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Next round of playoffs

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TIF 101: Breaking down the process Pages 3A & 9A

Badger prepares for second round Page 1C

Teachers talk about reported ghost sightings Page 1B

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Wausau CVB leader to head chamber Search group, local business leaders widdled down candidates from 67 to 1 John Halverson jhalverson@lakegenevanews.net The search is over. The Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Commerce has a new president. His name is Darien Schaefer. Schaefer is coming from the Wausau/ Central Wisconsin Convention and Visitors Bureau, where he’s served as executive director since 2000. That group, headquartered in Wausau, promotes the surrounding area including Rib Mountain, Schofield, Rothschild and Mosinee. During his tenure there, the bureau took over the Badger State Games, and he became its executive director. His hiring was announced by John Stensland, chairman of the board for the local chamber, late last week.

“He has the drive and energy Lake Geneva needs,” Stensland told the Regional News. Schaefer grew up in Wisconsin Dells and earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Stout in Hotel and Restaurant Management. Schaefer His early work experience included stints with the Marriott Corp., which operates hotels throughout the world, and as an area director for Tharaldson Lodging overseeing 13 hotels. And Schaefer was executive director of the Janesville Area Convention and Visitors Bureau from 1998-2000. “My wife and I are very excited about

the move and I’m really excited to start,” Schaefer told the Regional News in an email. Schaefer said he was familiar with Lake Geneva, in part, because of his former job in Janesville. He is expected to start Nov. 25. Stensland A public meet-andgreet is tentatively set for Dec. 4 at the Riviera. The position of president has been vacant since May when the chamber announced the retirement of George Hennerley, who led the chamber for 33 years. Schaefer was hired after a nationwide search conducted by SearchWide, an exec-

utive recruiting firm with expertise in the hospitality business. In its report to the chamber, SearchWide identified Schaefer as a “collaborative leader” with expertise in marketing. “He views himself as an idea generator and he seems to be very creative,” the report said. “Very solid fundamentals and habits as it relates to media, public relations and creating co/op activities.” SearchWide came up with 67 “qualified candidates” from applicants and from a pool of professionals who weren’t necessarily looking for another job, Stensland said. That was honed down to 15 semi-finalists, which was reduced to five after discussions with a chamber search committee. Those five were interviewed by the committee earlier this month. PLEASE SEE CHAMBER PAGE 10A

Parking issues same, solutions varied

Trick-or-treat

How other communities solve parking woes By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net

JOHN HALVERSON/REGIONAL NEWS

CHECKING THEIR PUMPKINS. Christian, 11, and Ella, 5, dressed as Smurfs, checked out the results of their trick-or-treating adventure in downtown Lake Geneva Sunday. Crisp, but sunny weather greeted the dozens of costumed kids. Many stores handed out candy during the annual event.

Urban parking problems tend to boil down to too many cars and not enough places to put them. But not all cities reach for the same set of solutions. Lake Geneva tries to keep traffic and business, moving by limiting parking time using metered parking. Those who park here pay upfront for their time. The parking meters were never popular, and the new computerized kiosk system seems to have spawned a whole new level of distaste among some residents. A recent parking study that suggests ending two-hour free parking for residents just increased levels of parking anxiety. David Quickl, a member of the Lake Geneva Board of Park Commissioners (not to be confused with the Lake Geneva Parking Commission) suggested during a recent public hearing on the parking study that the city consider just getting rid of metered parking altogether. Quickl gave a list of cities that, in his

experience, have no metered parking: Galena, Ill.; St. Charles, Mo.; Fargo, N.D.; and Laguna Beach, Calif. Galena, St. Charles and Fargo indeed have no metered parking on their streets. Laguna Beach does have metered parking but only in high-demand areas.

Galena, Ill. Population 3,429 Mark Moran, Galena city administrator, said his city had parking meters, but removed them several years ago. “Years ago, we had meters,” Moran said. But the northwestern Illinois city did a major downtown streetscaping, returning the city’s downtown business district to its pre-20th century appearance. “It doesn’t fit with the city’s 19th century ambiance,” Moran said of the parking meters. The little city’s timeless appearance draws history buffs, antiquers and sightseers. PLEASE SEE PARKING PAGE 11A

Kwik Trip proposal going back to plan board By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net Kwik Trip’s request for a conditional use permit for properties at 612, 630 and 700 Williams St. landed on the Lake Geneva City Council’s agenda Monday, and was quickly returned to the Lake Geneva Plan Commission. The council voted 6-0 with two members excused, to kick Kwik Trip’s request back to the commission. Voting with the majority was Alderman Gary Hougen, a member of the plan commission, who voted with the majority against Kwik Trip’s conditional use application.

Two aldermen, William Mott and Sturg Taggart were excused from Monday’s meeting. At its Oct. 21 meeting, the plan commission heard Kwik Trip’s request for a conditional use permit to build a gas station/convenience store on the site. During the public hearing on the conditional use request, the commissioners also heard a line of gas station owners oppose the La Crosse-based company’s request. They argued, the use would not fit on the location selected, that the city already has nine

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gas stations and locating the Kwik Trip there would put two nearby gas stations out of business. The plan commission voted 5-2 against the request. But according to City Attorney Dan Draper, that vote did not follow procedure set down in city ordinances. He sent a memo to the city council members, advising them to refer the matter back to the plan commissioners. According to Draper’s memo, city ordinance requires the plan commission to make a written report to the council on its

findings and on its recommendations on the application for conditional use as a whole. Draper wrote the report requires findings on whether the request is in agreement with the city’s comprehensive plan. And while the commissioners voted to deny Kwik Trip’s request for a conditional use, they failed to make a formal vote to recommend the city council deny Kwik Trip’s request. “While the council might be able to take action on the matter without a proper recommendation, such action would be subject to scrutiny and vulnerable to attack in a writ of certiorari,” Draper wrote. PLEASE SEE KWIK PAGE 10A

COMING ATTRACTIONS Daylight Saving Time Clocks should be moved back an hour at 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 3

Senior Travel Club meets Nov. 1 Matheson Memorial LIbrary’s Community Room will be the site for the next meeting of the county’s Senior Travel Club, from 10 t0 11 a.m.

