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07.07.1985 LIAM ROBERTS


07/07/1985

IT WAS MY OWN PERSONAL LUNAR LANDING

Sunday 7th July 1985 will be etched into one man’s memory as the day that changed his life forever. On a sunny afternoon, and with the world looking on, this swashbuckling powerhouse, thundered down yet another unreturnable service, to become Wimbledon’s youngest ever men’s singles champion, at 17 years and 227 days.

BORIS BECKER


PREVIOUS SETS

000 000

4

K.CURREN V B.BECKER

INTRODUCTION

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KEVIN CURREN

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BECKER BECKER

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BECKER STYLE

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WIMBLEDON

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SCORING

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GRASS

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SEEDINGS

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SETS GAMES POINTS

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BECKER’S ROAD

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CURREN’S ROAD

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TOURNAMENT TABLE

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THE FINAL

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SPOILS

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SHOT FOR SHOT

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MATCH STATS

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K.CURRUN B.BECKER Two players entered the hallowed turf of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club. No one expected to see these two players on the stage, but there were none more deserving. It was the Finals of the 99th All England, Wimbledon Championships.

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Curren as a boy, quickly rose among the ranks as a junior at Montclair Lawn Tennis Club in Durban, South Africa. At college he played tennis for the University of Texas and won the NCAA singles title in 1979. He turned professional later that year, and won his first top level singles title in the 1981 season at Johannesburg. In 1985, Kevin Curren reached the final at Wimbledon with the help of his coach Tony Roche. After defeating future champion Stefan Edberg in the fourth round in straight sets, 7-6, 6-3, 7-6, he comprehensively eliminated World No.1 John McEnroe in the quarter finals 6-2, 6-2, 6-4 and World No.3 Jimmy Connors in the semifinals 6–2, 6–2, 6–1. Curren was the first player to beat both the legends in the same Grand Slam event. McEnroe later commented that he had difficulty in dealing with Curren’s highly individualistic and very fast serving. It was hard to read and tended to produce low balls that would skip on the grass courts.

THIRD SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

When he reached the final against Becker the match was very heated and intense. Becker sent several hostile glares to Curren before and after each point. On one of the final changeovers, Becker even bumped Curren’s shoulder as they passed one another. After his defeat, Curren was noted as saying that he thought the game would see an increase in the number of successful young players, and predicted they would have more intense, but shorter, careers.

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FOURTH SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

FIRST SET // KEVIN KURREN // EUROSPORT TV,1985


KEVIN CURRUN

Though he never won a Grand Slam singles title, Curren did win 4 Grand Slam doubles titles. In 1981 he won the US Open mixed doubles, and in 1982 he won the Wimbledon mixed doubles. Also in 1982 both men’s doubles and mixed doubles at the US Open. During his career, Curren won 5 top level singles titles and 26 doubles titles. The highest he ranked during his career was World No.5 in singles and World No.3 in mixed doubles. His final singles title came in 1989 at Frankfurt, and his last doubles title was won in 1992 in Seoul. Curren retired from the professional tour in 1993 and Since retiring from the tour, Curren has served as Captain of South Africa’s Davis Cup team.

9 THIRD SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

FOURTH SET // KEVIN CURREN // EUROSPORT TV, 1985


BORIS BECKER

THIRD SET // BORIS BECKER // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

Boris Franz Becker is a former World No.1 professional tennis player. He is a six time Grand Slam singles champion, an Olympic gold medallist, and the youngest ever winner of the men’s singles title at Wimbledon. Becker also won five major indoor championship titles, including 3 ATP Masters World Tour Finals, 1 WCT Final and 1 GrandSlam Cup. He also won 5 Masters 1000 Series titles and 8 Championship Series titles. Becker turned professional in 1984, under the guidance of his coach, Günther Bosch, and Ion Tiriac as manager. He won his first professional doubles title that year in Munich. As a teenager in 1985, Becker won his first top level singles title at Queen’s Club and two weeks later, he was entered into the Wimbledon Tournament. He later became the first unseeded player and the first German to win the Wimbledon singles title. Also at the time, he was the youngest ever male Grand Slam singles champion at 17 years, 227 days.

