Page 1


WWW.DIOR.COM - 020 7172 0172


𰀮𰀪𰀭𰀦𰀴𰀁𰀢𰀩𰀦𰀢𰀥𰀏𰀁𰀯𰀢𰀵𰀶𰀳𰀢𰀭𰀭𰀺𰀏 𰀵𰀩𰀦𰀁𰀢𰀭𰀭𰀎𰀦𰀭𰀦𰀤𰀵𰀳𰀪𰀤𰀁𰀣𰀮𰀸𰀁𰁊𰀔𰀏


BMW i

Sheer Driving Pleasure

€ 

 „  „ „  „ „„    „ „  „  „„ „  „   „ „ „ „  „ „   „  „   ˆ„Š„  „ „   „  „ „  „ „  „„   „  „ „ „ „ „   „

 „ „    ˆ„ „ „  „  „  „„ „  „  „  „ „    „ „„„„ „  „ „  „„ „ „  „ „  „ „ „„    „„„ „  „ ˆ„‚   „ „„„  „  „„„  „ „  „ ˆ!   

„ „   „   „  „„ „   „ „„ „ „ „  „ „„ „„ „ˆ


collage studio - photo tommaso sartori

Bend-Sofa is music to Kate and Davide. Bend-Sofa is designed by Patricia Urquiola. www.bebitalia.com B&B Italia Stores: London, SW3 2AS - 250 Brompton Road - Tel. 020 7591 8111 New York, 150 East 58th Street - 138 Greene Street, SoHo - Tel. 1 800 872 1697 - info@bbitaliausa.com Milano, via Durini, 14 Tel. 02 76 44 41 - Paris: 35, Rue du Bac Tel. 01 55 35 14 35 MĂźnchen, Maximiliansplatz 21 - Tel. 089 461 368 0 Berlin, beim Minimum Einrichten Gmbh orstrasse 140 - Tel. +49 3024 04 77 377


DESIGN PORTRAIT.


TO BREAK THE RULES, YOU MUST FIRST MASTER THEM. THE VALLÉE DE JOUX. FOR MILLENIA, A PLACE OF RAW NATURE AND UNFORGIVING CLIMATE. FIRST SETTLED IN THE SIXTH CENTURY BY MONKS WHO SAW IN THIS AUSTERE ENVIRONMENT A RARE SERENITY AND SPIRITUALITY; MORE RECENTLY, SINCE 1875, THE HOME OF AUDEMARS PIGUET, IN THE VILLAGE OF LE BRASSUS.

WHILE MAN HAS LEFT HIS MARK HERE, IT IS A MARK SOFTLY PLACED; AS OUR FOREFATHERS BELIEVED

THAT TO MASTER NATURE ONE MUST FIRST LEARN TO RESPECT HER.

OUR PHILOSOPHY AS WATCHMAKERS IS DERIVED FROM THESE TIMELESS VALUES. THE EXCEPTIONAL COMPLEXITY, DETAIL AND HAND-FINISHING OF OUR MOVEMENTS ARE AN EXPLORATION OF THE DYNAMICS OF NATURE, CELEBRATED THROUGH HUMAN CRAFT, DEDICATION AND INGENUITY.

CALIBRE 2860.

GRANDE COMPLICATION MOVEMENT WITH PERPETUAL CALENDAR, SPLIT TIME CHRONOGRAPH AND MINUTE REPEATER.

THE AUDEMARS PIGUET FOUNDATION PROUDLY SUPPORTS GLOBAL FOREST CONSERVATION.


DESIGN AWARDS 2014 CONTENTS The wait is over. Wallpaper* reveals its very own world-beaters, from the awesome to the artful, the innovative to the irresistible. Here’s who won a WAWA*

BEST... Art experience

098 Fireside

067 Shower

084

Bar snacks

068 Folk

095 Showstopper

045

Bed

104 Future vision

112 Technique

049

Building site

088 In shows

120 Transparency

108

Camping

075 Line work

043 Use of material

058

Cars

056 Lounger

Catwalk launch

102 Musical bolt-hole

096 Wardrobe

078

Chocolate

106 New weave

052 Wash

076

Denim

060 Pixelation

071 Window sill

073

DIY

064 Reissue

047

Fashion future

093 Ride

050 Stockists

168

055 And the winners aren’t...

170

Finishing line

116 Room mates

110 Vanity unit

041

017


Tailor-made Danish design. Winner of numerous international design awards. LINDBERG 6500 n.o.w. frames combine remarkably thin composite fronts with ultra-lightweight titanium temples, resulting in a minimalist design that only weighs 2.3 grams. They’re so light you hardly know you’re wearing them. The frame is handmade and non-allergenic. The special

composite

material

features

transparent

polished colour gradients, as well as distinctive groove colours – supplementing or contrasting the ultra-slim titanium plate or wire temples. It’s the wearer’s choice.

Specially developed composite fronts only 2 mm thick.

Screwless hinges that do away with floppiness and adjustment.

Ultra-light titanium temples – extremely flexible yet retain their shape.

4 different nose pad designs, made of skin-friendly medical silicone.


mlindberg 6505

By Appointment to Te Royal Danish Court


UK AGENT ALBERTO SCHIATTI Tel. +39 0362 328 162 info@schiatti.it


A.D. NATALIA CORBETTA / FOTOGRAFIA MARIO CIAMPI

“made in italy”

F L E X F O R M SPA INDUSTRIA PER L’ARREDAMENTO 20821 MEDA (MB) I TA L I A VIA EINAUDI 23.25

TEL. 0362 3991 FAX 0362 399228 w w w. f l e x f o r m . i t E V E RGRE E N ANTONIO CITTERIO


JUDGES’ AWARDS 2014 CONTENTS Runners-up

137

Best city

148

Designer of the year

150

Best new public building

154

Best new restaurant

156

Best new private house

160

Best women’s fashion collection

160

Best men’s fashion collection

162

Life-enhancer of the year

163

Best new grooming product

163

Best domestic design

163

Best new hotel

166

This years judges are: Victoria Beckham Michael Chow Ron Gilad Spike Jonze Thom Mayne Thaddaeus Ropac 022


MP05-LaFerrari. A truly exceptional watch. A world record-holder. 50-day power reserve and a high-tech design developed with Ferrari. Limited edition of 50 pieces.

BOUTIQUE LONDON 31 New Bond Street / Harrods Knightsbridge T

  www.hublot.com t

UXJUUFSDPNIVCMPUt

facebook.com/hublot


ERASED BOCHUM | COLOGNE | STUTTGART | HAMBURG BERLIN | ZURICH | LONDON | MOSCOW | NEW YORK WWW. JAN-KATH.COM


World Headquarters

Subscriptions

twitter.com/wallpapermag

Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU, United Kingdom Tel: 44.20 3148 5000 Fax: 44.20 3148 8119 E-mail: contact@wallpaper.com

Tel: 44.845 676 7778 Fax: 44.1444 445 599 E-mail: ipcsubs@qss-uk.com Order online at: www.wallpaper.com

Architecture

Fashion

Wallpaper.com

International editors

Architecture Editor Ellie Stathaki

Fashion Director Isabelle Kountoure

Online Editor Malaika Byng

US Editor Michael Reynolds

Interiors / Entertaining

Fashion Editor Mathew Stevenson-Wright

Acting Online Fashion Editor Katrina Israel

New York Editor Pei-Ru Keh

Junior Fashion Editor Zoë Sinclair

Online Fashion Editor Apphia Michael

Italy Editor-at-Large J J Martin

Fashion Coordinator Alice Shaughnessy

Online Assistant Editor Jessica Klingelfuss

Brazil Editor-at-Large Scott Mitchem

Bookings Editor Minna Vauhkonen

Designer Ben Ewing

Germany Editor-at-Large Sophie Lovell

Watches & Jewellery Director Caragh McKay

Junior Designers Michael Ainscough, James Davies

Hamburg Editor Ina Becker

Wallpaper.com

Editorial Editor-in-Chief Tony Chambers Editorial Director Richard Cook Senior Contributing Editor Nick Compton Managing Editor Oliver Adamson Editors-at-Large Leïla Latchin, Emma O’Kelly, Henrietta Thompson, Suzanne Trocmé Art Creative Director Sarah Douglas Art Director Lee Belcher Senior Designer Aneel Kalsi Designers Jon Evans, Ben McLaughlin Intern Ashley Kitchin Photography Photography Director James Reid Associate Photography Editor Kate Barrett

Interiors Director Benjamin Kempton Interiors Editor Amy Hefernan Entertaining Director Melina Keays Interiors Assistant Maria Sobrino Interiors Coordinator Sujata Burman Interns Annabel Surtees, Francesca Zavieh Beauty / Lifestyle Beauty & Lifestyle Director Emma Moore Intern Rachael Sanders Travel Travel Editor Lauren Ho Intern Camila Cavalletti

Jewellery Editor-at-Large Franceline Prat Interns Chloe Curry, Philipp Humm Fiona Ryan Production Chief Sub Editor Bridget Downing Production Editor Anne Soward Acting Sub Editor Maksymilian Fus Mickiewicz Sub Editor Léa Teuscher iPad Production Coordinator Leonard Burns

Intern Tom Ravey

Web Developer Marcin Stepniewski Intern Mariel Reed Editorial Business Assistant David Paw Ofce Manager and PA to Tony Chambers Rosa Bertoli

Australia Editor Carrie Hutchinson Mexico and Central America Editor Pablo León de la Barra Buenos Aires Editor Mariana Rapoport Middle East Editor Warren Singh-Bartlett Singapore Editor Daven Wu

Contributing editors Design Albert Hill Media Stephen Armstrong Production Sarah Frank Typography Paul Barnes

Publishing & Marketing Publishing Director Gord Ray Publisher Kirsty Mulhern Advertising Commercial Director Paula Cain Tel: 44.20 3148 7724 Fashion, Watches & Jewellery Manager Anu Pai Tel: 44.20 3148 7764 Sales Manager Ben Dugan Tel: 44.20 3148 7722 Advertising Business Managers Amanda Asigno, Hannah Clare Advertising Coordinator TF Chan Tel: 44.20 3148 7720 Production Controller Nick Percival Marketing

Wallpaper.com

Advertising ofces

Digital Sales Director Sara Haufé-Brett

International Sales Director Malcolm Young Tel: 44.20 3148 7718

Digital Sales Manager Ryan Green Tel: 44.20 3148 7726 Digital Sales Manager Scott Lambert Tel: 44.20 3148 7730

USA Advertising Manager (Northeast) Ilaria Anghinoni Tel: 1.646 389 5554

Digital Project Manager Annie Charman Tel: 44.20 3148 7729

Advertising Manager (Southeast) Ana Torres de Navarra Tel: 1.305 662 4754

Wallpaper* Bespoke

Advertising Manager (West Coast) Scot Bondlow Tel: 1.415 706 0749

Bespoke Director Rebecca Morris Editor Simon Mills Special Projects Manager Thomas Aastad Producer Carly Gray Tel: 44.20 3148 7714

Marketing Manager Caroline Sampson

Account Manager Matthew Johnston Tel: 44.20 3148 7704

Marketing Assistant Chu Goldmann

Senior Designer Ben Jarvis Designer Luke Fenech Bespoke Coordinator Fred Jezeph

ITALY Advertising Manager Paolo Cesana Design Executive Rosalba Basile Fashion Executive Cristiana Catizone Tel: 39.02 844 0441 Fax: 39.02 848 10287 GERMANY, AUSTRIA AND SWITZERLAND Advertising Manager Peter Wolfram Tel: 49.89 9924 93990 Fax: 49.89 9924 93999 CHINA Deputy General Manager Magie Li Tel: 86.10 6588 0051

Circulation / Subscriptions BRAZIL Advertising Manager Paolo Mongeri Tel: 55.21 8393 9495 FRANCE Advertising Manager Malcolm Young Tel: 44.20 3148 7718 HONG KONG, TAIWAN, AND KOREA Advertising Manager Herb Moskowitz Tel: 852.2838 8702 Fax: 852.2572 5468 JAPAN, MALAYSIA AND SINGAPORE Advertising Manager Julie Harrison Tel: 65.6463 3220 Fax: 65.6469 6282 INDIA Advertising Manager Ravi Lalwani Tel: 91.22 4220 2118

Deputy Circulation Manager Gemma Melhuish Senior International Circulation Executive Richard Wilkinson Subscriptions Manager Jenny McCormack Classifed Classifed Head of Sales Howard Jones Tel: 44.20 3148 2535 Finance Deputy Management Accountant Mark Adams Corporate Managing Director, Southbank Jackie Newcombe Corporate Public Relations Victoria Higham Production Manager John Botten Assistant Syndication Manager Ef Mandrides

Wallpaper*, ISSN 1364-4475, is published monthly, 12 times a year, by The Wallpaper* Group, a division of IPC Media Ltd. © 2014 WaIIpaper* IPC Media Ltd. US agent: Mercury International, 365 Blair Road, Avenel, NJ 07001. Periodicals paid at Rahway, NJ. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Wallpaper*, 365 Blair Road, Avenel, NJ 07001. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All prices and credits are accurate at time of going to press but are subject to change. Manuscripts, photos, drawings and other materials submitted must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Wallpaper* cannot be held responsible for any unsolicited material. Subscription rate for Wallpaper* for one year (12 issues) is UK £64, USA $135, Europe €127, rest of the world £132. For subscriptions contact: (in the UK/ROW) IPC Media Ltd, PO Box 272, Haywards Heath, West Sussex, RH16 3FS, tel: 44.844 848 0848, e-mail: ipcsubs@quadrantsubs.com; (in the USA) IPC Media Ltd, PO Box 4661, Chesterfield, MO 63006-9956, tel: 1.888 313 5528, email: ipccustomerservice@quadrantsubs.com (USA). Repro by Rhapsody. Printed by Southernprint Ltd and Wyndeham Grange. Distributed by Marketforce (UK) Ltd, 4th Floor, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London SE1 0SU, tel: 44.20 3148 3555


HOROLOGICAL MACHINE N O5 RT ‘ON THE ROAD AGAIN’


WWW.MBANDF.COM

GENEVA / INTERLAKEN / GSTAAD / ST. MORITZ / AROSA / LONDON / PARIS / MILANO PORTO CERVO / MOSCOW / WARSAW / DONETSK / KIEV / CAIRO / AMMAN BEIRUT / KUWAIT / DOHA / DUBAI / ABU DHABI / TOKYO / TAICHUNG / BEIJING SHANGHAI / MACAU / HONG KONG / SINGAPORE / KUALA LUMPUR / BANGKOK PERTH / SYDNEY / TORONTO / LOS ANGELES / LA JOLLA / LAS VEGAS / JUPITER COSTA RICA / MEXICO / CARACAS


Taylor sectional sofa Taylor sideboard, cupboard, sidetable, small tables design Toan Nguyen Manda table and chairs design Patrick Jouin Grace armchair design Umberto Asnago

photo: alessandro paderni styling: monti studio ad: viola katic

www.busnelli.it tel +39 02 963 20221


MAISON /BUSNELLI 100% TAILOR MADE IN ITALY

Design and workmanship protagonists are the main characters of an exclusive living where details and finishes are custom tailored.


