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EIGHTEEN

A SHOWCASE OF LEGENDARY CLUBS DESIGNED BY JACK NICKLAUS

WRITTEN BY

Roger Schiffman

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Jim Mandeville


A Golden EIGHTEEN A SHOWCASE OF LEGENDARY CLUBS DESIGNED BY

JAC K N I C K L AUS


A Golden EIGHTEEN A SHOWCASE OF LEGENDARY CLUBS DESIGNED BY

JAC K N I C K L AUS WRITTEN BY

Roger Schiffman PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Jim Mandeville

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A Golden Eighteen

Table of Contents Foreword 14

11. Muirfield Village Golf Club 224

by Jack Nicklaus

1.

Jack’s Vision for Columbus Celebrates an Unparalleled Career

The Bear’s Club 16

The Other Half of Team Nicklaus

234

Playing the Game in Jack’s Image

12. Red Ledges 250

So You Want to be a Master Chef? 35

2. 3.

The Club at Carlton Woods 38

Spectacular Golf Among the Wasatch Mountains

Magnificent Golf in a Parkland Setting

So You Want to be a Cowboy Poet? 257

Castle Pines Golf Club 58

13. Country Club of the Rockies 270

First-Class Golf Within View of the Rockies

Skiing in the Morning and Golf in the Afternoon

Pike’s Peak: A View Like No Other 68

4.

CC of the Rockies’ Legendary Member 283

The Concession Golf Club 80 A Great Golf Club Built on a Magic Moment

14. Sebonack Golf Club 290

Concession Benefits More Than Just Golfers 89

5.

An Unusual Golf Design Right on Peconic Bay Acquiring the Property for Sebonack 303

Creighton Farms 100 History and Superb Golf Nestled in Horse Country

6.

15. Sherwood Country Club 312 Golf and the Good Life Among the Entertainment Set

Desert Mountain 120

Sherwood’s Early Years and Its Evolution 321

Six Distinctive Courses and Amenities Galore The Jim Flick Performance Center 130

7.

16. Shoal Creek 334 World-Class Golf in an Old World Setting

The Golf Club at Dove Mountain 140 Breathtaking Desert Golf with Ritz-Carlton Luxury

17. Toscana Country Club 352 Idyllic Golf and Living in Lavish Tuscan Style

Miles of Hiking Trails – and More 149

8.

18. Valhalla Golf Club 374

Harbor Shores 162

The PGA’s Magnificent Venue for Historic Championships

An Environmental Masterpiece Transforms a Community

9.

Nicklaus Courses Open for Play 392

Four Seasons Resorts–Lana’i Golf 182 Cliffhanger Golf with a Four Seasons Flair The Legend of Pu’u Pehe 196

Club Flags & Addresses 398

10. Mayacama Golf Club 202 The Game at its Finest in Sublime Wine Country

Acknowledgements 400

An Old School Golf Professional 210

17


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A Golden Eighteen

I

Foreword

’M NOT SURE of the exact date, but I believe the conversation took place in the early 1980s. I was late in my playing career—and late in my prime, you might say—but was still fairly green in my second career of designing the greens, tees and fairways of golf courses around the world. But I was long past hooked. I loved every aspect of the design process. The opportunity to create golf from blank canvasses quickly was taking its spot in my priorities behind family and golf. That’s when business associate Chuck Perry pulled me aside and said, “Jack, don’t you think it is time to turn your avocation into a vocation?” So at that point, golf course design went from being a fascination and fast-emerging hobby to being a business and an aspect of my career—my life—that hopefully will one day be as much a part of my legacy as playing the game itself. I have always said that nothing can replace the lasting feeling you get from walking up the 18th hole of a major championship with a chance at victory. But taking a raw piece of land, challenging the boundaries of your creativity and imagination, and creating a golf course—and in some ways, your own piece of art—for generations of golfers to enjoy, well, that is a very close second.

ers from The Legendary Publishing Group decided they wanted to be the tellers of those stories. So they looked across the United States and our body of work—more than 200 courses nationwide—and selected 18 clubs or communities that have achieved remarkable success due to myriad reasons, not the least of which was the impact of their centerpiece amenity—a golf course I was given the opportunity to design. In many ways, the collection of 18-hole layouts I have been blessed to design mean as much to me as the 18 majors I have accumulated. So the publishers settled on A Golden 18. This is a book intended to be a literary and photo celebration of the unique life and lifestyle that surrounds our Nicklaus courses, as well as the success many have enjoyed on the membership, residential and/or tournament side. I have long said that what matters most in my life is

