implementation for commercial food production in city centres, as it  offers a wider range of benefits to our built, natural and human environment.  References: 

1. Architectural Design, (2005), Special issue on Food and the  City, Franck K. (ed.) May, 75 (3)  2. Corrigan, M.P (2011) Growing what you eat: Developing community gardens in Baltimore, Maryland,  Applied Geography, 31, 1232‐1241   

3. Graff, G. (2009) A greener revolution: An argument for vertical farming, Plan Canada, 49(2): 49‐51  4. Komisar, J., Nasr J., Gorgolewski M., (2009) Designing for food and agriculture; Recent explorations at  Ryerson University, Open House International, 34(2); 61‐70   

5. Lyson, T.A  (2004)  Civic  agriculture:  Reconnecting  farm,  food,  and  community,  Medford:  Tufts  University Press 

6. Rowe, D.B., (2011) Green roofs as a means of pollution abatement, Environmental Pollution,159, 2100‐ 2110  

7. Satterthwaite, D., MacGranaham, G. and Tacoli, C., (2010) Urbanization and its implications for food  and farming. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 365 (1554): 2809‐2820 

8. Smit J. and Nasr J. (1992) Urban agriculture for sustainable cities; using wastes and idle land and water  bodies as resources, Environment and Urbanization, 4, No 2, 141‐152 

9. United Nations. 2008 World  urbanization  prospects:  the  2007  revision,CD‐ROM  edition. New  York,  NY: United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division    Key words: Building Integrated Agriculture, rooftop farming, green roof agriculture, hydroponics, containerised  farming, vertical farming             


List  of Tables  Table 1: Types of Urban Agriculture (Bakratsa, 2011).......................................................................................... 13  Table 2: Methods of Food Growing on buildings (soil based methods) and inside buildings (water based  methods) (Bakratsa, 2011).................................................................................................................................... 15  Table 3: Comparative analysis of BIA methods (Bakratsa, 2011).........................................................................  50   

                                      7 


List of Figures    Fig.1:  “Cross  section  of  RISC’s  Green  Roof”......................................................................................................17  Fig.2:“Green  Cones  can  be  used  to  compost  kitchen  waste  on  RISC’s  Green  Roof”.........................................19  Fig.3:”Fencing made of coppiced hazel is used on RISC’s Green Roof as a windbreaker”.....................................20  Fig.4: “ Rainbarrells and waterbutts can be used in order to save water for irrigation of crops”.........................20  Fig.5:“A variety of containers that can be used for food growing purposes”........................................................22  Fig.6:“The Earth Box”.............................................................................................................................................23  Fig.7:” The Hydroponics cycle”...............................................................................................................................25  Fig.8: “The Aqua‐ponics cycle”...............................................................................................................................26  Fig.9: “The Aero‐ponics cycle”................................................................................................................................26  Fig.10:”The Vertical Farm‐Water System”.............................................................................................................30  Fig.11:”The Vertical Farm‐ Energy System”...........................................................................................................30  Fig.12: ” General overview of the plots in Eagle Street rooftop Farm”..................................................................36  Fig.13: ” General overview of the plots in Eagle Street rooftop Farm”..................................................................36  Fig.14:”Tasks that take place on the roof: watering”............................................................................................37  Fig.15:”Tasks that take place on the roof: planting”.............................................................................................37  Fig.16:”Helen Cameron inspects the vegetables growing on the roof of her restaurant”.....................................39  Fig.17:”General overview of the containerised farm above the restaurant”........................................................ 39  Fig.18: ”Access to the roof is made through an external staircase”......................................................................40  Fig.19: ”The planters on the roof”..........................................................................................................................40  Fig.20: ”General view of the Hydroponic Farm”....................................................................................................42  Fig.21:”Gotham Greens’ Hydroponic Farm on the roof of a two storey building in Brooklyn”..............................43  Fig.22: ”Gotham Greens’ vegetables on supermarket’s shelves”..........................................................................43  Fig.23: ”Nuvege Vertical Farm Exterior view in Kyoto, Japan”..............................................................................46  Fig.24: ”Indoor Vertical Farming in Nuvege”.........................................................................................................46  Fig.25:”Contamination Security measures in Nuvege”..........................................................................................47  8 


C O N T E N T S     

I N T R O D U C T I O N ........................................................................................................................... 11 

L I T E R A T U R E  R E V I E W  

1.0 Urban Agriculture       1.1 Localisation of food…………………………………………………................................................................................ 12       1.2 Definition and main characteristics of Urban Agriculture……………………………………………………………………… 13       1.3 Types of Urban Agriculture ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….  13  2.0 Building Integrated Agriculture         2.1 Methods of growing food in and on Buildings………………………………………………………………............................15      2.2 Rooftop Farming: Challenges and Requirements of growing food outdoors…………………............................15  3.0 Soil Based Systems      3.1 Method A: Green Roof Agriculture          3.1.1 Definition and Types of Green Roofs……………………………………………………………………………………………….  17          3.1.2 Food Production: What can we cultivate on a Green Roof..................................................................  18          3.1.3 Requirements of Green Roof Agriculture............................................................................................. 18          3.1.4 Why choose a Green Roof for farming? Benefits of Green Roof Agriculture …………………………………..  21          3.1.5 Reasons for not choosing a Green Roof: Drawbacks……………………………………………………………………….. 21      3.2 Method B: Containerised Farming          3.2.1: Definition and Types of Containerised Farming…………………………………………………………………………...... 22          3.2.2: Food Production: What can we cultivate in containers?..................................................................... 23          3.2.3 Requirements of Containerised Farming.............................................................................................. 23          3.2.4: Why choose containers? Benefits of Containerised Farming ……………………………............................... 23          3.2.5: Reasons for not choosing Containerised Farming: Drawbacks…......................................................... 24    4.0 Water based systems  4.1 Method C: Hydroponics       4.1.1: Definition and Types of Hydroponic Systems……………………………………………………………………………….....   25  9 


4.1.2: Food Production: What can we cultivate with Hydroponics?...............................................................  26       4.1.3: Requirements of Hydroponics...............................................................................................................  27       4.1.4:Why choose Hydroponics?Benefits......................................................................................................... 27       4.1.5: Reasons for not choosing Hydroponics: Drawbacks............................................................................... 28  4.2 Vertical Farming      4.2.1 Definition and methods of Vertical Farming...........................................................................................   29      4.2.2 Food Production: What can we cultivate with Vertical Farming?...........................................................  31      4.2.3 Requirements of Vertical Farming...........................................................................................................  31      4.2.4 Why choose vertical farming? Benefits...................................................................................................  32      4.2.5 Reasons for not choosing vertical farming: Drawbacks...........................................................................  32  5.0 M E T H O D O L O G Y .................................................................................................................................... 34  6.0 C A S E   S T U D Y  A N A L Y S I S       6.1 Green Roof Agriculture.............................................................................................................................   36       6.2 Containerised Farming.............................................................................................................................    39       6.3 Hydroponics..............................................................................................................................................   42       6.4 Vertical Farming........................................................................................................................................   46  7.0 D I S C U S S I O N..........................................................................................................................................   48  8.0 C O N C L U S I O N S.......................................................................................................................................  56  9.0 R E F E R E N C E S...........................................................................................................................................  58  10 P H O T O     C R E D I T S .................................................................................................................................  65               

10


I N T R O D U C T I O N            The  research  will  provide  an  overview  of  the  methods  used  for  growing  food  on  rooftops  and  inside  buildings, a practice known as Building Integrated Agriculture (BIA). The research questions are:           1. What can we cultivate on and inside buildings? Which method is more productive?           2. What are the benefits and drawbacks of each BIA method with regard to the areas of: a) Built b)                Natural and c) Human environment?          3. Which issues should future research focus on?    To respond to the above questions, the objectives of the research are:  1.

To investigate the productivity of each BIA method and research about the selection of crops that they  are cultivated on rooftops and inside buildings. 

2.

To investigate the benefits and drawbacks of each BIA method with regard to the:  a)Built, b) Natural  and c)  Human Environment (in terms of social, health, financial and labour input issues) 

3.

To draw  upon  realised,  commercial  BIA  projects  as  sources  for  further  information  regarding  the  productivity, the achievements (benefits) and challenges (drawbacks) of each method. 

4.

To evaluate the methods through a qualitative comparative analysis, to conclude which method has  further potential for future implementation and to identify issues for further research. 

       The importance of the research lies in the fact that in the near future, “urban citizens of the world will be in  need of controlling and producing food for themselves, due to potential environmental, economic and social  challenges  that  will  have  an  impact  on  food  production”  (United  Nations,  2008  cited  in  Satteerthwaite  et  al.  2010:2809). Due to lack of space in cities, alternative spaces may have to be used such as rooftops or entire  buildings. The question would then be how food‐growing can be accomplished on buildings and which method  must be followed so as to achieve food production using a building as an agricultural setting (Viljoen and Bohn,  2010, In Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011). Knowledge of the benefits and drawbacks of all BIA methods  will assist technology and research to proceed in the implementation of BIA practices.    11


L I T E R A T U R E   R E V I E W   

                                                                1.0 URBAN AGRICULTURE    1.1. Localisation of food         In  the  20th  century,  the  ease  of  transportation  of  food  has  allowed  us  the  growing  of  products  at  large  distances and gave us the opportunity to have access to vegetables and fruits all year round (Jones, 2005). In  the 21st century, however, this food‐system model is questioned, because it is based on intensive agriculture  practices  (Kennedy  et  al.,  2004)  which  have  lead  to  a  variety  of  issues  (Sonnino,  2009):  a)  Environmental  problems: pollution caused by the intense use of pesticides and fertilisers and exploitation of natural resources  b)  Social  and  Economical  problems:  weakening  of  local  communities  caused  by  the  establishment  of  international  market  chains  that  replaced  the  local  food  markets;  increase  in  food  prices;  excessive  and  unsustainable consumerism  and finally c) Health issues, caused by the loss of the nutritional value of food or in  some cases by contaminated products (Grewal S.S and Grewal S.P, 2011).                Localisation  of  food  “has  emerged  as  an  approach  to  reduce  food  costs  and  to  facilitate  access  to  healthy food” (Lyson, 2004 cited in Corrigan 2011:1232) and it is currently “receiving increasing attention as the  potential solution to the globalized food system” (Kremer and DeLiberty, 2011:1252 ). Local food systems offer  a number of benefits: “Economy support, food self‐sufficiency, reduction of food transportations1, creation of  links between producers and consumers” (Foundation for Local Food Initiatives, 2002; Hines, 2000; Lang, 1999  in  Nichol,  2003)  and  also  opportunities  for  community  involvement  (Gorgolewski,  Komisar  and  Nasr,  2011).  Localisation of food can be applied at different scales, “from the household to the neighbourhood and from the  scale of a region to a country” (Sonnino, 2009). Urban Agriculture practices, such as allotments and community  gardens, have been introduced as systems for localisation of food.     

1

and thus reduction of the environmental pollution. 

12


1.2 Definition and main characteristics of Urban Agriculture    “An  industry  located  within  (intra‐urban)  or  on  the  fringe  (peri‐urban)  of  an  Urban  Centre,  which  grows  or  raises,  processes  and  distributes  a  diversity  of  food  and  non‐food  products,  reusing  mainly  human  and  material resources, products and services found in and around that urban area, and in turn supplying human  and material resources, products and services largely to that urban area".                                                                                                                                           Mougeot, 1999 in Cityfarmer, 2000           Urban Agriculture (UA) is generally defined as “a practice related to the production of crop and livestock  goods within cities” (Zezza and Tasciotti, 2010: 265). According to the definition of Mougeot (1999), the main  characteristics  of  UA  are:  a)  the  productive  use  of  land,  b)  the  use  of  urban  wastes  and  any  other  cheap  resources available c) the use of human resources (referring to employment), d) the creation of links between  people and e) the creation of opportunities for education and recreation. It is evident that UA is more than just  a farming practice: it is a complex system within which food growing is just one of its many aspects.         As UA is mainly practised in countries of the developing world, it is mostly related to lower income families  and it is associated with low‐tech practices. However, De Zeeuw et al. (2011) support that high‐tech practices  can  also  be  encompassed  as  components  of  intensive  UA  schemes:  large  scale  farms,  green  houses  and  hydroponic systems can contribute to the general concept of UA, if used as a part of larger sustainable urban  schemes.    1.3 Types of Urban Agriculture 

  13


Table 1: Types of Urban Agriculture (Bakratsa, 2011)           Urban Agriculture may take many scales and forms; from backyard vegetable‐growing to large scale farming  (Drechsel and Dongus, 2010; Grewal S. S. and Grewal S. P., 2011). Depending on the distance of the agricultural  plot from the urban centre, there can be distinguished three (3) main types of Urban Agriculture (Viljoen et al.,  2005):  1)  Peri‐Urban  Agriculture2   2)City‐Urban  Agriculture3 and  3)Homestead  Agriculture‐Farming  which  generally concerns the cultivation of food at home and it is the most common type of Urban Agriculture in the  developing countries (De Zeeuw et al., 2011).        Astee  and  Kishnani  (2010)  have  introduced  the  term  “Building  Integrated  Agriculture”  (BIA)  to  further  describe  Urban  Farming  practices  that  take  place  on  areas  that  do  not  have  direct  access  to  land,  such  as  interiors of buildings or rooftops and balconies. Building Integrated Agriculture is a relatively new practice and  a more detailed definition was not possible to be found. However, it successfully distinguishes the Homestead  farming on backyards from the food cultivation on surfaces of buildings (Table 1) that do not connect directly  to land.                 