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SECOND SET // BORIS BECKER // EUROSPORT TV, 1985

Six-Time Grand Slam Mens Singles Champion


SERVICE // BORIS BECKER // JOHN BURG, 1985

Becker went on to win many trophies after this first triumph, but none would be more important. It catapulted his career into the limelight and he became a German hero. Wimbledon was always his preferred tournament, grass being his favourite surface, winning it 3 times in total along with 3 other grand slams. In the late 80’s a fierce rivalry between Becker and Edburg broke out, having to play each other regularly at grand slam events, most noticeably 3 consecutive Wimbledon tournaments. Towards the end of his career in 1999, his tennis became second in the spotlight to his tumultuous relationships with his wives and children. He currently owns his own tennis brand and is a regular commentator on the sport for the BBC.

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FIFTH SET // BORIS BECKER // EUROSPORT TV, 1985


BECKER STYLE “He had a tremendous feel for the ball, but no technique,” ION TIRIAC

“He had a tremendous feel for the ball, but no technique.” recalls his youth coach at the young Breskvar training facility. “...Immobile, slow and stubborn he was.” This made him hard to coach, so he became a training partner for girls. But it was his stubbornness and his will to win, which made him refine his talent. During the early eighties, he won his first junior tournaments and became increasingly ambitious. His game developed into a fast, well placed serve and great volleying skills at the net. He could supplement his pure serve-and-volley game with brilliant athleticism at the net. His trademark was considered to be the diving volley, his use of which endeared him to his fans. His heavy forehand and return serve were also very significant factors in his game-play.

12 He occasionally deviated from his serve-andvolley style to try to out-hit, from the baseline. Most tennis players are normally at their best whilst returning from their own service baseline. Though he possessed powerful shots from both wings, commentators often criticized this strategy. He frequently had emotional outbursts on court. Whenever he considered himself to be playing badly, he often swore at himself and occasionally smashed his rackets. In contrast to John McEnroe, the young man rarely showed aggression toward his opponents or officials. Also in contrast to McEnroe, his level of play and focus tended to be diminished rather than enhanced following these outbursts. He described his style as “Boom Boom”. This later became his nickname.


BOOM BOOM


HER I WANT TO BE A

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ERO BORIS BECKER


1985 VIEW OF WIMBLEDON 1985 // BBC

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The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club is a private club founded in 1868, originally as ‘The All England Croquet Club’. Its first ground was situated off Worple Road, Wimbledon. Later being re-named when the club moved in 1922. The lawns at the ground were arranged so that the principal court was located in the middle, with the others arranged around it; hence the title ‘Centre Court’, which


WIMBLEDON

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was retained when the Club moved, although this is not a true description of its location. However, in 1980 four new courts were brought into commission on the north side of the ground, which meant the Centre Court was once more correctly defined.


The main show courts, Centre Court and No.1 Court are normally only used for two weeks a year, during the Championships, but play can extend into a third week in exceptional circumstances. The remaining seventeen courts are regularly used for other events hosted by the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club. The principal court, Centre Court, was opened in 1922 when the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club moved from Worple Road, to the current, Church Road. The Church Road venue was larger and was needed to meet the ever growing public demand. Wimbledon is the only Grand Slam event played on grass courts. At one time all the Majors, except the French Open, were played on grass. The US Open abandoned grass for a synthetic clay surface in 1975. The Australian Open abandoned grass for Rebound Ace, a different type of hard surface, in 1988.