For someone who was never been much of a true artist, I have thoroughly enjoyed every opportunity to take pencil to paper—sometimes even a napkin—and sketch what I thought might be a good or great golf hole. I thrive on the moments when I lean over the dash of a site vehicle, stare out over a flat piece of grass-covered land or the side of a mountain, and envision golf and the pieces that will bring it to reality. It has become my total expression. Yet as much as I have enjoyed the artistic process of designing golf courses for more than 45 years, I know my job far transcends that. After all, golf is most often an amenity, a piece or centerpiece to a greater puzzle. My job is to service the wants and needs of a client. For some, it is to create a golf course that serves as the “mousetrap” to a massive residential project. For others, it is the catalyst to create a community and destination. For others, it is to bring a world-class event to their little corner of the world. For most, it is to create a cherished social hub to recreate and congregate. Whatever the motivation, when you have been doing this for decades, you are fortunate to be a part of wonderful stories of success nationwide and worldwide. The publish-

won’t do it. In a perfect world, we would celebrate the success stories associated with all our golf courses. Instead, I would ask the owners and developers I have worked with over the years to allow A Golden 18 to represent all the Nicklaus Design golf courses nationwide and worldwide. There is a common thread, in that you have entrusted me and my team to bring to life your vision—our vision. Because of that vision and trust, we thank you. You are an important pillar of a legacy. Hopefully, your golden 18 and the courses that make up A Golden 18 will be around far longer than any records I have set. Most important, it is my hope that these creations continue to introduce the game, grow it, build lasting memories, and provide enjoyment to thousands, if not millions, of golfers for generations to come. That is more than a hobby; that would be a nice way to be remembered.

family, and I say with heartfelt sincerity that I look at our Nicklaus Design courses as extensions of my family—like children, you bring them into the world, you watch them develop, and then you sit back like a proud parent as they make their own mark. So to pick a favorite is like someone asking you to pick your favorite child. You can’t do it. You

Good golfing, JACK NICKLAUS

14


C H A P T E R

O N E

THE BEAR’S CLUB Jupiter, Florida


A Golden Eighteen

Playing the Game in Jack’s Image

I

F YOU EVER HAVE THE PRIVILEGE of passing through the gates of The Bear’s Club, in Jupiter, Florida, the word “quality”

is likely to come to mind immediately. The guard’s uniform at the security gate is perfectly pressed, and he greets you respectfully: “How are you today, sir?” The road to the clubhouse seems smoother than the norm, the streetlights sturdier, the directional signs more subtle. You drive along the club’s winding roads, shaded by huge magnolias, mature oaks, and native palms. A few minutes later, when you circle up the hill and approach the Tuscan-style, old-world clubhouse where the valet greets you by name—whether you’re a founding member or a first-time guest—then walk through the Europeanstyle gardens, into the locker room and pro shop, and onto the club’s perfectly manicured practice facility, it suddenly dawns on you: There might not be a more ideal place on earth to tee up a golf ball, strike an iron from the turf, or stroke a putt. On your left, your personal caddie in white bib overalls

This is a game. And Jack Nicklaus, more than any other

is making sure your clubs are clean and accounted for. On

golfer in history, knows that. You are here to relax and enjoy

your right, you see the putting green, the front

yourself. This hallowed ground represents

of which is the championship first tee. Like the

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everything the Nicklaus name and the Golden

south side of the immaculate practice ground

The par-5 18th and the Tuscan-style clubhouse.

Bear nickname stand for. They epitomize the

and adjacent Par-3 Course, all the other tees at The Bear’s Club are covered in a bed of saltwater-tolerant paspalum grass that more closely resembles an emerald carpet than turf. Farther right is the 18th green, protected by

highest values of not only the game of golf, but

ABOVE:

Wildlife abounds on the 13th hole.

also many of the other finer things in life: out-

OPPOSITE:

food and drink, fair play, and keen competi-

The demanding par-3 second hole.

water on three sides and set at the base of the

door recreation, social interaction, excellent tion, all in a natural, secluded environment. When it comes to sportsmanship, honor, style,

clubhouse’s veranda and restaurant, already injecting the

and humility, “The Bear” name says it all. So it’s no wonder

fear of a misplayed shot into your golfing soul. But wait.