2

i.e Brownfield and Greenfield land: these are potential sites for Urban Farming, provided that the soil is renewed and is 

suitable for cultivation.  3

i.e allotments and community gardens: these are smaller plots of land that are usually found in the edges of urban sites. 

They can either be rented by local authorities to individuals (allotments) or they may be managed by local communities for  recreation and educational purposes (community gardens) (Nairn and Vitiello, 2009). 

14


2.0 BUILDING INTEGRATED AGRICULTURE  (BIA)    2.1 Methods of growing food on and inside Buildings                         Table 2: Methods of Food Growing on buildings (soil based methods) and inside buildings (water based methods) (Bakratsa,  2011) 

       The  case  studies  will  later  reveal  two  main  categories  of  BIA:  1.  Outdoor,  soil‐based  agriculture  (Green  Roofs  and  containers)  and  2.indoor,  water‐based  agriculture  (hydro‐aqua‐aero‐ponics  and  vertical  farming).  For  each  method,  different  factors  influence  the  choice  of  species  that  can  be  cultivated,  determine  the  productivity and the project’s success; thus each method will be examined separately in the following chapters.    2.2 Rooftop Farming: Challenges and requirements of growing food outdoors.   

15


There are  three  main  reasons  why  rooftops  should  be  used  for  farming  activities:  A)  Lack  of  available  land: As cities grow bigger, the impermeable areas 4expand and the available land for food growing in cities is  disappearing (Rosenzweig et al., 2006 in Rowe, 2011). Surfaces of buildings, such as rooftops, are ideal because  they “provide the opportunity to replace their impermeable surface with vegetation” (Dunnett and Kingsbury,  2004 in Rowe, 2011:2102) B) Better control and monitoring: Roofs are free from vandalism risks, as opposed  to allotments on ground that suffer from thefts and intrusions of unwanted groups of people (Nowak, 2004)  and  finally  C)  Potential  for  creative  development:  According  to  Nowak  (2004),  roofs  can  be  designed  to  integrate a diverse range of activities (educational, recreational and agricultural) giving thus the opportunity to  urban citizens to experiment, to enjoy and to produce (Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2007).        The  greatest  challenge  of  rooftop  farming  is  the  sever  weather:  “High  temperatures,  light  intensities  and  wind speeds” (Dunnett and Kingsbury, 2004 in Oberndorfer et al., 2007: 825) are crucial to plant survival and  growth  (Oberndorfer  et  al.,  2007).  There  are  certain  plant  species  that  can  thrive  on  roofs,  the  selection  of  which results from experimental trials in different rooftop conditions (Heinze 1985, Boivin et al. 2001, Kohler  2003, Durhman et al. 2004, Monterusso et al. 2005 in  Oberndorfer et al., 2007) .         As far as the roof requirements are concerned, the main issues to examine are : A) Roof Size (Kail Vinish,  2010):  for  commercial  productions,  the  size  of  the  roof  needs  to  be  350m2  minimum.  The  area  needs  to  provide sufficient space for the planting beds, for the farming equipment and for the supplies (soil, compost  and  mulch),  B)  Roof  Accessibility  (Rowe,  2011):  the  roof  must  be  easily  accessible  and  must  also  provide  a  water source5 for the irrigation of the beds (Kail Vinish, 2010), C) Roof Load Capacity (Murray,2010): the roof  must be strong enough to hold the extra weight of; the people that work on the roof; the farming equipment;  the  crops  (Germain  et  al.,  2008);  the  saturated  soil  and  the  potential  snow  load  during  winter  periods  (Kail  Vinish, 2010) and finally D) Safety and Authorization (Kail Vinish, 2010): authorisation and safety measures are  essential (Kail Vinish, 2010).          4

streets, parking lots, pavements etc. 

5

Rain water capture systems, rain barrels and water butts can also be used for supplementary irrigation. 

16


3.0 SOIL BASED SYSTEMS  3.1 METHOD A: Green Roofs    3.1.1 Definition and Types of Green Roof Systems        Green Roofs are “layers of vegetation installed on top of buildings” (Dunnett and Clayden, 2007: 53). They  are also known as “eco‐roofs” or “living roofs” (Velazquez, 2005; Williams et al., 2010) and they are divided into  two  main  types: a)  extensive  and  b)  intensive (Williams et al., 2010). Both types consist of the “same basic  build up series of layers and only differ in the depth of the growing medium and thus in the type of vegetation  that they support” (Dunnett and Clayden, 2007: 56‐57).         A commercial Green Roof consists of five layers which aim to create the suitable environment for plants to  grow,  protecting  at  the  same  time  the  fabric  of  the  building  (British  Council  for  Offices,  2003):  1.  The  base  layer: a water and root‐proof layer. 2. The drainage layer: the layer that removes excess water from the roof. 3.  The  filter  mat:  a  geotextile  material  placed  between  the  previous  two  layers  to  prevent  substrate  from  compressing the drainage layer. 4. The growing medium: usually soil “which needs to be lightweight” (Dunnett  and Clayden, 2007: 58) and finally, 5. The vegetation layer: the layer that provides the “living elements of the  roof” (Dunnett and Clayden, 2007: 58).    Fig.1: Cross section of the roof garden (Reading  International Solidarity Centre, 2011)  Layers from top to bottom: 

17

a.

bark mulch (5cm). 

b.

newspaper layer 

c.

soil (30cm). 

d.

filter fleece. 

e.

drainage board. 


f.

insulation board (5cm). 

g.

felt layers with copper foil. 

h.

Strawboard panels (6cm). 

i.

Structural beams, (18cm height) 

     Only intensive Green Roofs can be used for agricultural purposes as they are the ones to support “a great  additional  load  and  a  deep  layer  of  growing  medium    of  20  cm  minimum”  (Dunnett  and  Kingsbury,  2004  in  Oberndorfer et al., 2007: 825). The maintenance required for a Green Roof farming project would be similar to  the maintenance of a plot at a ground level.    3.1.2 Food Production: What can we cultivate on a Green Roof?              Practitioners agree that there is a clear need for more research on “the kind of food crops that grow on  Green Roofs”, since the factors to consider are complex (MacDonald, 2008). Oberndorfer et al. (2007) support  that in theory almost anything can be grown on a Green Roof with adequate irrigation and sufficient soil depth.  Kortright (2001) supports that crops that grow in container gardens, are suitable for Green Roofs as well, since  growing conditions are similar.          According to Foss et.al (2011), crop selection depends on the depth of the growing medium. A Green Roof  with less than 15cm of soil can support the growing of herbs and strawberries (Foss et al., 2011:33). A Green  Roof  with  a  15‐30cm  depth  can  support  the  growing  of  leafy  vegetables.  Finally,  a  greater  variety  of  deep‐ rooted vegetables can grow successfully in a depth of more than 30cm of soil (Foss et al., 2011:33).    3.1.3

Requirements of Green Roof Agriculture 

               According  to  MacDonald  (2008)  the  main  requirements  for  Green  Roof  Agriculture  are:  A)  Sufficient  soil  depth  and  good  soil  composition  :the  growing  medium  must  be  high  in  organic  matter  and  in  nutrients  and  lightweight at the same time, B) Sufficient Sun exposure and wind protection of the roof and finally C) Sufficient  irrigation, because crops are water demanding. To be more specific:  A) Sufficient Soil Depth and good soil composition        Soil  depth  and  soil  composition  are  important  factors  for  a  successful  crop.  As  mentioned  above,  for  a  greater variety of crops, a depth of 30cm is essential. 

18


As far  as  soil  composition  is  concerned:  According  to  Kortright  (2011),  application  of  compost  is  the  best  way to maximize the depth/weight ratio because compost is lightweight and rich in nutrients at the same time  (Kortright, 2001). Compost can be mixed with other lightweight materials so as to add depth and aerate the soil  bed. Generally, the soil mixture must be lightweight, without chemical fertilizers and must ensure “good water  retention and drainage” (Germain et al., 2008; Rowe et al., 2006 in Williams et al., 2010). Although there are  many  commercial  varieties  of  compost  available,  the  case  studies  will  later  reveal  that  compost  can  also  be  made  of  organic  kitchen  waste  and  can  be  mixed  with  the  soil.  The  p.H  of  the  soil must  be between  6.5‐6.8  (Waldbaum, 2008).   

Fig.2: Green Cones can be used to compost kitchen waste (photo from the RISC’s Roof Garden, Bakratsa, 2011). 

B) Sufficient sun exposure and wind protection        Sun and wind exposure are important factors to examine (Earth Pledge Green Roofs Initiative, 2005): light is  a  fundamental  need  for  plants  and  when  it  comes  to  farming,  long  hours  of  daily  sunlight  are  needed.  Temperature  is  also  a  crucial  factor,  as  rooftops  are  exposed  to  sun  and  plants  need  to  withstand  high  temperatures (Kortright, 2001). One way to protect the crop from high temperatures is by increasing the soil  depth (Kortright, 2001).        Wind is another critical factor as it can destroy crops and it is stronger at rooftop heights than at ground  level. Wind breakers such as vegetal walls and canvases can reduce the exposure of the plants to strong winds  on the rooftop (Germain et al., 2008). Alternative ways to protect the crop from sun and wind are through the 

19


use of shade clothes and mulches and through frequent watering (Germain et al., 2008). Finally, the orientation  of the plot is of high importance both for sun and wind exposure. 

Fig.3: Fencing made of coppiced hazel is used at the RISC’s roof garden as a wind breaker (Bakratsa, 2011) 

C) Sufficient irrigation        An effective and inexpensive irrigation system is essential to have on the Green Roof Farm (Germain et al.,  2008).  Besides  drip  irrigation,  other  methods  and  devices  can  be  used,  such  as  rain  barrels  or  water  butts:  these are available on the market but the can also be made of reused, cheap materials (Dunnett and Clayden,  2007:  77).  Water  harvested  from  surrounding  roofs  or  processed  grey  water  can  also  be  used  for  irrigation  (Williams et al., 2010): this can reduce the volume of water use and can relieve the sewage system (Waldbaum,  2008).        In order for the Green Roof system to perform correctly, the roof will need to follow certain guidance for  better  drainage;  According  to  Velazquez  (2005),  a  slope  between  1.5  %and  2%  to  allow  for  natural  drainage  properties is preferred, as opposed to flat roofs present drainage issues .    Fig.4:  Rain  barrels  and  water  butts  can  be  used  in  order  to  reduce  the  volume of water needed for irrigation (Crocus, 2011) 

        20


3.1.4

Why choose a Green Roof for farming? Benefits of Green Roof Agriculture   

     The  main  reasons  for  choosing  a  Green  Roof  for  farming  would  firstly  be  because  of  the  benefits  that  a  Green Roof generally offers to our built and natural environment (British Council for Offices, 2003).         As  far  as  the  building  structure  is  concerned;  a)  Green  Roofs  provide  extra  insulation  (thermal  and  acoustic)  to  the  entire  structure.  They  reduce  the  noise  levels6 (Van  Renterghem  and  Botteldooren,  2009  in  Williams et al., 2010) as well as the energy for (winter) heating and (summer) cooling (Sailor, 2008 in Williams  et al., 2010), b) they increase the life of the roof (Kosareo and Ries, 2007 in Williams et al., 2010;Rowe,2011;  Velazquez,  2005)  by  protecting  it  from  weather  conditions  and  finally  c)  they  improve  the  view  of  the  built  environment (Velazquez, 2005).         As  far  as  the  natural  environment  is  concerned,  Green  Roofs:  a)  add  value  to  biodiversity  by  providing  habitat, shelter and feeding opportunities (British Council for Offices, 2003), b) they improve the microclimate  and reduce the urban heat island effect by lowering the temperatures around the building (Lowitt and Peck,  2008: Velazquez, 2005) and c) they improve the storm water quality (Rowe, 2011) which would normally be  dismissed into groundwater7.         Moreover, Green roof farming can provide recreational and educational opportunities to people (Foss et  al., 2011); a farming plot on the rooftop of a school for example, may be used as an outdoor classroom within a  walking distance, which students can use for educational activities.     3.1.5

Reasons for not choosing  a Green Roof: Drawbacks 

6

The growing substrate and the vegetation layer “absorb sound waves to a greater degree than a hard surface” (Rowe,  2011). 

7

With a  Green  Roof  system,  the  storm  water  is  filtered  and  cooled    through  evapotranspiration  (Mentens  et  al.  2005, 

Moran et al.2005 in Oberndorfer et al., 2007; Velazquez, 2005). 