EDITOR’S LETTER

WAWA* *WALLPAPER AWARDS: THE STUFF THAT REFINES YOU

Newsstand cover Photography: Jessica Eaton Trophy design: Nendo Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton (who first featured in W*152) created the image of our Nendo-designed trophy with no Photoshop or digital trickery. Her first London show is at The Hospital Club Gallery, 28 January to 8 February Wallpaper* is printed on UPM Star www.upm.com

034

It’s hard to believe this is the tenth Wallpaper* Design Awards issue, our very own honours list for the people, places, pieces and phenomena that have raised our pulse and kept up our pecker over the last year. This issue, as is in previous years, is split into two perfectly formed halves. Eleven major award winners have been selected (from an impressive shortlist drawn up by Wallpaper* stafers – see page 137) by our panel of six super-savvy international judges, each a leader in their respective feld. So a huge thanks and hurrah to Victoria Beckham, Michael Chow, Ron Gilad, Spike Jonze, Thom Mayne and Thaddaeus Ropac for their time, insight and commitment. The other 33 awards are selected and fought over by the Wallpaper* team, together with our international network of editors, photographers, writers and all-round clever-clogs contributors. And that process gets more difcult and fractious every year. Since the inception of the magazine in 1996, things have radically changed: the world looks a lot more like Wallpaper* now; as judge Spike Jonze (whose new movie, Her, a remarkable love story set in a turned-out-nicely near-future, opens this month) astutely observes in our interview on page 112. ‘I was thinking about how everything looked when Wallpaper* started and how the whole world looks like Wallpaper* now. And the idea in the flm is that even in this almost utopian world, where everything is well-designed and colourful and looks a bit like Wallpaper* magazine, you can still feel lonely. [Because] there’s so much you are expected to respond to, because expectations are so high.’ In this new, well-designed Wallpaper* world it gets ever harder to pick a path through the salvo of so-so and get to the truly great. But we make it our monthly mission to sort the remarkable from the also-rans, so you don’t have to. And the Design Awards is our ultimate edit. A special thank-you goes to Airbnb, joining us as our Design Awards partner this year. There could be no more sympathetic an ally – the accommodation marketplace platform, founded in 2008, has a truly global reach (covering over 34,000 cities and 192 countries from the frm’s 11 worldwide ofces), and an innovative, design-led approach that has reaped success (having just exceeded 9 million guests and 500,000 listings the world over). So well done, and thanks, to co-founders Nathan Blecharczyk, Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia. You can see the Wallpaper* edit of their most desirable dwellings on page 107. We’ll be celebrating with them and a few other winners on 15 January in San Francisco – our joint City of the Year (for the frst time ever we had a tie in the judges’ scores: Marseille stood neck and neck with San Francisco after all votes were counted). So enjoy the issue – and I hope our refned edit acts as a successful antidote to aesthetic fatigue. Tony Chambers, Editor-in-Chief

Limited-edition cover by Geoff McFetridge and Spike Jonze Los Angeles-based artist McFetridge and film director Spike Jonze combined forces for this month’s limitededition cover, inspired by Jonze’s new film, Her, and created for us. Jonze is on the panel of our Judges’ Awards (page 137) and the winner of a WAWA* of his own, Best Future Vision (page 112). Limited-edition covers are available to subscribers, see Wallpaper.com


The best furniture brands in the most glamorous showrooms of Italy

Milano +390229063421 – milano@internionline.it Verano Brianza +390362902641 – verano@internionline.it Bergamo +39035219953 – bergamo@internionline.it


Interni is delighted to welcome you to the MID route where showrooms, shops and companies exhibit the latest innovations in art and Italian design and you can shop your furniture with the professional assistance of our architects and interior designers. Enjoy and discover the industrial design district, North Milan, with 3 days and 2 nights in the heart of the industrial design district, inclusive of: RYHUQLJKWVWD\LQKRWHOVXLWH VSDSDFNDJHV EUHDNIDVW WUDQVIHUIURP$LUSRUW MID operation doesn’t request any FRVWRUMRLQLQJIHH±%RRNQRZ

www.internionline.it

www.c-hotel.it

Everything you wish – Everywhere you are


Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who is the cleverest of them all? Here are this year’s top dogs

BEST VANITY UNIT Sweet smell of success

Upping the ante in bedroom furniture this year is ‘Yang’, a striking seven-drawer chest made from solid walnut canaletto and topped with a leather tray and mirror set at the perfect pitch for grooming success. To that end, we’ve paired ‘Yang’ with our pick of perfumes for the year. In the men’s category is 1899, a fragrant tribute to Ernest Hemingway with notes of bergamot, juniper, iris from his beloved Mediterranean, and a sensual amber and vetiver base reminiscent of a waxed Cuban bar top. Marni’s entry to the world of scent impresses with a pleasingly unsugary rendition of rose topped with bergamot, pepper and ginger, tempered with patchouli, vetiver and cedar, all in the most covetable bottle around. Meanwhile, New York niche line Odin furnishes us with our favourite ungendered scent of the year, 11 Semma, a sensual blend of myrrh and sweet tobacco, interlaced with cinnamon, clove and tonka bean. 

Dog: Luna, courtesy of PetLondon

‘YANG’ CHEST OF DRAWERS, £12,369, BY DESIGN MVW, FOR GIORGETTI, FROM MAYFAIR DESIGN STUDIO. EAU DE PARFUM, £48 FOR 30ML, BY MARNI. 1899, €145 FOR 120ML, BY HISTOIRES DE PARFUMS. 11 SEMMA, $165 FOR 100ML, BY ODIN. CLUB EBONY WOOD BRUSH, £139, BY TAYLOR OF OLD BOND STREET FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SHORT WRITER: EMMA MOORE

041


Granite: Giallo Farfalla Polished. Leopard Design

STONE SEDUCTIONS

Antolini presents Natura Collection. The lightness of the design as a pure energy to shape magical, unique expressions of creativity, strength and versatility. Is there anything more changeable than stone? antolini.com


WAWA* ‘UMBRA’ RUG, £795 PER SQ M, BY PAUL SMITH, FOR THE RUG COMPANY. ‘ELEMENT’ CHAIRS, €1,581 EACH; TABLE, €7,163, BOTH BY TOKUJIN YOSHIOKA, FOR DESALTO. ‘WIREFLOW’ PENDANTS, PRICE ON REQUEST, BY ARIK LEVY, FOR VIBIA, FROM LSE LIGHTING FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168

BEST LINE WORK Furniture phantasmagoria

We embrace the idea of furniture that redesigns space with black shapes and optical illusions. This is perfectly exemplifed by Paul Smith’s hand-knotted Tibetan wool rug for The Rug Company, whose appearance changes with shifting points of view. Tokujin Yoshioka took the concept further with his table and chairs for Desalto – from one side, the elements look like simple fat lines, much like Arik Levy’s poetic chandeliers for Vibia: surreal compositions that play on geometry. ∂

PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL BODIAM INTERIORS: AMY HEFFERNAN WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

043


555 King’s Road, London, SW6 2EB T 0800 612 6647 124 Holland Park Avenue, London, W11 4UE T 0800 612 6036 Harrods Brompton Road, London, SW1X 7XL T 0800 612 6087 www.therugcompany.com Zebra Gold by Neisha Crosland


WAWA*

Model: Cecilie Deinsting at Women Management Paris. Hair: Stéphane Bodin at Marie-France Thavonekham. Make-up: Yumi Endo at Marie-France Thavonekham. Photographer’s assistants: Halldora Magnusdottir, Bryan Monaco

‘LUSTRE GABRIEL’ CHANDELIER, BY RONAN & ERWAN BOUROULLEC, FOR THE PALACE OF VERSAILLES, CREATED BY SWAROVSKI. DRESS BY DIOR HAUTE COUTURE, WWW.DIOR.COM

BEST SHOWSTOPPER

‘Lustre Gabriel’ chandelier, by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, for Swarovski

PHOTOGRAPHY: JONATHAN DE VILLIERS FASHION: GRACE ATKINSON WRITER: ALI MORRIS

Newly installed in the entrance staircase of the Château de Versailles, the Bouroullec brothers’ showstopping ‘Lustre Gabriel’ chandelier is the frst permanent contemporary piece to be installed in the palace. Brought to life by the crystal experts at Swarovski, the glittering installation is the winner of a competition launched in 2011, which asked entrants to design a permanent mobile artwork to adorn the palace’s Gabriel staircase. The Bouroullecs’ 12m-high composition is made up of three suspended crystal cords that majestically loop down into the space, creating an atmospheric glow. The piece uses 800 crystals in total, which are fxed to a steel skeleton structure embedded with LED light sources. While the design cleverly references the crystal chandeliers that were historically hung in the palace, the graphic, illuminated cords create a striking contrast with the ornate surroundings. ∂

045


BLUE SQUARE,

the energy of colour in the best Italian leather and organized pockets to travel with everything you need, even your dreams.

www.piquadro.it

MILAN, ROME, BARCELONA, PARIS, HONG KONG, MOSCOW, SHANGHAI, TAIPEI, BEIJING


Interiors: Amy Heffernan

WAWA*

BEST REISSUE ‘Judd at Conran’ collection, with the Judd Foundation and Schellmann Furniture PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SHORT WRITER: PEI-RU KEH

The late US artist Donald Judd had a posthumous moment last year, with a surge in projects bearing his name. In New York’s SoHo, a new arm of the Judd Foundation opened in his former studio (W*171). Meanwhile, The Conran Shop became the frst major retailer to sell his furniture designs. Motivated by the need to furnish his home in Marfa, Texas, in the 1970s, Judd’s foray into furniture was characterised by the same simplicity that typifed his art, utilising materials such as raw pine, plywood, hardwood and sheet metal. The ‘Judd at Conran’ collection features fve chairs, a library desk, a bed and this fnely crafted standing desk. Made in collaboration with the Judd Foundation and Schellmann Furniture (W*145), the newly available desk is the ultimate altar piece for the Judd devotee. 

STANDING DESK, £24,000, BY DONALD JUDD, PRODUCED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE JUDD FOUNDATION AND SCHELLMANN FURNITURE, FROM THE CONRAN SHOP, CONRANSHOP.CO.UK. ALSO AVAILABLE FROM WWW. SCHELLMANNFURNITURE.COM POSTER, STAMPS, FLIPBOOK AND STATIONERY, COURTESY OF THE JUDD FOUNDATION, WWW.JUDDFOUNDATION.ORG. DONALD JUDD: A GOOD CHAIR IS A GOOD CHAIR CATALOGUE, £25, FROM IKON GALLERY, IKON-GALLERY.ORG

047


Vision From minimal to multifunctional – USM transforms each individual focus.

Visit our showroom or request detailed information. USA: USM U. Schaerer Sons Inc., 28 – 30 Greene St., New York, NY 10013, Phone +1 212 371 1230 International: USM U. Schärer Söhne AG, 3110 Münsingen Switzerland, Phone +41 31 720 72 72 Showrooms: Berlin, Bern, Düsseldorf, Hamburg, Munich, New York, Paris, Stuttgart, Tokyo info@usm.com, www.usm.com


WAWA* ‘HÔTEL DE LA LUMIÈRE’ RING IN ROCK CRYSTAL, DIAMONDS AND WHITE GOLD, BY BOUCHERON, WWW.BOUCHERON.COM

With its glacier-like qualities, rock crystal is both dense and delicate, making it tricky to craft. With the ‘Hôtel de la Lumière’ ring, the skills of the Boucheron workshops are rigorously tested during a complex process where a sphere is hollowed out of a shard of rock crystal then polished to transparency. The diamonds are mounted onto the crystal base without any use of metal framework (as is the usual technique for stone setting), like a fne-jewel version of a ship-in-a-bottle. ∂

BEST TECHNIQUE

PHOTOGRAPHY: CHARLES NEGRE WATCHES & JEWELLERY DIRECTOR: CARAGH MCKAY

‘Hôtel de la Lumière’ ring, by Boucheron

049


BEST RIDE

Lift, by Gwenaël Nicolas, for Louis Vuitton PHOTOGRAPHY: JAN LEHNER FASHION: NOBUKO TANNAWA WRITER: NICK VINSON

Louis Vuitton’s new ‘Townhouse’ in London’s Selfridges department store boasts 700 sq m over three foors. Connecting the three levels – accessories on ground, men’s on one, women’s on two – is a rather fantastic elevator that delivers much more than your usual ride. Once you’re inside, and the radial doors are closed, it begins by moving straight up, but at around 60cm of the ground, it starts to spin in a clockwise direction, spiralling up the 6.5m to the frst foor (the men’s ‘universe’). The glass and chrome cylinder then takes of again and spins upwards at 9.48 degrees a second to reach the second foor. Adding to the novelty, you get on and of at completely diferent points on each foor, turning frst 211 degrees, then another 180. The mastermind behind the design of the lift and the architecture of the Townhouse is French-born, Tokyo-based architect Gwenaël Nicolas. After persuading Selfridges to let him cut two massive holes in the middle of its store (to this day he is still delighted no one stopped him), he then had to fnd a manufacturer brave enough to make it happen. His journey took him all the way to a small Bavarian village, where Rupert Huber, executive director of GBH Design, was the frst person ‘not to say no’. A non-sceptical, passionate German, with his own family-run lift-manufacturing business, was Nicolas’ ticket to ride, so to speak. The lift’s hydraulic motor has a threestage, central telescopic piston, diferent speeds (it’s set to 1.58 rotations a minute, but can go up to a dizzying 1.87) and is made up of around 30 pieces. Holding the white glass exterior cylinder in place is a double ribbon of steel that snakes and criss-crosses up the 12m shaft. The steel has been decked out in seamless oak marquetry, Jean-Michel Frank style, by a ship ftter rather than a shop ftter. This is one class elevator. www.louisvuitton.com, www.selfridges.com

050

CAPE, £2,030; TROUSERS, £930; BAG, £1,680, ALL BY LOUIS VUITTON

Model: Gaby Loader at Next Models London Hair: Yumi Nakada-Dingle using Aveda Make-up: Nobuko Maekawa using Chanel Le Lift and S2014


WAWA*


WAWA* Set design: Niklas Hansen

BEST NEW WEAVE Fresh twists on a classic craft

Ever curious about contemporary incarnations of traditional craft, we’re enjoying the current take on the basket weave aesthetic. Swedish designer Mathieu Gustafsson’s ‘Grand Light’ wardrobe, created with cabinet maker Niklas Karlsson for Grand, is divided into geometric rattan panels that play on the weave’s transparency to convey lightness. A more graphic interpretation is Nya Nordiska’s abstract braiding, printed on ‘Positano’ outdoor fabric. Meanwhile, Nendo’s glassware for Czech manufacturer Lasvit is composed of cut-and-paste pieces, juxtaposing several diferent patterns. ∂

FROM TOP, ‘GRAND LIGHT’ WARDROBE, SEK75,000 (€8,301), BY MATHIEU GUSTAFSSON AND NIKLAS KARLSSON, FOR GRAND. FABRIC, £52 PER M, BY NYA NORDISKA. ‘PATCHWORK’ VASE, €9,577, BY NENDO, FOR LASVIT, FROM DILMOS MILANO FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168

052

PHOTOGRAPHY: GUSTAV ALMESTÅL WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI


ad: designwork / photo: Massimo Gardone

I MA GINAI RE BIRDIE DESIGN LUDOVICA + ROBERTO PALOMBA FOSCARINI.COM


WAWA*

BEST ROOM MATES Our favourite seating and foor plans Jean-Marie Massaud’s impeccably upholstered ‘Grantorino’ modular sofa for Poltrona Frau takes its design cues from the saddlery industry. A slim armrest intricately upholstered in hand-cut leather sits at one end of the sofa, while a convenient, upholstered trunk ftted with an oak tray provides storage at the other. Paired with our ideal sofa are ‘Mews’ tiles by Italian porcelain brand Mutina and brilliant British design duo BarberOsgerby. Each tile is available in eight quintessentially London colours, including fog, pigeon, ink and soot (all made up of 15 diferent tones), in shapes that mimic the texture of brick and wood herringbone foors. ∂

‘GRANTORINO’ SOFA, £5,380, BY JEAN-MARIE MASSAUD, FOR POLTRONA FRAU, WWW.POLTRONAFRAU.COM. ‘MEWS’ TILES, £209, PER SQ M, BY BARBEROSGERBY, FOR MUTINA, WWW.MUTINA.IT

PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL BODIAM INTERIORS: AMY HEFFERNAN WRITER: ALI MORRIS

055


WAWA*

BEST CARS Two marques ahead of the game PHOTOGRAPHY: GREG WHITE WRITER: JONATHAN BELL

ON THE EDGE OF ASHDOWN FOREST IN SUSSEX, THIS CONTEMPORARY TAKE ON THE VERNACULAR TIMBER GARAGE IS PART OF SMERIN ARCHITECTS’ BOLD NEW RESIDENTIAL PROJECT, THE RED BRIDGE HOUSE. WWW.SMERIN.CO.UK


Best Luxury Land Rover Range Rover LWB

Best City Car BMW i3

From the outset, the fourth generation Range Rover was developed to take an extra few inches, transforming the back seat environment into the sort of rarefed space that was once the domain of Bentley and Rolls-Royce, while bolstering the 4x4’s unparalleled ability to squelch through any terrain with bespoke seating. From £105,840, www.rangerover.com

BMW’s electric revolution has been a long time coming. Exploiting every technological trick in the book, from a lightweight carbon-fbre bodyshell to a fexible airy interior, thanks to the minimalist electric drivetrain, the i3 is the ultimate city car. The 100-mile plus range knocks anxiety on the head. From £25,680, www.bmwi.com

057


WAWA*

BEST USE OF MATERIAL ‘Jali’ bangles, by Bhagat

These diamond and platinum bangles by Mumbai fne jeweller Viren Bhagat are an interpretation of stone jali screens that courtesans would sit behind to view Mughal court proceedings. Precisely cut diamonds appear to foat, but Bhagat counterbalances any prettiness by working the platinum as a stonemason would his base material: the metal is painstakingly fled by hand in one direction, from the centre to the outer rim, giving it an industrial, architectural feel. A ‘secret’ hinge allows the bangles to be opened. When closed, the platinum appears seamless, uninterrupted. ∂

A PATTERN OF LOTUS BUDS HAS BEEN WORKED INTO SOLID PLATINUM. THE PROCESS IS REPEATED ON TWO SIDES, SO THAT WHEN SEEN FROM EYE LEVEL, THE EFFECT IS OF A JALI STONE SCREEN. ‘JALI’ BANGLES, BY BHAGAT, TEL: 91.22 2364 0809 (INDIA)

058

PHOTOGRAPHY: JIGNESH JHAVERI WATCHES & JEWELLERY DIRECTOR: CARAGH MCKAY


Rubbish.