INDEX Editorial .....................1D Police/Court ............6-7B TV listings ...............5-6C Community .............3-5D Letters ........................2D Classifieds .................11B


2A

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

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October 31, 2013

The Regional News

3A

COUNTY REPORT

Tax Increment Financing Process

1 2

DETERMINE AREA OF NEED

CREATE THE TIF DISTRICT

ASSESS BASE VALUE

“Freeze” tax rate for properties in TIF District during life of TIF

CREATE JOINT REVIEW BOARD & TIF FUND

3

BOARD

TIF FUND

Oversees TIF District

$0.00

PROJECT PROPOSAL

Finances TIF District

CREDIT

Projects may start once proposal is approved. Money spent before revenue is collected is on credit.

REVENUE COLLECTED THROUGH PROPERTY TAXES

4

PROPERTY TAXES

TAX TIME

1 YEAR

TAX REVENUE

TIF DISTRICT BASE VALUE

TIF FUND

“Excess” tax dollars collected from the TIF properties beyond the original, “frozen” rate (tax based on original assessed worth) go into the TIF Fund to pay for TIF District projects and improvements. This “excesss” or increase is the increment.

5

LIFE OF TIF DISTRICT TIF DISTRICT LIFE UP TO 27 YEARS IN WI

INCREASED PROPERTY WORTH

INCREASED TAX REVENUE

PROPERTY WORTH TIME

6

TIF DISTRICT CLOSING

Projects completed. District lines “erased.” TIF property worth with improvements has increased, and is now part of tax base for all taxing bodies. LEFTOVER TIF FUND

New ordinance adds requirements to municipal plans By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net

HELP!

Determine worth of property at time of district creation

County tweaks TIF law

REDISTRIBUTED TO TAXING BODIES

STATE COUNTY MUNICIPALITY SCHOOLS

TIF Fund money redistributed to Taxing Bodies.

ELKHORN — Walworth County officials are critical of Tax Increment Financing (TIF) plans that are short on details, and supervisors approved an ordinance earlier this month requiring municipalities to present a better blueprint during a TIF’s inception. “It recognizes that TIF districts are suppose to be a partnership between all of the taxing bodies that participate,” Supervisor Daniel Kilkenny said of the ordinance. “As partners, we are making sure that the initial plan that gets approved has sufficient details so that all the partners understand what to expect.” The ordinance provides direction for the county’s representative on the Joint Review Board (JRB) before he or she votes creating or amending a TIF plan. “It is asking municipalities to be more specific in their project details and cost estimates,” said Jessica Conley, the county’s appointed member to the JRB. “It is requesting more detailed reporting, it is requiring me to provide municipalities with more feedback on the county’s perspective.” Before a TIF is created, it needs the blessing of the majority of the members on the JRB. Although the new guidelines require more details be provided — and could force the county’s representative to vote against the district if those details aren’t available — the county representative is only one of five votes on the JRB. The remaining 80 percent of the JRB wouldn’t be required to follow the county’s guidelines. County officials believe these meetings should provide a chance for the JRB to dive into the details of proposed TIFs and amendments. Kilkenny said some of these organizational meetings have lasted only 10 minutes. “Let’s not have 10-minute meetings that authorize expenditures of $20 mil-

TIF glossary Base value: The aggregate value, as equalized by the Department of Revenue (DOR), of the real, personal nonexempt municipal-owned property located within the TID as of the valuation date. Joint Review Board (JRB): A municipality may choose to create a JRB for each TID it creates, or one standing JRB that hears and votes on all TID creation and amendment actions. The JRB represents municipal, school, county, technical college and special districts affected by the TID. The first organizational meeting (within 14 days of public notice and before the public hearing) is to appoint a public member and select a chair, whether standing or temporary. A standing JRB will remain in existence until the municipal governing body chooses to disband it. Project Costs: Any expenditure or estimated cost to be paid for with tax increment revenue. The state does not decide on the eligibility of specific project costs. Each municipality must, in consultation with its legal and accounting advisers, decide whether a project or specific cost is eligible under TIF law. Project plan: The plan, properly submitted and approved by DOR, for the financial development or redevelopment of a TID, including all properly approved amendments. Tax Increment District (TID): The contiguous geographical area within a municipality consisting of whole units of property as assessed for general property tax purposes, not including railroad rights of way, rivers, highways, or wetlands. Tax Incremental Financing (TIF): A funding tool available to cities, villages and towns to encourage economic development that would not occur without public assistance. Value increment: The difference between the base value and the current value. This is the amount of property value that can contribute to the TIF investment. This is the portion of the tax base that is used to generate the tax increment that pays for the investment. Definitions from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue manual for TIF Districts. Graphic by Sarah Schauf

lion dollars that give total flexibility,” he said. “I would think we are being reasonable. Accountability always affects flexibility.” There are currently 15 TIF districts in Walworth County, including Genoa City’s TIF district, which is slated Kilkenny to close at the end of the year. “I think the county is just looking for more information on some of the TIF districts that are currently out there,” Conley said. “And because there is only meetings of the time of the project plan, and at the

time of a project amendment, we are trying to open up that communication.” Conley and Deputy County Administrator Nicki Andersen, who is in charge of the county’s finance department, both are critical of the amount of information provided by local municipalities when TIFs are created. “I think if we get the project plans more specific in their initial implementation going forward there is probably more likelihood that there will be more formal amendments to those plans during the 20 year life of that district,” Andersen said. “Right now, I think the plans are being written fairly general.” PLEASE SEE TIF PAGE 9A