that when Jack decided in the late 1990s to build his South-

22


C H A P T E R

T E N

MAYACAMA GOLF CLUB Santa Rosa, California


A Golden Eighteen

The Game at its Finest in Sublime Wine Country

T

O BE A MEMBER at Mayacama Golf Club, it would be a good idea to know the difference between a Bacigalupi Vineyard

pinot noir and a Mendocino Ridge pinot noir. As Mayacama’s founder and principal owner, David Wilhelm, says, “We’re a

wine club with a golf problem.” And if you don’t know your wines, you soon will after spending a little time here at this beautiful and tranquil club nestled in the foothills of the Mayacamas Mountains in Santa Rosa, California, sixty minutes north of San

Francisco. This is the only club in existence that has five-hundred wine lockers, yet only three-hundred golf lockers. Venture down two flights of stairs under the Tuscan-style, Barry Berkus-designed clubhouse that resembles a monastery or European estate, and you’ll find a temperature-controlled wine cellar (constantly 55 degrees) that contains a personal cache of up to four cases for each member. The cellar is perfect for wine and cheese parties, wine tastings, special events, and even weddings.

One side of the cellar is framed by the members’ wine lockers and classical paintings of vineyards, grapes, and casks. The other side opens up to a mag-

job to venture into commercial real es-

ical view of the 18th hole of the Jack

tate in St. Louis (a very successful

Nicklaus Signature Golf Course. The

move), and who also created Cordillera

dogleg-right par 5 winds around a

and Roaring Fork in Colorado, is a true

beautiful lake and a massive, valley oak

visionary. “I was tired of seeing com-

tree, which is lighted at night to high-

munities that had a bunch of houses on

light its drama.

both sides of golf holes, which were

Mayacama, in the heart of the

connected by a network of golf-cart

wine country of Sonoma County, is

paths and were virtually unwalkable,”

high on drama. Because it features a

he says. “I wanted to build a Roaring

number of on-site cottages where na-

PREVIOUS PAGES:

Fork in Napa Valley.” So that’s what he

tional members can stay and entertain

set out to do. But he eventually learned

guests, it is sometimes called a western

The fifth hole showcases the dramatic hills of the Mayacama Mountains that surround the golf course.

version of Augusta National. Whether

ABOVE:

you’re experiencing one of the three par 5s on the front nine or the three par 3s on the back nine, or the rugged hiking trail around the hilly perimeter of the 675-acre property, or one of the indoor/outdoor showers with Niagara Falls pressure in one of the casitas or

going to be lengthy and probably cost-

Mayacama’s club logo depicts a grape leaf and the moon, with the grape leaves representing the vineyards that surround the golf club and the moon symbolizing the Valley of the Moon, as Sonoma County is known. OPPOSITE:

Mayacama Golf Club’s 17th hole is surrounded by Douglas firs.

larger villas, you know you are in a

that the permitting process in Napa was prohibitive. He discovered, however, that there was a 675-acre parcel of land in nearby Sonoma County that might be available. It was owned by Peanuts cartoon creator Charles Schulz and his business partner Marv Soiland. The acreage was in a beautiful valley adjacent to the exclusive Shiloh housing de-

special place.

velopment. They had been trying to develop the land for

Developer David Wilhelm, who grew up in Boston

fifteen years, but had been unsuccessful because of the

and once worked for IBM for $750 a month but quit his

number of homes planned in an area without a water-

28


A Golden Eighteen

Culinary Federation. He took advantage of an opportunity to work for four months in Ireland at the Michelin-rated Sheen Falls Lodge, a Relais and Châteaux Hotel in County Kerry. It was in Ireland that he learned about timeless European cooking techniques and classic preparations. After that experience, he lived in Vail, Colorado, where he opened his own restaurant, then went to Napa Valley’s Auberge de Soleil, then the Calistoga Ranch, and finally rounded out his experience as the chef de cuisine for the Inn at Palmetto Bluff, in Bluffton, South Carolina. Because of Mayacama’s location in Sonoma County, he is now takAnd this will sometimes morph into a social dining

ing advantage of the region’s native ingredients and local

event. Members can eat in the formal dining room, sur-

wines and combining them with the sauces and presenta-

rounded by paintings of great vineyards,

tions he acquired in Ireland to provide a ABOVE:

or in the Bar & Grille, or outside on the patio overlooking the first and 18th holes, heat lamps and gas fires making for a cozy environment in the cooler evenings. (There is also a separate “smoking patio” on the other side of the clubhouse that overlooks the 10th hole.) Executive Chef

lighter touch to his culinary creations.