BROOM by PHILIPPE STARCK Made in America from 90% industrial waste. www.emeco.net


THIS PAGE, HE WEARS SHIRT COAT, £400; JEANS, £580. SHE WEARS SHIRT, £200; DUNGAREES, £400. OPPOSITE, SHE WEARS SHIRT, £265; JEANS, £580, ALL BY LEVI’S RED, FROM LN-CC, LN-CC.COM

060


WAWA*

BEST DENIM ‘Levi’s RED’ collection, by Levi’s Red

PHOTOGRAPHY: HART+LËSHKINA FASHION: NOBUKO TANNAWA WRITER: JJ MARTIN


Models: Eveline Rozing and Marc-Andre Turgeon at Supa Model Management. Hair: Mari Ohashi using Morrocanoil. Make-up: Nobuko Maekawa using YSL Touche Éclat

WAWA*

R

arely does a denim collection get our fashion pulses racing – especially one from a behemoth jeans brand that covers masses of asses across the globe. But a new ofering from Levi’s Red label smartly rethinks basic blue jeans. Crafted from a unique blend of compactly woven hemp and cotton that is sandwiched between fannel and silk linings, the collection of 18 unisex pieces looks nothing like regular denim. With soft, rounded silhouettes, each piece is loosely ftting and wraps around the body like a luxurious quilt. ‘You feel like you’re wearing pyjamas, but you look like you’re wearing jeans,’ observes Miles Johnson, the British-born design director of Levi’s XX, the stable of niche labels that includes Vintage Clothing, Made & Crafted, and Red. Conceived as a creative lab dedicated to reinventing Levi’s iconic fve-pocket jeans, Red was launched back in 1999, to no small acclaim, and it only releases

062

SHE WEARS SHIRT, £265; JEANS, £580. HE WEARS SHIRT, £350; JEANS, £580. THEY BOTH WEAR SILK QUILT, £675, ALL BY LEVI’S RED, AS BEFORE

new products when it’s good and ready. ‘I just work on it when I want to, when the time is right,’ explains Johnson, whose last Red collection popped up in 2007. And with skinny jeans and mass mufn tops still de rigueur on the world’s streets, Johnson decided the time was right for a Red alternative. In addition to his newly hatched material are thoughtfully considered shapes that are unorthodox in the denim world. Two fared women’s jackets, for example, get close to couture volumes and have a sculptural quality. Jean shapes include a bagy ft, single pocket style based on an 1870s model, and a 1970s-inspired 501 shape. Meanwhile, details such as round collars, pearl buttons, cloth patches and silk linings lift the collection well above workaday staples. ‘At the end of the day, it’s just jeans and jackets, but it looks very new,’ says Johnson. ‘That’s the new uniform.’ ∂ www.levi.com


MODEL: JALIS by Jehs + Laub

www.cor.de


WAWA*

BEST DIY

Handy tools for the perfect pad A smart set of DIY accoutrements are essential to keeping up appearances. As a starting point, Swiss studio Big-Game’s utilitarian ‘Cargo’ box for Alessi provides portable, streamlined storage for household tools such as its lightweight ‘Cargo’ hammer. For elevated working, the beautiful steam-bent rungs of Charlie Styrbjörn’s solid wood ladder are both functional and decorative, while the 3D aluminium design of Jehs + Laub’s ‘Entrance Digits’ for Authentics will ensure you make the right frst impression. ∂

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP, ‘CARGO’ BOX, PRICE ON REQUEST, BY BIG-GAME, FOR ALESSI. LADDER, FROM £550, BY CHARLIE STYRBJÖRN NILSON. ‘ENTRANCE DIGITS’, €50, BY JEHS + LAUB, FOR AUTHENTICS, FROM CONNOX. ‘CARGO’ HAMMER, PRICE ON REQUEST, BY BIG-GAME, FOR ALESSI. CUPBOARD, SEK4,600 (€510), BY EMMA OLBERS, FOR ASPLUND. ‘TANGO’ DOOR, SEK26,240 (€2,911), BY INGER GUSTAFSSON, FOR BOVALLS. ‘FSB 1173’ STAINLESS STEEL DOOR HANDLE, SEK1,428 (€158); ‘AFFA’ CYLINDER, SEK2819 (€311), BOTH FROM BOVALLS

Set design: Niklas Hansen

FOR STOCKISTS , SEE PAGE 168

064

PHOTOGRAPHY: GUSTAV ALMESTÅL WRITER: ALI MORRIS


WAWA* Shot on location at Galerie Pierre Marie Giraud, Brussels

BEST FIRESIDE This year’s hearth throbs

A utilitarian aesthetic makes us feel warm inside, so we were immediately drawn to this limited-edition stove by American artist Sterling Ruby. Inspired by his rural upbringing, the black-coated stainless steel stove pays homage to simple, get-it-done design. Similarly, Polish designer Jan Kochański’s dustpan and brush adds extra functionality, allowing dirt collected in the dustpan to fow through the handle and out into the bin. And, for their bright matchboxes designed for Danish company Hay, Shane Schneck and Clara von Zweigbergk used phosphorus ink (normally printed on a strip as a matchlighting track) to cover the boxes in diferent patterns, cleverly combining the ornamental with the useful. ∂

‘STOVE 3’, PRICE ON REQUEST, BY STERLING RUBY, FOR STERLING RUBY STUDIO, FROM GALERIE PIERRE MARIE GIRAUD, PIERREMARIEGIRAUD.COM. MATCHBOXES, £29, BY SCHNECK ZWEIGBERGK, FOR HAY, FROM SKANDIUM, WWW.SKANDIUM.COM. DUSTPAN AND BRUSH, €55, BY JAN KOCHAŃSKI, FOR MENU, WWW.MENU.AS

PHOTOGRAPHY: BENJAMIN BOUCHET WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI

067


WAWA*

BEST BAR SNACKS Japanese nibbles to match your tipples

PHOTOGRAPHY: KATE JACKLING LIFESTYLE DIRECTOR: EMMA MOORE ENTERTAINING DIRECTOR: MELINA KEAYS

03

02

04

01

‘Branch’ dining table, from £1,399, by Blue Dot, from Heal’s. From left to right, tray, £290, by Oji Masanori, from Objects of Use. Turkish blue glasses, £30 each, by Makiko Suzuki, from Gallery Eclectic. Glasses, ¥3,200 ($31) each, by Yumiko Iihoshi. Kagua beer, ¥630 ($6) per bottle, by Nippon Craft Beer. ‘Waku’ bottle opener, £45, by Oji Masanori, from Objects of Use.


When it comes to mopping up alcohol, most cultures opt for salty, fried foods. And the Japanese are no exception. However, their snacking plates come with a dollop of fnesse. Izakayas, the establishments that serve them, are not new, but this year there’s been a wave of cross-cultural reinvention. Chez Sardine in New York is mixing it up with dishes such as beef tartare sushi topped with sea urchin. Flesh and Buns in London ofers hirata buns with, among other fllings, fried sole with

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

ginger, lemon mayo and pickled daikon. Barcelona’s Dos Palillos won a Michelin star this year for a tapas menu that includes meat gyoza and onsen tamago. And Hong Kong’s Yardbird has opened sister venue Ronin, where sansho-spiced quail and rock oysters with ponzu ice and wakame are washed down with a maple syrup Old Fashioned (12-year-old Yamazaki whisky with baked apple bitters). Getting sozzled has rarely been so savoury.

Miso pulled pork buns Tsukemono pickles Takoyaki Crab, edamame and salmon eggs Spinach with black sesame sauce Teriyaki chicken shitake skewers Whelks with yuzu and jalapeño

06

07

05

Large bowls, £60 each, by Kaori Ceramics. Napkin, £7.50, from Ceramica Blue. Hakeme plate, £25, by Katsufumi Baba, from OEN. Tool holder, £160, by Oji Masanori, from Objects of Use. ‘Bushido Bishamon’ chopsticks, €8, from Casa Bento. ‘Daiso’ chopsticks, £3; carved chopsticks (in holder and on table), £3.50, all from Japan Centre. ‘Free’ cup, ¥2,500

($25), by Akio Nukaga. Spoon, £11.50, by Kohchosai Design, from Twentytwentyone. ‘Oxymoron’ plate, ¥2,600 ($25), by Yumiko Iihoshi. Sake cup, ¥1,890 ($18); sake jug, ¥3,990 ($39), both by Patricia Urquiola, for Sogo-Seibu. Small plate, ¥2,500 ($25), by Akio Nukaga. ‘Morning Set’ tray, £120 for set, by Kaori Tatebayashi, from Kaori Ceramics. Soy bottle,

£6.50, from Ceramica Blue. Velvet Mist sake, £58, from Tengu Sake. Dip dish, £4, from Ceramica Blue. Rectangular slab, £158, from Willer. Fork, £26, by Rieko Fujimoto, from OEN. ‘Rituals 3’ lamp, £275, by Ludovica + Roberto Palomba, for Foscarini, from Aram For stockists, see page 168

069


www.ivassalletti.it Adv Santi+Santi Santi+Santi Adv


Model: Oliver Jones at Premier Model Management. Hair & make-up: Ranelle Chapman using Bumble and bumble and Dr Hauschka. Photographer’s assistant: Salvador Dewald

WAWA* ‘DEEP GRID’ RUG, FROM £699, BY CRISTIAN ZUZUNAGA, FOR BRINTONS. ‘SENECA’ SIDEBOARD, FROM £16,200, BY FERRUCCIO LAVIANI, FOR EMMEMOBILI, FROM CHAPLINS. JACKET, £960; TROUSERS, £370, BOTH BY NEIL BARRETT. ‘MILLER’ LOAFERS, £425, BY MR HARE FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168

BEST PIXELATION Digital design is causing a blur

PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHIEL MEEWIS INTERIORS: MARIA SOBRINO WRITER: ALI MORRIS

United by their pixelated surfaces, these furnishing and fashion designs transform traditional patterns and crafts with digital design. Cristian Zuzunaga’s ‘Deep Grid’ rug, for UK manufacturer Brintons, enlarges antique-carpet motifs from the frm’s archive. Italian furnisher Emmemobili uses 2 sq cm slices of ten woods for its handmade ‘Seneca’ cabinet. And for S/S 2014, British fashion designer Neil Barrett borrows plaid patterns from 1990s lumberjack shirts, magnifes them, and weaves or prints them onto luxury fabrics, such as this silk jacket. ∂

071


WAWA* FLOWER POTS, FROM €96, BY MONICA FÖRSTER, FOR SKULTUNA. ‘X3’ WATERING CAN, $60, BY PAUL LOEBACH, FOR KONTEXTUR. ‘ORTE’ TOOL SET, €91, BY INTERNOITALIANO. PLANTING/SUCCULENTS, BY HATTIE FOX, FROM THAT FLOWER SHOP FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168

BEST WINDOW SILL

Top tools for high-rise horticulturalists

Set design: David White

Up in our city loft we don’t get to indulge in much horticulture, so we’re potty about this collection of gardening gizmos to brighten up our horizons. Swedish designer Monica Förster’s spun brass fower pots resemble traditional terracotta versions but with a modern twist. Plant your pots using Internoitaliano’s slick metal gardening tool set (rake, hoe and shovel), then keep them hydrated with Paul Loebach’s striking modernist watering can, available in copper or painted steel. 

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SHORT WRITER: ANNE SOWARD

073


Timeless and classic. Inspired by our convictions. A bulthaup b3 kitchen combines the utmost individualism with precision. The passion for detail plays as important a role as the overall architectural concept. This is what makes every bulthaup kitchen unique. It represents true, customized perfection tailored precisely to the room and everyone that lives in it. www.bulthaup.com


WAWA*

BEST CAMPING

‘FESTIVAL READY’ TENT, WOMEN’S CAPELET AND MEN’S PONCHO, ALL BY VICTORINOX

Tent, by Christopher Raeburn, for Victorinox

Fashion: Nobuko Tannawa. Models: Eveline Rozing and Marc-Andre Turgeon at Supa Model Management. Hair: Mari Ohashi using Morrocanoil. Make-up: Nobuko Maekawa using YSL Touche Éclat

This neon camo-printed festival kit, by Victorinox’s design director Christopher Raeburn, ensures you’ll never lose track of your tent or friends come Glastonbury season. The limited-edition ‘Festival Ready’ range includes a two-person tent, rain ponchos, rucksacks, that all-important Swiss Army knife and an app equipped with 3D navigation, a torch and a sound fare, proving that fashion and function can be happy bedfellows. The range, made from high-specifcation recycled nylon fabrics, safeguards an eco-conscious night’s sleep, whether you’re deep in the woods or a stone’s throw from the main stage. ∂ www.victorinox.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: HART+LËSHKINA WRITER: KATRINA ISRAEL

075


WAWA*

BEST WASH

Kartell by Laufen collection PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SHORT WRITER: EMMA MOORE

076

Put together two design giants – one, Laufen, a Swiss specialist in high-end sanitaryware, the other, Kartell, an Italian innovator in modern plastic furniture and accessories – and the scene is set for a whole new washing experience. Their concept bathroom collection, called simply Kartell by Laufen, launched earlier this year, designed by the talented Ludovica + Roberto Palomba. It combines all principle bathroom fttings – fne-edged washbasins, bathtubs, wall-hung toilets, bidets, showers in various sizes, all produced in sleek new material SaphirKeramik, with novel taps (which come with a ledge for resting soap, bottles or rings). Accessories such as stools, side tables, stackable units, shelves, mirrors and lighting come in Kartell’s signature translucent polycarbonates. ∂ www.kartellbylaufen.com

BASIN, £434; TAP, £624; VANITY UNIT, £754; MIRROR, £543, ALL PART OF THE KARTELL BY LAUFEN COLLECTION SHAVE CREAM, $8; ‘TRUMAN’ RAZOR, $10, BOTH FROM HARRY’S. ‘CUMULO’ TUMBLER, PRICE ON REQUEST, BY LILIANA OVALLE. CHARCOAL TOOTHBRUSHES, $7 EACH, FROM RIKUMO. SHAVING BRUSH, €21, BY SEMOGUE, FOR ANTIGA BARBEARIA DE BAIRRO, FROM ROTA DAS REGIÕES. THE ULTIMATE CLEANSING CUBE IN VANILLA, R70 ($7), FROM ESSENTIAL LIFE. SLIMTECH GOUACHE.10, €62 PER SQ M, BY DIEGO GRANDI, FROM LEA CERAMICHE ‘JUSTE UN CLOU’ RING IN YELLOW GOLD, £1,580, BY CARTIER


the show Visitors to Ambiente experience the world. They visit opportunities. Possibilities. International trends. Presented by more than 4,700 exhibitors. They visit highlights and events. Creations and inspirations. The designs of tomorrow. They visit ideas and new horizons. The future. When will you visit the show?

7 – 11. 2. 2014

ambiente.messefrankfurt.com


078

∑


WAWA*

BEST WARDROBE ‘Backstage’, by Antonio Citterio, for B&B Italia PHOTOGRAPHY: GIANLUCA FONTANA FASHION: WOO LEE WRITER: JJ MARTIN

‘BACKSTAGE’ WARDROBE SYSTEM, AS SHOWN, £20,000, PRICE DEPENDING ON CONFIGURATION, BY ANTONIO CITTERIO, FOR B&B ITALIA INSIDE WARDROBE, FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, JACKET, £658, BY PAUL SMITH. SHIRT, £500, BY VERSACE. BLOUSON, £1,459, BY SALVATORE FERRAGAMO. COAT, £580, BY EMPORIO ARMANI THIS PAGE, BODY SUIT, £1,500, BY GAETANO NAVARRA. BOOTS, £860, BY GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN. BRACELET, £92, BY ELISABETTA FRANCHI. ‘LANDSCAPE’ LOUNGER, FROM £2,344, BY JEFFREY BERNETT, FOR B&B ITALIA


MODULNOVA K I T C H E N BAT H LI V I N G

SHOWROOM MILANO

CORSO GARIBALDI 99

M M M O S C O VA

www.modulnova.it


WAWA* A WARDROBE DOOR CRAFTED FROM SUCUPIRA WOOD AND FEATURING A HANDLE WITH LEATHER INSERTS BLOUSON, £1,459, BY SALVATORE FERRAGAMO. BRACELETS, £67 EACH, BY SHARRA PAGANO

hough its name implies a certain behindthe-scenes shyness, the ‘Backstage’ wardrobe system, designed by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia, is centre-stage material. Designed to interact with the bedroom rather than disappear into it, the system features doors that can also be confgured as the access to an en suite, a hallway or any other room lurking on the other side of the bedroom. The concept originated from recent challenges Citterio has faced in the design

of several of his residential and hospitality projects. ‘Backstage,’ the architect explains, ‘is not a cabinet system, it is more an interior decoration idea. It ofers solutions that allow you to create diferent layouts in the bedroom.’ Aside from seamlessly integrating the wardrobe into the bedroom, the system also ofers the feeling that you’re stepping into it, even in a room with relatively snug dimensions. The doors, in three diferent »

081


Model: Celine Derrien at POP Models. Hair: Ezio Diaferia at Close Up Milano. Make-up: Miriam Langellotti at Greenapple. Photographer’s assistant: Paolo Pizzetti. Digital operator: Erika Buzin

WAWA*

widths (75cm, 87cm and 97cm), retract back into the wardrobe when you open them, so as not to protrude too much into the room. Of course, should you have enough space for a full-scale, walk-in wardrobe, the ‘Backstage’ does that, too – with a built-in, closed unit to store out-of-season clothing to boot. Along with structural and spatial intrigue, ‘Backstage’ comes dripping with obsessive details. The doors are crafted from sucupira wood (Brazilian chestnut) or lacquered with

082

a shellac fnish, with handles featuring leather or bronzed-nickel inserts. Inside, luxurious leather shelves and trays sit atop bronzednickel-fnished drawers. Additional features include accessory trays, an adjustable mirror, and belt and jewellery holders conveniently mounted on the inside of the doors. Sure, this wardrobe can hold your clothes; but more than that, it can completely redress your bedroom.   www.bebitalia.com

TOP LEFT, THE SYSTEM COMES WITH A VARIETY OF SHELVING, SUCH AS CLOTHES TRAYS AND A SHIRT COMPARTMENT TOP RIGHT AND BOTTOM LEFT, THE INTERIORS FEATURE LEATHERFINISHED DRAWERS AND TRAYS, AND ARE LIT BY ENERGY-SAVING LED LIGHTS WHEN THE DOORS ARE OPEN ABOVE, THE SYSTEM’S DOORS, WHICH RETRACT BACK INTO THE WARDROBE FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168


BEST SHOWER

‘WaterDream’, by Front, for Axor Hansgrohe PHOTOGRAPHY: AIMÉE HOVING WRITER: ALI MORRIS

When Swedish design trio Front was asked by bathroom brand Axor to create a shower that reimagines the bathroom space, the team looked behind the walls for inspiration. The result is ‘WaterDream’, a tangled maze of copper pipes, valves, couplings and funnels that join together to create a room-sized, threeheaded shower installation. The prototype has led to a range of Axor products based on the simple funnel shape: a shower-pipe, a shower set, an overhead shower with ceiling or wall connection, and a hand shower. Axor and Front are continuing to develop the concept and more products are already in the pipeline. 

