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FREEDOM FROM FEAR Learning from Existing Quick Response Structures on VAW

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Freedom from Fear: Establishing a Quick Response Team for Violence Against Women A Guide for Local Government Learning from Existing Quick Response Structures on VAW Copyright Š 2003 Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program (LGSP) All rights reserved The Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program encourages the use, translation, adaptation and copying of this material for non-commercial use, with appropriate credit given to LGSP. Although reasonable care has been taken in the preparation of this book, neither the publisher and/or contributor and/or editor can accept any liability for any consequence arising from the use thereof or from any information contained herein. ISBN 971-92687-2-7 Printed and bound in Manila, Philippines Published by: Philippines-Canada Local Government Support program (LGSP) Unit 1507 Jollibee Plaza Emerald Avenue, Pasig City 1600 Philippines Tel. Nos. (632) 637 3511-13 www.lgsp.org.ph This project was undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA).

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AS

SA KABUH AAN AY IW A

AT PAPAUNLA D PAG

UB

NA

S

R

EP

Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)

N

MBANSANG PA NG PA

A JOINT PROJECT OF

L IK A N G P ILIP I

National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA)

Canadian International Development Agency

IMPLEMENTED BY

Agriteam Canada www.agriteam.ca

Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) www.fcm.ca

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contents Acronyms

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Learning from Existing Quick Response Structures on VAW Leveling off on some Terms

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Existing Quick Response Team Models

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A. Barangay or Community-based Models Mapulang Lupa, Valenzuela Model

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Women’s Desk of Barangay Batasan Hills, QC COMBAT-VAW and D2KA Models 22

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B. Municipal and City Models 25 Municipal Center for Women of Balayan, Batangas KKK of Angeles City, Pampanga 27

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C. Multi-level QRT Models 30 Bacolod, Sipalay and Escalante QRTs 30 Inter-LGU Model: The CAPIU Model of Albay Province Bantay-Banay: A Nationwide Grassroots Movement Against Domestic Violence 35 Common Characteristics of Existing QRT Models Common Challenges A Final Note References

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acronyms Barangay Kagawad BCPC BFC CAPIU CB CIDA Combat-VAW CSSD CSWDO/MSWDO D2Ka DAW DAWN DepEd DILG DSWD GAD HASIK, Inc Katarungang Pambarangay KKKA LGU NCRFW NGO PNP PO QRT QRT3 SAC TUCP VAW WCC WD

Barangay Councilor Barangay Council for the Protection of Children Barangay Family Council Child Abuse Prevention and Intervention Unit Capacity-Building Canadian International Development Agency Combat Violence Against Women City Social Services and Development City/Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office District 2 Kababaihan Laban sa Karahasan Delivery of Justice for Disadvantaged Women Program Development through Active Women Networking Foundation, Inc Department of Education Department of Interior and Local Government Department of Social Welfare and Development Gender and Development Harnessing Self-Reliant Initiatives and Knowledge, Inc Barangay Justice System Kapisanan Para sa Kagalingan ng Kababaihan ng Angeles Local Government Unit National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women Non-government Organization Philippine National Police People’s Organization Quick Response Team Freedom From Fear: Book Three Social Action Center Trade Union Congress of the Philippines Violence Against Women Women’s Crisis Center Women’s Desk

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I want to learn from the

experience of existing QRTs. Can you describe your experience to us?

y Aral: S RT an kba tonio Q La nsored by May An Cruz

Sp

o

o r M ar i a

Learning from Existing Quick Response Structures on VAW

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D

ifferent localities have experimented and pursued different models of the QRT. There is a wide array of approaches and experiences in setting up and maintaining a Quick Response Team (QRT), developed by LGUs, NGOs, and communities in different parts of the Philippines. QRT3 compares the similarities and differences of such experiences to help you shape your own QRT. QRTs in the Philippines vary in coverage. Some are municipal- or city-based and others are barangay- or community-based. A nationwide grassroots movement against VAW called Bantay Banay has also gained international prominence. These QRTs also differ in the specific gender issues they focus on. Combat-VAW tries to address domestic violence primarily at the barangay level. The CAPIU model of Albay is focused on addressing child abuse. The QRTs of Bacolod, Sipalay and Escalante focus on family violence at the barangay level but take on VAW at the city-level. Both levels also address reproductive health concerns through RH counseling. The Bantay Banay of Cebu City is also a multi-tiered structure against VAW. Bantay-Banay structures in other parts of the Philippines take on different forms and issues depending on the receptiveness of the LGU, the presence of GAD champions and the needs of the community. QRT3 tries to distill the features of these different models to help you understand how QRTs have been set up and made to work in different parts of the Philippines.

There is a wide array of approaches and experiences in setting-up and maintaining a QRT.