4A

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

GENOA CITY

Genoa City bans synthetic marijuana they have a similar affect as amphetamines. The ordinance in Genoa City allows local police to issue citations for synthetic manufacturers, and they “are constantly changing the formula” to stay ahead of the marijuana use, possession, sale or distribution. U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and federal Balog said it was tailored after those regulations. adopted in other communities, including “They can change a molecule and, OK, Oak Creek. now it doesn’t meet the element that’s in He said, unlike marijuana violations, the state statutes,” said Balog. Synthetic marijuana may look like the police are not required to have the substance tested because this is a municipal real thing, but “it’s about 100 times worse,” ordinance. With he said. “Some of this stuff a local ordinance According to Balog, there are varis made with very on the books, fines ious side effects that caustic chemicals,” levied through violations — $676 — will can be experienced Genoa City Police go directly to the vilwhen using synChief Joe Balog said. lage. Also, the ordithetic marijuana, depending on the “It says right on the nance prevents busifrom selling chemical compound package, ‘Not made nesses the substance in the of the particular for human consump- village. substance that is Is synthetic marition,’ but they’re ingested. juana use a growing Some of the using it.” problem in Genoa more serious effects City? include seizures, “We’ve probably hallucinations, had five or six arrests,” Balog said. vomiting, headaches and — as in the case He added that police have been citing with the two 12-year-olds — increased people with possession of drug parapherheart rates. nalia if they’re using synthetic marijuana “It’s also been compared to the side effects from (ingesting) bath salts as well,” through a smoking device. But the main intent of the ordinance, said Balog. “These things are laced with so Balog said, is to protect people. Synthetic many different chemical compounds.” Bath salts are a designer drug that are marijuana use “is a health issue.” “I don’t want any other kids trying it. packaged to look like common bathing … The bottom line is I don’t want to see a salts, such as epsom salt. However, when bath salts are consumed drug fatality,” he said.

Police chief explains village ordinance By Steve Targo steve@lakegenevanews.net GENOA CITY — In summer 2012, an incident made Police Chief Joe Balog wish he’d proposed an ordinance to ban synthetic marijuana sooner. “When I first started, there were two 12-year-olds who got a hold of their dad’s (synthetic marijuana),” he said in an Oct. 23 phone interview. “They consumed it and they thought they were having heart attacks.” On Oct. 10, the village board adopted such an ordinance. Now, it is unlawful to have, buy, sell or trade any plant classified botanically as salvia divinorum, a.k.a. synthetic cannabis, which has a variety of street names such as K2, moon rocks or spice. Balog said although K2 looks like marijuana, it is actually intended for use as incense. “Some of this stuff is made with very caustic chemicals,” he said. “It says right on the package, ‘Not made for human consumption,’ but they’re using it.” Who? People with substance abuse problems, said Balog, those who perhaps might be attracted to the fact that it does not come up on standard drug tests. But will an ordinance stick? Balog said there are ways chemists are trying to buck the state and federal laws on synthetic marijuana. He said there are about 15 different

Say goodbye to impact fees By Steve Targo steve@lakegenevanews.net GENOA CITY — Impact fees, which developers would pay the village so it could implement various types of community improvements, are no more. On Oct. 10, two months after Village President Bill Antti brought the idea up at a pubic meeting, the village board repealed them. “It might work out for the large cities, but it doesn’t work out for the villages anymore because we don’t collect them that quick,” Antti said in an Oct. 16 phone interview. He said the village established impact fees in 1993. In 2005, according to Antti, the state created several restrictions on how they can be used. Impact fees must be designated to a specific purchase. For example, park impact fees must be used for park improvements.

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Impact fees have funded several projects in the county, including the creation of schools, parks and fire departments. Antti gave some examples, such as vehicles can’t be purchased with impact fees. He said if fees are set aside, they have to be usedwithin seven years — or give the money back if you don’t. At an Aug. 8 board meeting, Antti said there were other restrictions, such as you can’t buy a police squad car using Antti impact fees. He said the village would be better off trying to collect impact fees in an agreement with a developer. But there’s another reason Antti suggested repealing village impact fees. On Oct. 16, he said the village was scheduled to revisit its impact fee regulations. That would mean the village would have to conduct a study, which was estimated to cost about $15,000, Antti said. However, he said, times have changed. Not as many developments are being proposed now as they were in the mid 1990s. “If things go back to where development is booming, that might be another time” to revisit impact fees, Antti said. “It isn’t to the village’s benefit to have impact fees (right now).” Other communities have discussed eliminating or reducing impact fees. Recently, the village of Walworth reduced sewer impact fees by $3,000 — from $3,730 to $730. The city of Lake Geneva has also ended some impact fees.

HELP WANTED

Other ordinances On Oct. 10, the village board also adopted two other ordinances. n Loitering for the purpose of engaging in unlawful drug activities is now prohibited. Balog said this ordinance is similar to that of the city of Beloit’s, “because it was such a huge problem there.” Why? “A lot of time and energy goes into these drug investigations” and with an ordinance on the books, the village can recapture some of the costs that goes into enforcement. Balog said a fine hasn’t been set yet, but he is asking for a fine of between $1,000 to $1,200 “to hit the pocketbook and discourage” drug activities. n Winter parking regulations have been altered. Now, from Dec. 1 to April 1, people cannot park on village streets so that the road surface is clear for village employees to remove snow. This used to take effect from Nov. 1 to April 1, but “one of the biggest complaints would be, like on Nov. 3, someone will come in here with a parking ticket” to complain, said Balog. He added the amended ordinance was an attempt to “give village residents a break.” However, Balog said there is a village snow emergency ordinance in effect which states if there is more than 2 inches of snow, vehicles must be removed from village streets. This means people still may have to keep their cars off the streets “if the weather cycle changes and we start getting hammered with snow in the beginning of November,” Balog said. He urged people to pay attention to weather forecasts.

WHAT’S HAPPENING Thanksgiving dinner Nov. 7 GENEVA — Town employees and volunteers want to show how much they appreciate their friends and neighbors with a free Thanksgiving dinner Thursday, Nov. 7, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Como Community Church, W3901 Palmer Road. This will be the second year of the event, which was organized by Geneva Inspires Volunteer Effort (GIVE). A feature about GIVE and the event will appear in a future edition of the Regional News.

Learn how to become an elected official ELKHORN — An informational meeting for Walworth County Board supervisor candidates will be held Monday, Nov. 4, at 3 p.m., in County Board Room 114, Walworth County Government Center, 110 W. Walworth St., Elkhorn. The workshop format meeting is for candidates considering running in the spring of 2014 and will be conducted by Walworth County Board Chair Nancy Russell and County Administrator David Bretl. It is meant to provide an overview of county government and the time commitment likely to be required of new supervisors. The two-hour class is not a “how to” seminar on running for public office but rather a preview of what a newlyelected supervisor might expect to experience while serving on the board. In addition to outlining the wide range of services provided by county government and highlighting some of the legal rules under which supervisors must operate, the workshop will address the relationship between the county board and other elected and appointed officials, and review the proposed committee structure.