084


WAWA* ‘WATERDREAM’ SHOWER CONCEPT, BY FRONT, FOR AXOR HANSGROHE. ‘WATERDREAM’ COLLECTION AVAILABLE FROM £86 FOR THE HAND SHOWER, WWW.HANSGROHE.CO.UK. TOWEL, £69, BY UCHINO, FROM THE CONRAN SHOP, WWW.CONRANSHOP.CO.UK

Model: Nina M at Fotogen Hair & make-up: Francis Ases Photographer’s assistant: George Altman


We Are Such Stuf As Dreams Are Made On W. Shakespeare

www.francescoperini.it


Francesco Perini’s creations are manufactured by

www.ivassalletti.it


BEST BUILDING SITE

Taichung Metropolitan Opera House, Taiwan, by Toyo Ito PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIC GREGORY POWELL WRITER: CATHERINE SHAW


WAWA* SCAFFOLDING PARTIALLY MASKS THE COMPLEX, CONCAVE FORMS THAT WILL MAKE UP THE CURVACEOUS, CAVE-LIKE INTERIORS OF THE OPERA HOUSE


WAWA* ELEMENTS THAT WILL FORM THE STRUCTURE’S CURVED SURFACES LIE READY OUTSIDE THE SITE

P

ritzker Prize-winning Japanese architect Toyo Ito is no stranger to innovation, but even he admits his adventurous design for the Taichung Metropolitan Opera House in Taiwan was so groundbreaking it was almost impossible to build. The 38,220 sq m, eight-foor theatre complex, located within a park in the centre of the city, is home to the 2,014-seat Grand Theatre, large enough to accommodate a full-scale opera; the 800-seat Playhouse, for theatrical productions; and the 200-seat Black Box theatre, which has the fexibility to connect with the 4,000 sq m, rooftop-garden event space. The complex also includes rehearsal studios, workshops, restaurants, shops and parking. Ito’s trademark curvaceous façade, multiple entrances and thoughtful landscaping ensure the structure is closely integrated with the surrounding park and multi-storey housing. ‘I have long been conscious of how to create connections between the inside and outside of architecture,’ says 72-year-old Ito. Inside, meanwhile, a fuid network of free-form, cave-like spaces with sensuous surfaces form the integral structure. It represents an intriguing evolution of Ito’s earlier, airy, open interiors at the Sendai Mediatheque in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, where, inspired by the simple geometry of a Cartesian

090

38,220

SQ M MAKE UP THE WHOLE COMPLEX

8

FLOORS HOUSE THREE THEATRES

2,014

SEATS IN THE LARGEST THEATRE SPACE

4,000 SQ M OF ROOFTOP GARDEN SPACE

co-ordinate system, he introduced the notion of tubes vertically penetrating a structure. In Taichung, he says, these ‘catenoids’ (threedimensional shapes created by rotating catenary curves around a Z-axis) take on an even more complex form, the geometry complicated by tubes connecting in both horizontal and vertical directions. The extended system calls for the addition of ‘plugs’ inserted to form foors and dividing walls without obscuring the ethereality of the ‘caves’, while retaining structural integrity throughout. ‘The challenge was not so much in the design process, but more in how to realise such a design with current construction technologies,’ explains Ito. ‘Luckily, technical innovation made it a real possibility.’ When it was tendered for construction, only one local contractor, Lee Ming Construction, was willing to take on the challenge. ‘I think they took it because they had a strong motivation to realise this project, as a local business, rather than because they had confdence in their skills,’ observes Ito. The project team, which also included engineering innovator Arup, turned to 3D computerised models and took expert advice from racing car design engineers to help balance the project’s competing structural, acoustic and aesthetic requirements. Over the course of numerous trials, including the construction of full-scale structural models, it became clear the sole solution would involve the laying of ‘truss walls’ (truss beams made by reinforcing steel bars) to defne the curved shape, which would be overlaid by structural reinforcing bars and fne metal mesh, to be used as concrete formwork. This would then be solidifed in self-consolidating concrete. The fnal layer of mortar (measuring 20mm) would be applied painstakingly by hand to achieve the precise texture and smooth fnish Ito had envisaged for the interiors. The inventive, organic form created ‘awakens people’s memories of being inside of caves, the most primitive space for mankind’, says Ito. ‘On the other hand, they can enjoy a kind of spatial experience which one can never fnd in modernist architecture.’ The interior’s dynamic series of convex surfaces proved highly efcient in terms of acoustics and natural lighting. The structure also caters to environmental sensibilities, with integrated rainwater recycling and passive temperature control systems. Although the project represents a highly innovative approach to architectural engineering, Ito says it is not the desire to innovate per se that drives him to challenge the architectural norm. ‘Architecture often tends to inherit the order of the preceding era,’ he remarks. ‘I would like to reinstate its dynamism and energy in my designs. Beyond the perspective of function and performance imposed on contemporary architecture, I am pleased if we can share the joy of living through the building.’   www.toyo-ito.co.jp


Wallpaper & Tudor Style File Atelier 11 ∂

WALLPAPER.COM

Style File Atelier 11

PHOTOGRAPHY: CYBELE MALINOWSKI

THE LIGHT ARTIST Wallpaper∂ and Tudor Style File continues, this time with the focus locked and loaded on craft. Inspired by elements, accents and details of fne horology, we’ve been visiting the workshops and ateliers of some of our favourite artisans, mapping their creative processes and aesthetic mindsets. This month, we meet up with Melbourne-based light artist Kit Webster, who’s worked with everyone from Calvin Harris to Ford and New York Fashion Week and performed at festivals the world over. Using luminescence as brush strokes, splashes of vibrant, fashing white instead of paint daubs, Webster’s art takes you on a 3D journey, taking in sculptural form, synaesthesia, video projection and virtual reality, with a trippy wow factor guaranteed. Switched-on guy. Dazzling art. Enlightened Tudor wristwatch.


WAWA* DRESS, £825, BY SIMONE ROCHA, FROM NET-A-PORTER

Model: Lary Arcanjo at Next Models New York Hair: Peter Gray for L’Oréal Paris Hair Expertise Hair assistant: Takayuki Shibata Make-up: Roy Lui

BEST FASHION FUTURE Simone Rocha

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY FRIEND FASHION: ZOË SINCLAIR WRITER: KATRINA ISRAEL

Central Saint Martins graduate Simone Rocha may be the daughter of fashion designer John Rocha, but since founding her own label four years ago, she has danced to her own beat. Her spring collection’s sombre mood, inspired by the ruged Irish coastline, was a study in contrasts, playing with themes of purity and unruliness; see slashed, drop-waisted rufe skirts, sealed with precious pearl fnishes. Rocha is the epitome of a new generation of business-smart, London-based designers, picking up the British Fashion Council’s 2013 Emerging Womenswear Designer award for her eforts.

093


The fast-track guide for the smart traveller

Available in print and online phaidon.com/digital

Print: £ 6.95, $ 11.95, ¤ 9.95, AUS $ 12.95 Digital: £ 2.99, $ 4.99, ¤ 4.49, AUS $ 5.49

Amsterdam, Antwerp, Athens, Atlanta, Auckland, Bangkok, Barcelona, Basel, Beijing, Beirut, Belfast, Belgrade, Berlin, Bilbao, Bogota, Bologna, Boston, Brasilia, Brussels, Budapest, Buenos Aires, Cairo, Cape Town, Caracas, Chicago, Cologne/Dusseldorf, Copenhagen, Dallas/Fort Worth, Delhi, Dubai, Dublin, Edinburgh, Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Genoa, Glasgow, Guangzhou, Hamburg, Hanoi, Havana, Helsinki, Ho Chi Minh City, Hong Kong, Honolulu, Houston, Istanbul, Jakarta, Johannesburg, Kuala Lumpur, Kyoto, Las Vegas, Lima, Lisbon, Liverpool, Ljubljana, London, Los Angeles, Lyon, Maastricht, Madrid, Manchester, Marrakech, Marseille, Melbourne, Mexico City, Miami, Milan, Montreal, Moscow, Mumbai, Munich, Naples, New Orleans, New York, Nice/Cannes, Osaka, Oslo, Palermo, Palma, Paris, Perth, Philadelphia, Porto, Prague, Reykjavík, Riga, Rio de Janeiro, Rome, Rotterdam, St Petersburg, Salzburg, San Francisco, San Juan, Santiago, São Paulo, Sapporo, Seattle, Seoul, Seville, Shanghai, Singapore, Stockholm, Strasbourg, Sydney, Taipei, Tallinn, Tel Aviv, Tokyo, Toronto, Turin, Valencia, Vancouver, Venice, Vienna, Warsaw, Washington DC, Zurich


WAWA* FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, ‘NATURAL EARTH’ RUG IN BLACK, €2,100, BY NANIMARQUINA, FROM SKANDIUM. ‘BELL’ LAMP, £1,990, BY BARBEROSGERBY, FOR LOUIS VUITTON. ‘DALA’ PLANTER, £305, BY STEPHEN BURKS, FOR DEDON. ‘GRAFT’ CONSOLE, £6,250, BY SIMON HASAN, FOR LINLEY. ‘UNAM’ LOUNGE CHAIR, €1,010, BY SEBASTIAN HERKNER, FOR VERY WOOD. ‘RILEY SHINGLE’ FABRIC, £70 PER SQ M, BY BLACK EDITION BY ROMO. ‘CEMENTO 14’ FLOOR TILES, €156 PER SQ M, BY 14 ORA ITALIANA FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168

BEST FOLK

Crafty designers with contemporary angles

We don’t usually root for the folk aesthetic, but we’re smitten by a cluster of pieces that mesh modern technology with a crafty demeanour. Sebastian Herkner’s comfortable solid wood chair with a woven backrest manages to feel both traditionally handcrafted and modern at the same time, while BarberOsgerby’s handblown Murano glass lamp is perfect for stylish nomads, being cordless and solar-powered. And Simon Hasan’s unconventional marquetry, Stephen Burks’ recycled planters and Nanimarquina’s natural fbre rugs have us fervently campaigning for a folk revival. 

Set design: David White

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN SHORT WRITER: ANNE SOWARD

095


WAWA*

WITH VINYL RECORDS AND A GUITAR, THE SUITE IS CONCEIVED AS A COSY HOME FROM HOME FOR LA’S CREATIVE VISITORS

BEST MUSICAL BOLT–HOLE Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles PHOTOGRAPHY: JOE FLETCHER WRITER: PEI-RU KEH

096

Ace Atelier’s latest edition, in LA’s fast evolving Downtown, inhabits the once famous United Artists premises and theatre, built in 1927. Aside from its 182 rooms, 16 suites, restaurant, performance space, screening room, and rooftop swimming pool and bar, it’s the hotel’s focus on music – an initiative of the group’s late founder Alex Calderwood – that will really satiate creative visitors. Selected suites boast their own Ace x Rega RP1 turntables and curated collection of vinyl records, while the pictured suite also features a Martin acoustic guitar and a ceiling spotlight, under which amateur or professional musicians can throw an intimate gig at a moment’s notice. Furniture is selected, conceived or commissioned by local outft Commune Design, creating the perfect bolt-hole for long-term guests who might want to host their own visitors. ∂ 929 S Broadway, tel: 1.213 623 3233, www.acehotel.com/losangeles. Suites: from $599


SHIFT no. 5 FROM HARD CASH TO SOFT VALUES

Soft values such as appreciation, dedication and the ability to influence, contribute increasingly to our happiness at work. Kinnarps Trend Report – 8 shifts affecting the workplace of tomorrow. See the full report at www.kinnarps.com/trend


OLYMPIA SCARRY AND NEVILLE WAKEFIELD (LEFT) ARE CURATING THE SHOW IN THE SNOW. SEE CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS AND THEIR LOCATIONS, RIGHT, AND THOSE WHO HAVE YET TO DETERMINE THEIR SPOTS, BELOW: JOHN ARMLEDER VALENTIN CARRON BERNHARD HEGGLIN & TINA BRAEGGER OLIVIER MOSSET MAI-THU PERRET PAMELA ROSENKRANZ KILIAN RÜTHEMANN TOBIAS SPICHTIG HANNAH WEINBERGER

E

ver since it became a winter playground for the international ski-and-be-seen crowd in the 1960s, the Swiss resort of Gstaad has developed a reputation as a bit of a St Tropez im Schnee. But underneath all the Moncler is a rather typical alpine farming village dominated by the massive natural backdrop of the mountains and a temperamental climate that defnes everyday life and the local vernacular alike. Nothing about it really screams ‘art’. But this winter, the New York-based curator Neville Wakefeld and his partner, the artist Olympia Scarry, have decided to put the Schweiz back into Gstaad with an ambitious exhibition

098

of site-specifc works by Swiss artists entitled ‘Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell’. Olympia is the granddaughter of the children’s book illustrator Richard Scarry, who lived and worked in Gstaad from the 1970s. Both she and Neville have spent a lot of time there and are committed to bringing not only a sense of the ‘local’ back to the place, but also to celebrate its international infuences. ‘Gstaad is in some ways emblematic of Switzerland: very local and at the same time extremely global,’ says Wakefeld. With the support of Maja Hofmann’s LUMA Foundation, the curators have lured an A-list of the top living Swiss »

PHOTOGRAPHY: ARI MARCOPOULOS


1015: Special Exhibition

GSTAAD

1013: Peter Fischli & David Weiss 1033: Ugo Rondinone

Swapping the white walls of a gallery for the snowy slopes of a Swiss ski resort, the site-specific exhibition climbs every mountain, as it were. Here’s who’s showing at altitude

1053: Gianni Motti

1055: Pipilotti Rist

1047: Claudia Comte 1100: Sylvie Fleury 1138: Christoph Büchel

1053: Urs Fischer 1195: Not Vital

1101: Alexandra Bachzetsis 1101: Ugo Rondinone

1044: Roman Signer

1566: Olaf Breuning

1237: Thomas Hirschhorn 1381: Olympia Scarry

1743: Gianni Jetzer

1542: Christian Marclay

BEST ART EXPERIENCE

‘Elevation 1049: Between Heaven and Hell’, Gstaad ILLUSTRATOR: KATIE SCOTT WRITER: SOPHIE LOVELL


WAWA*

CHRISTIAN MARCLAY MARCLAY IS MAKING A FILM (ABOVE) BASED ON HIS DISCOVERY THAT GSTAAD IS USED AS A BACKDROP FOR MANY BOLLYWOOD MOVIES ROMAN SIGNER SIGNER (ABOVE LEFT) PLANS TO SEND A CHALET DOWN A SLOPE ON SKIS (LEFT) KILIAN RÜTHEMANN RÜTHEMANN (RIGHT) IS MAKING A SCULPTURE USING THE TRUNKS OF PALM TREES WHICH HE CURRENTLY HAS AT HIS STUDIO

artists, many of whom live abroad, to swap the white cube for the snow-covered slopes and create a range of pieces and performances to be shown from January until March. Participants include Fischli & Weiss, Sylvie Fleury, Pipilotti Rist and Christian Marclay. The decision to invite only Swiss artists arose out of the conversation with the place, explains Wakefeld, and the eforescence of Swiss artists in the last decade. ‘Half of them don’t live in Switzerland. They have very strong roots to the place and think of themselves as Swiss, but don’t need to be there all the time – again this confuence of the global and the local.’ The idea of the site-specifc nature of the show as a response to time and place was there from the start, says Wakefeld: ‘It’s a show that isn’t about enclosing artworks in essentially featureless spaces that could be anywhere in the world, but about expansiveness, and artworks that can exist and thrive in a specifc context.’ The works will be scattered around Gstaad: at the bus stop, in a mountain hut, or on the glacier. Visiting the show will most likely involve leaving the comfort zone for some. And ‘site specifc’ is not a term one has heard that often in recent years on the art circuit. ‘It has been out of fashion because the fashion for the past couple of decades has been driven by the market,’ says Wakefeld,

100

‘and the market is obviously not a friend of site-specifc work because it needs to transport works and display them in a universal context. Art that puts demands on the viewer and is harder to sell has not been in favour. But I think it has been in favour with artists for ever.’ The curators invited their selected artists over to Gstaad and asked them to respond to the place. Wakefeld sees his and Scarry’s role in this respect as that of ‘facilitators in a conversation between the artist and the circumstances they are creating their art for’. It’s a three-way conversation, rather than the usual dialogue between artist and curator in a generic gallery space. The results promise to be an interesting combination of the surprising and the essential. Artist Christian Marclay, for example, is making a flm, his frst since The Clock, based on his discovery that Gstaad is used as a backdrop for at least one scene in a lot of Bollywood movies and that the town is a favourite place of pilgrimage for Indian flm fans. Roman Signer, who often works with gravity and explosions, plans to send a chalet down one of the slopes on skis. The event will be flmed, then the flm will be shown in the chalet afterwards. We are very much looking forward to going of-piste in Gstaad this winter. 27 January–8 March 2014, elevation1049.org

PHOTOGRAPHY: AUGUSTIN REBETEZ


A genuine Starck. The bathroom by Philippe Starck.