21


Literature review has not revealed any issues or weaknesses regarding Green Roof installation on buildings.  With the exception of the set up costs which may seem high8, Green Roofs generally offer many benefits that  can compensate for the set up expenses in the long run (Velazquez, 2005)  3.2 METHOD B; Containerised Farming    3.2.1 Definition and Types of Containerised Farming    “A  micro‐model  of  farming  where  a  family  unit  or  household  is  producing  fruits  and  vegetables  in  special  containers for personal consumption to help improve the income, health and well‐being of its family members”.                                                                                                                                                                 Deveza  and  Holmer  (2002:1)         Cultivating food in containers is not a new practice: from ancient times until today it is considered to be the  most popular method to grow vegetables for household purposes (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr,2011).There  are  many  different  types  of  containers  that  can  be  used  for  food  growing:  a)  rigid  containers  (clay  pots,  wooden  boxes,  reused  vessels  and  tyres)  b)  raised  beds  and  c)  soft  planters    (grow  bags  and  wading  pools)  (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr,2011) (Fig.5).   

Fig.5: Types of containers that can be used for commercial farming: containers, raised beds and soft planters (photo sourced  from Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011). 

8

Cost would generally start from $200 per m2 and higher (Dunnett and Kingsbury, 2004 in Oberndorfer et al., 2007:825). 

22


For commercial  containerised  farming,  some  professional  companies  have  designed  units  for  low  maintenance  practices:  The  EarthBox,  (fig.6.),  used  for  community  and  educational  gardens,  includes  “a  container, a screen, a water filling tube, reversible mulch covers, lightweight soil and a fertilizer” and it can be  placed  in  a  variety  of  layouts  on  the  ground  (Gorgolewski,  Komisar  and  Nasr,2011).  Other  examples  of  container  farming  include  “built  sub‐irrigation    planters  with  built‐in  reservoirs”  to  facilitate  water  flow  (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr,2011:175) or raised beds of different depths and sizes.      Fig.6:  “The  Earth  box”  (Cultivating  Conscience,  2011) 

            3.2.2 Food production: What can we cultivate in containers?          There is a great variety of crops that grow in containers, depending on the depth of the container: Hanging  planters  and  raised  beds  can  accommodate  deep‐rooted  plants  such  as  tomatoes,  cucumbers,  peppers,  eggplants, leeks, lettuce and spinach (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr,2011). Grow bags can accommodate root  crops  and  vegetables  and  if  bigger  in  size  they  can  even  support  fruit  growing  (Gorgolewski,  Komisar  and  Nasr,2011).    3.2.3 Requirements of Containerised Farming        Similar  to  Green  Roof  Agriculture,  the  basic  requirements  for  containerised  farming  are:  a)  sufficient  soil  depth and good soil composition, b) irrigation and water drainage provision, c) roof load capacity control d)  south  to  west  orientation  (important  for  issues  like  sunlight  exposure  and  wind  protection)  and  finally  e)  selection of containers (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr,2011). 

23


3.2.4 Why choose Containerised farming? Benefits         According to Jobs (Technology for the poor, 2011), the main benefits of containerised farming are: a) Easy  establishment and customization on any horizontal surface of the building regardless of the size of the space  available, b) Low cost in terms of installation and maintenance and finally c) Soil and water conservation , as  containers prevent excessive watering and soil run offs.          As far as the environmental benefits are concerned, these are very similar to the benefits of Green Roof  agriculture, “when the coverage of the roofspace is substantial” (Foss et al., 2011:19).Moreover, containerised  farming can promote “social benefits, through education, public health and community development” (Foss et  al., 2011:19).    3.2.5 Reasons for not choosing Containerised farming: Drawbacks         Literature  review  has  not  revealed  any  issues  regarding  containerised  farming:  it  is  considered  to  be  the  most common and low cost method of growing food on rooftops (Erdmann, 2011).   

                                                                                                 24


4.0 WATER BASED SYSTEMS    4.1 Hydroponics  4.1.1 Definition and Types of Hydroponic systems    “The system in which the plant is grown to produce flowers or fruits that are harvested for sale and in which all  nutrients are supplied to the plant through the irrigation water, with the growing substrate being soilless”.                                                                                                                                                           (Devries,  2003  in  Jones,  2005:2)         As  the  above  definition  describes,  Hydroponics 9 is  a  system  in  which  crops  are  cultivated  in  a  mixture  of  water and nutrients, instead of soil. The methods of the nutrient solution delivery vary: a) they can be added  directly in the water (Hydroponics) (Fig.7) or b) they can be provided by fish waste water (Aqua‐ponics) (Fig.8)  or  c)  they  can  be  provided  “by  means  of  an  aerosol  mist  bathing  the  plants’  roots”  (Aero‐ponics)  (Fig.9)  (Nickols, 2002 in Jones, 2005:142). Regardless of the method of delivery of the nutrient solution, all the above  systems “are proven to be successful, resulting in good plant growth” and they are mainly used for intensive  commercial plant production (Jones, 2005:4).     Fig.7: The Hydroponics Cycle (Indoor garden online, 2009):   “The  simplest  hydroponic  system  consists  of  containers  in  which  plants  sit  directly  in  a  nutrient  solution  shallow  enough  to  allow  the  roots  access  to  oxygen.  In  commercial  systems,  nutrient  concentrations,  water  supply  and  the  recycling  of  the 

9

From “the Greek words hydro (i.e water) and ponos (i.e labor)” (Roberto, 2000).Similar terms are “aqua‐culture, hydro‐

culture and soilless culture” (Jones, 2005:381).  

25


nutrient solution are monitored and controlled automatically”(Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011:206)      Fig.8: The Aqua‐ponics Cycle (PRweb, 2010):  (1)  Fish  grown  for  consumption  (usually  tilapia  and  perch)  are  fed food and they produce waste.           (2) Bacteria and worms convert waste to fertilizer for plants.    (3)  Plants  absorb  the  essential  nutrients  for  their  growth  and  filter the water that returns to fish. 

          Fig.9: The Aero‐ponics cycle (Biocontrols, 2006):   “A  micro‐computer  controller  releases  a  spray  mixture  of  water,  nutrients and growth hormones into the enclosed air environment  of the growing box” (Biocontrols, 2006). 

                  Hydroponic systems can be found indoors or outdoors and they vary “in terms of design and operational  characteristics” (Jones, 2005:169). They are usually found in greenhouses (Jones, 2005) and they are thought to  be “high‐ cost and complex systems to operate” (Jones, 2005:169).   4.1.2 Food Production: What can we cultivate with Hydroponics?          There is a wide range of fruits and vegetables that are grown successfully with Hydroponics. According to  Jones  (2005:169),  the  crops  chosen  for  hydroponic  production  are  mainly  of  “high  value  cash”  (such  as  tomatoes and fruits) or “specialty crops” (such as herbs and vegetables). Peppers, cucumbers, lettuce, beans  and  corns,  as  well  as  strawberries  and  bananas  are  some  examples  of  crops  that  have  grown  successfully  in  hydroponic systems (Jones, 2005). Despite their success, Foss et al. (2011) support that “deep‐root vegetables    26


cannot be  grown  hydroponically,  because  water  cannot  expand  in  the  same  way  that  soil  does”  (Foss  et  al.,  2011:33). Many plant varieties require further research and trials, in order to be able to conclude what it can  be cultivated successfully with hydroponics (Jones, 2005).   4.1.3 Requirements of Hydroponics         As  far  as  commercial  food  production  is  concerned,  a  hydroponic  system  requires:  a)  a  levelled  area  (preferably  covered  with  concrete  and  not  soil) (Jones, 2005),  b)  south  to  west  orientation  c)  a  greenhouse  with  a  strong  structure  to  withstand  snow  and  winds  (Jones,  2005),  d)  storage  tanks,  e)  a  computer  programmed system and f) sensors to control the growing conditions (Jones, 2005).         As far as the procedure of Hydroponics is concerned, Jones (2005) supports that some main points to take  into consideration for successful farming are:  i)

Attention to  details  and  good  growing  skills  (Jones, 2005:4): Hydroponics requires excellent trained  staff, as a potential mistake would have a negative impact on the entire production (Jones, 2005). 

ii) Excellent water quality: Hydroponics requires good quality of pure water, free of any substances and  elements that can affect negatively the plant growth. Domestic water or rainwater collected from  the greenhouse is unsuitable because it can cause contamination to the crops, “due to presence  of  inorganic  and  organic  substances”  (Jones,  2005:  72).  To  ensure  that  the  water  is  free  from  unwanted organisms, filtering and monitoring should take place frequently (Jones, 2005).   iii) Nutrient Solution  Composition  and Temperature:  this is one of the most important issues, as it can  result in a potential failure of the crop production. The challenges are: a) “to maintain a constant  level of the nutrients which would be neither deficient nor excessive” (Jones, 2005:16) and b) to  keep  the  temperature  on  the  same  level  as  the  ambient  air  temperature10,so  that  plant  roots  absorb the sufficient amount of nutrients.   iv) Surface  and  Depth  of  Containers:  “Contact  and  intermingling  of  the  plants’  roots  must  be  avoided”  (Jones,  2005:  118)  and  plants  must  be  widely  spaced  to  allow  sufficient  light  to  penetrate  their  canopy.     4.1.4 Why choose Hydroponics for farming? Benefits   According to Jensen (Jensen, 1981 in Jones, 2005:4), the main benefits of Hydroponics are:  10

between 24‐30 C, (Jones, 2005: 105). 

27


i)

Adaptation to  any  site  and  climatic  conditions:  Due  to  the  fact  that  Hydroponics  takes  place  in  a  controlled environment, it can be installed in any climate. 

ii) Low Labour  Input  Requirements:  Hydroponics  is  an  automated  system  that  operates  with  high  technology  and  it  can  be  controlled  with  computers  and  sensors:  “the  PH  of  the  water,  the  lighting exposure, the temperature, the humidity, the composition of air in the greenhouse, the  nutrient feeding and irrigation can all be controlled and regulated accordingly” (Wigriarajah, 1995  in Jones, 2005:306). The grower mainly needs to control the composition of the nutrient solution  and then observe the plants’ growth. As hydroponics takes place in water, it is considered to be a  “cleaner” system as opposed to soil‐based methods.  iii) High productivity (Roberto, 2000): Hydroponics produces “the same yield as soil gardens in 1/5 of the  space”  (Foss  et  al.,  2011:21).  Plant  roots  are  exposed  to  almost  the  full  volume  of  the  nutrient  solution and competition is reduced to the minimum helping, thus, the yield to increase.  iv) Organic food production: any disease can be treated in an organic way, without the use of chemicals.  v) Extension  of  season  of  the  crop  (Schoenstein,  2001  in  Jones,  2005):  compared  to  other  growing  techniques, Hydroponics gives the farmer the opportunity to extend the crop to a longer season.  vi) Less water requirements (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011:206): Hydroponics uses almost “90%  less water than the soil‐based methods” (Foss et al., 2011:21).    4.1.5 Reasons for not choosing Hydroponics: Drawbacks     “A  forced  flowering  process  technique  for  growing  plants  in  which  the  time  required  to  bring  crops  to  production is shortened by controlling all aspects of plants’ life so that the shortest amount of time is taken to  produce the largest amount of product, in the least amount of space, with a minimal amount of work”.                                                                                                                                                                       (Wright , 2004:1)  Hydroponics  is  generally  believed  to  be  a  highly  productive,  free  of  problems  system,  yet  Jensen  supports  (Jensen, 1997 in Jones, 2005) that it is a difficult system to sustain. The main drawbacks of Hydroponics are:  i)

High set  up  cost:  the  development  of  greenhouses  as  well  as  the  implementation  of  the  essential  technological systems in order to control the growing ambient of hydroponics require high capital  (Jones, 2005).    28


ii) High energy inputs: According to Foss et al. (2011:21) Hydroponics relies on “consistent energy inputs ,  which adds to operational costs and environmental impacts”.  iii) Vulnerability to diseases: “Diseases spread quickly to all beds on the same nutrient tank through the  water11 and affect all crops directly” (Jones, 2005:5) The entire system is vulnerable (Van Patten,  2008), thus high control is essential: Containers, devices and working surfaces must be clean from  dust.  Even  small  possible  openings  “must  be  sealed  sufficiently  so  as  to  prevent  insects  from  intruding” (Jones, 2005:279).  iv) Technical  expertise:  Hydroponics  needs  well  trained  farmers,  because  water‐based  methods  do  not  forgive  mistakes:  this  corresponds  with  “Hydroponics  not  being  as  strong  an  educational  or  community builder”, as opposed to soil based agriculture (Foss et al., 2011:21).  v) No  ecosystem  restoration:  Foss  et  al.,  (2011:21)  support  that  Hydroponics  is  a  “clinical  process”.  It  does not reinforce biodiversity neither it connects humans with the natural environment, as it is  intended  mainly  for  commercial  production  and  profit.  However,  renewable  energy  systems  (photovoltaic  systems,  solar  panels  etc.)  can  be  integrated  in  Hydroponics,  “minimizing  its  negative aspects” regarding the environment  (Foss et al., 2011:21)    4.2 VERTICAL FARMING    4.2.1

Definition and Methods of Vertical Farming. 