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leveling off on our

understanding of some terms

Because QRT models use many terms and define similar concepts differently, let us first level off on our understanding of some basic terms. A QRT or Quick Response Team is a group of individuals trained, designated and committed to undertake one, or two or all of the following: ◗

◗ ◗ ◗

Provide immediate, short and medium-term assistance and services to survivors of VAW and family violence, particularly to women and children. Provide reproductive health counseling Undertake advocacy on gender, reproductive health and family violence Focus on addressing VAW in general or specific forms of VAW such as domestic violence, rape, and child abuse.

KINDS OF QRT INTERVENTION OR ASSISTANCE ◗

Crisis Intervention: immediate services/assistance provided after the occurrence of the abuse incident, including providing medical examination and treatment to injuries suffered by the victim, temporary shelter if the victim has left the home, crisis counseling to help the victim deal with the aftershock or emotional trauma.

Short-term intervention: may include referrals, referring victims to different agencies for

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assistance in pursuing the case, extending stay in the shelter, assisting the victim file a complaint with the police and prosecutor’s office, providing basic necessities such as food, clothing, medicine, transportation and other expenses.

QRT intervention or assistance

kinds of

◗ Crisis Intervention ◗ Short-term Intervention ◗ Medium-term Intervention ◗ Long-term Intervention

Medium-term to long-term intervention: consists of more strategic intervention, including comprehensive therapy and long-term counseling program, livelihood assistance, assistance in finding alternative shelter, skills training for employment and livelihood provision, educational support for children or the mother.

It also includes advocacy to raise awareness on family violence, reproductive health, human rights and VAW prevention in the communities. It can also entail the conduct of capacity-building (CB) activities for QRT members and other service providers in the community. These CB activities include gender sensitivity training, training on providing para-legal services, counseling and crisis intervention, seminars on gender, violence against women and other related topics.

POSSIBLE STRUCTURES It is or can be

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Inter-agency: comprising different LGU departments and local line agencies such as the social welfare, health, police, legislative and peace and order councils.

Multisectoral: consisting of government and nongovernment agencies

Multi-disciplinary: combining people of different disciplines and expertise — social work, legal/ law, law enforcement, medicine, local governance — to work on family violence and reproductive health counseling

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Multi-level: exists at the barangay, municipal/city and provincial levels; it can be within the barangay or within the city/municipality (intra-LGU), or it can consist of several cities/municipalities (inter-LGU).

LGU-based: adopted by an LGU as a project/ program, is physically-based in the LGU and mainly led by the LGU, instead of by members of the community or an NGO.

Community-based: located within the barangay or neighborhood, and whose sphere of influence and range of jurisdiction is the community. It is also sustained and implemented by members of the same community.

Coordinated and integrated: different agencies with different mandates and responsibilities work together on the same cases, referring cases to one another, planning interventions and planning actions together.

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existing

VAW Quick Response Models Let us now take a look at different QRT models that have evolved over time from various experiences in the Philippines.

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Barangay or Community-Based DAW-RELATED INITIATIVES: BARANGAY WOMEN’S DESKS Two of the barangay models featured here were initiated by the Delivery of Justice for Disadvantaged Women Program (DAW) of the Trade Union Congress of the Philippines (TUCP) in collaboration with other NGOs, including HASIK, Inc. and the Women’s Crisis Center, that provided training and other capacity building support. The two were set up by a Barangay Kagawad pushing for a resolution to create a Women’s Desk. The resolution also contained budget allocation from the Internal Revenue Allotment of the Barangay. The DAW trainers with the assistance of Hasik and the Women’s Crisis Center provided the preparatory training to the members of the QRT.

Mapulang Lupa, Valenzuela Model The Mapulang Lupa Women’s Desk was established in 1998 through a barangay resolution pushed by Barangay

QRT models

different

1. Barangay or Community-Based 2. Municipal/City-Level 3. Multi-Level

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Salient Features of the Mapulang Lupa Women’s Desks ◗ LGU-based and initiated ◗ Has an institutional budget integrated in the barangay budget ◗ Has a pool of community-based crisis intervention workers ◗ Conducts advocacy activities in every barangay sector ◗ Had extensive training for members ◗ Has a 24-hour hotline for cases

Kagawad Marina Pabaya. It has an annual budget of P277,401 (2001), sourced from the 5% GAD budget of the barangay. It has a barangay-based Women’s Desk coordinator and 18 crisis workers who work on rotation basis, answer the 24-hour hotline number and conduct home visits. Its office and hotline is based on the third floor of the barangay hall. Basically, the services of the women’s desk revolve around crisis intervention and advocacy. They have a referral system with links to the police, the CSSD, and the women’s NGOs (such as the Women’s Crisis Center) for counseling, legal assistance and other assistance to victims. Crisis workers note that a majority of the cases they handle are family violence cases. The strong linkages it has established with women’s NGOs enable them to avail of continued training and other technical support.