Following a Wednesday-afternoon Skins Game, members relax in the bar; members Laura Allen, Max Ulrich, and Tom Patzau. OPPOSITE:

Executive Chef Scott Pikey; the private rotunda in the Dining Room; heirloom tomato salad; veal medallions.

Scott Pikey plays an integral role in May-

Pikey prefers not to list a “signature dish,” but he is eager to note that he produces 99 percent of the ingredients “inhouse,” including the breads, pastries, and even pizza doughs. All his sauces are natural reductions, with no fillers. He supervises two sous chefs and eleven cooks,

acama’s appeal. His résumé is stellar, and it started with a

and maintains a healthy approach, even to the point of

fortuitous apprenticeship at Old Warson Country Club in

juicing (kale, cucumber, ginger) for his staff five days a

his native St. Louis, while he was attending the American

week. “I’m completely hands-on,” he says. “My name is not

32


C H A P T E R

E L E V E N

MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB Dublin, Ohio


A Golden Eighteen

Jack’s Vision for Columbus Celebrates an Unparalleled Career

A

FTER A STELLAR ROUND at Augusta National Golf Club during the 1966 Masters Tournament, Jack Nicklaus was re-

laxing with one of his high school friends from his hometown of Columbus, Ohio. As they discussed the magnificence of Augusta’s rolling, emerald-green fairways, the vast number of patrons milling over the course, and the sprawling oak trees and various cabins on the grounds, Jack turned to his buddy Ivor Young and said, “I wish we could have something like this for

Columbus someday. It would be a great thing for the community.” Right then and there the idea for Muirfield Village Golf Club was launched. Nicklaus went on to win that Masters, becoming the first player to don back-to-back green jackets. A few

weeks later, he, Young, and two of Jack’s other friends from Columbus, Pandel Savic and Bob Hoag, got together. The four founders vowed to pursue Jack’s dream for however long it would take to become a reality. Young found eleven potential sites,

but Jack only needed to see a few before he selected a tract of land where he used to hunt as a kid. Six years later construction

started and the club was formed.

had no money left for a clubhouse.

“I personally put together all

“When the course opened in 1974,

the land, and I remember that Mark

we used a temporary clubhouse, out

McCormack [Jack’s agent at the

of the George Trachewski house off

time from International Manage-

the sixth tee. Once we finally had

ment Group] thought I was out of

members, we built the clubhouse a

my mind,” Nicklaus says today. “I

year or so later, before the first Me-

said, ‘Mark, that’s what I want to do.’

morial Tournament in 1976.” Jack

So I bought all the land personally

and Tom Weiskopf played in the

or tied it all up. It came in at 1,560

grand opening on May 27, 1974,

acres. I liked the way it flowed

Memorial Day, with Nicklaus shoot-

through the valleys, and I knew I

ing 66, a score that stood as the

wanted to create a gallery golf

course record and was not broken

course, and I liked the way the valleys were wide enough to be able to

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The grand 18th hole leading up to the clubhouse.

until half a decade later. Today, almost forty years later,

do that.” Nicklaus needed somebody

ABOVE:

when you drive through the stone-

to help him take it to the next level,

The Memorial Tournament Waterford crystal winner’s trophy, designed by Barbara Nicklaus.

laden entrance to Muirfield Village

and that’s when “Put” (Putnam) Pierman came in. “He became a partner with me,” Nicklaus says. “He

OPPOSITE:

Members enjoying the elevated green of the par-3 eighth hole.

went out to the Ohio Company, and

and wind around the deep bend alongside the massive practice area to your left with the newly renovated clubhouse complex directly ahead,

they did a $9 million public offering—$2.4 million for the

you know you are about to step onto hallowed ground. The

course and the rest for the development.” Nicklaus remem-

privilege of being invited to join the prestigious club is

bers they spent about $2.45 million on the golf course and

something the members don’t take lightly. And for their

36


The Other Half of Team Nicklaus

IT’S OFTEN BEEN SAID that the best thing about Jack

Nicklaus is Barbara Nicklaus. Not only has she been Jack’s wife for more than fifty years (they have four sons and one daughter and twenty-two grandchildren), throughout his career she was his etiquette coach (making sure all the thank-you notes were written tastefully and punctually), his confidante (during good times and the inevitable sad times), and even sport psychologist ABOVE:

Barbara Nicklaus at home. OPPOSITE:

Memorial Park, which Barbara designed.