Leben im Badoms Living bathro

badmagazin

Edition 4

P. 70OOM RANGE HAPPY D.2

8

BATHR ng an Reinterpreti archetype

P. 15 ASH OW ET SENSER TOIL SHOW R THAT ED

P. 122 AMME TURE PROGR

®

FO WASH HLY- G IN FEEL

FURNI X-LARGE e space, le Extra storag extra flexib extra light,

FRES

CRE ATI NG

YOU R

HROOM D R EA M B AT

Outstandin

entry-leve ng from the g design rangi

y bathroom l to the luxur

More nuances. More elegance. More versatility: The Starck bathroom series with the coordinating furniture programme. Just one example from the comprehensive Duravit range – sanitary ceramics, bathroom furniture, accessories, bathtubs, wellness products and saunas. Free brochure available from Duravit AG, export@duravit.de, www.duravit.com


BEST CATWALK LAUNCH Tod’s, by Alessandra Facchinetti PHOTOGRAPHY: DIMA HOHLOV FASHION: ZOË SINCLAIR WRITER: JJ MARTIN

Alessandra Facchinetti’s debut, S/S 2014, ready-to-wear collection for Tod’s was a highlight of Milan Fashion Week. With Tod’s reputation for understated luxury clearly front of mind, the designer, an alumna of Valentino, Gucci and Moncler Gamme Rouge, produced a collection that was subtle but perfectly judged. Using fabulously crisp cotton poplin and paper-thin leathers in burnt brick and dusty rose, Facchinetti cut feminine clothes in clean lines that gave a modern kick to the trusted Tod’s aesthetic. She not only nailed the fullvolume skirts and new takes on men’s shirting, but also showed an assured hand with the label’s accessories. Tod’s famous drivers were streamlined in a new, slimmer, fatter style, while the fringe-fronted sandals, fat boots and chic lugage are sure to set sales on fre. 

102


WAWA* THIS PAGE, LEATHER TOP, MADE TO MEASURE, £2,715; BAG, £1,300 OPPOSITE, LEATHER TOP, MADE TO MEASURE, £1,775; SKIRT, MADE TO MEASURE, £1,125, ALL BY TOD’S, WWW.TODS.COM

Model: Maja Milosavljevic at Women Management Paris Hair: Peter Gray for L’Oréal Paris Hair Expertise Hair assistant: Takayuki Shibata Make-up: Ariel Yeh using NARS cosmetics and Clarins Skincare Photographer’s assistants: Clement Mahjoub, Sylvain Patry


WAWA*

BEST BED

‘Bumper Bed’, by Marc Newson, for Domeau & Pérès PHOTOGRAPHY: VICTOR PRADO WRITER: PEI-RU KEH

One of the lesser-known facts about Australian designer Marc Newson may be that until he conceived his playful ‘Bumper Bed’ in 1997, he slept on a mattress laid simply on the foor. Seventeen years on, the bed has fnally been produced for the frst time by design gallery and master crafts-maker Domeau & Pérès. Its wooden frame, into which a mattress is set, is flled with polyurethane foam, covered in buttery leather and encircled by a band in a matching shade or bright orange. ‘I thought it would give people like me the opportunity to transform their trusty mattress into a nicelooking bed,’ explains Newson. Each bed is made to size, signed and issued in a numbered edition, making it a true collectible. ‘Bumper Bed’, price on request, by Marc Newson, for Domeau & Pérès, domeauperes.com


‘OROTUND’ LIGHTS, £250 EACH, BY MARC NEWSON, FOR FLOS, FROM YOOX.COM. ALSO PICTURED ARE NEWSON’S ONGOING CLOTHING COLLABORATION WITH G-STAR RAW; ‘HERCULES’ COAT HANGERS (1997), FOR MAGIS; ‘ZVEZDOCHKA’ SHOES (2001), FOR NIKE; ‘SCOPE’ SUITCASES (2004), FOR SAMSONITE PHOTOGRAPHED AT THE EXHIBITION ‘MARC NEWSON: AT HOME’, PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART, UNTIL 20 APRIL 2014

105


WAWA* BEST MILK NÚMERO 4 SAL MARINA, COP16,000 ($8) FOR 85G, BY MASA, SOMOSMASA.COM BEST FLAVOURED MATCHA, £4 FOR 50G, BY PASCAL BESCHLE AND SARA HOCHULI, FROM FORTNUM & MASON, FORTNUMANDMASON.COM, BESCHLE.CH, MIYUKO.CH BEST DARK ECUADOR 75%, £5.80 FOR 75G, BY PUMP STREET BAKERY, PUMPSTREETBAKERY.COM

BEST CHOCOLATE Our favourite squares, dark, milk and favoured Top of our dark chocolate list is Ecuador 75% by the Sufolk-based Pump Street Bakery, which imports its cocoa beans directly from co-operatives and small farms in the countries of origin, then roasts, grinds and conches them in very small batches. The resulting chocolate is exceptional: complex, almost savoury in its richness, and deeply satisfying. For milk chocolate, we turn to Masa, an artisanal bakery and café in Bogotá, headed up by sisters Silvana and Mariana

106

Villegas. Their products are handmade, using the best, locally sourced ingredients. Número 4 is a sophisticated milk bar, reassuringly smooth, with luxurious caramel notes and a light sprinkling of sea salt. And when it comes to the best in favoured squares, we can’t resist the refreshingly tangy green tea and yogurt bar by Pascal Beschle and Sara Hochuli, who have created an intriguingly coloured chocolate aimed at the new generation of sophisticated, style-savvy gourmets. ∂

PHOTOGRAPHY: KATE JACKLING ENTERTAINING DIRECTOR: MELINA KEAYS


W Bespoke Promotion ∂

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE The Wallpaper* Design Awards have a brand new category, Best New Neighbourhood, organised in association with Airbnb

01

09

07

06

04

08

05

02

REDCHURCH STREET 01 ACE HOTEL 02 SUNSPEL

DESIGN AWARDS 2014

03

03 SHOREDITCH HOUSE 04 ALBION/ BOUNDARY HOTEL 05 APC 06 REDCHURCH LOFTS 07 MARGARET HOWELL

in associatio

n with

08 AUBIN CINEMA 09 LABOUR AND WAIT

Winner Redchurch Street London, UK

Runner-up Haji Lane Singapore

Residents include: APC, Sunspel, Aesop, Labour and Wait Staying power: Once a rather hostile bit of London’s East End, right now this is hitting that cultural sweet spot somewhere between discovery and gentrifcation. Yes, Aubin & Wills is here but it has appeased the locals with a bijou cinema and an art gallery founded by Stuart Semple. With Shoreditch House and the Ace Hotel just around the corner, retail scouts have been busily sizing up any available Georgian façades and disused light industrial buildings for big name fashion brands.

Residents include: Pluck, Dulcetfg, Know It Nothing Staying power: People have been visiting the pre-war shophouses of the Muslim quarter for a century, yet these days Haji Lane has the quality of a newly discovered gem, with independent boutiques popping up (along with the odd pop-up) among the old sari shops and bead exporters. Tokyobike was one of the trailblazers, attracting accessorisers like Flufy Feline, fast fashion from Crayon, smart tailoring at Know It Nothing, and Scandinavian-inspired furniture from A Thousand Tales.

BOOKLET ILLUSTRATOR: RAY ORANGES MAP ILLUSTRATOR: LUKE FENECH

Runner-up Haarlemmerstraat / Haarlemmerdijk Amsterdam, Netherlands Residents include: OntFront, Restored, Tenue de Nîmes Staying power: Lower rents frst attracted artisan bakers and makers to this thoroughfare of 17th-century townhouses, and concept stores like Sukha soon followed. The rest of the city took notice when Tenue de Nîmes rocked up and became a destination for denim-seekers, and the street now plays host to the annual New Food Fair. Even the ‘cofee shops’ took their cues; the glass-fronted Dampkring makes lazy days on the pipe seem positively aspirational.

Runner-up Porta Nuova Milan Residents include: Maison Martin Margiela, Costume National, Dsquared2 Staying power: The 99-acre Porta Nuova community just got an infusion of cash from Qatar, so residents of César Pelli’s sleek, new Unicredit Tower should fnd themselves in good company. Stefano Boeri’s Bosco Verticale residential towers, with their tiers of landscaped terraces, is almost complete. Meanwhile, launches by Costume National, Dsquared2, Nike and Maison Martin Margiela have hastened gentrifcation in the scrufy Isola, Garibaldi and Varesine quarters.


WAWA* ‘Empatia’ lamp The LED light at the base of this lamp (bottom left) shines up through a central rod, refects of its opaque top and radiates out of the hand-blown glass dome. £466, by Carlotta de Bevilacqua and Paola Monaco di Arianello, for Artemide

‘Shibuya’ vase Designed in plastic and named after the neon lights of Tokyo’s vibrant shopping district, this vase (second left) is one of a series that have interchangeable bases and lids in translucent bands of colour. £87, by Christophe Pillet, for Kartell

‘Cloud Boxes’ Instead of hiding away ofce clutter entirely, the semi-transparent latex skin of this unit (back left) transforms unsightly objects into blurred silhouettes of colour. Price on request, by Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters, for ProofLab

‘Haze’ table This ethereal side table (top) is made from cast plates of softly coloured resin, allowing the asymmetrical leg joints to show through the milky, translucent table top. €4,850, by Wonmin Park, from Rossana Orlandi

‘Deep-Sea’ table Crafted with precision, the dividing panels of this unit (front right) are made of glass tinted with coloured flm and spaced at increasingly narrow intervals to create a gradient of deepening colour. €2,631, by Nendo, for Glas Italia

‘Fiorente’ vase This centrepiece (far right) is expertly composed of nine precisely cut, lead-free crystal vessels that are stacked and fused together to form a colourful plant structure. Limited edition of 50. £8,919, by Studio IRDS, for Moser For stockists, see page 168


BEST TRANSPARENCY Clear winners take their place on the podium

PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL BODIAM INTERIORS: AMY HEFFERNAN WRITER: ALI MORRIS

∑

109


WAWA*

BEST LOUNGER ‘Orson’ sunlounger, by Gordon Guillaumier, for Roda Forming part of the ‘Orson’ garden furniture collection, Gordon Guillaumier’s sunlounger is an exercise in ergonomics and clean lines. Created for Italian outdoor furniture manufacturer Roda, it’s made from slightly curved teak boards mounted on a sturdy four-leged structure. The simple sophistication of the piece is enhanced by a metamorphic twist: when the reclining headrest is laid fat it looks just like an unassuming bench. ∂

‘ORSON’ SUNLOUNGER, €1,640, BY GORDON GUILLAUMIER, FOR RODA. BOOKS, FROM A SELECTION, BY PENGUIN GROUP. PROTECT SPF50 ULTRA SHEER, £32 FOR 60ML, BY CANE & AUSTIN, FROM SPACE NK. BEACH TOWEL, £275, BY HERMÉS

Shot on location at Church Walk by David Mikhail Architects (www.davidmikhailcom). With thanks to David Mikhail, Annalie Riches and Sarah Bolton

FOR STOCKISTS, SEE PAGE 168

110

PHOTOGRAPHY: CHRISTOFFER RUDQUIST WRITER: ROSA BERTOLI


3KRWRE\2SL¿FLR9DUHVH,WOD\

FLOLVWKHUHVXOWRIWKH¿UVWFROODERUDWLRQEHWZHHQOLJKWLQJPDQXIDFWXUHU /XPLQDDQGDUFKLWHFWXUHDQGGHVLJQSUDFWLFH)RVWHU3DUWQHUV 7KH NEW Flo WallLVQRZDYDLODEOHLQDUDQJHRIFRORXUVDQG¿QLVKHV 0RUHLQIRZZZOXPLQDLWRULQIR#OXPLQDLW


BEST FUTURE VISION Her, directed by Spike Jonze INTERVIEW: NICK COMPTON

112

∑


Photography: Sam Zhu

Newspaper WAWA*

Spike Jonze’s new flm Her tells a sad, sweethearted, slightly unsettling story about a sad, sweet-hearted, unsettled man called Theodore Twombly, played by Joaquin Phoenix, who falls in love with his artifcially intelligent, talking operating system, who calls herself Samantha, and is played by Scarlett Johansson. The flm is set in the near-future. You can tell this because Theodore and all the other men in his world wear high-waisted trousers and the colours in his world are not the colours of the world as it is. Well, not entirely. They are, says Jonze, the colours of a branch of Jamba Juice. When Jonze, who wrote and directed Her, and his team frst began working on the flm, their near-future didn’t feel that near. And then Siri started piping up on Apple devices and Team Jonze realised that Samantha might be just a couple of software updates away. ‘When we started talking about the movie, we were thinking years in the future,’ says KK Barrett, Jonze’s longtime production designer. ‘And then Siri came out and we were like, this could be the day after tomorrow.’ That’s the trouble with the future. It never travels at the speed you expect it to travel. As Barrett says, Her is not placing bets on the way the future is going to shape up. ‘You can’t win that battle. And the point of the movie is not to make predictions. It’s about providing a bubble

for the characters to live in.’ Indeed, Jonze calls Siri’s arrival a ‘liberating moment when we realised the flm wasn’t about the future, it was about getting the right feeling, the right colours, the right wood.’ As Jonze and his team have imagined it, Twombly’s some-way-of-just-around-thecorner world is not an unpleasant place to be. Not at all, even if he is having a hard time in it. ‘The one really clear instruction that Spike gave us was that this shouldn’t be a dystopia,’ says Barrett. ‘This is a world of pleasurable experiences, not a post-apocalyptic nightmare.’ And as another collaborator on the flm, artist Geof McFetridge, says, creating that kind of environment can be a lot stickier than rendering a world gone to hell in a handcart. ‘Dystopia or even a jump-suited, crystalline utopia would both be easier than this,’ he says. ‘The world of Her is just nice. Futurenice is pretty tricky.’ Anyway, it turns out that this magazine may have fgured in Jonze’s vision of futurenice. ‘I was thinking about how everything looked when Wallpaper* started and how the whole world looks like Wallpaper* now. And the idea in the flm is that even in this almost OPPOSITE, SPIKE JONZE AND DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY HOYTE VAN HOYTEMA ON THE HER SET THIS PAGE, THEODORE TWOMBLY, PLAYED BY JOAQUIN PHOENIX, IN HIS HIGH-WAISTERS OF THE FUTURE

utopian world, where everything is welldesigned and colourful and looks a bit like Wallpaper* magazine, you can still feel lonely. And lonely because there is so much intrusion, so much you are expected to respond to, because expectations are so high.’ Jonze means that not just in the busy-beingbothered sense, but in the way a glut of good things can become a burden; that there is this surfeit, this totality, of good design and information and culture that demands a response. And trying to answer those demands can, oddly, get you down. Twombly’s job – and he is good at it – is writing personal letters, delivered digitally, for people who are too busy to compose them themselves. He has long-term clients who have outsourced the entire written record of their personal relationships to him. People do not have time to engage with each other, it seems, when there is all this other good stuf to engage with. All basic needs have long since been met in Twombly’s world – even the public transport is clean, efcient and relatively uncrowded – so choice, quality and texture matter. It’s like our world but more so. ‘The one buzzword we had was “bespoke”,’ says Barrett. ‘It just seemed to us that that was the way things were going, so wouldn’t it be even more like that in the future? You would have even more choices. What you »


often see in visions of the future is this very streamlined, mechanical, uniform world. But we wanted the opposite of that. This is a future where you can have what you want.’ Oddly, though, there are also things that people in Twombly’s world don’t have. ‘There are a lot of things that we took away,’ says the flm’s costume designer Casey Storm. ‘There are no jeans, no sportswear, no belts and no ties.’ Creating a coherent futurescape is then as much about what you take out as what you put in. The one thing they did add was the already much-discussed highwaisters. Though, as is the case with a lot of science fction, future fashion can have an oddly retro look. ‘The high-waisters kind of reference the 1940s, but we also added a 1960s element,’ says Storm. (It’s a look that designer/retailer Opening Ceremony liked so much they produced a capsule menswear collection based around it.) If not in the predictions business, Barrett and Storm did try something approaching the scientifc when it came to constructing Twombly’s material universe. ‘We had this discussion about how, in terms of clothes and product design, you have these periods which are a reaction to what has come before. We were trying to think two reactions ahead. So if there is this trend for the natural and organic now, perhaps that will come back but even more refned. We defnitely didn’t want this world to feel hard and metallic.’ Though the flm is set in LA, much of the outdoor shots were flmed in Shanghai. ‘We went to places like Japan and Malaysia, but fnally decided that Shanghai had this really dense downtown that we were looking for,’ says Barrett. ‘It also has these elevated sidewalks, which was great because then we didn’t have to show cars of the future. ‘When you go to any really modern city, you feel like you have travelled in time,’ he continues. ‘Everything feels strangely futuristic because people are doing things in diferent ways. Hopefully we get some of the strangeness across.’ Perhaps the trickiest problem for the team was designing the places where Samantha lives: Theodore’s desktop and the smartphone he carries with him at all times. ‘We thought that if it was really advanced it might be this sheet of glass or some new material,’ says Barrett. ‘Or a holograph but there are all sorts of problems with that.’ What they ended up with was a device based on an art deco cigarette case. ‘Ultimately, we decided that it wasn’t about the technology. It was about how people treasure certain objects; the way they get worn and comfortable in the hand,