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October 31, 2013

The Regional News

5A

LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS

Brzinski wins world language award By Regional News staff GENEVA — Woods School Principal/Superintendent Ed Brzinski will receive the 2013 Anthony J. Gradisnik Award Nov. 2 at the Wisconsin Association for Language Teachers in Appleton. The award recognizes those who show enthusiasm and advocate language education in international education and early language learning, as well as those who create language education initiatives. Brzinski was nominated by Jeanine Kopecky, Woods world languages and cultures teacher. In her nomination letter, she wrote that Brzinski taught Spanish in middle school for 20 years and become an advocate for starting a world languages program at the elementary-school level. In 2012, that goal became a reality. Woods began the world languages and cultures program, which is offered to students in the K-8 district.

Kopecky charted Brzinski’s progress in establishing the program. “There was no world language program when Mr. Brzinski came to the school in 2009,” she stated. “Working without a budget for world languages, Mr. Brzinski collaborated with the (Woods) parent group to bring international awareness to the school through ethnic themes and lunches, established a before-school Spanish Amigos proBrzinski gram, invited students from the high school to give French lessons as an elective opportunity at the end of the school day for middle school students and encouraged a parent to come into classrooms to practice Spanish once a week.” Brzinski “set cultural awareness and early language learning as priorities,” Kopecky stated. He also “pioneered efforts to establish heritage language classes for native

Man arrested in Pell Lake burglary

LG Hope Walk competes in Pink Glove Dance video contest Lake Geneva Hope Walk competed in the 2013 Medline Pink Glove Dance Video Competition with the goal of winning a $25,000 donation to the Aurora Health Care Breast Treatment Assistance Program and international social media attention. The video, which was led by Linda Moritz, fitness director at Grand Geneva Well Spa, features participants dancing and wearing pink-colored exam gloves to raise awareness about the importance of early detection of breast cancer through mammograms. As part of the competition, the walk also had a goal of raising more than $15,000 for Aurora Health Care Breast Treatment Assistance Program. The video, courtesy of Firstlight Creative, Kenosha, will be posted on http://tinyurl.com/159vx2x beginning Oct. 25 where the public can go online to vote for the Lake Geneva Hope Walk video. The winners will be announced Nov. 15, with the winning team receiving a $25,000 donation in their name to the breast cancer charity of their choice. The second place winner will receive $10,000 and the

SUBMITTED

LAKE GENEVA HOPE WALK participants are competing to earn $25,000 for the Aurora Health Care Breast Treatment Assistance Program through the Medline Pink Glove Dance video competition (see article for details). Voting continues through Nov. 8. Members of the dance team are, (front, from left), Charley Rupkey, and Carter Rupkey, and (back), Chris Humphreys, Terri Humphreys, Jennifer Rupkey, Lauren Humphreys and Haley Sharp. third place winner will receive a $5,000 donation. Everyone is being asked to join the effort to win by going to http://tinyurl.com/159vx2x and voting for the Lake Geneva Hope Walk video by email once each day from Oct. 25 to Nov. 8. Donations to the Lake Geneva Hope Walk are accepted at P.O. Box 173, Lake Geneva, WI, 53147.

WHAT’S HAPPENING Sharon hosting annual turkey dinner Christ Lutheran Church, Sharon, will host its annual turkey dinner Saturday, Nov. 2, from 4 to 7 p.m. It will be served family style, all you can eat. The menu includes turkey, real mashed potatoes, gravy, stuffing, corn, squash, cranberry sauce and pie for dessert. The dinner has been taking place for more than 30 years. All the work is done by volunteers from the church, bringing together multi-generations and it strengthens everyone’s sense of community because everyone has a part. Tickets for adults are $9, children 6 to 12, $5, and those under 5 eat free. Carry outs also are available at $9.

Tour of homes begin Nov. 8 The eighth annual Holiday Tour of Homes, sponsored by the Delavan-Darien Soccer Club, has expanded to two days, Friday, Nov. 8, from 4 to 8 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Friday schedule includes cheese and crackers at the Tapavica log home and Main Street Manor, with lighted trees, cookies, cider and coffee at Delavan Comfort Suites. Halloween is the theme for the Williams Bay home of Patrick and Courtney Peyer, where Yerkes Observatory is seen and there is a secret passage, while Stan and Carolyn Logterman will feature Christmas and winter at their Geneva National home that includes viewing nature with an ensemble of windows. Main Street Bed and Breakfast, restored with many details from an 1857 drawing, features a Thanksgiving/ autumn theme. Christmas is the theme for Mike and Vicki

Spanish speakers” and helped lay the foundation for a “school-within-a-school” program for alternative education students. “Mr. Brzinski has truly set a precedent in the state with his vision, his diligence and his success in providing a comprehensive and innovative world languages and cultures program for students, reflecting the values held so dear to Mr. Anthony J. Gradisnik,” she stated. Kopecky stated that, aside from being a tireless advocate for world cultures, Brzinski “has made things happen,” starting from nothing. “My children have benefited from this program, the children of Woods School have benefited, our community has benefited, and I believe our ever more closely connected world will benefit as these children reach adulthood,” she stated. A feature about Woods’ world languages and cultures program appeared on the Aug. 30, 2012, edition of the Regional News.

Tapavica’s home that also features a glass foyer salvaged from the Lake Geneva Post Office, dating to 1926. The 100-year-old home of Doug and Debbie Cox celebrates the autumn theme, including their patio, flower beds and hand-crafted birds made by Debbie’s father. Tickets are available in advance at Community Bank CBD, Walworth State Bank at Delavan Inlet and Bradley’s Department Store. A map of the tour is included with the tickets. They cost $15. Tickets also are available at any of the stops the day of the tour. Proceeds from the tour support Delavan-Darien High School scholarships for students who played soccer.