Influencing factors A strong factor in the stability and sustainability of the Mapulang Lupa Women’s Desk is that it has been fully adopted by the barangay government and integrated in the barangay’s program of work. It has its own budget allocation, its own space in the barangay hall and its crisis workers are officially recognized in the community. They also have their own barangay accredited ID cards. Another facilitating factor is the considerable training that the members have participated in.

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model 1a Mapulang Lupa, Valenzuela Model

Setting-up

Services

Structure

1. Approval of brgy resolution 2. Setting up of structures ◗ Hotline ◗ Roles and responsibilities 3. Trainings on para-legal, GST, etc

The MAPULANG LUPA WOMEN’S DESK

a. b.

Brgy Captain

c. d. e.

WD Coordinator f. 8 Crisis Workers, including rotating/alternating hotline operator and office staff, RH counselor, brgy advocates

g. h.

Documentation of cases Submission of reports to the brgy, and then to court and DILG Hotline Medical assistance Referral to DSWD, Women’s League, Women Crisis Center, Nayon ng Kabataan and other service providers Counseling available from 18 crisis workers Victim accompanied to the PNP’s Special Investigation Division Advocacy work in every purok (forum, seminars)

Budget taken from 5% GA Budget

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Women’s Desk of Brgy. Batasan Hills, Quezon City The Women’s Desk of Brgy. Batasan Hills in Quezon City is another pilot project of DAW in Quezon City. Created through a Barangay Resolution pushed by Kagawad Elias Gamboa, the Women’s Desk is actually part of a larger Barangay Family Council that includes five committees: ◗ Rescue and Protection, ◗ Health and Education, ◗ Counseling, ◗ Youth and Sports, ◗ Livelihood.

Salient Features of the Brgy. Batasan Hills Women’s Desks ◗ LGU-based, but setting up was facilitated through initiative of HASIK, a non-government organization ◗ Women’s Desk integrated in the larger Barangay Family Council, that includes other departments and committees, like BCPC

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While the BFC was originally envisioned to compose representatives from the Department of Education, Police, Health Center, Katarungang Pambarangay, Social Services Development Program, religious organization, NGOs & POs, the multisectoral character has not been realized. The WD is practically being run solely by the designated Women’s Desk Officer.

Influencing Factors Some of the factors that helped create the Batasan Hills Women’s Desk include: the presence and support of NGOs, POs, and local champions. The decline in NGO/PO presence over time and the change in barangay LGU leadership, however, have resulted in the waning of activities and support for the Women’s Desk.

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model 1b The Women's Desk of Brgy Batasan Hills, Quezon City Setting-up

Services

Structure

1. Approval of Brgy Resolution creating the Barangay Family Council 2. Free training given to members 3. Support from WCC, NCRFW, DAW, TUCP

THE BARANGAY FAMILY COUNCIL

a. Accompany victim to court b. Case monitoring c. Medical (PNP Crime Lab, East Avenue & Fabella) d. Referral (PNP Station 6, DSWD) e. Shelter referral (RACM) f. Referral to Social Services Dev’t Program

Brgy. Captain Chair

DECS PNP Health

Brgy Justice

Social Services

Religious/ NGO

Brgy. Kagawad Officer-in-Charge

Committees Rescue Health Counselling Youth Livelihood & Protection & Education & Sports

BCPC

Women’s Desk WD Coordinator

Barangay gives allowance of P4850 to WD

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HASIK’s COMBAT VAW and D2 Kababaihan Laban sa Karahasan Unlike the first two barangay models initiated by DAW, which were anchored on existing barangay government structures, the HASIK models are primarily dependent on the existence of strong people's organizations within the barangay.

Combat-VAW Model I Its early model, implemented from 1992-1996 was premised on the belief that gender sensitive communities will serve as a preventive mechanism to VAW, with the community becoming the primary support for VAW victims. COMBAT-VAW-Model I, which combined community organizing and Combat-VAW training, was piloted by HASIK, Inc. and the Women’s Legal Bureau and later by SALIGAN, with support from the Ford Foundation in two urban poor communities in Quezon City.

Salient Features of the COMBAT-VAW

Baseline surveys were conducted to come up with a situationer; and later a set of training programs were implemented consisting of (1) Gender Sensitivity Training, (2) Violence against Women Workshop and (3) Paralegal Training.

Models

◗ Community-based, involving both women and men at the barangay level ◗ Strong Training Program developed by HASIK, Manualized in Hudyat ◗ Partnership among non-government organizations assisting the urban poor areas ◗ Goal: Gender sensitive communities and Skilled Para-legal Advocates ◗ Limited coordination with city government

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Combat-VAW Model II By 1996, HASIK phased out from the two communities, to expand its coverage to District 2 of Quezon City, also with funding support from the Ford Foundation. Calling the project, District Two Kababaihan Laban sa Karahasan or D2 KA (Combat-VAW Model II), an organization of daycare workers and parents was established and provided with gender-sensitivity, VAW and paralegal trainings. Drawing lessons from earlier experience, this model tried to involve barangay officials; with LGU participation remaining at the barangay government level.