114

like old cigarette lighters. Look at iPhones – as soon as people buy one, they buy a particular plastic case to make it their own.’ McFetridge, meanwhile, was charged with developing the look of the operating system, the base-station of Samantha’s quickgrow consciousness and self-consciousness. ‘My goal was to bring an artful humanity to the graphics,’ McFetridge says. ‘The graphics on Theodore’s screens should be specifc like his clothes, they should refect his taste. ‘Much of what I did was about using a combination of the opposing forces of decorativeness and function. So if you can imagine having a piece of art, and that artwork is framed, and that frame contains an expandable interface. So you mainly get art in the middle, but there is always a functional context around the edge. But Spike was totally obsessed with looking at Dodger Stadium on Google Earth and saying: “It should be like this!” In the end, looking at James Turrell’s work was a real inspiration and helped me fnd a way to work that was graphic, but addressed some of the notes that I was getting from Spike about making things “Super 3D! Dodger Stadium!”.’ But if Her is partly about our increasingly complex relationship with technology, technology increasingly designed to identify and perhaps manipulate our wants and needs as much as serve and service them, it is more about our increasingly complex relationships with each other. It is also at times – for instance, when Samantha tries to remain chipper in the face of Theodore’s sudden coldness – quite heart-breaking. The central concern of Her is not that Samantha is an operating system, but that she is growing, learning and developing new ambitions and needs. ‘There is this tension between expectations in a relationship,’ Jonze says. ‘You expect the other person to give you the space to grow, but you go to bed and expect exactly the same person to wake up next to you in the morning.’ Her, then, is not a science fction movie but a painful and perfectly judged study in love falling foul

FEBRUARY 2014

*THE STUFF THAT REFINES YOU

LIMITED EDITION COVER BY GEOFF MCFETRIDGE AND SPIKE JONZE

OUR LIMITED-EDITION COVER IS BY GEOFF MCFETRIDGE AND SPIKE JONZE. LIMITED-EDITION COVERS ARE AVAILABLE TO SUBSCRIBERS, SEE WALLPAPER.COM

of rising expectations, of hearts broken by distance and dissatisfaction, and the pull of something, somewhere else. The poster calls it a ‘Spike Jonze love story’. It is also a portrait of quiet, male desperation and disappointment. At the start of the flm Theodore is low-level depressed, functioning but curled into himself. It is a condition that Jonze clearly thinks needs more consideration. ‘Do men talk about this kind of stuf in the UK?’ he asks me. ‘Can you talk about feelings in Wallpaper*? I think you really need to get feelings into Wallpaper*.’ I’ll try, I said. After an initial edit, Her was running at two and half hours. Jonze called in his friend, director Steven Soderbergh, who performed what he calls a ‘slash and burn’ edit and brought the flm down to an hour and a half. Jonze put half an hour back, but still gave up an entire subplot involving the actor Chris Cooper. As is now well known, Cooper was not the only original cast member to fnd their work cut out of the fnal version. Samantha was originally voiced by the English actress Samantha Morton, who read her lines while hidden away in a wooden box. Once flming was complete, Jonze decided her performance wasn’t working and he made the decision to replace her. For Jonze, who comes of as disarmingly likeable and generous spirited, it was a tough call to make. ‘Samantha is someone I have worked with before and totally respect. She is one of the best actresses in the world. And what she has given the flm and Joaquin is invaluable (Morton gets an associate producer credit). So it was a really tough thing to tell someone.’ Jonze auditioned a lot of actresses before meeting with Johansson and deciding he had fnally found his Samantha. And disembodied (ironically, obviously) Johansson does amazing things. Her Samantha is sexy, spikily questioning and intelligent, and fun to be around. And a heart-breaker. Says Jonze, ‘Listening is a big part of any relationship.’ And you could listen to Johansson’s Samantha all day. ‘She brings all this vulnerability and pain and hurt into the voice,’ Jonze says. ‘It’s a really challenging thing to do. And I saw her do it, really diging deep.’ Phoenix, meanwhile, is just as moving, hidden behind a moustache, specs and those high-waisters. As Jonze says, Her is not really about a future where everyone wears earpieces and all food is fusion. It’s about the relationship between a man and a woman who just happens to live in an art deco smartphone. 

Photography: courtesy of Warner Bros Pictures

‘The idea in the flm is that even in this almost utopian world, where everything looks a bit like Wallpaper*, you can still feel lonely’


WAWA* THIS PICTURE, GEOFF MCFETRIDGE CREATED THE NOTES THAT SAMANTHA WRITES TO THEODORE ON HIS ART DECO SMARTPHONE. ‘HER HANDWRITING IS MY OWN, BECAUSE MY HANDWRITING LOOKS LIKE A GIRL’S,’ HE SAYS BELOW, TWOMBLY MAKES HIS LIVING WRITING PERSONAL LETTERS FOR OTHER PEOPLE


BEST FINISHING LINE

Zielturm Rotsee, Switzerland, by Andreas Fuhrimann Gabrielle Hächler Architekten PHOTOGRAPHY: JOËL TETTAMANTI WRITER: JONATHAN BELL

116


WAWA* LEFT, THE TOWER ON LAKE ROTSEE IS DESIGNED FOR THE MARSHALLING OF AN ANNUAL ROWING REGATTA BELOW, SHUTTERS CLOSED WHEN OUT OF USE, THE WOODEN STRUCTURE BECOMES A LAKESIDE SCULPTURE

F

using sport, architecture and artistic expression, this new Swiss structure forms a solemn piece of functional art with a secret, inner life. Lake Rotsee is a sliver of water in the suburbs north of Lucerne. Its 2.5km stretch is home to several rowing clubs, lured by its unusually placid surface. So admired are its conditions, it is dubbed the ‘Lake of the Gods’. And every year, it plays host to a regatta. The Zielturm Rotsee, or Finish Tower, was designed by the Zurich-based studio of Andreas Fuhrimann and Gabrielle Hächler (AFGH) and has a singular purpose. It is for marshalling, timing and observing rowing races during the regatta, a three-week window of operations that determines not only the building’s shape, but the materials used and the whole design philosophy. With three slightly ofset storeys, external stairs and a façade of sliding wooden shutters, the tower has a modest scale, set out above the water on concrete pillars and reached by a short pier. The architects took a sculptural approach from the start. ‘Except during the regatta, the tower is a kind of sculpture,’ explains Hächler, ‘unused, refecting and

foating above the water’s surface.’ The client, Naturarena Rotsee, oversees the surrounding nature reserve, and specifed that the building had to have a minimal impact and be as unobtrusive as possible when not in use. The structure and façade are formed from heat-treated, sustainably harvested pine, designed to perform well in the waterside location. ‘Wood will age in a natural way to blend into its surroundings,’ says Hächler. The transformable, ‘tectonic’ façade allows the entire building to be closed up and rendered as an unyielding, wooden cube, with little clue as to what, if anything, lies inside. The interiors are ‘purely functional, designed to host the jury, press and regatta committees’, says Hächler, with concrete foors and OSB walls and shelving. ‘We realised the project within a tight budget. Keeping interior details simple allowed us to construct the elaborate façade.’ AFGH is now designing a new rowing centre on Lake Rotsee in a complementary style. With such contemporary design lining its banks, the lake is certainly living up to its heavenly reputation. www.afgh.ch


SWEDE DREAM Volvo’s road to great design embraces past and future

character since it was founded in 1927, thanks to enduring designs such as the Amazon, XC90 and the classic P1800, shown here. Volvo is entering a new era, bolstered by a radical new technological approach that gives Ingenlath and his team unprecedented design freedom. A trio of concept cars, starting with the 2013 Volvo Concept Coupé, showcases key elements of the new generation. The Concept Coupé is the frst waypoint on a journey, one that embraces emotion, heritage and innovation on the road to a new design language for this most Swedish of brands. Explore Volvo’s world with our series of short flms, available exclusively at Wallpaper.com.

Credits

PHOTOGRAPHY: DANIEL GRIFFEL

There’s a close correlation between Sweden’s rugged landscape and extremes of light and dark and the refned quality of Swedish design. The country’s architecture, products, furniture, fashion and industrial design share a common thread, that of an understated synergy between object and landscape, function and beauty, melancholy and delight. The sensibility that emerges remains strong, characterful and undeniably modern. Thomas Ingenlath, Volvo’s new head of design, came to Sweden from Germany. His immersion in its culture has been absolute, as is his respect for its design history. Ingenlath understands Volvo’s heritage, a company that has been an integral part of the national

CREDITS


W Bespoke Promotion ∂

Credits

VOLVO’S CLASSIC P1800, PICTURED AT THE VILLA AT AMUNDÖN, IN BROTTKÄRR, GOTHENBURG, A PRIVATE RESIDENCE DESIGNED BY SWEDISH ARCHITECTS WINGÅRDHS

CREDITS


Balenciaga As the new American in Paris, Alexander Wang’s second outing for Balenciaga lightens up the French house’s edgier biker essentials. Jacket; jumper, prices on request, both by Balenciaga

BEST IN SHOWS

Our favourite spring/summer 2014 collections shone with advanced fabrications, modern sportswear silhouettes and a pared-back palette Photography Dima Hohlov Fashion Isabelle Kountoure

120


WAWA*

MaxMara Leading the chase towards cross-season dressing, this coat and slip-dress combo epitomises the new versatility. Coat; dress, prices on request, both by MaxMara


WAWA*

Louis Vuitton Kim Jones relaxed black-tie dressing, with his all-American freedom seekers sporting a new spin on the classic tuxedo in cool ice-blue (silk varsity jacket included). Blouson, £1,580; double-breasted jacket, £3,000; shirt, £720; trousers, £1,610, all by Louis Vuitton. Trainers, £79, by Adidas Originals


Christopher Kane Blossoming with a botanical bent, Kane’s game of hide-and-seek ran the garden gamut, from laser-cut petals to his predominately pastel palette. Dress, £4,000, by Christopher Kane

123


WAWA*

Proenza Schouler The New York-based design duo used metallic inserts to rev up the subtle sensuality of their stellar, pleated performance. Dress, ÂŁ1,985, by Proenza Schouler


Saint Laurent Hedi Slimane proved that the devil, and even a little disco, is in the detail, with his heavily encrusted, couture-weight fnishes polishing his evening ofering. Dress, ÂŁ8,265, by Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane

∑

125


Hermès Marrying luxe fabrications with classic cuts is Hermès’ calling card, so for designer Véronique Nichanian’s 25th anniversary, the refned pairings continued with precious python skins holidaying as a simple boat-neck tee. Top, £14,100, by Hermès

126


WAWA*

Ermenegildo Zegna Couture For his debut collection, Stefano Pilati played with proportion, rethinking the jacket from its collar-buttoning to its lapel widths, while also igniting a trend for exagerated sleeve lengths. Coat, ÂŁ2,120; jumper, price on request; trousers, ÂŁ680, all by Ermenegildo Zegna Couture


WAWA*

Calvin Klein Collection Francisco Costa’s milestone, ten-year anniversary explored the full potential of luxurious minimalism, from tactile silk T-shirts to the elaborate basket weave of his deconstructed fabrics. Top, £1,130; trousers, £1,580, both by Calvin Klein Collection


Fendi A pixelated fower print united the organic and digital worlds at Fendi, which saw Karl Lagerfeld and Silvia Fendi’s lightweight coat of laser-cut mink, foating on a base of organza. Coat, £16,450, by Fendi

129


WAWA*

Brioni Rome via London, this was Englishman Brendan Mullane’s ode to Italy’s neo-realist cinema, relaxing the suit’s formality with gentlemanly checks, short-sleeve knitwear and silken bomber jackets. Jacket, £2,650, by Brioni


Dior Interrupting the traditional house narrative, Raf Simons’ hyper-reality ‘Trans Dior’ collection called for a slightly surreal Through the Looking-Glass approach, with knit dresses bonded to stif internal structures and his pleated shorts easily mistaken for skirts. Dress, £2,300; shorts, £2,500, both by Dior

131


WAWA*

Salvatore Ferragamo Pushing the storied Italian house forward, Massimiliano Giornetti’s deconstructed suiting toyed with a sportif sexiness, from asymmetric pleated kilts to abbreviated knitwear. Top, £725; skirt, £489, both by Salvatore Ferragamo ‘Fold’ chair, €1,990, by Olivier Grégoire, from Specimen Editions


Richard Nicoll For his brand’s tenth birthday, the London-based designer ofered a rose-coloured view of the future with his diaphanous pastel-pink layers mimicking the show’s bubble-gum hued benches. Dress, £625, by Richard Nicoll

133


Lanvin Alber Elbaz’s molten metallics for spring were gift-wrapped with a high-shine shimmer. The collection was an ode to the inventiveness of the fabric industry, with tactile textures from lamé to Lurex. Dress, £2,410, by Lanvin Writer: Katrina Israel Models: Josephine van Delden at Women Management Paris, Tommaso at Tomorrow Is Another Day Casting: Eddy Martin for File and Parade Hair: Peter Gray for L’Oréal Paris Hair Expertise Hair assistant: Takayuki Shibata Make-up: Ariel Yeh using NARS cosmetics and Clarins skincare Set design: Sylvain Cabouat at Michele Filomeno Photographer’s assistants: Clement Mahjoub, Sylvain Patry Fashion assistant: Zoë Sinclair

134


WAWA*

Comme des Garçons Rei Kawakubo’s deconstructed tailoring spoke of an iron-free summer ahead – her crumpled patchwork jackets turned inside out, while trousers were similarly scrunched. Jacket, €918; top, €382; trousers, €370, all by Comme des Garçons For stockists, see page 168


www.olivari.it AD. calvibrambilla - Ph. Tommaso Sartori

design taken by the hand

Melopsittacus Undulatus

Nina, designed by Daniel Libeskind, one of the door handles that Olivari has been entirely producing in Italy for 100 years.

Olivari, 100 years of door handles Globe

Trend

Lucy

Euclide

design Stefano Giovannoni

design Studio Olivari

design Patricia Urquiola

design Nicola Novelletto

please contact us to receive the New 2013 Catalogue e-mail: olivari@olivari.it ph.: +39 0322 835080


THE JUDGES’ AWARDS 2014 It’s grand fnale time. Each year, we invite a panel of high-altitude achievers to form a creative supreme court and sit in judgement over 11 special award categories, shortlisted by us. First up, peruse the contenders, then keep turning for the big reveal, this year’s winners Photography Sam Hofman Interiors Benjamin Kempton

The judges

The contenders

Victoria Beckham Former pop icon, now fashion mogul

Over the next 11 pages you’ll fnd all the nominees that were given the once and twice over by our judges. And for the 2014 Judges’ Award winners, as well as profles of our esteemed panel, see page 148

Michael Chow Legendary restaurateur and art patron Stone, used throughout, 5100 Vanilla Noir, 6003 Coastal Grey, 5003 Piatra Grey, 4230 Shitake and 3100 Jet Black, $1,000–  $1,500 per m, including fabrication and installation, all by Caesarstone, www.caesarstone.com. ‘Hot Paprika’ matt emulsion, £24 per 2.5 litres, by Dulux

Ron Gilad Wallpaper’s Designer of the Year 2013 Spike Jonze Skater boy turned auteur Thom Mayne Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thaddaeus Ropac The grand fromage of Paris art dealers

137


01 02

03

06

04

DESIGNER OF THE YEAR

138

01 Muller Van Severen

02 Lievore Altherr Molina

03 Philippe Nigro

04 Neri & Hu

05 Michael Anastassiades

Belgian-based Fien Muller and Hannes Van Severen bring new shapes and uses to everyday pieces, creating ‘furniture landscapes’ out of chopping boards, deckchairstyle seats and light fxtures. mullervanseveren.be

This Spanish studio has led the creative direction of Arper since 1999 and is known for pure lines and organic shapes, as in its ‘Ply’ tables and ‘Song’ coat rack for the brand. lievorealtherrmolina.com

This year, the French-born, Milan-based Nigro was enlisted by Hermès to create a capsule collection of furniture. Other recent work includes two lighting designs for Baccarat. philippenigro.com

Lyndon Heri and Rossana Hu founded Neri & Hu in Shanghai in 2004, and have since won plaudits for their interiors, products and architecture, including last year’s Design Commune. en.neriandhu.com

The London-based Cypriot designer wowed Milan Salone-goers this year with his marble ‘Miracle Chips’ created for Wallpaper* Handmade. He has also designed lighting for Flos. michaelanastassiades.com


The Contenders

07

08

05

09

LIFE–ENHANCER OF THE YEAR 06 Chineasy Illustrated Dictionary, by ShaoLan Hsueh with illustrations by Noma Bar ShaoLan Hsueh’s system turns inscrutable Chinese characters into simple illustrations by Noma Bar. chineasy.org

07 First and business class seats, by Singapore Airlines Singapore’s business class seat is the widest fully reclinable seat money can buy, while frst class travellers enjoy an extended side panel for added privacy. singaporeair.com

08 Glass, by Google Not yet on general sale, but already the world’s most talked-about personal tech item, Google’s Glass, activated by voice and touch, puts a screen right in front of your face. google.com/glass

09 ‘Neorest AC Washlet’, by Toto Life’s luxuries surely include a toilet that requires no cleaning. Toto’s ‘Washlet’ has a cleansing spray dispenser, a heated seat and a built-in deodoriser. toto.co.jp