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ELKHORN — A village of Bloomfield homeowner found a suspected burglar in his home and held him there until police arrived. Miguel A. Mora, 20, W998 Pell Lake Drive, has been charged with felony burglary. If convicted, Mora faces up to 12 1/2 years imprisonment and $25,000 in fines. According to the criminal complaint: On Sept. 28, police were dispatched to a report of a burglary in progress. When the officer walked into the home, he saw Mora lying on the floor. Mora The homeowners told police that when they returned to their house they noticed that items were out of place and doors had been opened. While one homeowner was on the phone with 911, the other heard a person moving around in a bedroom. The homeowners found a man in the bedroom, who was removing jewelry from his pockets and apologizing. One of the homeowners “escorted” Mora to the ground, and pressed his foot onto his back to prevent him from leaving. The homeowners removed jewelry and coins from Mora’s pockets. When police arrived Mora said he used a piece of wood to break a kitchen window.


6A

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

LAKE GENEVA NEWS

Balke brings color to comic book heroes By Chris Schultz cschultz@lakegenevanews.net They seem to fly and leap off the wall. Thor raising his hammer, Spiderman swinging among high-rises, Batman and Dare Devil back-to-back, a light saber-wielding Yoda, the Teenage Mutant Ninja turtles in martial arts poses. The colors pop. They make the two-dimensional art appear three-dimensional. They make the figures move. And that’s the work of Jeff Balke, a comic book colorist now living in Elkhorn. Balke and his work were brought to C. Berger Gallery, 237 Broad St., Lake Geneva, by the Lake Geneva Art Museum. The nonprofit museum organized the show, said Elizabeth Chappell, president of the museum board of directors. And gallery owner Claire Berger provided the wall space. Balke has been a professional comics color artist for the past five years. He was born in Chicago and grew up in Lindenhurst, Ill. He said he moved to Elkhorn about six years ago to be closer to family, who moved to Wisconsin about a decade ago. Balke said in a Oct. 23 interview that he plans to move to Lake Geneva. And that seems appropriate. Lake Geneva was home to Sidney Smith, who created the newspaper comic “The Gumps,” which first appeared in the Chicago Tribune in 1917. Comic artist Joe Martin, creator of “Mr. Boffo” and “Cats with Hands,” also has a home in Lake Geneva. Balke doesn’t look or act like the scrawny little ink-stained introvert-in-glasses stereotype of a comic book artist. OK, he wears glasses. But he’s a big guy with a big laugh, and he loves to talk. Balke said he’s loved drawing and doodling since he was a child. But Balke said he didn’t start collecting comics until he was 12. He remembers buying his first comic book at the newly-opened Gurney Mills mall. It was Fantastic Four number 188. In 1993, he attended his first comics convention in Chicago, where comic book publishers advertise their new titles, where comic book artists sell their work and where fans try to get a glimpse of their favorite artists or seek out the latest on their favorite superheroes. There, Balke met a superhero of sorts. Stan Lee, founder of Marvel Comics, was meeting fans and signing autographs. Balke said he put down a Spiderman comic for Lee to sign. Lee signed the book and encouraged Balke to keep being a “true believer.” Balke said that was the day he decided he wanted to work in the comic book industry. Naturally, with his love of artwork and comic books, Balke got a degree in informa-

CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS

BRINGING COMICS TO LIFE is a full-time job for Jeff Balke, professional comics color artist. Since 2007, Balke, Elkhorn, has made his living coloring the drawings of other comic book artists. His coloring work is on display and for sale at the C. Berger Gallery, 237 Broad St., Lake Geneva, until Nov. 11. tion technology and then got jobs managing retail stores. OK, that doesn’t sound right, but, said Balke, that’s what he did. During the evenings, however, he would go home and indulge in his first love, drawing comic book heroes and posting them on Myspace in the pre-Facebook Internet era. His drawing and coloring are self-taught, as is his ability with PhotoShop. Comments made of his work online made him realize his color work attracted far more interest than his black-and-white drawings. Balke said he began making contacts within the comic book industry, showing

some of his work at comic book art shows and letting it be known he was interested in breaking into the business. It’s not an easy profession to break into, he said. Comic book publishers need to know that an artist can meet deadlines and produce high-quality work within a short time, Balke said. Balke said he tried to attract the attention of the big comic book corporations, DC and Marvel. Both publishers took his submissions and made a few helpful comments, but Balke said he never heard from them again. Balke’s first real comics job came in 2005, when he took a commission to color the pages of a now-defunct “all-ages” comic called

Foxwood Falcons, published by After Hours Press. He did the work, cover-to-cover, for free. Balke said the comics were terrible. “You can’t give them away,” he said, laughing. But coloring the pages of “Foxwood Falcons” became his passport into the world of comics. His break came in 2007 while he was managing a Crate and Barrel store in the Chicago area. “Thankfully, I got fired,” Balke said. That forced him to make some life-changing moves. First, he moved to Elkhorn where his parents, Raymond and Mickey Balke, live. And then he seriously took the plunge into comics as full-time work. A company called Zenescope Entertainment gave the newcomer a shot. Balke wound up being the colorist for such books as “Charmed,” “Grimm’s Fairy Tales,” and “Urban Legends.” Balke said he’s able to color a page or a cover in about three hours. Balke attends up to 32 comics conventions across the country annually, but now he’s the professional the fans seek out. “The fans want to meet you,” Balke said. “The fans to me are number one.” Of his art on the wall at C. Berger Gallery, Balke said that the figure drawings were done by other artists. But the colors are his. About 28 individual pieces were on display last week, with another 15 or so in storage. They were selling for between $60 and $150 each, Balke said. He said he keeps good relations with his figure artists. Color artists and figure artists technically both own the artwork they produce, he said. The two groups often cross promote each other, and there are figure artists who will specifically ask that a certain color artist do their works, Balke said. Balke said he was proud to be a special guest at the ribbon cutting for Wizard World at the Nashville Comicon in the new Nashville convention center. Standing with him to help cut the ribbon were actors Lou (The Hulk) Ferrigno and Henry (Happy Days) Winkler. Also at the ribbon-cutting was the seemingly-immortal Stan Lee. Balke said that when he’s handcoloring commissioned artwork in Starbucks with his special markers, occasionally people will approach and ask, ‘Can you make a living at that?’“ Balke’s reply is an emphatic affirmative. And he doesn’t plan on slowing down. He recently completed coloring his 300th comic, and he said, he’s looking forward to doing his next 300. In addition to working for established comics publishers, Balke said he plans to bring out his own publications in January under the imprint EKO Entertainment. “I want to work into my 90s,” said Balke. “Just like Stan Lee.”