      Despommier describes Vertical farming as “stacked up green houses on top of each other” (Despommier,  2010  (b):23).  The concept  of Vertical farming  is based  on the creation  of  zero  energy buildings,  where  inputs  and outputs are balanced (Vertical Farm, 2011): freshwater is recycled and energy resources are conserved in  order to facilitate the food production that takes place indoors (Fig.10 and Fig.11, following page).          According to Despommier, Vertical farming is seen as a stable system that can ensure achievable results,  despite  its  high  technological  and  financial  demands  (Despommier,  2010  (b)).As  far  as  crop  production  is  concerned,  vertical  farms  can  be  achieved  through  hydroponic,  aqua‐ponic  and  aeroponic  methods  (Despommier, 2010 (b)).    11

Plants in Hydroponics are fed by a common water supply which could help diseases spread rapidly. 

29


Fig.10: The  Vertical  Farm‐Water  System  (Dan  Albert/Weber Thompson in Despommier, 2010 (b):146‐ 147)  1.

rainwater collection 

2.

cistern

3.

purification system 

4.

potable water 

5.

grey‐black water 

6.

on‐site wastematter treatment 

7.

output water to wetland system 

8.

rainwater for urban farm 

9.

on site infiltration 

10. nutrient supply for growing systems  11.  hydroponic, aero‐ponic systems 

  Fig.11:  The  Vertical  Farm‐Energy  System  (Dan  Albert/Weber Thompson in Despommier, 2010:146‐147)  1.

Summer sun 

2.

Winter sun 

3.

Reflected light 

4.

Thermal stack 

5.

North side‐cool thermal mass 

6.

Warm air vented from greenhouse 

7.

Radiant floor 

8.

Ground source loop 

9.

Operable vents 

10. Photovoltaic panel 

                     30


4.2.2

Food Production: What can we cultivate with vertical farming?   

      Despommier supports that all crops that grow in greenhouses, can easily grow in vertical farming as well, as  long as the root system is held at the right temperature (Despommier, 2010 (b) ). Crops mainly include leafy and  rooted vegetables, but Despommier supports that “The technology of hydroponics allows almost any kind of  plant to be grown in the Vertical farm, from root crops like radishes and potatoes to fruits such as melons and  even  cereals“(The  Economist,  2010).  Besides  plants,  animal  species  can  be  commercialised  in  Vertical  farms:  from freshwater fish (tilapia, trout,) shrimps and mussels to chicken and pigs (Despommier, 2010 (b)).     4.2.3

Requirements of Vertical Farming   

“Bringing a vertical farm into reality, even a prototype, will require many elements to come together to permit  its maximum expression and make it a highly efficient food producing method”                                                                                                                                                        (Despommier, 2010 (b):182)           Vertical farming demands: 1.  Availability  of  space: Despommier supports that the vertical farm needs to  “consist  of  a  complex  of  buildings  constructed  in  close  proximity  with  each  other”  in  order  to  be  successful  (Despommier, 2010 (b):179) : a) a building for food growing b) a control centre for monitoring c) a nursery for  seeds  selection  and  germination:  d)  a  quality  control  laboratory  to  monitor  food  safety  and  document  the  quality of each crop, e) a building for the vertical farm workforce f) an eco‐educational centre for the public  and ideally g) a green market and a restaurant.  2. The excellent design of a building that will keep out pests  and  diseases  (Despommier,  2010  (b):  169):  The  building  must  have  “double  lock  entry  doorways”  and  be  as  sealed as possible, 3. Application of new technologies to get the right conditions for the crops to grow: these  include  computerised  systems  that  control  the  light,  the  temperature  and  humidity  inside  the  building.  Ventilation and water purification systems are also essential.             31


4.2.4

Why choose Vertical Farming? Benefits    

Despommier (2010 (b):145) supports that Vertical farming has a range of advantages:  i)

Year round crop production. 

ii) No weather‐related crop failures: the system is controllable, which reduces the possibility of diseases  that can damage the crops (Despommier, 2010(b):148).  iii) Organic  Production  (Despommier,  2010  (b):161):  no  chemical  pesticides,  herbicides  or  fertilizers  are  needed, as “the system is protected from outside intruders”.   iv) Environment friendly System: Vertical farming “recycles black and grey water and  it adds energy back  to the urban grid” (Despommier, 2010(b):145).  v) Low irrigation costs: Vertical farming uses 70‐95 % less water, compared to conventional agriculture.  Ideally, vertical farms can be used as “water regenerating facilities, where grey water is restored  to drinking water quality and is then used for aquaculture or for crop growing”(Despommier, 2010  (b):29). 

vi) It creates job opportunities: Vertical farming will require the employment of people from a variety of  backgrounds, from farm‐managers to biologists, educators and farmers (Vertical Farm,2011).      4.2.5

Reasons for not choosing Vertical Farming: Drawbacks   

“When  planning  the  vertical  farm,  architects  and  engineers  must  be  driven  by  this  critical  concept,  since  the  vertical farm will be built to satisfy the needs of the crops and not necessarily ours (..) The materials employed  in the construction of the building will be dictated by the needs of the plants and secondarily by the needs of  those who work inside the vertical farm”.                                                                                                                                                    (Despommier, 2010:181‐184)           The Vertical farm project supports that "The Vertical Farm must be efficient‐ cheap to construct and safe to  operate”  (The  Vertical  Farm,  2011). Proefrock  and  Green(2009),  support  that  the  idea  of  vertical  farms  may 

32


seem appealing, “but when it comes down to practicalities, constructing buildings for food growing purposes  makes no sense”.         Despommier (2010  (b) ) supports that existing buildings may not be able to support maximum yield to farm  indoors. The main reason is the insufficient lighting (Despommier, 2010  (a) ). Even if Vertical farms are made of  glass in order to use natural sunlight for the plants, additional artificial lighting will be needed, “to enable year  round production” (The Economist, 2010). As a result, the cost “of powering artificial lights can make Vertical  farming prohibitively expensive” (The Economist, 2010).          Besides  high  electricity  costs,  Vertical  farming  demands  space.  New  building  developments  need  to  be  constructed,  “designed  with  plants  in  mind  “  (Despommier,  2010  (b):  181).  Additional  drawbacks  of  vertical  farming are:  i)

High Set up Cost: Vertical farms need new technologies and thus a high financial capital.  

ii) High Control  and  Management  of  the  conditions  inside  the  farm:  Despommier  supports  that  the  greatest  challenge  is  “to  best  manage  temperature,  humidity  and  security  inside  the  farm”  (Despommier,  2010  (b):  184).  In  terms  of  security,  the  farm  must  be  sterilised  and  the  staff  will  need  to  wear  disposable  uniforms  as  well  as  hair  coverings.  Finally,  an  annual  routine  series  of  “laboratory tests” is essential in order “to avoid risk of contamination of the crop due to human  pathogens” (Despommier, 2010 (b): 169).     iii) Human  Un‐friendly:  Despommier  claims  that  “Conditions  inside  the  building  must  favour  maximum  crop  yields  while  creating  a  tolerable  condition  for  humans”  (Despommier,  2010  (b):  184).  It  is  clear  that  vertical  farming  is  not  designed  for  humans,  who  will  be  required  to  tolerate  the  conditions inside the farm and not indulge in the process of food growing, as opposed to previous  BIA methods.                  33


5.0 M E T H O D O L O G Y           The paper uses a systematic, critical review of research and precedents on BIA methods. The first part of  the  study  aims  to  establish a  broad  contextual  overview  of  the  methods  currently  used  for commercial  food  production. Key points for research regard to: a) the selection of crops, b) the productivity of each method and  finally c) the benefits and drawbacks of each method.          Articles and publications were searched from September 2010 to October 2011.As far as academic sources  are concerned; the search engines used are Scopus, Proquest, Jstor and Google scholar, using the keywords:  green roof farming, container farming, hydroponics, urban farming and vertical farming. It needs to be stressed  that there are not sufficient academic sources available (i.e. peer reviewed papers) which are directly related  to the topic of Building Integrated Agriculture (BIA), as it is a rather new field‐ not extensively explored.          As  far  as  Green  Roof  farming  is  concerned,  much  of  the  information  is  sourced  from:  grey  literature  documents (MA dissertations), academic articles, books and trade journals. In order to gain further knowledge  about Green Roof agriculture, I visited the RISC’s Green Roof garden in Reading: the field trip took place in the  summer of 2011 and helped me to understand the basics of rooftop farming. This visit has not been included as  a  case  study  for  the  purposes  of  this  paper,  as  it  did  not  concern  a  commercial  farming  project.  However,  photographic material from this visit is used to support the literature review on Green Roof agriculture.        There is a plethora of books on the topic of Containerised Farming and Hydroponics: the majority is related  to D.I.Y guides with technical details. Dickson Despommier is regarded as the “progenitor of the idea of Vertical  farming”  (The  Economist,  2010):  his  articles,  book  and  website  are  my  main  sources  of  information  for  this  topic. Finally, the book “Carrot City: Creating places for Urban Agriculture” (by Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr,  The Monacelli Press: 2011) is a valuable guide for a general introduction to BIA practices.          The  second  part  of the  study  focuses  on  evidence  based  case  studies  of  five  realised  projects  of  farming  inside  and  on  surfaces  of  buildings.  The  case  study  method  was  the  appropriate  way  of  gaining  information  about  commercial  food  production  in  BIA  practices  because  it  provided  an  in‐depth  description  of  realised  projects,  examining  the  achievements  and  the  challenges  that  each  project  encountered.  All  information  collected from these five realised projects is integrated with the results of the literature review in a form of a  table (Table 3), which is used to complete the comparative analysis of BIA methods, to conclude which method  has further potential for implementation in cities and to identify where future research should focus on.        34


There are quite a few realised farming projects on surfaces of buildings, both in countries of the developing  and  the  developed  world,  that  show  the  range  of  forms  that  this  practice  can  get:  from  low  maintenance,  cheap systems to cost effective, high‐maintenance projects. Information about the case studies chosen in this  paper is sourced from websites such as “City Farmer News” which has been a useful tool to obtain information  regarding realised examples of BIA projects. As all case studies refer to commercial farming projects, further  knowledge and details are obtained by each project’s official website. All case studies are selected in the basis  of the following criteria:    

Relevance to advanced  farming  operations,  with  food production being  approached  as  an  intensive,  agricultural practice and not as an experimental, household activity. 

Availability of  information  regarding  the  research  questions  of  the  study:  a)  selection  of  crops  and  productivity  b) achievements‐ benefits  and c) challenges‐drawbacks. 

       It needs to be stressed that, as far as crop production is concerned, the parameters/conditions of each case  study  differ.  They  may  all  concern  commercial  food  production  in  urban  centres,  yet  they  are  established  in  different countries of the world, with different climatic conditions ( from the USA to Japan) and they occupy  different size spaces (Nuvege farm in Japan uses 5300sq.m for vertical growing, whereas Eagle Street’s Green  Roof occupies only 557sq, m of space).In the future, it will be very interesting to set up an experiment of all  these methods, setting the same conditions and parameters for the projects (space size, geographical location)  so as to examine and come to safe conclusions regarding their productivity.       Finally,  the  research  did  not  raise  any  issues  of  ethics  as  all  information  is  sourced  from  published  books,  articles  and  websites.  The  field  trip  to  Reading  did  not  require  ethical  approval  as  the  visit  took  place  in  an  “open day” that the centre organised to introduce the Green Roof concept to the residents of Reading.        

      35


6.0 C A S E  S T U D Y  A N A L Y S I S     

                                                       6.1  G R E E N   R O O F   A G R I C U L T U R E  6.1.1 Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, Brooklyn  Keywords: commercial production, partnership, volunteering, education, organic food, open to public. 

Fig.12 and Fig.13: General overview of the plots in Eagle Street Rooftop Farm.  (photos by  Nyerges S. In Gorgolewski, M., Komisar, J. and Nasr, J.(2011). Carrot City. Creating places for Urban Agriculture.  United States: The Monacelli Press) 

Designer: A collaboration between Ben Flanner and Annie Novak.  Size: 557 sq. meters.  Height above ground level : 15m  Year of completion: 2008  Construction Costs: 60.000 $ for design and installation (NTDTV,2009)  (financed by Broadway Stages).  Funded by: Broadway Stages ( for the green roof installation ) (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011)  Yield: around 30 tons of vegetables and fruits per year (Urban Farm Online, 2011)  Who  is  involved:  A  head  farmer  with  a  team  of  trained  interns,  apprentices,  staff  from  Growing  Chefs,  agriculturalists and educators (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011)    Aim‐Purpose: To provide high production crops for restaurants and market sales.  Future Aim: To reduce the cost and introduce more farms in the City.   