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model 1c Combat VAW Model One Setting-up Batasan Hills, Tawid Sapa Dos 1. Community organizing 2. Baseline Survey 3. Training: (a) gender sensitivity (b) VAW (c) Paralegal

Services

Structure Barangay level:

a. Legal advocates b. Gender sensitive community

◗ Community organizations: men and women members

◗ Day care workers

Funding Support from FES, PCHRD, Ford Foundation

model 1d Combat VAW Model Two Setting-up

Services

Structure

Change in slant: 1. VAW, a Reproductive Health Concern 2. District Organizing 3. Baseline Survey 4. Training: (1) gender sensitivity, (2) VAW, (3) Paralegal 5. Additional Trainings Provided: Reproductive health Organizational development Case Management

◗ District Two Kababaihan Laban sa Karahasan or D2 KA Members from District 2 Barangays

◗ Barangay Officials

a. Support system ◗ Noise barrage ◗ Community protest b. Counseling c. Referral system d. Training and advocacy e. Paralegal advocates

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Apart from the strong role of community organizing, Hasik’s COMBAT-VAW interventions had three salient features: the use of community-based cultural productions i.e. songs, theatre and story-telling as mechanisms for capacity building, the inclusion of men in the Gender Sensitivity Training and VAW seminars and the development of paralegal advocates among the women in the community who can work very closely with barangay officials on cases of VAW and other related cases such as issues of land ownership.

Influencing Factors Two factors facilitate the continued existence of D2ka: 1) the development of a committed, skilled, and viable core group of women community advocates, and 2) the strong support and mentoring of HASIK to D2Ka. With HASIK phasing out in the area, D2ka has to face the challenge of continuing the project on their own. D2ka and HASIK believe that by strengthening D2Ka’s partnerships with local governments at the barangay and city level, initial gains can be sustained. Given the long history of LGU-NGO-PO antagonism in Quezon City over urban poor issues, forging sustained partnerships will prove to be its biggest challenge.

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Municipal/City Models

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The Municipal Center for Women of Balayan, Batangas The Municipality of Balayan received a Galing Pook Award in recognition of an exemplary project: The Balayan Municipal Center for Women. The Center was a project of former Balayan Mayor Benjamin Martinez and is still supported by current Mayor Emmanuel Fronda. The Center has its own building near the municipal hall, built from funds from the mayor’s office. It has a regular staff of two social workers. The fund for the management of the center comes from the General Fund of the Mayor’s Office. The Municipal Center for Women serves as an umbrella center that tries to integrate and coordinate the different women-focused initiatives in the municipality. For example, it regularly brings together different women’s organizations in Balayan and the LGU to help establish a municipal-wide network for gender concerns. It also channels LGU funds to these organizations for economic and livelihood assistance to women members. It also tries to organize more community-based groups of women for economic and political empowerment. The center coordinates information and advocacy campaigns on different gender issues, including women’s rights, children’s rights and reproductive health. Finally, the Center acts as a drop-in facility for women victims of VAW. The Center has a legal assistance program, a health assistance program and a counseling program for VAW survivors.

Influencing Factors A big factor in sustaining the Center is its institutionalization as an LGU program and office. The continued support of the mayor is another strong factor.

Salient Features of the Balayan Municipal Center for Women

◗ LGU-based and initiated ◗ Has its own structure and staff of two ◗ Gets its funds from the Mayor’s budget ◗ Provides livelihood and economic assistance to barangay-based women’s groups ◗ Has programs for health, legal and counseling assistance to survivors of family violence ◗ Have legal advocates in all 48 barangays of the municipality to refer cases to the center

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model 2a Municipal Center for Women, Balayan, Batangas

Setting-up

Services

Structure

1. Approval of City Resolution and Ordinance 2. Physical space provided (later structure built)

MAYOR’S OFFICE

a. Education and Info dissemination program (advocacy, even in other towns) b. Legislative advocacy and research program c. Economic and livelihood assistance program to 30 brgy women’s groups d. Health Assistance program e. Legal Assistance program f. Women Counseling Program g. Community Organizing program h. Women’s Networking program i. Monitoring and evaluation program

Municipal Center for Women Two Center Staff 75 legal advocates in 48 brgys who refer cases