Captivated by work Elizabeth Chappell said she was captivated by Jeff Balke’s art from the first time she saw it. “When he’s in town, he likes to hang out at Starbucks and does his work there,” Chappell said of Balke. Chappell said she “appreciates” comic books, but she’s not a comic book fan. But she is a fan of Balke’s work. “It’s really colorful and you don’t need to know who the characters are to appreciate his work,” she said. As president of the board of the Lake Geneva Art Museum, Chappell offered Balke a place to show and sell his work at the C. Berger Gallery, 237 Broad St., Lake Geneva. The nonprofit museum also arranged an Oct. 26 reception for Balke to introduce him and his artwork to the area. Balke’s artwork will continue to show at the Berger Gallery until Nov. 11. Established in 2009, the Lake Geneva Art Museum is a mobile museum, Chappell said. The museum’s main address is 513 Broad St., Lake Geneva. The museum rents space at one of Lake Geneva’s art venues for its shows. Chappell said the museum has shown art at the Bootery, Pop More Corks, Lake Lawn Resort and the Baker House. The next event for the Lake Geneva Art Museum will be at Pop More Corks during Women’s Weekend, April 25-27, 2014. The museum will sponsor a Sip and Paint, at which participants will learn to paint in the styles of Monet and Van Gogh, while sipping wines from Pop More Corks, Chappell said.

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October 31, 2013

The Regional News

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8A

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

COUNTY REPORT

Crashes on decline in county By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net ELKHORN — Despite a growing population, traffic accidents in Walworth County have been declining during the past two decades, and in 2011, the most recent year the data is available, those numbers hit an all time low. In 1995, there were 2,078 crashes in Walworth County. In 2011, there were 1,183 crashes within the county limits. “The most significant trend is that the total number of crashes have been cut in half in the last 25-plus years,” Capt. Scott McClory wrote in an email. “We have made a significant reduction in total crashes in our county.” The traffic accident data dips, spikes, changes annually, and is anything but a steady decline. However, considering the county’s population has grown 15.74 percent in the past 15 years, a decrease in the number of accidents shouldn’t be taken for granted. “The decline may be attributed to safer cars, better designed roads, and (people) making conscious driverrelated decisions such as choosing seat belts, designated drivers, etc.,” McClory wrote.” Walworth Fire Chief and Police Lt. Andy Long agreed. “The cars are so much safer nowadays with air bags and other safety features. That helps a lot,” he said. McClory During the last 15 years, roughly 30 percent of the county’s crashes resulted in injuries. McClory said an injury can range from a scratch to something more serious. The injury is defined by the victim, he said. When alcohol or drugs are a factor in a crash, the number of accidents resulting in injuries is closer to 50 percent. “OWI crashes tend to be more violent, involving more than one vehicle Severt and multiple passengers, and also include some higher-risk behaviors which result in more violent crashes (no seat belt, high speed, etc),” McClory wrote in an email. Williams Bay Chief Robert Pruessing agreed that drunken drivers are more reckless. However, he also added, impaired drivers have slower reaction times to situations on the roads. If a driver doesn’t react immediately, the driver has less time to slow down, and the speed when the crash occurs is greater. So far in 2013 there have been nine fatal crashes. In 2005, there were 29 fatal crashes, a 15-year high.

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Walworth County crash statistics Year

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Total Crashes

Injury crashes

2,078 1,877 1,735 1,675 1,927 1,966 1,701 1,983 1,365 1,234 1,867 1,649 1,981 1,958 1,753 1,653 1,183 701* NA

Percent of crashes with injuries

Fatal crashes

Total OWI crashes

NA NA NA 31.2 31.6 30.3 30.0 29.8 41.1 49.6 31.5 33.0 28.4 26.4 26.4 26.7 35.4 NA NA

NA NA NA 14 20 7 14 16 19 16 29 15 11 4 14 11 19 14 9***

217 181 150 160 171 173 166 187 187 205 186 162 167 132 121 108 103 ** NA

NA NA NA 522 608 595 511 591 561 612 588 543 563 516 463 444 419 177* NA

Percent of crashes that are OWI

OWI injury crashes

NA NA NA 30.7 28.0 29.0 32.5 31.7 33.0 33.5 31.6 29.83 29.7 25.6 26.1 24.3 24.6 ** NA

171 152 142 76 91 90 88 105 121 100 92 86 84 60 50 55 42 ** NA

Percent of OWI crashes w/injuries

78.8 84.0 94.0 47.5 53.0 52.0 53.0 56.0 64.9 48.8 49.5 53 50.3 45.5 41.0 50.9 40.8 ** NA

OWI fatal crashes

8 4 16 6 9 1 6 9 4 10 14 5 4 0 3 3 7 ** NA

*Reflects records of Walworth County Sheriff’s Department only. The Wisconsin Department of Transportation has not yet released countywide numbers. **Not available yet from WI DOT. *** Year to date SOURCE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT

Looking at five year averages, the number of fatal crashes in Walworth County has also slightly decreased. Between 2012 and 2008 an average of 12.4 people were killed on Walworth County roadways. Between 2003 and 2007 that average was 18, and between 1998 and 2002 that average is 14.2. Drunken driving In the past 14 years, 38.75 percent of the fatal crashes in Walworth County involved either alcohol or drugs. Between 1995 and 2011, impaired driving was a factor in fatal crashes that claimed the lives of 109 people. However, the number of OWI-related collisions is on the decline in Walworth County. The five-year average between 2007 to 2011 is 126.2 alcohol-related crashes. The five years before that, between 2002 to 2006, there was a yearly average of 185.4 alcoholrelated crashes. Walworth Police Chief Chris Severt said he attributes this decline to improved education and increased penalties for drunken-driving offenses. “I think people understand. You’re seeing more people walking home from the bars,” Severt said. However, with OWI arrests, the recidivism rate is still high, Severt said.