36


Fig.14 and Fig.15: Tasks that take place on the roof (watering and planting) 

(photo by  Nyerges S. In Gorgolewski, M., Komisar, J. and Nasr, J.(2011). Carrot City. Creating places for Urban Agriculture.  United States: The Monacelli Press) 

Plant selection‐crops:   

Corn, salad  greens,  herbs,  nasturtiums,  peppers,  radish,  tomato,  aubergine,  zucchinis,  green  onions,  lettuce,  cabbage,  eggplant,  peas  and  beans.  The  most  successful  crops  are:  tomatoes,  hot  peppers,  sage and squash (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010). 

Activities that take place (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010):  

Farming of fruits and vegetables. 

Honey production and Chicken Keeping (Yelp, 2004). 

A community  supported  agriculture  program  (CSA)  (includes  composting  programs  in  cooperation  with  local restaurants of the area) (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010). 

Onsite farm market on Sundays. 

Farm‐based educational  and  volunteer  programs  (workshops  for  children  and  adults  about  composting  and cooking and food growing). 

Achievements‐ Benefits:   

Provides produce to local restaurants and citizens (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010). 

Reduction in cooling costs for the building below because the captured rainwater from the roof cools  the warehouse (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010).    37


Reduction in storm water run off (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010). 

Keys to Success:  

Bee hiving:  The  apiary  helps  pollinate and spread  the crops,  besides  the  honey production (Eagle Street  Rooftop Farm, 2010). 

Lightweight soil: a mixture of compost, rock particulates and shale  (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010) that   retains water and allows for air circulation. 

Earthworms: bought and mixed into soil to help it aerate (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010). 

North‐South orientated  planting  beds (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010) that benefit from day‐long sun  exposure. 

Management : Involves a group of people from  volunteers and the owners, to  trained interns and  Urban  Farming  Apprentices  (Eagle  Street  Rooftop  Farm,  2010).  Main  management  tasks  take  place  during  the  growing  season,  when  volunteers  visit  every  week  for  harvesting  and  composting  (Eagle  Street  Rooftop  Farm, 2010). 

Challenges‐ Drawbacks:  

Installation  Process: Soil had to be transferred three floors up to be placed on the roof. This task was  done over the course of a single day, with the use of a crane and  “super‐sacks” (Eagle Street Rooftop  Farm, 2010). 

Crop Selection: In the first season, the farm  was growing more than 30 types of crops which later on  had  to  be  reduced.    A  narrower  crop  list  was  then  introduced,  including  only  the  plants  that  were  proven to be successful in growing on the rooftop (Eagle Street Rooftop Farm, 2010). 

Irrigation: initially irrigation was provided via black plastic drip lines using city tap water.  This caused  issues,  as  “the  root  systems of  the  crops  were  incodusive  with drip  watering (esp. carrots,  radishes,  micro greens”).Currently the farm relies on hand watering via a hose for seedlings and transplants and  on rainwater on established plants. 

      38


6.2 C O N T A I N E R I S E D    A G R I C U L T U R E  6.2.1 Uncommon Ground Restaurant, Chicago  Keywords: commercial, containers, eco‐living, beehives, restaurant farming     

Fig 16: “Helen Cameron inspects the veggies growing on the roof of her restaurant” (photo by Stewart S., Sun Times)  Fig. 17: General overview of the farm on the roof of the restaurant (photo by Cameron M., In Gorgolewski, M., Komisar, J. and Nasr,  J.(2011). Carrot City. Creating places for Urban Agriculture. United States: The Monacelli Press) 

  Designer: a collaboration between M. and H. Cameron (clients) and P.Moser (Architect)  Size: 232 sq.m  (Uncommon Ground, 2010) of which 60sq.m are covered with planters (Gorgolewski, Komisar  and Nasr, 2011) .  Height above ground level:  6m (City Farmer News, 2008).  Year of completion: 2007  Construction Costs: $150.000 (City Farmer News, 2008).  Yield: not available  Who is involved: not available    Aim‐Purpose:   To provide the restaurant of the ground floor with locally produced food without the use of any  pesticides, herbicides, hormones or genetically modified ingredients (Uncommon Ground, 2010).    Future Aim: Not available    39


Fig. 18:  Overview  of  the  farm  on  the  roof  of  the  restaurant  (photo by Cameron M., In  Gorgolewski, M.,  Komisar, J.  and Nasr, J.(2011).  Carrot City. Creating places for Urban Agriculture. United States: The Monacelli Press)  Fig. 19: The planters on the roof (photo by Cameron M., In Gorgolewski, M., Komisar, J. and Nasr, J.(2011). Carrot City. Creating places for  Urban Agriculture. United States: The Monacelli Press) 

Plant selection‐crops:    

Sweet and hot peppers, eggplants, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, radish, beets, spinach, fennel, garlic,  edamame, beans, okra, shallots, herbs and flowers (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011) . 

Activities that take place:  

Farming

Educational activities for volunteers and schools (City Farmer News, 2008). 

Recycling programs and community events (Uncommon Ground, 2010). 

Bee hiving:  4 beehives are installed on the southern part of the garden and produce annually 18kg of  honey, which is used for the  restaurant  needs(Uncommon Ground, 2010). 

Private tours  for  the    public    (City  Farmer  News,  2008)  as  well  as  summer  camps  for  educational  purposes. 

Achievements‐ Benefits:  

Organic Food  Production:  The  roof  was  certified  as  an  organic  farm  in  2008  by  Midwest  Organic  Services Association (MOSA) (Uncommon Ground, 2010). 

Promotion of  the concept of eco‐living: installation of five(5) solar thermal panels (which cover up to  70 percent of the restaurants water), use of locally harvested wood, purchased equipment from local    40


sources and use of local craftsmen, workers and artists for interior design, use of recycled materials  and  eco  friendly  cleaning  supplies  (Uncommon  Ground,  2010)  are  only  some  of  the  steps  of  the  Uncommon Ground to promote ecological design and living.  

Relation development with local farmers (Uncommon Ground, 2010) 

Keys to success:   

Involvement: The  project  was  realised  with  the  help  of  community  volunteers  and  the  restaurant’s  employees) (Uncommon Ground, 2010). 

Composting: All kitchen waste from the restaurant  is composted and reused for gardening purposes  (Uncommon Ground, 2010). 

Materials Selection  :  long  lasting  materials  (  steel  and  cedar  )are  used  for  the  planters  to    provide  durability, ease of use and maximization of food production (Uncommon Ground, 2010). 

Planters Construction  and  design: Planter boxes have been built in a variety of different heights, to  allow flexibility in growing. All boxes are on casters, allowing different rearrangements of the garden’s  layout if needed, and they include support structure capability for plants such as tomatoes, cucumbers,  beans and peas (Uncommon Ground, 2010). 

Use of Earth boxes: Earth boxes reduce the water evaporation rate of the soil and keep it saturated  (Gorgolewski,  Komisar  and  Nasr,  2011),  allowing  thus  plants  to  grow  to  their  full  potential  (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011) . 

Challenges‐ Drawbacks:  

Re‐support  and  Re‐construction  of  the  building:  The  existing  building  required  additional  reinforcement (Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr, 2011) . 

Farm Installation:  6 tons of soil (City Farmer News, 2008) were transported on the roof. 

Crop Selection: The owner claims that experimenting with the crops will be needed so as to confirm  what can grow best in rooftop conditions. He will then readjust the restaurant’s needs and menu (City  Farmer News, 2008). 

Irrigation: For the irrigation of the boxes, plumbing was brought to the roof. It was essential that all  planter  boxes  would  be  connected  to  a  digitally  programmable  irrigation  system  so  that  the  risk  of  excessive water or drought would be avoided. This added further financial requirements to the project.    41


6.3 H Y D R O P O N I C S  6.3.1 Gotham Green, Greenpoint, Brooklyn  Keywords: hydroponic farm, commercial, high tech farming, controlled environment agriculture   

Fig. 20: General view of the hydroponic farm, (Gotham Greens, 2011) 

Designer: The Founders of the Farm (Viraj Puri, Eric Haley and Jennifer Nelkin).  Size: 1400 sq. metres  Height above ground level: On the roof of a former two‐story building.  Year of completion: 2008  Construction Costs: Around $2 million for the greenhouse construction (Collins, G., 2011) 

Funded by: The founders of the farm  (Eckel, S., 2011)  

Yield: 100 tons a year (Gotham Greens, 2011). 

Who is involved: 25 people that propagate hand‐pick and hand‐pack the produce (Collins, G. 2011). 

    42


Fig.21: Gotham Greens hydroponic farm on the roof of a two storey building in Brooklyn (The Green Point Gazette, 2008) 

Fig. 22: Gotham Greens vegetables on supermarket  shelves (Tedblog, 2011) 

Aim‐Purpose:    

“To create a local farm that would offer New York chefs and retailers the freshest and highest quality  culinary ingredients, year‐round, at competitive prices” (Gotham Greens, 2011).

Future Aim:   

To build other rooftop greenhouses all over the city, which will grow more diverse crops  (Eckel, S.,  2011). 

Plant selection‐crops: 

Butterhead lettuce, red leaf lettuce, tropicana green leaf lettuce, Gourmet Lettuce, medley, basil  (Sposato J., 2011), arugula, bok choy and Swiss chard  (Eckel, S., 2011).

Activities that take place: 

Farming

Research: A  part  of  the  project  is  dedicated  to  research  (funded  by  the  New  York  State  Energy  Research Development Authority) regarding energy efficiency methods of hydroponic food cultivation.  Monitoring and collection of data take place in order to check and compare the carbon impact and the  energy use of Hydroponics (Eckel, S., 2011). 

43


Achievements‐Benefits: 

High production and popular demand in the local supermarkets. 

Natural pest  Controls  through  the  introduction  of  parasitic  wasps,  lacewings  and  ladybugs  (Collins,  2011) 

Water Recycling:  Only  700  gallons  used  per  day12 (Collins,2011).Irrigation  water  is  captured  and  reused (Eckel, S., 2011) Rainwater is also gathered from a giant cistern (Schwartz, A., 2011). 

Keys to success:  

Controlled Environment Agriculture13: it provides the best control possible of the environment in the  greenhouse and creates the most suitable conditions for the growth of plants offering thus very high  productivity  and  efficiency  (TedBlog,  2011).  The  system  consists  of  a)  sensors  installed  inside  the  greenhouse  which  measure  the  temperature,  light,  humidity  and  oxygen  b)  a  central  computer  control system which adjusts the conditions in the greenhouse based to the readings of the sensors14  and c) a rooftop weather station that monitors wind, rain, temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide and  light intensity15.  

Proximity to the City: The farm is within distance from the city centre, it avoids the long‐distance and  the refrigerated food transport16 (Eckel, S., 2011) 

Experienced Staff: Selection of people with the right technological, financial and business know‐how (GothamGreens, 2011) has contributed to the project’s overall success. 

Social entrepreneurship: Involvement of a team of people with a diversity of skills that can cooperate  with each other (GothamGreens, 2011). 

12

a 10th of the amount of water  needed in conventional farming (Collins,2011)

13

“a combination of horticultural and engineering techniques, which can be well adapted to the built environment (TedBlog, 

2011) 14

“when temperature rises, fans and vents are deployed. If  it is very sunny a shade curtain opens and in case of rain the 

vents close automatically (TedBlog, 2011).  15

This serves to regulate irrigation pumps, greenhouse vents, exhaust fans, gable shutters and shade curtains.(Collins. 2011) 

16

This helps to reduce carbon emissions and air pollution. 

44


Trials: To decide which greens to grow, the team surveyed their customers and relied on their  experience of what would grow well. Then, they conducted variety trials with the five vegetables they  decided and finally settled on one that would do well in the system.(Sposato J., 2011) 

Challenges‐ Drawbacks:  

Energy demanding to achieve the right conditions for the crops. However, the farm is designed to be  as energy efficient as possible; For cooling, the greenhouse relies mostly on natural ventilation and   also on fans and for heating, a 59 kilowatt array solar energy system is installed on the roof, which  feeds a part of the facilities electrical needs (TedBlog, 2011). A radiant water system will be installed in  the future, so as to heat the greenhouse through water instead of through air. 

Establishment costs: According to the owners, the set up costs are high, but they expect to save  energy costs in the long run (TedBlog, 2011). 

                                45


6.4  V E R T I C A L   F A R M I N G   6.4.1  Nuvege, Kyoto, Japan  Keywords: highly controlled farming environment, indoor farming 

Fig.23: Nuvege Farm Exterior view in Kyoto, Japan (Nuvege, 2011)  Fig. 24 : Indoor Farming in Nuvege (Nuvege, 2011) 

Size: 5300 sq. meters of vertical growing space (Cho, 2011)  Year of completion:2006  Construction Costs: not available  Funded by: Green Green Earth Inc.  Yield: 6 million lettuces per year    Employees: Not known  Aim‐Purpose: Commercial Lettuce production.  Future Aim: Establishment of branch operations in Asia and the United States.                    46


Fig.25: Contamination Security measures in Nuvege (Nuvege, 2011) 

Plant Selection‐Crops:   

a range of lettuce varieties (Frill, Moco, Silk, Pleat, Wasabi, Ruttkora and Detroit lettuce) 

Activities that take place:   

Farming

Achievements‐ Benefits:  

High quality, Bacteria Free and healthier products: all products are organic and pesticide free.  