TOILETS

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TOILETS OUTSIDE THE GROUNDS FIRST AID

CEMTRE COURT // LIAM ROBERTS

INFORMATION DRINKING FOUNTAIN TELEPHONE

DESIGNATED WHEELCHAIR VIEWING – AOR

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NON-TICKET HOLDERS’ ENTRANCE VIA THE

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SITE MAP // WIMBLEDON.COM

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DIMENSIONS & SCORING Tennis is played on a rectangular flat surface; at Wimbledon the court is grass. It measures is 78 feet long and 36 feet wide. Its width is 27 feet for singles matches and 36 feet for doubles matches. The service line is situated 21 feet from the net. The net is stretched across the full width of the court, parallel with the baselines, dividing it into two equal ends. The net is 3 feet 6 inches high at the posts, and 3 feet high in the centre. Additional clear space around the court is needed in order for players to reach overrun balls. A tennis match is composed of points, games, and sets. A match is won when a player or a doubles team wins the majority of prescribed sets. Traditionally, matches are either a best of three sets or best of five sets format. The best of five set format is typically only played in the Men’s singles matches at Majors and Davis Cup matches.

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A set consists of a number of games (typically six to twelve) which in turn consist of points, with a tiebreak played if the set is tied at six games per player. Tennis scoring rests on the premise that serving is advantageous over receiving. Because of this it is only possible to win a set or match by breaking the opponent’s service game at least once, before a tiebreak is required. Likewise, it is not possible to win a tiebreak without winning at least one point during an opponent’s turn at serve.

A game consists of a sequence of points played with the same player serving, and is won by the first player (or players) to have won at least four points by two points or more over their opponent. In scoring an individual standard game of tennis, the server’s score is always called first and the receiver’s score second. Score calling is unique to the sport of tennis in that each point has a corresponding call that is synonymous with that point value. Tennis is also the only sport in which a player can score more points and lose the match. In tennis, scoring in tie situations also varies. If each player has won three points, the score is described as “deuce” rather than “40-all”. From this point on, whenever the score is tied, it is described as “deuce” regardless of how many points have been played. In standard play, scoring beyond a “deuce” score, in which both players have scored three points each, requires that one player must win two consecutive points in order to win the game. This type of tennis scoring is known as “advantage scoring”. In this type of scoring, the player who wins the next point after deuce is said to have the advantage. If the player with advantage loses the next point, the score is again deuce, since the score is tied. If the player with the advantage wins the next point, that player has won the game, since the player now leads by two points. The server may simply use players’ names; in professional tournaments the umpire announces the score in this format (e.g., “advantage McEnroe”). The current point score is announced before each point by the umpire. For example if the server, or the umpire, announces the score as “30-love” it means that the server has won two points and the receiver none.


27 FEET

13 1/2 FEET

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BJORN BORG


GRASS

50mm

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The nineteen courts used for Wimbledon are composed purely of Ryegrass. During the winter months the lucious grass is allowed to grow using artificial lighting. Once the grass has reached the height of 5cm it is capped at that height. To get the grass ready for the tournament again they cut the grass 1mm a day until it reaches the 8mm mark. “Any more than this and the grass will go into a state of distress� says the Chief Grounds Keeper. This process, in total, can take upwards of 42 days to complete. After the tournament the Ryegrass is replanted ready for the next cycle.

GRA

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COURT NO.1 // BBC


GRASS AT LENGTH // BBC

25 LINE DRAWER // WIMBLEDON.CO.UK

“Any more than this and the grass will go into distress.” EDDIE SEAWARD CHIEF GROUNDS KEEPER

IMAGE


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OTHER PLACES AND& MEMORIES FADE


WIMBLEDON ONLY GETS BRIGHTER BORIS BECKER

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PLAYERS & SEEDING A total of 128 players feature in each singles event, 64 pairs in each single-sex doubles event, and 48 pairs in mixed doubles. Players and doubles pairs are admitted to the main events on the basis of their international rankings, with consideration also given to their previous performances at grass court events. At the outset of the fortnight, Becker and Curren could have been kidney pie makers to the stars, for all John McEnroe would have cared. Curren was just another big hitter who had lost 18 of 19 sets to McEnroe, while Becker was another dangerous teen who, Mac said, “Goes for broke, moves reasonably well but doesn’t really think a lot.”