“Your second, third and fourth offenders are still high,” Severt said. “But your first offenders, I think those are down.” Other trends Severt said law enforcement agencies throughout the county, and throughout the state, are taking part in the Click it or Ticket and Safe and Sober programs. He said visible enforcement of seat belt laws has resulted in more people wearing their seat belts. “With Operation Click at the high school, you’re starting to educate that age more in regards to wearing your seat belt and not texting,” he said. Operation Click is a program where students countywide sign a pledge to drive safely. The students learn about driving safely in the program. At the end of the program, students are entered into a drawing, and the winner of the drawing wins a new car. Is there more that law enforcement can be doing to keep the roadways safe? “The sheriff’s office can only do so much from the enforcement side of this equation,” McClory wrote. “We need the public’s help to call in suspected drunken drivers and we also need drivers to be more responsible in their decisions.”

COMMUNITY NOTES Breakfast seminar set for Nov. 13 The third in the series of free Breakfast and Learn sessions for small business owners or those contemplating a business start up will be Wednesday, Nov. 13, from 7:30 to 9 a.m., at Harbor Shores on Lake Geneva. Ronald “Bud” Gayhart, director of the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Small Business Development Center, will be the presenter.

The topic is “Top 10 ‘Must Know’ Issues for Small Business.” The series sponsor is the Lake Geneva Economic Development Corporation. The goal of the seminars is to assist new and growing businesses to become successful. Cosponsors for this session are Community Bank CBD and the Geneva Lake Area Chamber of Commerce. Gayhart will be available after the session to discuss individual concerns. Reservations may be

made by contacting the Association (WCHRA). chamber at (262) 248-4416. Blood donors are already winners, but the drive offers Blood drive in Elkhorn food, fun and a chance to win prizes. Share the “Gift of Life” Walk-ins are welcome but with a blood donation when appointments are encourthe BloodCenter of Wis- aged. Call (262) 723-3345 or consin conducts a drive make an appointment online Wednesday, Nov. 13, at Peo- at www.bcw.edu/Walworthples Bank, 837 N. Wisconsin CountyHRAssoc. St. in Elkhorn. from 2 to 7 p.m. Senior Travel Club The annual Commumeeting Nov. 1 nity Holiday Blood Drive is sponsored by the Walworth The Senior Travel Club of County Human Resource Walworth County will meet Friday, Nov. 1, in the Community Room of Matheson Memorial Library, Elkhorn, from 10 to 11 a.m. The program will be a musical show by Ray Knutson. Signup will continue for the December trip to the Holiday Market at the Osthoff, Elkhart Lake, on Dec. 3. Members only may sign up for the Christmas lun-

cheon at the December meeting, with a cost of $5 each person. Call Rachel at (262) 743-1555 with questions.

Geneva Lake Museum hosting Craft Show The Geneva Lake Museum will be hosting its first Craft Show on Saturday, Nov. 20 on Main Street at the Geneva Lake Museum from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., on Small Business Saturday. The museum is currently seeking for crafters/vendors for the event. It is a show for hand-crafted or vintage style items. Table space is $35 and cost is a donation to the museum. To reserve a space for this special event, contact Melinda Mitchell at thefiligreetoad@yahoo.com or contact the Geneva Lake Museum at (262) 248-6060 for more information.

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October 31, 2013

FROM PAGE 3A

TIF COVERAGE

How a TIF district works The following is an explanation on how a Tax Increment Financing District could work. The example is occurring in the fictional city of Westerly. In the city of Westerly, an abandoned, dilapidated factory is sitting on the outskirts of town. The area is blighted. The abandoned factory’s connection to water and sewer is inadequate, and the roads leading to it are in disrepair. The value of the factory is low, and, in turn, the owner pays little in taxes. A developer has plans for housing and is considering the site in Westerly, but the developer is also considering other locations within Westerly and neighboring communities. The Westerly city government creates a Tax Increment Financing District (TID) in the area of the abandoned factory. It develops a project plan, which includes razing the abandoned factory, improving the water and sewer infrastructure in the area and repairing the roads. Before the TIF is created, the base value for the TIF is established. The base value is the assessment of the abandoned factory.

The local taxing jurisdictions continue to collect taxes on the base value throughout the life of TIF. However, any taxes collected above the base value goes to projects within the TIF. The developments within the TIF must pass the “but for” test, which is “but for” these improvements the developer would have built the housing units in a different location or not at all. After the TIF is created, Westerly borrows money to pay for the improvements. The developer begins the project, which increases the property value in the area. The taxes collected on this increase in property value, or increment, is put into the TIF. The Westerly council controls the TIF. The TIF uses that increment it collects to pay back its loans for the improvements. When the loans are paid, the TIF closes. In this scenario, Westerly taxpayers benefited in three ways. The abandoned factory is gone, a new housing project is done and the community’s tax base increases, which should lower taxes throughout the community.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3A

TIF/County critical of Lake Geneva’s TIF district Conley said, in some cases, that communication doesn’t improve as the TIF district moves forward. “In the city of Lake Geneva, we have received their audit reports. However, they are not very detailed,” Conley said. “They told us they were going to get us more detailed reports. They are still working with our auditor.” Lake Geneva City Administrator Dennis Jordan said that the city is working on getting this information to the county.

“We think, from our perspective, in looking at the information that they have provided us, that it is time to close,” County Comptroller Jessica Conley said. “Without further information we can’t really see why they are looking to keep that open. We are at that point where we expect that it should be closed.”