(before they were fashionable for Tour players). Jack met Barbara Bash the first week of classes at Ohio State University when they were seventeen. They started dating and never looked back. On their honeymoon,

they drove east from Columbus, stopping at Hershey Country Club in Pennsylvania so Jack could play the course, then on to Mamaroneck, New York, and Winged Foot, where he had been asked to play. In a driving rain, Jack and his host were the only ones on Winged Foot’s West Course, except for Barbara, who faithfully walked every hole. Jack asked where she wanted to go next, and she said

40


41


C H A P T E R

F O U R T E E N

SEBONACK GOLF CLUB S o u t h a m p t o n , N e w Yo r k


A Golden Eighteen

A Special Golf Design Right on Peconic Bay

I

N LESS THAN EIGHT YEARS since its grand opening, Sebonack Golf Club, on the shores of Peconic Bay in Southampton, New

York, has quickly risen to national prominence. It was the site of the U.S. Women’s Open in July 2013 (the first on Long Island),

and it already has broken into the top-fifty course rankings of the major golf publications. Thirteen holes are on the water. A

grand clubhouse overlooks three of those holes and then Peconic Bay beyond. Nine elegant yet comfortable cottages can be re-

served for the exclusive use of the club’s members and their guests. Spacious outdoor patio and deck dining with sunset views

can seat up to 130 people. And most importantly, the distinctive, championship golf course stands as a testament to the unique

collaboration of two of the game’s greatest architects: Jack Nicklaus, considered by many to be the best and the brightest, and

Tom Doak, a classic minimalist who some day might be recognized as the most creative ever. That’s what you’ll find among these

311 stunning acres nestled between the National Golf Links of America and Shinnecock Hills on Long Island’s South Fork.

ABOVE:

learned to caddie at Long Island’s Engineers

A view of the clubhouse from the tie-breaker19th hole, across the first fairway.

Club. Michael majored in finance at Bucknell

The story of Sebonack goes back to before the turn of the century, but let’s begin with its founder and owner, Michael Pascucci, and his wife of fifty-six years, Jocelyn. They have three sons (Michael Jr., Christopher, and Ralph), one daughter (Dawn) and eleven grandchildren. Mike and Jo Pascucci provide the vision for the

then got his MBA in marketing from New York University. He is a self-made, highly successful

OPPOSITE:

The stately staircase inside the Michael Cunningham-designed clubhouse.

Long Island businessman, who started a carleasing business and sold it for $660 million, and also founded the television station WLNY, Channel 55, which he subsequently sold to

club and make sure the staff, members and their guests meet that vision. Pascucci’s father, a hard-work-

CBS. “I built that station from scratch in 1979 after I looked

ing construction engineer with a third-grade education,

around and realized there were three-million people living

44


A Golden Eighteen

around. One way to figure out where you are is by

kitchen. “The Swiss are very strict, but I made friends there

looking at the hole diagrams Nicklaus sketched on rough

and that got me into cooking,” he says. He also retained

pieces of paper, which are labeled, signed, framed, and

the Swiss knack for efficiency. “We do 160 lunches a day

displayed on the walls. The one of No. 13 is especially eye-

on the patio,” he says. “It’s about quality and speed. We

catching: It is a rare combination sketch by Nicklaus and

serve each meal within twelve minutes. So members can

Doak on the same page. An-

get a quick lunch but a quality

other image —one that brings

lunch. I am very quality driven.”

chills—is the first sketch by

Giacoponello is committed to

Nicklaus, on a sandwich wrap-

using local produce, especially

per and dated Sept. 19, 2001,

tomatoes and lettuce from Long

which was the day the post-fly-

Island, and most of his fish is

ing ban was lifted after 9/11.

from the area. The fish tacos are

There are also numerous

to die for. But his signature dish

photographs of the opening day,

is the Arctic Chard, which he

as well as one of the symbolic sil-

serves pan-seared and sautéed.

ver shovels used in the original

He crisps the skin (“that’s where

groundbreaking ceremony. On

the Omega-3s are,” he says) and

one wall hangs a Vote of Grati-

serves it over sautéed spinach

tude memento from the USGA,

with a grapefruit reduction and

adopted on June 30, 2013, to

celery salt. “It’s very colorful,” he

thank the club for hosting the

says. His Pasta Bolognese sounds

U.S. Women’s Open. Each locker

simple, but it takes three days to

has the double-crescent “S”

make. His sixteen-ounce steak is

carved all the way through the door, and yes, they are spacious inside. The men’s lockers are a deep mahogany; the women’s are pickled oak, in keeping with the more feminine theme of the

dry-aged for twenty-one days.