Funds from Mayors’ Office Funds 201,373 pesos for 2002

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KKKA of Angeles City, Pampanga One of the oldest models, the Kapisanan para sa Kagalingan ng Kababaihan ng Angeles (KKKA), was established in 1991 as a people’s organization, primarily to help women deal with the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. From providing livelihood assistance to women leaders, KKKA went on to organizing, training and education of grassroots women on gender and social issues advocacy. From being an ad-hoc group for disaster relief, KKKA grew into a strong grassroots movement for gender advocacy in Angeles. It gained the support of the city government, local politicians and personalities and an international funding partner, the Ford Foundation. It also gave birth to a foundation, the IMA foundation, which became its sister organization. At the same time, given the strength and visibility of KKKA, members noted they were increasingly called upon to respond to the individual cases, mostly VAWrelated. Women in the communities where they worked as advocates began calling on them for help in cases of rape, domestic violence, and other cases of VAW. Thus, KKKA developed a Quick Response function for VAW and DV. KKKA’s services include direct crisis intervention, temporary shelter, referral services, advocacy, community organizing, and case documentation. With 48 barangay chapters, KKKA and its sister organization, the IMA Foundation, boasts of a wide and strong membership. Many KKKA members became barangay councilors and Susan Pineda, KKKA and IMA founder, served two terms as city councilor. Today, KKKA has become the community-based mechanism while IMA provides technical assistance (e.g. training, publication, advocacy) to KKKA and other local

Salient Features of the KKKA ◗ Purely community-based, no LGU involvement ◗ Strong community organizing work by KKKA among the communities, which resulted in establishing 48 Chapters in 33 barangays ◗ Strong link with local foundation (IMA Foundation) that provides temporary shelter, resources and other support services ◗ Was able to obtain funding from LGU and International foundation (Ford) even if it was not LGUbased or initiated

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model 2b KKKA, Angeles, Pampanga

Setting-up

Services

Structure

1. Organizing of women leaders into PO by NGO (Ugnayan) 2. Training and education 3. Lobbied support from mayor for funds

CITY-LEVEL

a. City-established Women Resource and Development Center b. Temporary shelter c. Crisis intervention d. Referral e. Case documentation

KKKA Executive Committee/ Board of Trustees Set of Officers Technical support from IMA Foundation

BARANGAY LEVEL 48 Brgy. chapters in 33 barangays 4 committees per chapter (health, education, livelihood and VAW) 9 local community organizers

Previously Supported by LGU funds and Ford Foundation through IMA Foundation

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groups. Both KKKA and IMA are affiliated with GABRIELA and support a national democratic agenda. From active support in previous years from two former mayors and City Councilor Susan Pineda, KKKA and IMA managed to get a Women Resource and Development Center, where the two organizations now hold office. While the center functioned fully for 3 years as a temporary shelter and resource center, with LGU financial support, it has since stopped fully operating. It is now mostly used as office space for KKKA and IMA, and as a sometime temporary shelter. While the reach of KKKA is city-wide (having organized chapters in 33 barangays), the scope of its intervention is still more barangay-based than city-level. Cases are directly handled by barangays. No similar structure, except for administrative/technical concerns, exists at the city-level.

Influencing Factors Two factors to KKKA’s sustained work over 10 years are: its grassroots base and its capacity to obtain institutional and external support. At the same time, concerns for its continued existence are now being voiced due to the waning of support and the decline in grassroots organizing work.

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3 Multi-level QRTs DAWN QRTs in Bacolod, Sipalay and Escalante Piloted in Barangay 3 of Bacolod City, under the BacolodKamloops City Exchange Program, this model is now being replicated in the cities of Sipalay and Escalante in Negros Occidental with funds from the Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program. The main proponents of this model are the Development through Active Women Networking (DAWN) Foundation, a Bacolod-City based NGO and the LGUs of the three cities. Unlike the above models, the DAWN model is two-tiered:

Salient Features of the DAWN QRTs ◗ LGU-based, NGO-LGU initiated ◗ Strong organizing and training support from NGO (DAWN/ LGSP) ◗ Government and non-government partnership ◗ Two-levels: city and barangay with own structures and team members ◗ Services range from case management to advocacy

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◗ First, it consists of a city-level multisectoral network of service providers and caregivers from the city government like the GAD focal points, CSWDO, City Health Office, Sangguniang Panlungsod, as well as Women NGOs, media, private doctors and other sectors. The city network of service providers and caregivers support each other when providing assistance to VAW victims. The City GAD focal point, on the other hand, meets and discusses city-wide issues related to gender issues, and tries to formulate and advocate for city-wide policies and actions on the issue. ◗ Second, it has community-based QRTs composed of barangay officials and other concerned people in the barangay who directly handle cases of family violence.

Influencing Factors Some of the factors that influence how the QRT project is implemented in the different cities include: ◗ The readiness of the LGU to take on and support the project ◗ The resources of DAWN and LGU ◗ The presence of LGU champions

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model 3a DAWN QRTs in Sipalay, Escalante, and Bacolod City

Setting-up

Services

Structure

1. Representation by DAWN to LGUs 2. MOAs signed between DAWN and LGUs 3. Members identified 4. One-year training by DAWN 5.Teams and protocols developed

The City-wide Network of Service Providers and Caregivers

CSWDO SP CHO Other LGU Depts GAD Focal Point

Dawn Fdn.

