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QUEENS COLLEGE A M A R J I T, C L A I R E , L A C H L A N & S A R A H


FOUNDATIONS AND FOOTINGS •  Some footings existing •  Combination of strip, pad and bored piers


PRIMARY STRUCTURE •  Stud wall framing (top and bottom plates 45x90mm) •  Steel framework (lightweight and durable) •  Standard connections to add to rigidity •  Standard Floor slabs •  Pre fabricated concrete columns for added support •  Roof Sheeting •  Insulation •  Brickwork


SECONDARY STRUCTURE Any modifiable portions such as (non load bearing): •  outer walls •  metal, brick and timber cladding •  inter-walls •  Partitions •  fixed lightings


GRAPHIC STRUCTURAL DIAGRAMS (STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS) Compressive structure Under compressive stresses Load bearing wall A load resting upon it

Trusses Roof trusses bridges space above the room and provides support

Shear Structure Concrete shear walls to reduce lateral movements due to wind loads


GRAPHIC STRUCTURAL DIAGRAMS (STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS)

Post and lintel Commonly used to support weight

Framing Studs to provide stable frame for walls that are attached by ceiling joists and floor joists

Funicular structure Vaults, form of arch


STRUCTURAL MATERIALS •  Steel- steel framework with corrosion protection •  Concrete- prefabricated concrete walls - footings •  Reinforced brick work- high crushing strength of 30mpa •  Glass- glass brick wall •  Timber- diagonal roof bracing - stud walls - top and bottom plates - all pine wood, standard dimensions (45 x 90mm)


STRUCTURAL JOINTS •  Concrete panel joints – •  Steel framework- cleat plates -anchor joints -timber nailing plate •  Roof joints- vertical nail lamination joints - T-cleat plate joins beam to column - joining rafters to non-load bearing walls: brace wall bracket nailed at top of slot into noggin in rafterallows for vertical movement of rafter


IDENTIFY DIFFERENT FIXINGS •  Mortar to join sections together •  Steel studs •  Cast in-plate connection •  Bolts, nuts and washers •  Concrete •  Galvanised nails and screws •  Nails – clouts •  Epoxy adhesive anchors •  Welding


SUSTAINABILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS •  To reduce green house gas emissions, the design team for Queens College would have focused on using low-embodied emissions materials such as re-used, recycled and local materials •  Maximise durability and flexibility, in order to survive a longer period of use and adaptation •  Reduce the building footprint by using existing areas and parts of Queens College •  reducing the size may have been a factor, therefore reducing quantity of materials needed, and the volume of space that must be heated and cooled or lit •  Using glass throughout across the building for the windows is using a sustainable material because there is no shortage of sand and it can be recycled •  Sustainable concrete could also have been used, where the concrete could have been formed using recycled materials in the mix


ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS OF DECISIONS •  The decision to use precast concrete panels for select walls most likely saved the builders money, as the labouring needs/costs would have been much higher had the wall been cast in situ, (outweighing the cost of transport). •  The decision to use the existing foundation and footings in some places would also save the builder both time and money, as they would not need to lay down a slab and wait for it to cure before being able to build on it. •  Colorbond is also a more expensive type of guttering when compared to Zincalume, however it is also more durable and of higher quality than Zincalume.


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