ABOVE:

Mark Hissey helped oversee construction, as did Pascucci's sons Ralph and Christopher. PREVIOUS PAGES:

Thirteen holes feature tranquil views of Peconic Bay; camaraderie and golf with caddies is the norm, as are wild turkeys and deer aplenty.

When members and their guests sit down at one of the perfectly laid out tables, they are immediately greeted with “the mother of all bread baskets,” as Giacoponello calls it. Most of the

ladies locker room, which is also spacious and comfortable. Both locker rooms have ample

desserts, such as the pies and cheesecake, are made home-

space for playing cards, watching the large flat-screen tele-

style, and few can pass up the tiramisu. One of the founding members, Phillip Morse, de-

visions, getting ready for a round of golf, or for an evening

scribes not only the eating experience, but also the club in

of socializing and dining.

general. “We generally start with a wonderful breakfast, Enjoying the food, indoors and out

then eighteen holes of golf, a bit of relaxation following

DINING IS A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE at Sebonack. Exec-

golf, and then a fabulous dinner on the deck, watching the

utive Chef Anthony Giacoponello is a master of his craft.

sun go down,” he says. “On a beautiful night, it’s perfect.”

He studied for a year under Alain Ducasse in Monte Carlo

Morse, who contends there is no item on the menu that

and at Hotel De Paris. And he graduated from the Culinary

Pascucci hasn’t approved, is a fellow founding member at

Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. But he cred-

The Bears Club. He’s also a partner and vice chairman of

its his high school internship at the Hotel Victoria

the world-champion Boston Red Sox, but his easygoing

Jungfrau in Interlaken, Switzerland, for his love of the

personality is typical of the membership. “The members

48


Acquiring the Property for Sebonack THE ORIGINAL ACREAGE along

Peconic Bay, next to Cold

In 1949, the International Brotherhood of Electrical

Spring Pond on Long Island’s South Fork, was first known

Workers bought the estate from Pauline Sabin Davis for

as Bayberry Land, and it was purchased in the early 1900s

$131,000. The IBEW used it for various purposes, most

by Charles H. Sabin and his wife, Pauline. Sabin was

notably as a convalescent home, school, and children’s

chairman of the board of the Guaranty Trust

summer camp for its members. In 2000, Sotheby’s

of New York. Pauline was formerly

auctioned off the property to the high

Pauline Morton Smith, an heiress to the

bidder, who wanted to buy it subject to

Morton Salt estate and also the daughter

zoning approval. But that bidder later de-

of President Theodore Roosevelt’s secre-

cided to pull out of the deal, so it became

tary of the Navy. They built a twenty-

available again. That’s when Michael Pas-

eight-room house on the property, along

cucci stepped in. “I met with the union,

with eight other structures for their guests

and there really wasn’t much negotia-

and workers, plus a hunting lodge.

tion,” he says. “They said, ‘Here’s the

They commissioned fabulous gardens,

number, $46 million dollars. Give us a

designed by one of the first female land-

million and do the due diligence, which

scape architects of the day, Marian Cruger

is what I did.” Pascucci eventually paid

Coffin. She produced four separate gar-

$45 million dollars, plus 2 percent to the

dens, plus a great lawn. The complex be-

town of Southampton.

came known as the Sabin Estate. (The

To get through the zoning process,

double-crescent “S” carved into its shutters

which he was told would take at least ten

was adopted by Sebonack as its logo,

years, Pascucci had to assemble a

and one of those original shutters sits

ABOVE:

team of lawyers, consultants, ac-

in the grand foyer of the clubhouse.)

Shutters from the original Sabin estate with the distinctive Sebonack logo.

countants, financial planners, envi-

The estate’s opulence, however, was short-lived. Sabin died in 1933 and his widow, Pauline, continued to live

BELOW:

Sunset view from the clubhouse over Peconic Bay. The view is spectacular almost every evening.

there, even after marrying Dwight F.

ronmentalists, and land managers. “The works,” he says. “We had 350 meetings. I met every potential adversary. I told them, ‘I’ll give you

Davis (who donated tennis’ Davis Cup). During World War

what you want, but give me my eighteen golf holes.’ ” Three

II, Davis relocated to Washington to serve President

years later, he had permits to build his eighteen golf holes,

Franklin Roosevelt as an advisor, and Pauline Sabin turned

a clubhouse, a large practice range, a 19th hole, and up to

the property over to the Red Cross for supply storage.

fifteen cottages; there are nine completed so far.