Media

Mayor’s Office

Police

Schools

Other Women’s Orgs

The Barangay-Based QRT

Barangay-level: a. Counseling b. Temporary shelter in brgy hall c. Documentation of cases d. Referrals to DSWD, City health office

Barangay Captain Brgy. GAD Focal Point

Purok 1 Kagawad-Team Leader BHW/Doctor Brgy. Tanod

City-level: a. Advocacy through media forum b. Legislation c. Direct Case management

Lawyers Doctors

Purok 2 Kagawad-Team Leader BHW/Doctor Brgy. Tanod

◗ Funds from DAWN for Bacolod City with LGU counterpart ◗ Setting up Funds from Philippines-Canada Local Government Support Program (LGSP)

for Sipalay and Escalante through DAWN; with LGU and members’ counterpart

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Inter-LGU: The CAPIU of Albay Initiated by the Social Action Center of Legazpi, this was the Catholic’s Church response to increasing reports of child abuse cases in Region V. SAC encouraged local government units in 5 towns and 1 city to organize and strengthen their five pillars of justice by providing capacity-building programs for them. The CAPIU model basically calls for the organizing of the Five Pillars of Justice – the police, the prosecution, the courts, the correction and penology and the community (which includes NGOs and P0s) to provide coordinated case management of child abuse cases. The City/Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office (CSWDO/MSWDO) acts as secretariat and team leader. The 5 pillars in the different LGUs were provided a number of training on improved case management, counseling and para-legal training.

Salient Features of the CAPIU

At the same time, the CAPIU project also sought to involve the barangays – through the activation of the Barangay Councils for the Protection of Children (BCPC).

◗ LGU-based, NGO initiated ◗ Network of several LGUs ◗ Government and non-government partnership ◗ Strong training and organizing support from NGO (SAC/CF) and the Catholic Church ◗ Focused on Five Pillars of Justice as Case Management Team ◗ Services range from case management to advocacy

At the city/municipal level, the structures that have been established include:

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◗ A referral/case management system of the 5 pillars ◗ Regular meetings of each CAPIU for case conferences and other activities ◗ Standardized documentation forms for cases ◗ Advocacy materials and campaigns In 2000, in recognition of the success of the project in organizing the 5 Pillars for child abuse, the CAPIU of Legazpi was recognized by the Galing Pook awards.

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model 3b CAPIU, Albay Setting-up

Services

Structure

◗ Organized Five Pillars of

Core Group of 6 LGUs

Justice (by SAC) ◗ Capacity-Building for Service Providers ◗ Orientation of BCPCs

Integrated and coordinated services at the municipal/city level with institutionalized referral system and case management

Legazpi 5 Pillars

Ligao 5 Pillars

Tabaco 5 Pillars

Daraga 5 Pillars

Libon 5 Pillars

Tiwi 5 Pillars

5 Pillars of Justice ◗ police ◗ prosecution ◗ courts

◗ correction and penology ◗ community

Funds by Consuelo Foundation through SAC with LGU counterparting

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Influencing Factors The 6 CAPIUs have various levels of strength and effectiveness – some CAPIUs are stronger and more stable than others. This has been partly caused by a number of factors, including: ◗ The presence or absence of institutional and leadership support in the LGU. How strong a CAPIU is often depends on how strongly it is supported by the mayor. ◗ The level of enthusiasm and pro-activeness shown by the CAPIU members. CAPIUs where the members have good relations, strong commitment and are willing to work extra for the project are stronger than the CAPIUs who are less interested in putting in effort on the project ◗ The level of mentoring and support provided by SAC as facilitating NGO. Sometimes, closer monitoring and support by an external source provides added incentive to work.

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A Nationwide Grassroots Movement Against Domestic Violence: Bantay-Banay Like the DAWN model, the Bantay Banay is a multi-level initiative. It recommends a strong grassroots base at the barangay level; and endorses active networking by the different service providers at the city or provincial level that can provide support services for victims of VAW. Initiated by the Lihok Pilipina Foundation in 1992, it has caught fire because non-government organizations and local government units in other parts of the country have tried to replicate it within their locality calling it by different names—Bantay Familia in Legaspi and Naga, Bantay Tahanan in Orani, Bataan, Bantay Panimalay in Iloilo and Leyte. What is interesting about this model is that Lihok Pilipina tries to bring the Bantay Banay network from different parts of the country together at least once a year to share experiences and best practices.

Influencing Factors Again, Bantay-Banays in different parts of the Philippines have varying levels of strength and effectiveness. The influencing factors include: ◗ The presence of champions. Whether at the city or barangay level, Bantay Banays with active and committed member-supporters in the LGU emerge stronger than those that don’t. ◗ The level of mentoring and monitoring provided by an external partner. Bantay-Banays in the different areas also show that the quality of mentoring they receive from NGO partners is critical in determining how strong and sustainable the groups become. ◗ The level of integration in the LGU structure. The more a Bantay Banay is adopted and integrated by the LGU in its overall program, the more institutional support and recognition it receives and the more sustainable it becomes.