Increased yield: this is achieved through a “lighting network that increases vegetable growth by  equalizing light emissions which advance photosynthesis through increased levels of carbon dioxide”  (Nuvege, 2011). 

Year round Crop production 

Water Saving: it demands 70‐90 % less water than conventional farming.  

Local production: products reach the market  in a day, offering thus to customers the luxury to eat  them fresh 

Popular Demand: the company sells its products to Subway Chain Markets, Disneyland and the United  States Army (Nuvege, 2011).     

Keys to success:  

Fully protected environment, unaffected by weather: food growing takes place indoors, in a building  sealed and protected from the outside environment. 

Challenges: Not available 

  47


7.0 D I S C U S S I O N       SELECTION OF CROPS           The literature review and the case studies show that there is a variety of crops that grow on rooftops and  inside buildings: Green roof farming has allowed the farmers of Eagle Street rooftop farm to grow salad greens  and  vegetables.  The  owners  of  the  Uncommon  Ground  Containerised  Farm  grow  herbs,  vegetables  and  flowers in their containers and provide their products to the restaurant’s kitchen on the ground floor. Gotham  Greens’  Hydroponic  farm produces  an  impressive  yield  of  leafy  vegetables,  aromatic  salad greens and herbs  whereas  Nuvege  Vertical  farm  in  Japan  provides  lettuces  to  the  local  supermarkets.  Leafy  vegetables,  salad  greens and herbs seem to thrive in BIA conditions, whether grown in soil or in water. All case studies agree that  the selection of crops needs further tests and trials on roofs and inside buildings in order to be able to conclude  which crop varieties perform best in BIA conditions. For example, none of the above projects grows fruits, with  the  exception  of  strawberries  that  grow  on  Eagle  Street’s  rooftop  farm.  Fruit  trees  have  greater  irrigation  demands than vegetables (Germain et al., 2008): this will create further challenges for BIA, in terms of building  load capacity and labour input, which future research will need to examine.    PRODUCTIVITY         As  far  as  productivity  is  concerned,  it  is  possible  to  infer  that  Vertical  Farming  and  Hydroponics  in  greenhouses  (practices  that  take  place  indoors  and  are  unaffected  by  weather  conditions)  are  highly  productive  systems  that  provide  year  round,  high  value  cash,  organic  crops:  6  million  lettuces  per  year  for  Nuvege Vertical Farm and 100 tons of vegetables for Gotham Greens’ Hydroponic Farm are the proof. Green  Roof Agriculture and Containerised Farming (practices that take place outdoors and their productivity depends  on weather conditions) are also successful, though their annual yield is lower: 30 tons of vegetable crops per  year for Eagle Street Rooftop farm and just a sufficient food production for Uncommon Ground’s Containerised  farm to cover the needs of its restaurant.         In soil‐based methods, productivity is increased through the implementation of techniques such as compost  making  and  mulching  or  through  involving  other  living  organisms  in  the  process  (earthworms,  bees  and  humans). In water‐based methods, on the other hand, productivity is regulated through automated procedures.     48


As previously said, it needs to be stressed that all case studies in this paper refer to practices that occupy  different  sizes  of  space:  Nuvege  farm  in  Japan  uses  5300sq.m.  for  Vertical  growing,  whereas  Eagle  Street’s  Green Roof occupies only 557sq.m. of space. Besides, they are established in different countries of the world,  in  different  climatic  conditions:  thus  their  annual  yield  is  expected  to  vary.  Further  study  on  the  topic  of  productivity of BIA is therefore recommended: it will be very useful in the future to set up an experiment in  order to test the productivity of all these methods, setting the same conditions and parameters for the projects  (space size, geographical location).         The second question in this research regarded to the benefits that each BIA method offers to the areas of  a) Built, b) Natural and c) Human environment. Table 3 (next page) provides analytical information on this  topic, it gives general overview of all BIA methods and it aims to categorise information sourced from the  literature review and case studies. To be more specific:    GREEN ROOF AGRICULTURE:         Green Roof Agriculture offers a range of benefits. As far as the Built environment is concerned, it provides  thermal and acoustic insulation to the building structure, it improves the microclimate and it extends the life of  the roof, while “softening” the view of the city (Livingroofs, 2011).          As  far  as  the  Natural  environment  is  concerned,  it  creates  an  ecosystem  in  which  all  living  organisms  contribute to the natural renewal of nutrients of the growing medium: for example, in Eagle Street farm the  soil quality is enhanced by the help of earthworms while bees from the apiary pollinate the crops. Therefore,  biodiversity is enhanced.          It is interesting to note the benefits that Green Roof Agriculture offers to people (Human Environment).  From a Social perspective,  it offers a variety of activities (educational and recreational) that take place along  with  farming.  It  also  motivates  people  to  take  part  in  the  farming  process  (community  involvement).  Community involvement is a very important benefit of Green Roof Agriculture, because it can strengthen the  relations between the members of a group (Ohmer et. al.,2009) by offering them the opportunity to cooperate  in order to achieve a common goal. Moreover, community involvement can be beneficial for the project itself:  In  Eagle Street  farm,  for  example,  it contributed  to the project’s overall  success.  Volunteers,  interns  and  the  employers of the rooftop farm cooperated for the overall management of the project and helped for the farm’s  maintenance.     49


50


51


As far  as  Health  benefits  are  concerned,  it  is  widely  known  that  home  gardening  is  used  as  a  “tool  to  alleviate  physical  and  mental  disabilities”  (Shieh  et  al., 2008: 23). With  this  in  mind, Green  Roof  farming  can  also “aid people’s mental and physical health” through their connection with the soil and observation of nature  (Raske, 2010).          In terms of financial benefits, farming on Green Roofs can reduce i) the heating and cooling costs of the  building  structure,  ii)  the  drainage  costs  and  finally  iii)  the  roof  protection  costs  “through  the  reuse  of  secondary  aggregates”(Livingroofs,  2011).  In  terms  of  set  up  costs,  as  the  case  studies  showed,  Green  Roof  agriculture is less expensive, compared to water‐based practices ($1070 per sq.m for the set up of Eagle street  Green  roof  farm  as  opposed  to  $1428  per  sq.m  for  the  establishment  of  Gotham  Greens  hydroponic  greenhouse). Green roof farming can further limit down the set up costs by making use of recycled materials:  for example, materials found on site can be used for the construction of the windbreakers or the rain collectors  etc. A great challenge of Green roof farming is the irrigation cost, which according to the literature review can  be reduced by storing water in rain barrels.         Finally, in terms of labour  input, Green roof Agriculture is an intensive practice which requires a team of  people to undertake tasks on a regular basis (Eagle Street farm case study). An advantage, however, is that it  does  not  demand  experienced  or  professionally  trained  staff,  as  opposed  to  water‐based  farming  methods  which require farmers with an excellent knowledge of the farming techniques.    CONTAINERISED FARMING:          Similar  to  Green  Roof  Agriculture,  Containerised  farming  offers  a  range  of  benefits.  As  far  as  the  Built  environment is concerned, neither the literature review, nor the case studies mention any benefits regarding  the  protection  of  the  building  structure.  In  terms  of  aesthetics,  the  case  study  of  Uncommon  Ground  shows  that  design  and  farming  can  be  compatible  and  that  aesthetically  pleasing  design  solutions  can  be  achieved,  even with containers.          The  benefits  to  the  Natural  and  Human  environment  are  equivalent  to  Green  Roof  agriculture  with  the  exception of the set up costs that are generally the lowest of all BIA methods: only $646 per sq.m are spent for  the establishment of Uncommon Ground’s container farm.        52


HYDROPONICS:                Hydroponics is an interesting case in which crop yield is at its maximum, yet the range of benefits that it  offers    are  limited.  As  far  as  the  Built  environment  is  concerned,  the  existing  literature  does  not  provide  information  regarding  the  impacts  that  the  construction  of  greenhouses  has  on  buildings  and  on  the  microclimate. In terms of aesthetics, greenhouses do not constitute an aesthetic building element, thus their  contribution in improving a city’s skyline is argued. Architects and urban planners will have an important role in  evaluating the potential of Hydroponics as systems that can be incorporated into the built environment.         As  far  as  the  Natural  environment  is  concerned,  Hydroponics  does  not  interact  with  the  outdoor  environment.  As  Roberto  supports,  the  success  of  Hydroponics  relies  on  “the  ideal  growing  conditions  of  a  sterile environment” (Roberto, 2000:8).The entire system is based on controlled environment agriculture, with  sensors  and  computers  established  inside  the  greenhouse  and  does  not  rely  on  the  performance  of  an  ecosystem for the crop production.          As  far  as  the  Human  environment  is  concerned:  The  role  of  humans  in  Hydroponics  is  to  control  the  growing conditions and not to assist in the system. Thus, farmers involved in Hydroponics must be well trained  and skilled in order to contribute in the procedure. As the literature review revealed, failure due to mistakes  can damage the crop: this can probably explain the lack of community involvement and integration of uses (in  Gotham Greens for example, only farming and research activities take place).         In terms of financial benefits: hydroponic systems produce high yields and prevent loses of nutrients, but  demand higher investments, since they rely on the implementation of high technology in order to create the  ideal growing conditions for the crops. As previously mentioned, Gotham Greens, required $1428 per sq. meter  for  the  establishment  of  their  system‐  a  very  high  investment  compared  to  the  investments  of  Green  Roof  agriculture and containerised farming. The energy costs for the heating and cooling of the greenhouse and for  the entire building structure are not mentioned in the literature or in the case study of Gotham Greens: this is  another issue that research should examine in the future.             Finally, Labour input is lower in Hydroponics, as all tasks are automated. However, experienced and highly  skilled staff is more than essential.          53


VERTICAL FARMING:         An  issue  that  emerges  from  the  case  studies  and  the  literature  review  is  that  the  majority  of  books  and  articles  praise  the  idea  of  vertical  farming  and  of  constructing  new  buildings  in  order  to  grow  food  in  cities.  They do not further question the impact that vertical farming may have on the built environment. Nelkin and  Caplow  (2008)  stress  the  fact  that  urbanization  as  well  as  financial  costs  of  delivering  power  and  water  are  increasing.  It  seems  thus  logical  to  question how  much  space  there  is actually  available  in  cities to  construct  new  building  complexes  and  how  much  of  natural  resources  are  available  in  order  for  vertical  farming  to  become a reality. Another issue that arises is the disconnection of people from nature. Barker (2007) supports  that  the  lack  of  connection  of  societies  to  nature  is  a  well  recognised  problem  and  steps  are  needed  to  be  taken .With this in mind, it would be rational to question the possibility of using the remaining free space of  cities to erect buildings as opposed to creating additional green spaces.         As far as the natural environment is concerned, on the one hand, the concept of vertical farming supports  the  creation  of  zero  energy  buildings.  On  the  other  hand,  this  needs  further  research  in  order  to  become  a  reality: Despommier also admits this when he claims that “Vertical farms are likely to be experimental projects”.  Besides, nature is not integrating with the growing process of plants in vertical farms: it is all about technology  inside buildings, thus ecosystem creation is absent.          As far as the Human  environment  is concerned, vertical farming does not encourage integration of uses,  unless  additional  buildings  are  constructed  next  to  the  farms,  that  can  accommodate  educational  or  recreational activities. Community involvement is an impossible task: the conditions inside the building do not  allow the involvement of non trained staff. Moreover, in order to prevent contamination, measurements are  strict: all equipment must be disinfected and the staff must wear uniforms. One issue that emerges from the  case study of Nuvege farm is linked to the impact of vertical farms to human health: a practice that is created  only for maximum plant growth purposes, is it likely to provide a suitable environment to the people that will  be, for example, exposed to artificial light or to limited natural light? Largo‐Wight (2011) supports that natural  light  plays  an  important  health  focus.  Grimaldi  et.  al  (2008)  further  support  that  shortage  of  exposure  to  daylight is associated with mental ill‐being. More research is needed in the above field in order to investigate  the impact that vertical farming would have to people’s well‐being.         In terms of financial  benefits, vertical farming produces an optimum annual yield, however, set up costs  are estimated as the highest of all four BIA methods This is of no wonder if one thinks of the high technology    54


that needs  to  be  implemented  in  order  to  create  the  ideal  growing  conditions  for  the  crops  indoors.  A  final  issue  that  emerges  from  Vertical  farming  is  whether  humans  should  rely  completely  on  technology  for  the  production of their food, and what the financial loss would be in case technology fails‐ even for simple external  reasons such as electricity shortage.                                                       55