49


C H A P T E R

T W E L V E

RED LEDGES Heber City, Utah


A Golden Eighteen

Spectacular Golf Among the Wasatch Mountains

T

HE STORY OF RED LEDGES, a beautiful golf club development within view of Mount Timpanogos in Utah’s Wasatch

Range, is the story of a self-made businessman who ultimately followed his dreams. M. Anthony (Tony) Burns could just as easily have spent his entire life washing big rigs and filling them with diesel fuel in the middle of Nevada. Unless you work in the

nearby casinos, that’s what a lot of young men do when they grow up in the truck-stop town of Mesquite, among the tumbleweeds

and dusty highways of the desert an hour northeast of Las Vegas. But not Tony Burns. Fortunately, he had a coach in high school who said, “Son, you need to go to college,” and Burns listened. He attended Dixie College (now Dixie State University) in St. George, Utah, on a $100 baseball scholarship, and then moved on to get his Bachelor of Science degree from Brigham Young

University in 1964. From there he went to the University of California Berkeley, where he earned his MBA. Over the next four decades he became one of the most successful—and influential—business leaders in the country, first as the controller of North

America for Mobil Oil, then as the president and CEO (and later chairman of the board) of Ryder Systems, bringing the company

from five-hundred million dollars in revenue to more than five billion dollars when he retired in 2002. And although Burns retired

and near Heber City. For thirty-

from Ryder Systems, he did not

three years he accumulated

retire from leading the most

property there—twenty-seven

productive life possible. In addi-

different

tion to serving on numerous

ended up with two thousand

boards, such as for J.P. Morgan

contiguous acres. But before

Chase, and heading various

taking the plunge into launch-

philanthropic efforts, such as

ing the Red Ledges develop-

the United Way, he decided to

ment, he felt he needed a

fulfill a lifelong quest and build

business partner. He turned to

his own golf course. That’s when

an old Dixie College friend,

transactions—and

he returned to his roots, back to the West,

PREVIOUS PAGES:

Nolan Archibald. While Burns played base-

and to the mountains of Utah. While at

The dramatic view of Mount Timpanogos from the ninth tee.

ball at Dixie, Archibald starred on the

Dixie, Burns had met his wife of fifty-one years, Joyce Jordan, who was a rodeo queen in 1956 in the small town of Heber City, near Salt Lake City. Her family owned hundreds of acres in the shadow of the Wasatch Mountains. And over the years, whenever he had

ABOVE:

Sunrise glints upon the 11,752-foot-high peaks of Mount Timpanogos. OPPOSITE:

Member Bill O’Brien plays the par-3 ninth hole.

the opportunity, instead of investing in com-

school’s basketball team, later became an academic All-American at Weber State University playing for Dick Motta, tried out with the Chicago Bulls, and eventually received offers to play professionally. But Archibald opted for a career in business, earning an MBA from Harvard, and he went on to become

panies or mutual funds or gold, he bought land—near Las

president and CEO of Black & Decker. (He’s now executive

Vegas, Mesquite, Miami (where he lives and has an office),

chairman of the Board of Stanley Black & Decker.) Burns

52


A Golden Eighteen

years, including in the first Gulf War, and was the first

“The Cliff Drysdale tennis program drew us here, including

woman to land a plane on an aircraft carrier at night.

the Har-Tru courts,” Chris says. “It’s the first time we’ve

“Now I’m flying the desk,” she smiles. Both are keen

lived in a gated community, and we had some trepidation

golfers (John carries a 7.3 Handicap Index; Laurie, a 38,

about that,” Laurie says. “But we love all the activities. I’m

is working on her game with Jon Paupore and is improving fast). They bought a home site in November 2009 and plan to start building soon. “Now that I’m in retirement,” John says, “we’re spending a lot of time with

an active person, and there are so many PREVIOUS PAGES:

The juniper-lined canyons surrounding the par-4 third hole. ABOVE:

A view of the par-4 12th hole.