π

For details of everything pictured, see Wallpaper.com or download the iPad edition at Wallpaper.com/iPad


01

02

06

07

03

08

BEST NEW PRIVATE HOUSE 01 Binh Thanh House, by Vo Trong Nghia and Sanuki + Nishizawa Designed for two families, an older couple and a young family, this is a home rooted in tradition but responsive to its owners’ varying needs. votrongnghia.com

02 Solo Pezo, by Pezo von Ellrichshausen

03 Karri Loop House, by MORQ

04 Tower House, by Gluck+

05 Geneses House, by Isay Weinfeld

This concrete house seems to foat above the treetops, while a deep pool in the roofess central space acts as a symbolic tether between sky and earth. pezo.cl

Two existing trees played a key role in the design, determining an unusual foor plan of two irregularly shaped courtyards. Interiors are lined with plywood. morq.it

Aiming to keep its footprint to a minimum, the house stands on a narrow ‘leg’, while its raised living area extends horizontally from the slender base. gluckplus.com

Set in the São Paulo neighbourhood of Morumbi, this family home blends indoors and outdoors in characteristic Brazilian style. isayweinfeld.com


09

10

π

For details of everything pictured, see Wallpaper.com or download the iPad edition at Wallpaper.com/iPad

05

04

BEST NEW PUBLIC BUILDING 06 Centro Roberto Garza Sada for Art, Architecture and Design, by Tadao Ando The structure’s ferce, 100m concrete span, ribbed with immaculate precision, hints at its engineering challenges. tadao-ando.com

07 MOCA Cleveland, by Farshid Moussavi Unfolding over four storeys, the building envelope has six faceted sides, one a triangle of transparent glass, the others clad in panels of black stainless steel. farshidmoussavi.com

08 Kyushu Geibunkan Community Centre, by Kengo Kuma A group of three low-slung structures, Kuma’s art and cultural centre features a series of distinctive slanting roofs in steel and stone. kkaa.co.jp

09 Louvre-Lens, by SANAA Transparency is a major theme at the Louvre’s new outpost, which sports a shimmering facade that alternates glass and anodised aluminium. sanaa.co.jp

10 Ghent Market Hall, by Robbrecht & Daem and Marie-José Van Hee Architecten A dual-gabled timber structure features hundreds of small slits that flter light into the sheltered plaza. robbrechtendaem.com

141


07

06

02

01

BEST MEN’S FASHION COLLECTION (A/W 2013) 01 Cerruti 1881 Paris, by Aldo Maria Camillo

02 Prada, by Miuccia Prada

03 Dries Van Noten, by Dries Van Noten

Camillo has a lock on relaxed tailoring and his debut for Cerruti 1881 Paris marked the arrival of a new comtemporary cool, while being elegant in the extreme.

Sidestepping the standard grey suit, Prada man was outftted in checked, collared shirts, boxy jackets and slouchy, tailored trousers – fnished with a contemporary crop.

Van Noten presented patterns that should have clashed but instead seemed to harmonise, while layered looks, topped with oversized jumpers, made for voluminous silhouettes.

04 Valentino, by Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccoli This collection took classic men’s motifs to graphic new heights, playing with the house’s signature camo print, houndstooth and Prince of Wales check.

05 Berluti, by Alessandro Sartori The state-of-the-art fabrics at Berluti had to be felt to be believed. Its suits, coats and tuxes were a perfect blend of the sporty and the luxe, built with an unparalleled level of complexity.


05 09

08

04

03 10

BEST WOMEN’S FASHION COLLECTION (A/W 2013) 06 Hermès, by Christophe Lemaire

07 Givenchy, by Riccardo Tisci

08 Sacai, by Chitose Abe

Lemaire’s look is rooted in pared-down, ultra-luxe ‘separates’. His simple silhouettes freed the eye to dwell on the impeccably crafted materials, including paper-thin calfskin.

Hauntingly beautiful, Tisci’s collection for Givenchy was a tour de force, with infuences ranging from punk and streetwear to couture, as well as tartan and baroque patterns.

Japanese designer Chitose Abe was light-handed with her signature plaids, adding rich astrakhans, shearlings and glossy velvets into the mix for a dramatically elegant yet original efect.

09 Proenza Schouler, by Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez This exceptionally wearable collection united uptown polish with a raw, downtown verve, using graphic, monochrome patterns in chic, tailored combinations.

10 Céline, by Phoebe Philo Razor sharp in its focus though not in its contour, Philo’s superb collection embraced softness using luxuriously spun reams of wool, with her silhouettes defned by cut.

143


07

08

01

06

02

BEST DOMESTIC DESIGN 01 ‘Shoe Stool’, by Koichi Futatsumata Each element of this stool’s minimal design has a function. Made entirely of sturdy, industrial steel, it’s a pleasing, no-fuss blend of curves and corners. futatsumata.com

144

02 ‘Sail’ TV stand, by Caronni + Bonanomi, for Desalto

03 ‘Terra.Cotto’ pots, by Stefania Vasquez, for Sambonet

Desalto has reconfgured its 2004 ‘Sail’ TV stand into a collection of six pieces in varying heights and sizes to hold screens and hide cables. desalto.it

Sicilian designer Vasquez’s set of contemporary terracotta pots comes in a bold palette of colours and minimal shapes. sambonet.it

04 ‘eUnit Kitchen’, by Dornbracht The system’s electronically controlled taps are activated with a foot switch, while another control panel regulates water volume, fow and temperature. dornbracht.com

05 ‘August Smart Lock’, by Yves Béhar and Jason Johnson An app-controlled virtual key that locks or unlocks doors remotely, and grants access to visitors without having to see them in. august.com


The Contenders

03

09

04

Ď€

For details of everything pictured, see Wallpaper.com or download the iPad edition at Wallpaper.com/iPad

10

05

BEST NEW GROOMING PRODUCT 06 Masterclass brush collection, by MAC

07 Skincare, by Verso

08 Perfume tools, by Jody Kocken

09 Young Again haircare, by Kevin Murphy

10 Velvet Rope, by Lipstick Queen

The brushes feature a new synthetic bristle called Cosmofbre and easy-grip, rubberised, fat handles that make putting on make-up a whole lot easier. maccosmetics.com

A fve-step skincare regime that includes new ingredient Retinol 8, said to exceed the potency of Retinol by eight times while decreasing its irritant side efects. versoskincare.com

A set of jewellery that can be afxed to a dispensing bottle and flled with perfume. When worn, the metal warms up and releases the scent through tiny holes. jodykocken.com

This set of three anti-ageing hair treatments, Wash, Rinse and Masque, is designed to improve the look and feel of hair, and protect from daily damage. kevinmurphy.com.au

Containing candelilla, carnauba, beeswax, apricot oil, vitamin E and peppermint oil, this luxury lipstick balances comfort, nourishment and impact. lipstickqueen.com


The Contenders 04 08

09 05 07 14

01

12

04

08 15

01 06 06 11

02 02

14 03

BEST CITY 01 San Francisco

02 Lima

03 Doha

04 Marseille

05 Amsterdam

San Fran’s lively food scene is led by some of the country’s most adventurous chefs, while museums by Renzo Piano and Daniel Libeskind will soon be joined by Snøhetta’s SFMOMA expansion.

A culinary reinvention led by chef Gaston Acurio means the city now has some of the world’s most revered restaurants, while old mansions are being converted into galleries such as Mario Testino’s MATE.

The relentless drive of the Qatar Museums Authority towards cementing Doha’s status as the Gulf ’s leading art hub has also produced a handful of impressive projects by the likes of Jean Nouvel and IM Pei.

As the city emerges from a year as Capital of European Culture, the Vieux Port has been overhauled by new art venues, new architecture and new hotels, including the Philippe Starck-designed Mama Shelter.

A brave new world of developments has emerged in Amsterdam-Noord, while in the city’s red-light district, the cofee shops and neon-framed windows are being replaced by design shops and studios.

Set build: Cloud + Horse. Interiors assistant: Francesca Zavieh

11

07


03

05

13

12

10

09

13

10

15

BEST NEW RESTAURANT 06 Kiga, Mexico City

07 Monsieur Bleu, Paris

08 Volkshaus Brasserie, Basel

09 Amass, Copenhagen

10 Duddell’s, Hong Kong

Chef Rodrigo Sanchez serves up a pan-Asian menu at this sleek new eaterie – designed by local outft Cherem Arquitectos – in the Paseo Interlomas mall. cinbersol.com

This dramatic space in the Palais de Tokyo, by prolifc Parisian designer Joseph Dirand, ofers brasserie-style dishes such as suckling pig with a spice glaze. monsieurbleu.com

In a restored Herzog & de Meuron manor, chef Gilles Hofer’s modern French and Swiss menu includes comfort dishes such as venison stew with Spätzle. volkshaus-basel.ch

Set in an old shipyard building, Amass is the new home to former Noma head chef Matthew Orlando, with interiors by Danish design outft Gubi. amassrestaurant.com

With stylish interiors by Ilse Crawford, Duddell’s combines fne dining, by Michelin-starred chef Siu Hin-Chi, with a programme of art shows and screenings. duddells.co

BEST NEW HOTEL 11 Hotel Click Clack, Bogotá

12 Mercer Hotel, Barcelona

13 The Naka Phuket, Phuket

14 Pedras Salgadas, Bornes de Aguiar

15 Sense Hotel Sofa, Sofa

Bogotá’s most playful place to sleep, by architect Felipe Mesa of Plan B, along with other design houses, mixes Scandinavian interiors with vertical gardens. clickclackhotel.com

Architect Rafael Moneo has created a luminous space, preserving original elements and adding modern touches. There’s also a rooftop terrace with a lap pool. mercerbarcelona.com

Designed by Bangkok architect Duangrit Bunnag, this discreet hideout, with 94 glass-walled villas, is set over 1,740 acres and comes with its own private beach. thenakaphuket.com

Sited among the pines of Pedras Salgadas park, tree houses designed by Luís Rebelo de Andrade are complemented by a luxury hotel and spa. pedrassalgadaspark.com

Designed by Lazzarini Pickering, the Sense, Sofa’s frst upscale design hotel, sports a 15m stainless-steel pool, wood-clad spa and panoramic rooftop bar. sensehotel.com

147


Marseille MARSEILLE’S VIEUX PORT IS CURRENTLY THE SITE OF A SERIES OF REGENERATION PROJECTS, RECLAIMING THE QUAYSIDE AS A CIVIC SPACE PHOTOGRAPHY: CAMILLE MOIRENC

AND THE WINNERS ARE...


Judges’ Winners

San Francisco DOWNTOWN SAN FRANCISCO, WITH MARKET STREET RUNNING DOWN THE CENTRE, CLOSE TO WHERE NORWEGIAN ARCHITECTS SNØHETTA ARE EXPANDING THE MARIO BOTTA-DESIGNED SFMOMA PHOTOGRAPHY: HENRIK KAM

BEST CITY JOINT WINNER Marseille

BEST CITY JOINT WINNER San Francisco

Misconceptions about Marseille being all salt and no style should be fully dispelled by now. As the city emerges from a year as Capital of European Culture, the Vieux Port has been overhauled by new architecture, including Foster + Partners’ mirrored pavilion, L’Ombrière, while new art venues include Ora-ïto’s arts centre, MAMO, atop Le Corbusier’s iconic Cité Radieuse. The hotel scene, meanwhile, has received a jolt with the opening of a fve-star InterContinental and the Philippe Starck-designed Mama Shelter.

Less daunting than New York and more compact than LA, San Francisco is relatively straightforward to navigate, a quality buoyed by the 2013 launch of the Bay Area Bike Share scheme. A lively food scene is led by some of the country’s most creative chefs, including Danny Bowien at Mission Chinese Food and Saison’s Joshua Skenes. Museums by Renzo Piano and Daniel Libeskind will soon be joined by Snøhetta’s SFMOMA expansion, with Pier 15’s new Exploratorium keeping things ticking along nicely in the meantime.

149


Judges’ Winners

VICTORIA BECKHAM, WEARING VICTORIA BECKHAM, PHOTOGRAPHED IN LONDON BY SØLVE SUNDSBØ, SITTING ON A ‘MING’ CHAIR, DESIGNED BY NERI & HU, FOR STELLAR WORKS

Fashion: Isabelle Kountoure Hair: Chi Wong at Julian Watson Agency Make-up: Lotten Holmqvist at Julian Watson Agency Nails: Danielle Edgington-Gibson for LSRunway Retouching: Digital Light


JUDGE Victoria Beckham Fashion designer Victoria Adams joined the Spice Girls in 1994 at the age of 20. The all-girl pop group split six years later, having sold over 55 million records. In 1999 she married David Beckham. Together they are Brand Beckham, but Victoria is now a successful solo operator. She has displayed a deft touch in handling her brand profle and runs a highly regarded fashion-to-fragrance business empire. She launched a range of sunglasses in 2006, followed by a jeans line, but it was her frst dress collection, launched in 2008, that earned Victoria Beckham her fashion bona fdes, receiving uniformly glowing reviews.

DESIGNER OF THE YEAR JOINT WINNER Neri & Hu Architects Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu founded Neri & Hu in 2004, and have since won plaudits for their interior and product design, as well as their architecture. Last year, the pair opened the Design Commune in Shanghai, which houses fashion retailers, a design gallery, a restaurant and a loft apartment, as well as their retail venture, Design Republic, which aims to bring international design to the Chinese market. This year, they’ve also designed a furniture collection for De La Espada and Stellar Works and Camper’s fagship in Shanghai.

151


NIGRO’S CAPSULE COLLECTION FOR HERMÈS INCLUDED THE ‘GROOM’ VALET STAND, WHICH FEATURED ON THE COVER OF OUR JULY ISSUE PHOTOGRAPHY: SIMON THISELTON

152


Judges’ Winners SPIKE JONZE, BY GEOFF MCFETRIDGE

DESIGNER OF THE YEAR JOINT WINNER Philippe Nigro

JUDGE Spike Jonze Film maker

This year, French-born, Milan-based designer Philippe Nigro was enlisted by Hermès to create an eight-piece capsule collection of furniture, Les Nécessaires d’Hermès, which blended French luxury with Oriental sensibility. The designer’s frst full collection, it comprised simple, versatile objects, including stackable side tables, low benches, pufy stools and decorative screens. Other recent work includes two designs for Baccarat: the retro-looking, modular hanging light ‘Clochette’; and ‘Céleste’, which is inspired by an Oriental lantern.

Spike Jonze is one of the most interesting flm directors working today. His pop videos include Beastie Boys’ Sabotage (the 1970s cop one), The Pharcyde’s Drop (the backwards played forwards one) and Fatboy Slim’s Praise You (the crazy dance troupe one). His feature flms include Being John Malkovich and Where the Wild Things Are, both ofeat studies of alienation, loneliness and fantasy as a coping mechanism. Jonze’s latest flm Her (see page 112) is a sci-f romance staring Joaquin Phoenix and the voice of Scarlett Johansson. At 43, he remains a poster boy for a particular type of American cool.


Judges’ Winners THE UNIVERSITY OF MONTERREY’S ‘GATE OF CREATION’ IS CLAD IN SILKY SMOOTH CONCRETE, ITS UNDERSIDE RIBBED WITH IMMACULATE PRECISION PHOTOGRAPHY: LAURA WILSON


BEST NEW PUBLIC BUILDING Centro Roberto Garza Sada for Art, Architecture and Design, by Tadao Ando Part of the University of Monterrey, Mexico, the Tadao Ando-designed Centro Roberto Garza Sada for Art, Architecture and Design was inaugurated last spring. Aiming to create a building that would hold a dialogue with the surrounding mountains, Ando designed a towering concrete structure spanning six foors that reads as a giant arch, or gate, inspiring him to nickname it the ‘Gate of Creation’. Looking up, the building’s ferce 100m concrete span, ribbed with immaculate precision, hints at its engineering challenges.

155


Photography: Sylvie Becquet

156

BEST NEW RESTAURANT Monsieur Bleu, Paris

JUDGE Thom Mayne Architect

This impressive restaurant in Paris’ Palais de Tokyo is a dramatic space designed by prolifc local designer Joseph Dirand. Huge suspended geometric lights, originally designed for the French Embassy in Brazil, make the most of the room’s soaring ceilings, while four Lalique glass panels from the original 1930s interior punctuate a side wall. Chef Benjamin Masson (formerly of Pétrus) serves French brasserie-style dishes, such as suckling pig with a spice glaze and mashed potato. A decadent caviar list is also on ofer.

Connecticut-born Thom Mayne set up his interdisciplinary frm Morphosis in 1972 and went on to win numerous awards for his forward-thinking, powerful work that marks a clear departure from traditional styles and modernism. His accolades include the prestigious Pritzker Prize, which he was awarded in 2005. One of Mayne’s most recent oferings is the Perot Museum of Nature and Science that opened in Dallas in 2012, while the studio’s current work includes the Emerson College campus in Hollywood.


Judges’ Winners THOM MAYNE, PHOTOGRAPHED BY LAURA WILSON, OUTSIDE THE NEW MORPHOSIS OFFICE IN CULVER CITY, CURRENTLY THE LARGEST NET-ZERO ENERGY BUILDING IN LA


JUDGE Thaddaeus Ropac Gallerist A specialist in European and American contemporary art, Thaddaeus Ropac set up business in Salzburg at the age of 23, having served time as a dogsbody at Joseph Beuys’ studio in Berlin and partied in New York with Robert Mapplethorpe and Keith Haring. His debut ofer was ten paintings by his friend Jean-Michel Basquiat. He moved to Paris in 1990 and last year entered the megagallery elite, moving from the Marais to a vast space, which includes four galleries, a performance centre, ofces and an archive, in the eastern suburb of Pantin. He opened the new gallery, housed in a former factory converted by architects Buttazzoni & Associés, with a show by Anselm Kiefer.