16. Tim Mayotte (Fourth Round)

12. Miloslav (First Round)

In 1985, The 16 men were seeded for the title as follows;

0. Boris Becker

ALL IMAGES // WWW.SPORTING-HEROES.NET

8. Kevin Curren

7

(Final)

(

4. Mats Wilander

3

(First Round)

(


15. Tomás Smíd

14. Stefan Edberg

13. Eliot Teltscher

(Second Round)

(Fourth Round)

(Second Round)

11. Yannick Noah

10. Aaron Krickstein

9. Johan Kriek

(Third Round)

(First Round)

(Third Round)

7. Joakim Nyström

6. Pat Cash

5. Anders Järryd

(Third Round)

(Second Round)

(Semifinals)

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3. Jimmy Connors

2. Ivan Lendl

1. John McEnroe

(Semifinals)

(Fourth Round)

(Quarterfinals)


I LOVE TO WIN 01/04 BORIS BECKER


I CAN TAKE A LOSS 02/04 BORIS BECKER


BUT MOST OF ALL 03/04 BORIS BECKER


I LOVE TO PLAY 04/04 BORIS BECKER


CURREN’S ROAD In April, Curren lost 6-1, 6-1 in a first-round match in Las Vegas to the young, blonde Swede, Stefan Edberg. He promptly left the tour and didn’t pick up a racket until later that year. Curren emerged in the fourth round at Wimbledon after having beaten D.G.C. “Colonel” Mustard, who would turn out to be the last man to break his service before the final—presumably he broke it in the dining room with the wrench—to face none other than Edberg. Anyone who watched Curren blow the racket from Edberg’s hand in straight sets might have guessed just what was in store for McEnroe, He won just six points on Curren’s serve in the first set. Leading 2-1, 40-30 in the second set, Curren took the most significant shot of the match, and it wasn’t a serve or return. He had faulted his first ball when McEnroe lost his cool. Curren marched to the chair and demanded two serves because of McEnroe’s delaying, Curren got his two serves. All the usual hell broke loose between McEnroe and officialdom, but Curren’s argument upheld. McEnroe wasn’t heard from again.

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Continuing to flail away at his huge second serve to prevent any rhythm on McEnroe’s return, Curren cut too fine and double -faulted twice in two games. Still, Mac couldn’t break him. Curren was lethal on the receiving end as well. Set two, game seven, game point for McEnroe, Curren aimed down the line three straight times off first serves, and Mac didn’t touch a one. Set three, game seven, McEnroe having just double-faulted, Curren loaded up the backhand again and “zoned” another trio of clean, winning returns.

“He kept swatting the big bombs,” JIMMY CONNERS

After the changeover, Mac strolled off court with one hand in his pocket, the 6-2, 6-2, 6-4 finish written all over his face. Later, in a session with the press, a strangely vulnerable McEnroe said that he felt “old”, “overpowered” and “overwhelmed.” He talked of “the mentality factor,” of “more enjoyable things than tennis,” even of retirement. The less said about Curren’s semifinal victory over Connors the better. The 6-2, 6-2, 6-1 score accurately reflects Jimbo’s runs, hits and pulls. As defending champion in 1983, Connors had swallowed 33 aces from Curren in a similar defeat to his last. This time it was 17. “He kept swatting the big bombs,” the victim testified. “They kept coming at my face or crawled along the ground. There was nothing to do.”


BECKER’S ROAD If Connors was carried off Centre Court on his shield for the last time, at least his spiritual legacy of stare-offs and stoked-up, pumping fists remains with Becker. The youngster served notice by reaching the quarterfinals of the Australian Open in December and the semis of the Italian Open in May. Each time however he lost later to weaker opponants. Then, a week before the fortnight, he won Queens in a romp. Afterward, Johan Kriek, the losing finalist, predicted that Becker would win Wimbledon just as easily. In the big show, Becker came from behind in 4 matches. Cold and calculating, yet with that big goofy kid smile, he handled the press and the pressure. Ion Tiriac, the warrior of old who manages the Wunder Boom Boom, was serious. He revealed that at age 10 Becker was kicked out of the German Federation’s youth program as he was “too crazy” and that even last year he had “the temperament of complete bananas” Wimbledon was but one round gone when Hank Pfister, his beaten opponent, rated Becker higher than Bjorn Borg or McEnroe at the same age, describing his power as “frightful.” Pfister said he didn’t think Boris Becker could win Wimbledon. Then he thought longer. “But maybe so, the guy’s got to win it sometime.” Becker’s 9-7 in the fifth defeat of seventh-seeded Joakim Nystrom was a study in courage and chutzpah. Twice Nystrom broke Becker on an array of glorious, all court rallys, to serve for the match. Twice Becker broke back and then held and broke again for the win. In the fourth round Becker recovered from a twisted ankle to outslug a 1982 Wimbledon semifinalist, Tim Mayotte, 6-2 in the fifth. He hardly glanced at Mayotte on the handshake.