Salient Features of the Bantay-Banay ◗ Mostly LGU-based, NGO initiated ◗ Multi-level, with city/municipaland barangay structures and members ◗ Government and non-government partnership ◗ Services mostly focused on case management

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model 3c Bantay-Banay Model Setting-up

Services

Structure

Cebu 1. Capacity-building (GST, VAW, Paralegal Training) 2. Community Organizing of BB Structures (CommunityBased Interagency Committees) 3. Response to Other Women Issues (Need for livelihood, Potable Water, Health and Sanitation) Other Parts of the Country 1. Capacity-Building 2. Partnership with LGU or Local NGOs

Cebu City & selected cities and municipalities in the Philippines Lihok Pilipina

a. Direct Services: counseling, medico-legal, legal assistance, temporary shelter and livelihood referral

Lihok Pilipina's partnership with NGOs like COPE-Bicol, DAWN Fdn., FORGE, POWER, Norfil, World Vision, Merciphil, WAND, Group Foundation, PhildHRRA Partnership with LGUs like Cebu, Orani, Bataan, Gen. Santos City, Calbayog, Hindang, Cagayan de Oro, Jasaan, Tacloban, Toledo, Tagbilaran city governments

b. Direct Action: noise barrage in the community, mediation at the barangay level c. Training, Advocacy and Media Work

Set-up funds from: Miserior, CIDA, with counterparting funds from LGUs

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common characteristics of QRT models= basic elements of a QRT Despite the variety of available structures, these models share common characteristics that you can consider as the basic elements your QRT needs to have. So when you think of coming up with your own QRT, you do not need to replicate one or another model entirely. You only have to ensure that the structure you put in place have the basic features that existing models have.

◗ A Defined Structure

There is a working structure. The structure may be: ◗ Multi-leveled (city wide, barangay-level) ◗ Community or Barangay-based only

◗ Point Persons/Champions

There are a number of gender sensitive service providers and community volunteers who understand gender issues, especially family and domestic violence and have the necessary skills to respond to the issues.

◗ Concrete response mechanisms/ Concrete services

There are concrete mechanisms for effective response (e.g., hotline, common interview rooms, referral system, trained staff, etc). A set of services are offered for victims of family and domestic violence (counseling, livelihood assistance, referral system) and for women with RH-related concerns

◗ LGU/NGO support

There is sustained support either from the LGU or a nongovernment organization. Support may be financial, legislative, political or human.

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common challenges Besides sharing common characteristics, these models also encounter common challenges and obstacles that hinder their efforts including the following: â—— Obtaining institutional and LGU leadership support One factor that determines why some QRTs are stronger than others is the level of institutional support they get from the LGU. While some of the models featured here have managed to obtain institutional funding from the LGUs, other models are still struggling to get official recognition and financial support from their local governments. Other models may enjoy the support of some officials in the LGU, but not that of the mayor. Because local chief executives largely decide what priorities the LGU will have, the success of the QRT depends heavily on his/ her support. â—— Ensuring the sustainability of QRTs Another common challenge faced by many of these models is the gradual waning of support and enthusiasm of members, the LGU and community for the project. While many of these projects had promising beginnings, chalking up initial gains and successes and getting broad support across sectors, much of this momentum tends to dissipate over time. Projects run out of funds and implementers fail to tap alternative sources. Regular activities are not sustained, members fail to meet on appointed dates, supporters change address or priorities, NGO mentors also run out of funds.

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Without clear sustainability mechanisms, the QRTs have no way of addressing these concerns. â—— Addressing Political Transition and Staff Turnover Because LGU support is often critical in sustaining and strengthening a QRT, changes in LGU leadership through elections, personnel turnovers, retirements, transfers and resignation often spell change for the QRT. If a mayor who strongly supported the QRT does not win a reelection, the lukewarm support of the new mayor can cause problems.

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a final note Q

RT 3 has shown us the many existing QRT models today, how similar and how different they are, what common problems they face and what factors spell their success or failure. The next step therefore is to actually set up your own QRT, which is what QRT4 will help you do.

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references _____. (1994). Action for the 21st Century Reproductive Health & Rights for All: Summary report of recommended actions on reproductive health and the rights of the CAIRO ICPD Programme of Action. (12) ____. (2002). Action Plan Year. Balayan Municipal Center for Women. ____. (undated). AIDS AWARENESS. National AIDS/STD Prevention & Control Program Department of Health. ____. (1997). An Ordinance Creating the Municipal Center for Women and Providing for its Functions. ____. (undated). BALAYAN PROFILE. ____. (undated). Bacolod-Kamloops Partnership Program on Gender. Orientation on Reproductive Health and Violence Against Women. Dawn Foundation, Inc. Bacolod City, Philippines. Barcelona, Alice. (2002). Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Escalante City, Negros Occidental. Barcelona, Santiago Jr. (2002). Mayor, Escalante City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Negros Occidental. Batapa, Jocelle. (2002). Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Bacolod City, Negros Occidental. Canete, Suzette. (2002). City Social Welfare and Development Officer. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Escalante City, Negros Oriental. Castro, Gina. (2002). DSSD Social Worker. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Bacolod City, Negros Occidental. Casuela, Nelia. (2002). Women’s Desk Officer, Barangay Batasan Hills. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Quezon City. Coronel, Merenciana, (2002). President, KKKA. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Angeles, City, Pampanga Corral, Annabelle. (2002). Program Officer, DAWN Foundation, Inc. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. Negros Occidental. ____. (undated). DAWN. Development Through Active Women Networking Foundation, Inc. Bacolod City.