our kids. Golf is a big part of our life—we can even play as a family of five. They let us do that here, which is nice.” Each of their children—Elaine, Christine, and Jack—has gone through the McLean program. “We came to visit for the skiing, but we ended up staying for the summer,” Laurie says. “We’re

things to do here. The hiking is unbelievable. You don’t need trails. We have such great wildlife. Even bald eagles.” The Von der Ahes just downsized within Red Ledges. “From our previous house [4,800 square feet] we had

OPPOSITE:

(from left) Head Golf Professional Jon Paupore; Golf Course Superintendent Pat Christoffer with his faithful companion, Bessie; Mount Timpanogos awaits a new blanket of snow.

really glad we did.”

views of Cascade Peak, the back of the Wasatch, and the back of Deer Valley. Our new house [3,500 square feet] is right on the fourth hole, a par 3,” Chris says. “Our typical day in the summer is like this: Start with a tennis clinic, then have lunch, complete a workout, do laps in the pool, take a shower,

Members Chris and Laurie Von der Ahe share the sen-

sneak in a few holes, maybe do some mountain biking on

timent. They bought a home site in 2011 and finished their

Park City’s world-class trails. Then we go into Heber City,

home a year later. Chris’ grandfather, Wilfred Von der Ahe,

a real town, for dinner. It doesn’t get much better than that.”

started the famous Vons grocery store chain in Southern

It’s safe to say, the other members at Red Ledges would

California and Las Vegas. Their son, Nick, is captain of the

agree.

tennis team at Loyola Marymount University in California.

56


CLUB FLAGS AND ADDRESSES

THE BEAR’S CLUB

THE CLUB AT CARLTON WOODS

THE COUNTRY CLUB AT CASTLE PINES

One Carlton Woods Drive The Woodlands, Texas 77382 281-863-5800 www.carltonwoods.com

6400 Country Club Drive Castle Rock, Colorado 80108 303-688-7400 www.ccatcastlepines.com

COUNTRY CLUB OF THE ROCKIES

THE CONCESSION GOLF CLUB

CREIGHTON FARMS

676 Sawatch Drive Edwards, Colorado 81632 970-926-3080 www.countrycluboftherockies.com

7700 Lindrick Lane Bradenton, Florida 34202 941-322-1922 www.theconcession.com

DESERT MOUNTAIN GOLF CLUB

THE GOLF CLUB AT DOVE MOUNTAIN

10550 E. Desert Hills Drive Scottsdale, Arizona 85262 480-595-4000 www.desertmountain.com

6501 Boulder Bridge Pass Marana, Arizona 85658 520-572-3500 www.thegolfclubatdovemountain.com

250 Bear’s Club Drive Jupiter, Florida 33477 561-626-2327 www.thebearsclub.com

398

22050 Creighton Farms Drive Aldie, Virginia 20105 703-957-4800 www.creightonfarms.com

HARBOR SHORES 201 Graham Avenue Benton Harbor, Michigan 49022 269-927-4653 www.harborshoreslife.com


FOUR SEASONS RESORTS – LANA’I GOLF Four Seasons Resort Lana’i at Manele Bay One Manele Bay Road Lanai City, Hawaii 96783 808-565-2000 www.fourseasons.com/manelebay

MAYACAMA 1240 Mayacama Club Drive Santa Rosa, California 95403 707-387-0938 www.mayacama.com

RED LEDGES

SEBONACK GOLF CLUB

1851 E. Center Street Heber City, Utah 84032 877-733-5334 www.redledges.com

405 Sebonac Road Southampton, New York 11968 631-287-4444 www.sebonack.com

SHOAL CREEK

TOSCANA COUNTRY CLUB

100 New Williamsburg Drive Shoal Creek, Alabama 35242 205-991-9000 www.shoalcreekclub.com

76009 Via Club Villa Indian Wells, California 92210 760-404-1444 www.toscanacc.com

399

MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB 5750 Memorial Drive Dublin, Ohio 43017 614-889-6740 www.mvgc.org

SHERWOOD COUNTRY CLUB 320 West Stafford Road Thousand Oaks, California 91361 805-496-3036 www.sherwoodcountryclub.com

VALHALLA GOLF CLUB P.O. Box 43759 15503 Shelbyville Road Louisville, Kentucy 40253 502-245-4475 http:/Valhalla.pgalinks.com



A Golden Eighteen - A Showcase of Legendary Clubs Designed by Jack Nicklaus