“Boris never thinks about it; he just plays,” HENRI LECONTE

One round later, according to Becker, the only thing that prevented the 17 year old from retiring from the match was that his opponent, Tim Mayotte, was too far away from the net. He was tired after playing too many sets early on in the tournmant. Becker slipped, which brought back, immediatly, memories of the previous year, but he gritted his teeth and carried on like a true champion. He later described this match as his hardest of the entire tournament. By the quarterfinals all regularly scheduled T.V. programs in the homeland were canceled for Boris in Limeyland. Wrote the man from the Times, “How odd Germany should have such personal interest in a court on which in 1940 they dropped a bomb.” Jarryd, the fifth seed, seemed in control of his semifinal match with Becker. Jarryd won the first set 6-2 and had two set points at 5-4 in the second. Trailing 3-1 in the tiebreaker, Becker thundered a return winner, another bomb and then stalked around the net post to change ends. His stride took him straight for Jarryd, but the older man looked up just in time to lurch out of the way lest he be crunched to the ground. Jarryd didn’t win another point in the breaker and went on to lose 2-6, 7-6, 6-3, 6-3. The Boomer patted Jarryd on the shoulder as if dismissing a puppy. “Boris never thinks about it; he just plays,” said Henri LeConte, who fell in the quarters to Becker. “I see his plan. He just hit ball, make winner, win, say thank you and go bye bye.”

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Final 16

Kevin Curren

Kevin Curren

767

S. Edburg

636 Quarter Final Kevin Curren

666

John McEnroe 2 2 4 Final 16 John McEnroe 6 6 6 A. Maurer

042 Semi Final

Final 16 S. Giammaiva 3 4 3 J. Conners

666 Quarter Final

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Final 16 R. Seguso

462

R. Acurna

676

J. Conners

676

R. Acurna

162

Kevin Curren

666

J. Conners

221

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TOURNAMENT TABLE

Boris Becker

Final 16 Anders J채rryd 6 6 6 D. Visser

141

Quarter Final Anders J채rryd 6 6 6

V

H. Gunthardt 4 3 2 Final 16 V. Amritraj

441

H. Gunthardt 6 6 6 Semi Final Anders J채rryd 6 6 3 3 Boris Becker 2 7 6 6 Final 16 Henri Leconte 3 6 6 6 I Lendyl

6431

Quarter Final Henri Leconte 6 6 3 4 Boris Becker 7 3 6 6

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Final 16 T. Moyotte

36762

Boris Becker 6 4 6 7 6

This tournament table shows how each player reached the final. You can see that Kevin Curren had the higher seeding of the two players but Boris Becker had a lot more tennis to play, his matches averaging longer times.