158


Judges’ Winners THADDAEUS ROPAC, PHOTOGRAPHED BY AZIM HAIDARYAN, AT HIS HOME IN PARIS IN FRONT OF AN ARTWORK BY TIM NOBLE AND SUE WEBSTER


Photography: Fernando Guerra

Judges’ Winners

BEST NEW PRIVATE HOUSE Geneses House, by Isay Weinfeld

BEST WOMEN’S FASHION COLLECTION (A/W 2013) Céline, by Phoebe Philo

In the São Paulo neighbourhood of Morumbi, this family home efortlessly blends indoors and outdoors in characteristic Brazilian style. Designed by Isay Weinfeld, it is spread across three foors. Staf quarters and a car park are on the lower ground; the family’s sleeping areas and guest bedrooms are on the frst; and the main living areas, gym and relaxation room are on the top foor. The interior is clad in reclaimed wood, and large glass openings create a glimmering light and open the main living spaces onto a garden and pool.

If there is a case for wearing felted wool, it has been made most convincingly by Phoebe Philo. Razor sharp in its focus though not in its contour, her superb collection embraced softness. She achieved this with luxuriously spun reams of wool – bumpy, textured or totally fat – with her silhouettes defned by cut. Slim-hipped, fared skirts were paired with boxy, buttonless tops. In coordinated materials, the sets gave the neat, polished feel of tailoring, while the palette of buttery creams and greys was balanced by tartans.


COAT, €2,500; TOP, €750; SKIRT, €650; BOOTS, €2,500, ALL BY CÉLINE, FROM HARRODS, HARRODS.COM PHOTOGRAPHY: HART+LËSHKINA

Fashion: Nobuko Tannawa Model: Eveline Rozing at Supa Model Management Hair: Mari Ohashi using Aveda Make-up: Nobuko Maekawa using Chanel Le Lift and S 2014

161


Judges’ Winners JACKET, £1,675; JUMPER, £290; SHIRT, £445; TROUSERS, £435; SHOES, £720, ALL BY PRADA, PRADA.COM PHOTOGRAPHY: DEVIN BLAIR

Fashion: Lyson Marchessault Model: Marc Faiella at FM London Hair: Yoshitaka Miyazaki at Untitled Artists using L’Oréal Professional Grooming: Nobuko Maekawa using YSL Touche Éclat

BEST MEN’S FASHION COLLECTION (A/W 2013) Prada, by Miuccia Prada Miuccia Prada questioned the notion of classic tailoring, sidestepping the standard grey suit for Teddy boy-inspired separates. Keeping with the theme, there wasn’t a single necktie on the runway. Instead, Prada man was outftted in checked, frilled, collared shirts, boxy jackets and slouchy, tailored trousers – fnished with a contemporary crop. For outerwear, artfully aged jackets in buttery leather accentuated the leisure slant. In a celebration of muted colour, mustard, blue and red sweaters were casually layered beneath sports jackets.


LIFE-ENHANCER OF THE YEAR Chineasy Illustrated Dictionary, by ShaoLan Hsueh with illustrations by Noma Bar

BEST NEW GROOMING PRODUCT Perfume tools, by Jody Kocken

BEST DOMESTIC DESIGN ‘Terra.Cotto’ pots, by Stefania Vasquez, for Sambonet

The brainchild of tech entrepreneur and self-confessed geek ShaoLan Hsueh, the Chineasy Illustrated Dictionary is an attempt to bridge the linguistic gap between the West and China. Her system turns notoriously inscrutable Chinese characters into simple illustrations by Wallpaper* regular Noma Bar, with art direction by Crispin Jameson of Brave New World. A funding campaign launched in July reaped nearly £200,000 in pledges, and a 192-page book will be published by Thames & Hudson in 2014.

Looking to overcome her perfume allergy, Design Academy Eindhoven graduate Jody Kocken developed a set of jewellery as an alternative to applying fragrance straight onto the body. Each piece can be afxed to a dispensing bottle and flled with scent. You then wear the jewellery, and the metal warms up and releases the fragrance through tiny holes. Smart in its invention, the collection of prototypes, including a cuf, earrings and necklace, is also beautifully refned and minimalist in its design.

Founded in 1856, Sambonet has been at the forefront of kitchenware innovation and design for decades. This year, the brand collaborated with Sicilian designer Stefania Vasquez to produce a set of contemporary terracotta pots in a bold palette of colours and minimal shapes. Vasquez hopes the pots will revive interest in terracotta cooking. The material allows for gradual heat difusion which enhances favours, and Vasquez has compiled a book of her grandmother’s recipes to be included with each pot.

PHOTOGRAPHY: TOBIAS HARVEY

163


Judges’ Winners MICHAEL CHOW, PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANA LIXENBERG, AT MR CHOW IN TRIBECA, NEW YORK

JUDGE Michael Chow Restaurateur Born in Shanghai, the son of a famous actor, Chow was sent to boarding school in England and studied architecture and art before opening the frst Mr Chow restaurant in London’s Knightsbridge in 1968. It became famous as much for the collection of pop art on its walls as the food. A Beverly Hills version followed six years later. He has since added branches in New York, Miami and Malibu. Chow is a serious collector and commissioner of contemporary art. His ex-wives include fashion maven Grace Coddington and the late model, jewellery designer and style icon Tina Chow. He lives with his current wife, Eva, in Los Angeles.


166

BEST NEW HOTEL The Naka Phuket, Phuket

JUDGE Ron Gilad Designer

Set against a backdrop of dense tropical forest, The Naka Phuket comprises 94 glass-walled villas that cantilever strikingly towards the Andaman Sea. Each has its own pool with modern furnishings and wood and stone interiors. Designed by Bangkok architect Duangrit Bunnag, the discreet hideout is set over 1,740 acres and comes with its own beach. The three dining options are The Nava restaurant, the beachside Wiwa, and The Meka café set in the mountainside with stunning 360-degree views.

Born and now based in Tel Aviv after over a decade in New York, Ron Gilad operates on the increasingly porous border between art and design, expertly balancing concept and function. Gilad trained as an industrial designer at the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem and relocated to New York in 2001, where he established his studio Designfenzider. Gilad’s breakthrough came in 2005 with his spidery ‘Dear Ingo’ chandelier, now produced by Moooi. He was last year’s Wallpaper* Designer of the Year.

OPPOSITE, RON GILAD, PHOTOGRAPHED BY TIM GUTT, IN THE GARDEN OF HIS TEL AVIV HOUSE, WHICH HE ALSO USES AS A STUDIO


Judges’ Winners


Stockists

A

Adidas Tel: 44.870 240 4204 (UK) www.adidas.com Akio Nukaga Studio Tel: 81.296 74 4477 (Japan) Alessi Tel: 44.800 2288 2828 (UK) store.alessi.com Aram www.aram.co.uk Artemide Tel: 44.20 7291 3853 (UK) www.artemide.com Asplund Tel: 46.8 662 52 84 (Sweden) www.asplund.org

B

B&B Italia Tel: 44.20 7598 1111 (UK) www.bebitalia.com Balenciaga www.balenciaga.com Bovalls Dörrbygeri Tel: 46.52 351 700 (Sweden) www.bovalls.com Brintons Tel: 44.800 505055 (UK) www.rugs-by-brintons.co.uk Brioni www.brioni.com

C

Calvin Klein Collection www.calvinklein.com Cartier www.cartier.co.uk Casa Bento casabento.com Ceramica Blue www.ceramicablue.co.uk Chaplins Tel: 44.20 8421 1779 (UK) www.chaplins.co.uk Charlie Styrbjörn Nilsson Tel: 46.737 687337 (Sweden) www.charliestyrbjorn.com Christopher Kane www.net-a-porter.com Comme des Garçons at Dover Street Market www.doverstreetmarket.com Connox Tel: 49.511 300341 0 (Germany) www.connox.com

D

Dedon www.dedon.de Desalto www.desalto.it

Dilmos Milano Tel: 39.02 2900 2437 (Italy) www.dilmos.com Dior Tel: 44.20 7172 0172 (UK) www.dior.com Dior Haute Couture Tel: 33.1 40 73 54 44 (France) Dover Street Market www.doverstreetmarket.com

E

Elisabetta Franchi www.elisabettafranchi.it Emmemobili www.emmemobili.it Emporio Armani Tel: 44.20 7491 8080 (UK) www.emporioarmani.com Ermenegildo Zegna Couture www.zegna.com Essential Life Tel: 27.11 447 2142 (South Africa) www.essentialliferetail.com

F

Fendi Tel: 44.20 7838 6288 (UK) www.fendi.com

G

Gaetano Navarra www.gaetanonavarra.com Galleria Rossana Orlandi Tel: 39.02 467 4471 (Italy) www.rossanaorlandi.com Gallery Eclectic www.eclectic66.co.uk Giuseppe Zanotti Tel: 44.20 7838 9455 (UK) www.giuseppezanottidesign.com Glas Italia www.glasitalia.com Grand Tel: 46.736 39 17 29 (Sweden) www.grandstockholm.com

H

Harry’s www.harrys.com Heal’s www.heals.co.uk Hermès Tel: 44.20 7499 8856 (UK) www.hermes.com Histoires de Parfums www.histoiresdeparfums.com

I

Internoitaliano Tel: 39.02 3658 5655 (Italy) www.internoitaliano.com

J

Japan Centre www.japancentre.com

BEST POP–UP SHOW Wallpaper* Handmade with Jaguar in Miami

The first outing of the Wallpaper* Handmade ‘best of ’ show – a spectacular presentation across 12 windows of Harrods – brought Knightsbridge to a standstill back in September. Thoroughly emboldened, we decided to take it Stateside, with the show making its US debut in December in Miami during Art Basel. Our edit of the best Handmade pieces of the last four years included the boiled leather armchair made by Simon Hasan and Poltrona Frau, Martha Schwindling’s dressing table for Schönbuch, Paul Cocksedge and Smili’s marble bookmarks, and BarberOsgerby’s bright red stainless steel watering can (all pictured above). Thanks to Jaguar for driving the show, Caesarstone for providing the fine stone for our beautiful exhibition display units, and hosts Dacra and Perrier-Jouët for making the opening night sparkle and fizz.

Photography: Corey Weiner

14 Ora Italiana www.14oraitaliana.com


Roda www.rodaonline.com Romo Tel: 44.16 2375 6699 (UK) www.romo.com Rota das Regiões www.rotadasregioes.pt

S

Saint Laurent by Hedi Slimane Tel: 44.20 7493 1800 (UK) www.ysl.com Salvatore Ferragamo Tel: 44.20 7201 7000 (UK) www.ferragamo.com Selfridges www.selfridges.com Sharra Pagano www.sharrapagano.it Skandium Tel: 44.20 7823 8874 (UK) www.skandium.com Skultuna Tel: 46.21 783 00 (Sweden) www.skultuna.com Sogo-Seibu www.sogo-seibu.co.jp Space NK uk.spacenk.com Spécimen Editions Tel: 33.1 77 12 18 72 (France) www.design.specimen-editions.fr

T

Tengu Sake www.tengusake.com

K

Kaori Ceramics www.kaoriceramics.com Kartell www.kartell.it Kontextür Tel: 1.917 558 6126 (US) www.kontextur.com

L

Lanvin Tel: 44.20 7491 1839 (UK) www.lanvin.com Laufen www.laufen.com Liliana Ovalle www.lilianaovalle.com Linley Tel: 44.20 7730 7300 (UK) www.davidlinley.com Louis Vuitton Tel: 44.20 7399 4050 (UK) www.louisvuitton.co.uk LSE Lighting Tel: 44.1905 22243 (UK) www.lselighting.com

M

Marni www.marni.com MaxMara Tel: 44.20 7499 7902 (UK) www.maxmara.com Mayfair Design Studio Tel: 44.20 7499 7133 (UK) Moser Tel: 44.20 3534 16242 (UK) www.moser-glass.com Mr Hare www.mrhare.com

N

Neil Barrett www.neilbarrett.com Net-A-Porter www.net-a-porter.com Nippon Craft Beer www.nipponcraftbeer.com Nya Nordiska Tel: 49.5861 8090 (Germany) www.nya.com

O

Objects of Use www.objectsofuse.com Odin www.odinedt.com OEN www.the189.com

P

Paul Smith Tel: 44.800 023 4006 (UK) www.paulsmith.co.uk Penguin Group www.penguin.co.uk Proenza Schouler www.proenzaschouler.com ProofLab Tel: 31.1 04 25 8792 (Netherlands) www.proofab.com

R

That Flower Shop Tel: 44.20 7613 9866 (UK) www.thatfowershop.co.uk The Rug Company Tel: 44.20 7384 0980 (UK) www.therugcompany.com Twentytwentyone www.twentytwentyone.com

V

Versace Tel: 44.20 7259 5700 (UK) www.versace.com Very Wood www.verywood.it

W

Willer www.willer.co.uk

Y

Yumiko Iihoshi www.y-iihoshi-p.com

Richard Nicoll www.richardnicoll.com Rikumo Tel: 1.215 238 1328 (US) www.rikumo.com

169


WAWA*

AND THE WINNERS AREN’T...

We bring you the best of this year’s less successful designs 01

03 02

04

07

05

08 06

170

01. 20 Fenchurch Street Even if the ‘Walkie Talkie’ didn’t emit a banker-barbecuing death ray when hit by direct sunlight, Rafael Viñoly’s skyscraper in London’s fnancial district would qualify as an architectural mishap. In a city enamoured of elegant spires, Viñoly’s swelling erection literally sticks out like a sore thumb; a plug-ugly plug, shamed by The Shard across the river and the cluster of higher-quality towers a few blocks north, especially the new Leadenhall Building by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners.

02. Ostrich Pillow Light Some of you may remember that last year we gave a critical spanking to the Ostrich Pillow, by design studio KawamuraGanjavian. This seems to have deterred neither those who have adopted the Ostrich Pillow in surprising numbers, nor Kawamura-Ganjavian, who have now come out with the Ostrich Pillow Light, a more compact mobile pillow system, as well as Ostrich Pillow Junior, for little sleepy heads. We may have to accept that we are fghting a losing battle with this one.

03. ‘Street Meat’ candle Vegans, vegetarians and the delicate of constitution apart, who doesn’t love the smell of meat sizzling gently somewhere in your vicinity, perhaps undercut with the earthy whif of roasting vegetables? Now you can have that olfactory feast on demand with the RickyHome ‘Street Meat’ candle. Just light it up and breathe in that delicate mix of charcoal, whisky and fr balsam. Alternative odours include ‘Banker Husband’, ‘Taco Tuesday’ and another favourite, ‘Walk of Shame’. Stinky.

04. Emporia by Wingårdhs You might think of us as a single, fnely tuned mega-mind, sweeping the earth for signs of intelligence. Or maybe as a shouty bullpen of competing ideas. The truth is somewhere in the middle. So those with prodigious powers of recall may remember the neutral review of Malmö’s new Emporia mall on Wallpaper.com. Now we compare it to a cold, hard, new pat of butter, softened in the microwave for two seconds longer than was wise; a gilt-edged example of computer-modelling gone mad.

05. Snail-poo tiles Bio-design is all the rage, but some investigations in this area seem to be heading along very strange passages. Take Dutch designer Lieske Schreuder, who fed coloured paper to snails after noticing they were partial to a bit of pressed pulp. Defciencies in a snail’s digestive system mean that when they eat in colour, they also defecate in colour. Schreuder harvested the now-vibrant snail faeces, fed them into a munching machine and pressed them into tiles. And there, we hope, is where this design trail ends.

06. Walking Shelter Designed by Australian design collective Sibling, this shelter in a shoe is essentially a one-man tent – poles not included – stufed into the net pocket at the back of a pair of sneakers, the idea being that, at the appropriate time, the shelter is simply unfurled and the wearer becomes structural support. One supposes this is aimed at festivalgoers, who could use the extra space left in their bag to pack in more cider. There are other plusses – the Walking Shelter is a one-of conceptual prototype.

07. Concept 1865 A bizarre update of Karl Drais’ dandy horse, this collaboration between German design studio Ding3000 and plastics company BASF nods to the year that Drais added pedals to his velocipede. This contemporary version adds an electric motor. In truth, the Concept 1865 isn’t really a stab at creating the next hipster plaything but a one-of showcase for high-performance plastics, and it does boast innovations such as puncture-proof plastic tyres and all-plastic bearingless pedals. Not that that’s an excuse.

08. ‘Good Vibrations’ cabinet Occasionally a design comes along that starkly splits opinion in the ofce. Studio Laviani’s ‘Good Vibrations’ cabinet for Fratelli Bof is one such design. The central conceit of Ferruccio Laviani’s design is that you’re deceived into thinking your synapses have snaged like an old VHS videotape strugling with sticky heads, when in fact the cabinet is the result of clever computer-controlled milling. We think great design should do many things. Sugesting snagy synapses is not one of them.


Nordic 100 Series | Model ST101 | Design Stäffan Thomasen buzzispace.com


SHOP ONLINE HUGOBOSS.COM

HUGO 0118/S

HUGO BOSS AG Phone +49 7123 940

Wallpaper 2014年2月刊  
Wallpaper 2014年2月刊  
Advertisement