8.0 C O N C L U S I O N S       

    From the above, it is possible to conclude that there is a variety of crops that grow on rooftops and inside  buildings: from herbs to salad greens and leafy vegetables. Water based practices (Hydroponics and Vertical  farming)  provide  high  annual  yield  of  high  cash  value,  specialty  crops.  Soil  based  practices  (Green  Roof  agriculture  and  Containerised  farming)  provide  satisfactory  yields,  but  crops  are  always  subject  to  potential  failure due to weather conditions. Literature review and case studies agree that further research and trials are  needed for all methods in order to clarify which crops thrive in BIA conditions.       Soil‐based  methods  have  more  benefits  to  offer  over  water‐based  farming  methods:  they  form  an  ecosystem in which all organisms interact with their physical environment, providing opportunities to people  for recreation, education and connection with nature. They assist in making them feel a part of a community  through their involvement in the project, they allow them to make mistakes and learn, to experiment and to  improve  their  physical  and  mental  health.  In  terms  of  aesthetics,  Green  Roofs  and  containerised  farming  improve the views of the built environment. At the same time, Green Roofs offer the benefit of insulating the  building, reducing its energy costs ‐ a benefit that containerised farming does not offer. Although both systems  demand higher labour input compared to water‐based methods, they allow the involvement of inexperienced  people in the project: volunteers and trainees can contribute and help to achieve a successful result.     On  the  other  hand,  water‐based  systems  have  the  capacity  to  produce  higher  yields  ,  excluding  however,  people  and  the  environment  from  the  overall  procedure:  people  only  facilitate  the  production  through  the  computerised  control  of  the  growing  conditions  and  they  are  not  further  involved  in  the  farming  process.  Hydroponics  and  vertical  farming  are  more  demanding  in  terms  of  set  up  costs,  which  according  to  the  literature review may be compensated in the long run. Although they are completely unaffected by weather  conditions, failure can also exist due to human mistakes, for example due to contamination of water which can  damage  the  crop.  In  terms  of  aesthetics  none  of  these  two  methods  contributes  aesthetically  in  the  built  environment. Vertical farming needs extra space in the urban grid, as new building structures will need to be  erected:  this  is  an  important  issue  to  investigate,  because  lack  of  space  is  already  a  current  issue  in  cities.  Finally, as opposed to soil‐based systems, Hydroponics and Vertical farming do not improve the quality of our  natural environment. Their concern is not to put further strain on it, by using organic farming methods and by  collecting and storing energy.    56


There is a variety of issues that future research should examine. As far as hydroponics is concerned, it is  essential to investigate how greenhouses on rooftops will affect the image of our cities and how this would add  further challenges regarding the energy costs of the buildings that accommodate the farms. Issues that emerge  from Vertical farming are related to many aspects including ethical issues: Firstly, it needs to be examined how  the  idea  of  a  zero‐energy  building  can  be  achieved.  Secondly,  it  is  necessary  to  investigate  whether  relying  completely  on  technology  for  food  production  is  advisable.  Thirdly,  it  needs  to  be  examined  whether  the  expenses  for  the  establishment  of  high‐tech  systems  can  offer  benefits  in  the  long  run.  Fourthly,  research  should  examine  the  impacts  that  vertical  farms  will  have  on  the  well‐being  of  people  and  whether  vertical  farming is socially sustainable practice.         To sum up, it is possible to infer that soil‐based BIA systems have more benefits and potential for future  implementation  in  cities,  even  though  their  productivity  is  lower‐  compared  to  water‐based  methods.  Green  roof  agriculture  seems  the  most  promising  practice  that  offers  benefits  to  nature,  buildings  and  humans,  making them feel a part of an ecosystem.  An important issue to keep in mind is whether food production in  cities is a goal to achieve per se, or planners and designers are interested in incorporating it into the ecosystem  and hence in people’s lives. Further investigation to the above questions would assist research and technology  to progress in the field of BIA and to implement it extensively in cities.     

                        57


9.0 R E F E R E N C E S     Architectural Design, (2005), Special issue on Food and the City, Franck K. (ed.) May, 75 (3)    Astee, L.Y and Kishnani, N. (2010) Building Integrated Agriculture. Utilising rooftops for Sustainable Food Crop   Cultivation in Singapore. Journal of Green Building, 5(2), 105‐113         Barker, S. (2007) Reconnecting with nature; learning from the media. Journal of Biological Education , 41 (4):  147‐149  Boivin, M.A., Lamry, M.P., Gosselin, A. and Dansereau, B. (2001) Effect of artificial substrate depth on freezing  injury of six herbaceous perennials grown in a green roof system. HortTechnology. 11:409‐412    British Council for Offices (2003) Green Roofs; Research Advice Note. London: British Council for Offices    Cho, R. (2011) Vertical Farms: From Vision to Reality Available online at:  http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2011/10/13/vertical‐farms‐from‐vision‐to‐reality/[Accessed: 20.10.2011]    Collins,G.(2011)  Want  Fresher  Produce?  Leave  Dirt  Behind.  Available  online  <http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/03/dining/hydroponic‐produce‐gains‐fans‐and  flavor.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all> [Accessed: 04.10.2011] 

at

Corrigan, M.P (2011) Growing what you eat: Developing community gardens in Baltimore, Maryland, Applied  Geography, 31, 1232‐1241      Despommier, D. (2010 (a)) The vertical farm: controlled environment agriculture carried out in tall buildings  would create greater food safety and security for large urban populations, Journal of Consumer Protection and  Food Safety, 6:233–236    Despommier, D. (2010 (b)) The vertical Farm: Feeding the world in the 21st Century, New York: St.Martin’s Press    Deveza, K. and Holmer, R. (2002) Container Gardening – A Way of Growing Vegetables in the City. Paper  presented at the Urban Vegetable Gardening Seminar. Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines: Sundayag Sa  Amihanang Mindanao Trade Expo. URL [Accessed: 19.05.2010]    Devries, J. (2003), Hydroponics, pp. 103‐114, in C. Beytes (Ed.), Ball Redbook: Greenhouses and Equipment,  Vol.1, 17ed., Illinois: Ball Publishing    De Zeeuw, H. ,Van Veenhuizen, R. and Dubbeling, M. (2011) The role of Urban Agriculture in building resilient  cities in developing countries, Journal of Agricultural Science, pp; 1‐11  Available online at;  https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=1rF5fVx4UHZoKCx6ewTv0VZsESCwL7l v7Qb7EUyGMx8BmYUKq8M_OkWRQQlUx&hl=en_US [Accessed: 19.05.2010]    Drechsel P. and Dongus S. (2010) Dynamics and sustainability of urban agriculture; examples from sub‐Saharan  Africa, Sustainability Science, 5; 69‐78      Dunnett, N. and Clayden, A. (2007) The stormwater chain. In: Mumford, A. ed. (2007). Rain Gardens. Managing  water sustainably in the garden and designed landscape. Portland:Timber Press. Ch.2    Dunnett N. and Kingsbury, N.(2004) Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls, Portland, OR : Timber Press, Inc.,      58


Durhman , A.,  Rowe, D.B,  Ebert‐May, D. and Rugh, D.L  (2004) Evaluation of crassulacean species on extensive  green roofs. Paper presented at the Second Annual Greening Rooftops for Sustainable Communities  Conference, Awards and Trade Show; 2–4 June 2004, Portland, Oregon. .    Earth Pledge Green Roofs Iniative (2005) Green Roofs. Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey: Shiffer Books    Eckel, S. (2011) Rooftop farms sprouting in Brooklyn. Urban pioneers cater to restaurants and markets.  Available online at; <http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/20110828/REAL_ESTATE/308289984> [Accessed  at 4 October 2011]    Erdmann, R.A.M (2011) Container Farming: Organic food production in the slums of Mexico City [online]  Available at:  <http://journeytoforever.org/garden_con‐mexico.html>[Accessed 12 September 2011 ].    Foss, J., Quesnel,A. and Danielsson,N. (2011) Sustainable Rooftop Agriculture:”A strategic guide for city  implementation” [online] Available at: http://metrohippie.com/sustainable‐rooftop‐agriculture‐ guide/[Accessed 12 September 2011 ].    Foundation for Local Food Initiatives (2002) The Local Food Sector: Its Size and Potential (Bristol, Foundation for  Local Food Initiatives) _http://www.localfood.org.uk/flair/flair‐report‐Apr‐02.pdf    Germain et. al (2008) Guide to setting up Your Own Edible Rooftop Garden.[pdf] Montreal: Alternatives and the  Rooftop Garden Project. Available at: http://rooftopgardens.ca/files/howto_EN_FINAL_lowres.pdf  [Accessed:  21.09.2011]    Gorgolewski, M., Komisar, J. and Nasr, J., (2011) Carrot City: Creating places for urban agriculture, New York:  The Monacelli Press    Graff, G., (2009) A greener revolution: An argument for vertical farming, Plan Canada, 49 (2); 49‐51    Grewal S. S. and Grewal S. P., (2011) Can cities become self‐reliant in food? Cities, 29 (1); 1‐10     Grimaldi, S., Partonen, T., Saarni, S.I, Aromaa, A. and Lonnquist, J. (2008) Indoors illumination and seasonal  changes in mood and behaviour are associated with the health related quality of life, Health and Quality of Life  Outcomes, 6; art. no 56    Heinze, W. (1985). Results of an experiment on extensive growth of vegetation on roofs. Rasen Grünflachen  Begrünungen. 16: ( 3): 80‐88    Hines, C. (2000) Localization: A Global Manifesto, London: Earthscan    Jacobsen, P. (2003), insect screens, pp.201‐205, in C.Beytes (Ed.), Ball Redbook: Greenhouse and Equipment,  Vol. 1, 17th ed., Illinois: Ball Publishing    Jensen, M.N. (1997) Hydroponics, HortSci, 32 (6); 1018‐1021    59


Jones, J.B., (2005) Hydroponics: a practical guide for the soilless grower. 2nd ed. USA: CRC Press    Kail‐Vinish, P., (2010) Research Report on the Potential for Rooftop Food Production in Toronto, Available  online at;  http://urbangrowers.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/rooftop‐food‐production‐research‐report‐penny‐kaill‐ vinish‐april‐2010.pdf [Accessed: 21.09.2011]    Kennedy, G., Nantel, G. and Shetty, P., (2004) Globalization of food systems in developing countries: impact on  food security and nutrition. FAO food and nutrition paper 83; 1‐300 

Köhler, M. (2003) Plant survival research and biodiversity: Lessons from Europe. Paper presented at the First  Annual Greening Rooftops for Sustainable Communities Conference, Awards and Trade Show; 20–30 May 2003,  Chicago    Komisar, J., Nasr J. and Gorgolewski M., (2009) Designing for food and agriculture; Recent explorations at  Ryerson University, Open House International, 34(2); 61‐70     Kortright, R., (2001)  Evaluating the potential of green roof agriculture: a demonstration project. MA Thesis,  Trent University     Kosareo, L. and  Ries R. (2007), Comparative environmental life cycle assessment of green roofs. Building and  Environment,  42: 2606–2613.    Kremer, P. and DeLiberty, T.L., (2011) Local food practices and growing potential: Mapping the case of  Philadelphia, Applied Geography, 31 (4); 1252‐1261    Lang, T. (1999) Local sustainability in a sea of globalisation? The case of food policy, in: M. Kenny & J.  Meadowcroft (Eds) Planning Sustainability ,London: Routledge    Largo‐Wight, E. (2011) Cultivating healthy places and communities; Evidense based nature contact  recommendations, International Journal of Environmental Health Research, 21(1); 41‐61     Lowitt P. and Peck S., (2008) Planning for rooftops. The benefits of green roof infrastructure. Planning Advisory  Service Memo, March/April issue  Lyson, T.A (2004) Civic agriculture: Reconnecting farm, food, and community, Medford: Tufts University Press    MacDonald, L., (2008) Potential for Agriculture in combination with native plants on extensive green roofs. MA  Thesis, University of Michigan    Mentens, J., Raes, D. and Hermy, M. (2005) Green roofs as a tool for solving the rainwater runoff problem in  the urbanized 21st century? Landscape and Urban Planning. 77: 21‐226  Monterusso, M.A. , Rowe, D.B. and Rugh, C.L. (2005) Establishment and persistence of Sedum spp. and native  taxa for green roof applications. HortScience. 40: 391‐396    Moran, A., Hunt, B.  and Smith, J. (2005) Hydrologic and water quality performance from greenroofs in  Goldsboro and Raleigh, North Carolina. Paper presented at the Third Annual Greening Rooftops for Sustainable  Communities Conference, Awards and Trade Show; 4–6 May 2005, Washington, DC.       60