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I

“I 'M GOING ON cOURT TO fight to win , I

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BORIS BECKER


BECKER ACES

40


FINAL As Chief Referee, Alan Mills opened the door to the Wimbledon Centre Court stage and two players entered the hallowed turf of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club. No one expected to see these two players on the stage, but there were none more deserving. It was the 7th July 1985, the 99th final of the All England Championships. 14:00 and Leo Turner, Steward of the locker room, traditionally walked the finalists on to the square. He was followed by Boris Becker, the 17 year old boy from Germany and Kevin Curren, South Africa-born American and number 8 seed. As Curren was seeded, the wonder kid, or “Das Wunderkind” in his native tongue, was regarded as the underdog. Although Becker had won, just before his first professional tournament, Kevin Curren secured his right to be favourite with victories over the top favorites John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors on his road to the final. The young Becker appeared on that day, however, completely unimpressed. Full of self-consciousness, he entered the place, seemingly nervous to make the bow to the Royal Box. The Duke and Duchess of Kent, surrounded by high-ranking personalities, among them Juan Antonio Samaranch and Fred Perry. With 13,118 spectators eagerly waiting along side them.

28 degrees of sunshine provided excellent conditions for a special day for sporting history. In Germany 11 million people were already sitting in front of their TV sets, several hundred million worldwide. The British have already identified their favorite as Boris Becker. His passion, his carefree attitude and above all, his never give up attitude, won the hearts of Wimbledon’s home. At 14:09 match was started. The outsider won his first service game confidently, it lacked any nervousness. His body language oozed with determination. The American, however, had his own firm belief in his previous victories left in the changing room. With a double fault, it allowed a Boris Break. 2-0 for the redhead from Leimen. Boris won the first set 6-3, serving out it with ease after Curren’s mistakes. His opponent was confused, the first initial charges far below the young man’s potential. 41

SET 1 BECKER 6-3


The second set ran more balanced than the first. Early on in the set Becker kicked the ball like a football, which created cheerful laughter from the audience. With no fear, again and again, Boris danced at the baseline; it wasn’t until late in the set he began to fall short. He brought his own service games through safely, nevertheless, Curren turned around his 4-2 lead and finally won this set with 7-6. The game had now reached a turning point. Boris seemed to have lost his cool. He began to quarrel, complain and gesticulate wildly. The 27 year old Curren then took his opportunity and got the upper hand. With the score at 3-3 for the first time Becker lost his serve, Curren was ecstatic, after 2 hours and 4 minutes for the first time in the final, he had the lead. Everyone expected a turnaround in this match, “The experienced Curren forces the young men to their knees.” The Wimbledon commentator shouted, “But not Becker”. Boris fought for every ball and dived and danced over the sandy soil of Wimbledon. Again, it went into the tiebreak. Becker decided it quickly with a 7-3 win. For the first time in the match he unleashed the Becker fist and his mother Elvira smiled in the stands.

FOURTH SET // KEVIN CURREN // TENNIS WAREHOUSE

42

SET 2 CURREN 7-6

FIRST SET // BORIS BECKER SERVING // TELEGRAPH


FURST SET // BORIS BECKER // BBC

SECOND SET // BORIS BECKER // BBC

THIRD SET // BORIS BECKER // TENNIS WAREHOUSE

43

SET 3 BECKER 7-6 FOURTH SET // BORIS BECKER // TELEGRAPH


BECKER

double fault

44

CURREN


Right at the beginning of the fourth set, Boris Becker broke the service of the South African. Both players continued to win their serves until late into the set. With the score at 5-3, Boris had his first match point. Curren resisted and reduced the game to 5-4. Boris now had to serve out for the match and to win the championship. With a double fault, he began the most important service game of his career to date. Triumph, would change everything for him. With his 22nd ace he got his chance, the next match points. A murmur went through the audience, the youngster’s fans screamed before the point was played. He double faulted, 40-30.

“He goes for broke, moves reasonably well but doesn’t really think a lot.” JOHN MCENROE

45

“This is it... Match point for eternity.” BORIS BECKER


THE WIMBLEDON CUP // LIAM ROBERTS

SPOILS

The Gentlemen’s Singles champion receives a silver gilt cup 18.5 inches in height and 7.5 in diameter. The trophy has been awarded since 1887 and bears the inscription, “All England Lawn Tennis Club Single Handed Championship of the World.” The Ladies’ Singles champion receives a sterling silver salver. This, commonly known as the “Venus Rosewater Dish”, or simply the “Rosewater Dish”. The salver, which is 18.75 inches in diameter, is decorated with figures from mythology. The winners of the Gentlemen’s Doubles, Ladies’ Doubles, and Mixed Doubles events receive silver cups. The runner-up in each event receives an inscribed silver plate. Presented by the President of the All England Club, The Duke of Kent. 46