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Veluz-De Asis, Cecilia. (2002). Councilor, Naga City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Naga City. Dichoso, Marne. (2002). Program Coordinator, DAWN Foundation, Inc. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Bacolod City Diploma, Corazon. (2002). Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Bacolod City, Negros Occidental. ____. (undated). Discussion Modules on Violence Against Women, Reproductive Health , Maternal and Child Care Nutrition, Men’s Reproductive Health, Family Planning, Infertility Management, Prevention and Control of Reproductive Tract Infection, Adolescent Reproductive Health, Prevention of Reproductive Tract Cancer and other Gynecological Problems. Dawn Foundation, Inc. Flor, Celia. (2002). Councilor, Bacolod City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Negros Occidental. ____. (undated). HASIK-MSCI Community-Based Education Session. Adolescent Reproductive Health and Sexuality. ____. (undated). History of Balayan. ____. (undated). Brochure. IMA Foundation. Angeles City, Pampanga. Ico, Suzette. (2002). Barangay 3 GAD Focal Point Person. Interview by STRIDES, Inc for the QRT Manual Project. Bacolod City, Negros Occidental. ____. (2000). IMA. Women Responding to Women’s Rights, Needs and Welfare. Ing Makababaying Aksyon (IMA). Angeles City. ____. (undated). Integrated Program for Neglected and Abused Children. Legaspi City. ____. (2001). Kaban Galing, The Philippine Case Bank on Innovation and Exemplary Practices in Local Governance. Edition. Ford Foundation. Makati City, Philippines. ____. (undated). Brochure. Kapisanan Para sa Kagalingan ng Kababaihan ng Angeles (KKKA). Angeles City. ____. (undated). LAKBAYON. Sipalay. Locsin, Doods. (2002). Director, DAWN Foundation, Inc. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Macayanan, Fe. (2002). Local Community Organizer, KKKA. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Angeles City, Pampanga. Madayag, Gloria. (2002). Crisis worker and president of Samahang Kabuhayan sa Mapulang Lupa. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Valenzuela City. Martine, Vicky . (2002). Crisis worker, Women’s Desk of Mapulang Lupa, Valenzuela City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Valenzuela City.

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Montilla, Oscar. (2002). Mayor, Sipalay City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Sipalay City, Negros Occidental. ____. (2000). Municipal Center for Women: An Integrated Gender-Sensitive Health Program. Innovations Magazine. ____. (undated). National Family Violence Prevention Program. Department of Social Welfare and Development. Pangan, Leticia. Board of Trustee, KKKA. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Angeles City, Pampanga. Pavillar, Marie June. (2002). Program Officer, DAWN Foundation, Inc. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Ramos, Angeles. (2002). OIC; VP, Batangas Provincial Federation of Women’s Org, Inc (BPFWOI). Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Balayan, Batangas. ____. (2002).Resolution Accepting the Project: Community Based Quick Response Team (QRT) on Domestic Violence and Reproductive Health Counselors. Escalante City. ____. (1999). QUICK Response Team. (QRT). Protective Services for Abused Children, Women and Their Families. Governor’s Workshop. Cebu City. Santes, Rita. City Social Welfare and Development Officer, Sipalay City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. Negros Occidental. ____, (undated). Socio-Economic Profile, Escalante City, Negros Occidental. ____. (undated). Terminal Report. Sipalay. Tan, Brigid. (2002). Barangay Captain, Brgy. 3, Bacolod City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc for the QRT Manual Project. Negros Occidental. Tumbaga, Letty et.al. (2003). Learning from Experience: A Study of the Bantay-Banay Project. STRIDES, Inc. and The Asia Foundation. Tumbaga, Letty et al. (2003). A Rapid Field Appraisal of Community Outcomes and Impact of the COMBAT-VAW Program. STRIDES, Inc and Harnessing Self-Reliant Initiatives and Knowledge, Inc. ____. (2001). Updated Socio-Economic Profile. City of Sipalay, Negros Occidental. Valdez, Joy. (2002). Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Bacolod City. Vengano, Gregoria. (2002). Barangay Kagawad and Crisis Worker, Barangay Mapulang Lupa, Valenzuela City. Interview by STRIDES, Inc. for the QRT Manual Project. Valenzuela City.

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