Mougeot, L. (1999) Urban agriculture: Definition, Presence, Potentials and Risks, and Policy Challenges. Paper  presented to the International Workshop "Growing Cities, Growing Food", October 11‐15 1999, Havana, Cuba    Murray, S., (2010) Highly productive, Financial Times, 24 Apr 1b     Nairn, M. and Vitiello, D., (2009) Lush lots: Everyday urban agriculture ‐ From community gardening to  community food security, Harvard Design Magazine (31); 94‐100    Nelkin, J. and Caplow, T., (2008) Sustainable controlled environment agriculture for urban areas, Acta  Horticulturae, 801 (part 1); 449‐455       Nichol, L. (2003) Local food production:Some implications for planning, Planning Theory and Practice, 4(4): 409‐ 427    Nickols, M. (2002) Aeroponics: production systems and research tools, The Growing Edge, 13 (5): 30‐35    Nowak, M., (2004), Urban Agriculture on the Rooftop. MA Thesis, Cornwell University          Oberndorfer, E., Lundholm, J., Bass, B., Coffman, R.R., Doshi, H., Dunnett, N., Gaffin, S., Rowe, B. (2007), Green  Roofs as Urban ecosystems; ecological structures, Functions, and Services, Bioscience, 57 (10); 823‐833       Ohmer, M.L., Meadowcroft, P., Free, K. and Lewis, E. (2009) Community gardening and community  development: individual, social and community benefits of a community conservation program, Journal of  Community Practice, 17 (4); 377‐399     Proefrock, P. and Green, H. (2009) Let’s make this clear: Vertical Farms don’t make sense [online] Available at: <http://www.ecogeek.org/agriculture/2984‐lets‐make‐this‐clear‐vertical‐farms‐dont‐make‐sens>[Accessed  10  October 2011 ]    Raske, M. (2010) Nursing home quality of life: study of an enabling garden, Journal of Gerontological Social  Work, 53 (4); 336‐351                 Richards, D.(2011) RISC Roof Garden Open Days, [Site Visit to RISC] (Personal communication, 3 July 2011)    Reading International Solidarity Centre (RISC), (2011), Roof Structure [leaflet] July 2011    Roberto, K.F., (2000) How‐To Hydroponics, 3rd ed. New York: Future Garden Inc.  Rowe, D.B., (2011) Green roofs as a means of pollution abatement, Environmental Pollution, 159; 2100‐2110      Rowe, D.B, Monterusso, M.A and Rugh, C.L. (2006), Assessment of heat‐expanded slate and fertility  requirements in green roof substrates. HortTechnology,  16 : 471–477.     Rosenzweig, C., Solecki, W., Parshall, L., Gaffin, S., Lynn, B., Goldberg, R., Cox, J., Hodges, S., (2006) Mitigating  New York City's heat island with urban forestry, living roofs, and light surfaces. In: Proceedings of Sixth  Symposium on the Urban Environment, Jan 30–Feb 2, Atlanta,  GA.http://amsconfex.com/ams/pdfpapers/103341.pdf.      61


Sailor, D.J. (2008) A green roof model for building energy simulation programs. Energy and Buildings, 40: 1466– 1478    Satterthwaite, D., MacGranaham, G. and Tacoli, C., (2010) Urbanization and its implications for food and  farming. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 365 (1554): 2809‐2820    Schwartz, A., (2011) Gotham Greens Building First Hydroponic Rooftop Farm in NYC, Available online at; <  http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/ariel‐schwartz/sustainability/gotham‐greens‐building‐first‐hydroponic‐ rooftop‐farm‐nyc> [Accessed: 04.10.2011]    Shieh,S., Pollard, C. and Palada, M.C. (2008) Developing a horticulture therapy garden for vocational training in  Taiwan, Acta Horticulturae, 775:23‐30    Shoenstein, G.P. (2001), Hope through the Hydroponics, The Growing Edge, 13 (2): 69‐79    Smit J. and Nasr J. (1992) Urban agriculture for sustainable cities; using wastes and idle land and water bodies  as resources, Environment and Urbanization, 4 (2); 141‐152      Sonnino R., (2009) Feeding the City; Towards a New research and Planning Agenda, International planning  Studies, 14; 425‐435     Sposato J., (2011) Gotham Greens Guide to Green. Available online at;  <http://www.greenpointnews.com/news/3652/gotham‐greens‐guide‐to‐greens> [Accessed: 04.10.2011]  United Nations. 2008 World urbanization prospects: the 2007 revision, CD‐ROM edition. New York, NY: United  Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division    Van Patten, G.F. (2008) Gardening indoors with Soil and Hydroponics, Van Patten Publishing    Van Renterghem, T. and Botteldooren, D. (2009) Reducing the acoustical facade load from road traffic with  green roofs.Building and Environment, 44 :1081–1087    Velazquez, L. S. (2005), Organic greenroof architecture: Sustainable design for the new millennium.  Environmental Quality Management, 14: 73–85.       Viljoen,A., Bohn, K. and Howe, J. (2005), Continuous Productive Urban Landscapes. Burlington MA:  Architectural Press    Wigriarajah, K. (1995) Mineral nutrition in plants, pp.193‐222, in M. Pessarakli (Ed.) Handbook of plant and crop  Physiology, New York: Marcel Dekker    Wiley j. and Sons Ltd., (2007), Urban American landscape (Designed Landscape creating outdoor public space),  Architectural Design, 186; 36‐47         62


Williams N., Rayner J.P and Raynor K.J (2010) Green roofs for a wide brown land; opportunities and barriers for  rooftop greening in Australia, Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 9, 245‐251            Zezza  A. and Tasciotti L., (2010) Urban agriculture, poverty, and food security: Empirical evidence from a  sample of developing countries, Food Policy, 35, 265–273 

  Websites  City Farmer (2000) Urban Agriculture ‐ Justification and Planning Guidelines [online] Available at:  http://www.cityfarmer.org/uajustification.html [Accessed 05 September 2011 ]  City Farmer News (2008) Restaurant opens 2,500‐square foot Organic Rooftop Farm – first to be Certified  Organic in the USA [online] Available at: http://www.cityfarmer.info/?s=uncommon+ground[Accessed 05  September 2011 ]    Eagle Street Rooftop Farm (2010) Farm Fact Sheet [online] Available at: http://rooftopfarms.org/wp‐ content/uploads/2010/01/EagleStreetRooftopFarmFactSheet2010.pdf [Accessed 05 September 2011 ]  Gotham Greens (2011) Gotham Greens’ first greenhouse facility, located on a rooftop in Greenpoint, Brookyn,  will begin harvesting in June 2011. [online] Available at: http://gothamgreens.com/our‐farm/ [Accessed 05  September 2011 ]  LivingRoofs (2011) Introduction to Green Roof Benefits [online] Available at: http://livingroofs.org/2010030565/green‐roof‐benefits/greenroof‐benefits.html [Accessed 19 July 2011 ]    NDTV, (2009) New York City Rooftop Farm [video] Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3mLPy0ttqc> [Accessed 09 August 2011 ]    Nuvege (2011) What is a “Vertical Farming Environment?” [online] Available at: http://nuvege.com/about3.html[Accessed 19 October 2011 ].    TedBlog (2011) Fellows Friday with Viraj Puri [online] Available at: http://blog.ted.com/2011/07/01/fellows‐ friday‐with‐viraj‐puri/[Accessed 09 August 2011 ]    Technology for the poor (Not Known) Urban Agriculture: a guide to container gardens [online] Available at:  <http://www.technologyforthepoor.com/UrbanAgriculture/Garden.htm> [Accessed 10 October 2011 ].     The Economist (2010) Vertical farming: Does it really stack up? [online] Available at: http://www.economist.com/node/17647627 [Accessed 10 October 2011 ].     The  Greenpoint  Gazette  (2011)  Gotham  Greens’  Guide  to  Greens  [online]  Available  at: http://www.greenpointnews.com/news/3652/gotham‐greens‐guide‐to‐greens [Accessed 10 October 2011 ].    The  Vertical  Farm  (2011)  The  vertical  farm:  Learn  more  [online]  Available  at: <http://www.verticalfarm.com/more>[Accessed 10 October 2011 ]    Uncommon Ground (2010) Rooftop Farm resources [online] Available at: <http://www.uncommonground.com/pages/roof_top_farm_resources/151.php > [Accessed 12 August 2011 ]  

63


Urban Farm  Online  (2011)  Eagle  Street  Rooftop  Farm  [online]  Available  at: http://www.urbanfarmonline.com/community‐building‐and‐resources/urban‐farm‐bloggers/urban‐farmer‐ judy‐hausman/eagle‐street‐rooftop‐farm.aspx [Accessed 09 August 2011 ] 

Yelp (2004) Eagle Street rooftop farm [online] Available at:  http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/x_I__ctT3nwQUij9wEMySw?select=jR_g9P5_0oJUqoeIPjDLtA  [Accessed  09  August 2011 ]     

                                                                 

64


1 0. P H O T O     C R E D I T S    Fig.1: RISC, 2011 Cross section of RISC’s Green Roof. [Illustration](Reading International Solidarity Centre leaflet)  Fig.2: Bakratsa, E., 2011. Green Cones can be used to compost kitchen waste on RISC’s Green Roof.  [photograph]  Fig.3:  Bakratsa,  E.,  2011.  Fencing  made  of  coppiced  hazel  is  used  on  RISC’s  Green  Roof  as  a  windbreaker.  [photograph]  Fig.4: Unknown, 2011. Rain barrels and water butts can be used in order to save water for irrigation of crops.   [electronic  print]  Available  at:  http://www.crocus.co.uk/product/harcostar‐child‐safe‐water‐butt‐227‐ litre/classid.200980/ [Accessed 18 November 2011].  Fig.5: Collage of photos sourced from Gorgolewski, Komisar and Nasr,(2011) A variety of containers that can be  used for food growing purposes [photograph]  Fig.6:

Unknown,

2011.

The

Earth

Box.

[online

image]

Available

at:

http://www.cultivatingconscience.com/2011/03/earthbox‐diy/ [Accessed 18 November 2011]. Fig.7: 

Unknown,

2009.

The

Hydroponics

cycle

[online

image].

Available

at:

http://

www.indoor_garden_online.com/section/hydroponic_garden [Accessed 18 November 2011].  Fig.8: 

Unknown,

2010.

The

Aqua‐ponics

cycle

[online

image].

Available

at:

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/05/prweb3803954.htm [Accessed 18 November 2011].  Fig.9: 

Unknown,

2006.

The

Aero‐ponics

cycle

[online

image].

Available

at:

http://www.biocontrols.com/aero17htm#HOW_DOES_IT_WORK [Accessed 18 November 2011].  Fig.10:  :  Dan  Albert/Weber  Thompson  in  Despommier,  2010  (b):146‐147.  The  Vertical  Farm‐Water  System  [illustration]  Fig.11:  Dan  Albert/Weber  Thompson  in  Despommier,  2010  (b)  :146‐147.  The  Vertical  Farm‐  Energy  System  [illustration]  Fig.12: Nyerges S., 2011. General overview of the plots in Eagle Street rooftop Farm [photograph]  Fig.13:  Nyerges S., 2011. General overview of the plots in Eagle Street rooftop Farm [photograph]  Fig.14: Nyerges S., 2011. Tasks that take place on the roof: watering [photograph]  Fig.15: Nyerges S., 2011. Tasks that take place on the roof: planting [photograph] 

65


Fig.16: Stewart S., 2008. Helen Cameron inspects the vegetables growing on the roof of her restaurant. [online  image].  Available  at:  http://www.cityfarmer.info/2008/12/28/restaurant‐opens‐2500‐square‐foot‐organic‐ rooftop‐farm‐first‐to‐be‐certified‐organic‐in‐the‐usa/ [Accessed 20 October 2011].  Fig.17: Cameron, M., 2011. General overview of the containerised farm above the restaurant [photograph]  Fig.18: Cameron, M., 2011. Access to the roof is made through an external staircase [photograph]  Fig.19: Cameron, M., 2011. The planters on the roof [photograph]  Fig.20:  Unknown,  2011.  General  view  of  the  Hydroponic  Farm  [online  image]  Available  at: http://gothamgreens.com/our‐philosophy/ [Accessed 15 September 2011].  Fig.21:  Unknown,  2008.Gotham  Greens’  Hydroponic  Farm  on  the  roof  of  a  two  storey  building  in  Brooklyn  [online  image]  Available  at: http://www.greenpointnews.com/news/3652/gotham‐greens‐guide‐to‐greens  [Accessed 15 September 2011].  Fig.22:  Unknown,  2011.  Gotham  Greens’  vegetables  on  supermarket’s  shelves  [online  image]  Available  at:  http://blog.ted.com/2011/07/01/fellows‐friday‐with‐viraj‐puri/. [Accessed 15 September 2011].  Fig.23:  Unknown,  2011.  Nuvege  Vertical  Farm  Exterior  view  in  Kyoto,  Japan [online  image]  Available  at:  http://nuvege.com/gallery.html. [Accessed 20 November 2011].  Fig.24:  Unknown,  2011.  Indoor  Vertical  Farming  in  Nuvege

[online image]  Available  at: 

http://nuvege.com/gallery.html. [Accessed 20November 2011].  Fig.25:  Unknown,  2011.  Contamination  Security  measures  in  Nuvege  [online  image]  Available  at: http://nuvege.com/about2.html. [Accessed 20November 2011]. 

   

66

Building Integrated Agriculture (BIA)  

The paper will provide an overview of the BIA methods and it will investigate what it can be cultivated on rooftops and inside buildings. Fu...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you