“All England Lawn Tennis Club Single Handed Championship of the World.” THE WIMBLEDON TROPHY


47


“Kevin Curren can’t reach it, he can’t reach it.” DAVID MERCER

Becker’s mother smiled once more, his father Karl Heinz looked seriously at his son. 3rd Match point. Boris composed himself again and wiped the sweat from his tired face. He tapped the ball four times, paused and pounded the ball with such a force, Kevin Curren only came close with the frame of his racket. The commentator cried “And here’s the serve. Kevin Curren can’t reach it, he can’t reach it. The Wimbledon champion is Boris Becker. Boris ‘Lionheart’ Becker could be an apt name for this man, who has gone down in the history of the sport.” Becker made two steps, stretched his arms toward heaven, threw his head back and cried out to the cheers of the victory.

48

SET 4 BECKER 6-3


49


SHOT FOR SHOT

50

Curren Point Curren Game Point Cureen Set Point Becker Point Becker Game Point Becker Set Point Becker Match Point Becker Ace & Unreturned


51


PREVIOUS SETS

476 667 57 7 19 8 KEVIN CURREN SOUTH AFRICAN

52

6’1” 182LBS RIGHT 1979 5 ATP 5TH

H


SETS GAMES POINTS

K.CURREN V B.BECKER ERRORS D.FAULTS ACES RETURN ACE NAME NATIONALITY HEIGHT WEIGHT HANDED TURNED PRO TITLES HIGHEST RANK

1

3

-

3

6

-

41 6 21 18 BORIS BECKER GERMAN 6’3” 187LBS RIGHT 1984 49 ATP, 6 GRAND SLAMS 1ST

53


After 3 hours and 18 minutes, Boris Becker won the Wimbledon final with 6-3, 6-7, 7-6, 6-4 against the favourite Kevin Curren. At 17 years and 227 days, Becker is the youngest Wimbledon champion in history, the first German and the first unseeded player to win the tournament. The 7th July 1985 was only the beginning. It was a tournament victory that would change the life of the young tennis player completely. Boris only spoke briefly after the ceremony, saying to one reporter. “This is going to change tennis in Germany, they now have an idol�

BORIS BECKER // SPORT ILLUSTRATED

BORIS BECKER, THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF YORK // BBC


BBC

THE CHAMPION // SPORTS JOURNAL

BORIS BECKER // TELEGRAPH

BORIS BECKER WIMBLEDON WINNER 55 BORIS BECKER // BBC

“This is going to change tennis in Germany,” BORIS BECKER


56 BORIS BECKER // SPORT ILLUSTRATED


“Maybe he was too young to know that he was too young to win Wimbledon.” TERRY SHAW // NEW YORK TIMES

57


BORIS BECKER RETURNS THE GERMANY // DIE ZEIT


Text & Information:

Imagery Sources:

Designed by:

Copy Edited:

The Hindu Times

Die Zeit

Liam Roberts

Hannah Tribe

Deutsche Welle

Sports Illustrated

80’s-Tennis.com

BBC Archive

Wimbledon.com

Sports Journal

BorisBecker.com

Telegraph Online

The Wimbledon Meseum

Liam Roberts

Sporthelden.de

Tennis Warehouse

Sports Illustrated

Sporting-Heroes.com

The LTA

Wimbledon.com

Wikipedia

Eurosport TV

The New York Times Liam Roberts Hannah Tribe

Alexandra Nicholson


07.07.1985 - Boris Becker's lunar landing  

Sunday 7th July 1985 will be etched into one man’s memory as the day that changed his life forever. On a sunny afternoon, and with the worl...

07.07.1985 - Boris Becker's lunar landing  

Sunday 7th July 1985 will be etched into one man’s memory as the day that changed his life forever. On a sunny afternoon, and with the worl...

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