Lake Geneva’s TIF District County officials pointed to Lake Geneva’s TIF district as one that should close. “We think, from our perspective, in looking at the information that they have provided us, that it is time to close,” Conley said. “Without further information we can’t really see why they are looking to keep that open. We are at that point where we expect that it should be closed.” Lake Geneva’s TIF district was created in the 1990s, it had a base value of about $19.6 million. Since then, the district has grown in value by $73.8 million. The county’s criticism is that Lake Geneva’s TIF district has reached its target increment. However, the city’s initial project plan includes building a parking garage, and the city hasn’t made a decision on that project. “It was amended. There was a group (of aldermen) that was trying to, I think, make sure we never got one, so they lowered the figure,” Jordan said of the parking structure line item on the TIF district budget. Jordan agreed that the parking garage was the main reason the TIF district is still open. “If it comes in at $7 million or $8 million it is the only place we are going to get the money,” Jordan said. Andersen expressed concerns that Lake Geneva believes it can make changes to its TIF plan without approval from the JRB. “The question comes down to the interpretation of the plan,” Andersen said. “It is a little general in some areas, and I think the city of Lake Geneva believes that it can approve an additional project out of there without making a formal amendment.” Jordan said when the TIF was created, some of the plan placed funds in undesignated reserves. “When that was done in 1996, (the Lake Geneva City Council) didn’t have a clear idea on what might be coming down the pike,” Jordan said. “They had certain projects, but they knew there were a lot of things that could be done to improve blight and to improve transportation.” Lake Geneva, Jordan said, placed funds in undesignated reserves to fund future projects that would alleviate blight or help relieve downtown congestion. “I think people can appreciate back then, there was a lot to do, some things came up earlier like (the Edwards Boulevard extension),” Jordan said. “I think nobody can argue that has helped alleviate downtown traffic to a degree. I think they just have to look at it from a different perspective.” County officials said that loose project plans have allowed municipalities to change TIF plans years after they are created without having formal amendments. “We would like to have the initial plan more specific. If we are talking road construction which roads or which segments of roads,” Andersen said.

Conley added that “lots of times there is enough flexibility in these project plans that they can add things without it coming back for an amendment.” Other times, the lack of details and time provided to review the plans has pushed the county to say no, when it may have supported an amendment. “The village of Fontana, when we did vote no against that most recent amendment, I think we wanted to vote yes, but (voted no) because we didn’t have enough time in order to make suggestions or minor changes,” Conley said.

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The ‘but for’ test Kilkenny said he isn’t opposed to TIF districts. “I am no more against TIF districts than I am against sanitary districts, school districts, drainage districts, business districts,” he said. “It is how they are set up and run and whether they are accountable.” However, he is concerned that the municipalities aren’t using the “but for test” fairly. The “but for test” states that TIF funds can only be used if the project wouldn’t have occurred “but for” the TIF. Kilkenny pointed to Delavan’s TIF district, which includes a portion of the strip mall along Highway 50, as an example of a district that was approved with a questionable use of the “but for” test. “The Chili’s (restaurant) is in the TIF district, and it was already owned by Chili’s before it was in the TIF district,” Kilkenny said. “I have an article that states Lowe’s is chomping at the bit and can’t wait to come to Delavan.” He said he doesn’t believe the TIF district enticed the developers of Lowe’s or Chili’s to come to the community. “I think that is all stretches,” he said. “If you look at what Lowe’s and other people paid, they paid market value, so that didn’t induce them to come. Did it induce the developer to offer it for sale? I think the market did.”

CITY OF LAKE GENEVA REMINDER NOTICE WINTER PARKING RESTRICTIONS From November 15 through March 31 of the following year, vehicles may not park between the hours of 2:00 A.M. - 6:00 A.M. on any City street and year around from 3:00 A.M. - 6:00 A.M. downtown. No vehicle may be left parked on any City street for a period of time longer than 24 consecutive hours. Vehicles may not park on the street until the snow has been plowed to the curb line. Signs have also been erected, prohibiting parking on certain streets to facilitate snow removal. Vehicles parked in violation of these regulations may be ticketed by the police and may also be towed away during snow and ice control operations. SNOW REMOVAL FROM SIDEWALKS WITHIN 24 HOURS OR LESS AFTER STORMS All properties with public sidewalks are required by City Ordinance to remove the snow within 24 hours of the end of a snow storm. In consideration for the welfare of the walking public, everybody is asked to cooperate and see to it their sidewalk is shoveled and in a timely manner. Safe sidewalks are a priority for our Mayor and City Council. We will therefore be monitoring the City sidewalks for compliance. If your sidewalk isn't cleared within a few days of the end of the snow storm, we will arrange for a private contractor to remove the snow and/or any ice build-up, and invoice you at double the contractor's cost. Persons physically disabled/restricted that cannot afford to clear their public walk may contact City Hall (248-3673) for possible volunteer assistance. Keeping the sidewalks safe for pedestrians requires everybody's assistance and cooperation. If you have any questions, please contact either City Hall at 262-248-3673 or this office. Daniel S. Winkler, P.E. Director of Public Works & Utilities 262-248-2311

The Regional News

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The Regional News

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LAKE GENEVA NEWS

One killed in crash on Highway 50 At deadline, an investigation was continuing into a crash that killed one person at the intersection of Highway 50 and Town Hall Road in the town of Delavan early Tuesday morning, according to a press release from the Town of Delavan Police Department. Around 4:26 a.m. town of Delavan officers received a report of a vehicle traveling west at a high rate of speed on Highway 50 near Highway 12 in Lake Geneva. A town of Delavan officer saw a vehicle speed through the intersection of highways 50 and 67. The vehicle was moving fast enough that it was out of the officer’s sight before the officer could turn around and follow, the press release said. At about 4:32 a.m., the vehicle ran off the road and crashed on Highway 50 near County Highway F in the town of Delavan. The vehicle hit a utility pole and several trees before coming to rest in the Walworth State Bank parking lot. No other vehicles or property were damaged at the crash scene, police reported. The sole occupant found in the vehicle was dead at the scene, police said. While the investigation was still in progress, speed was listed by police as a factor in the accident. The name of victim is being withheld pending notification of family.

Community notice Hartshorne memorial service planned Members of the Hartshone family invite the public to a celebration of life for Harry Hartshorne. Hartshorne died on Monday, Oct. 28. Sarah Hill, Lake Geneva alderwoman, called Hartshorne “a pillar of the community.” A memorial service will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Church of the Holy Communion, 320 Broad St., Lake Geneva. Following the memorial service, a celebration of life will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Horticultural Hall, 330 Broad St. Both the celebration and memorial service are open to all. In lieu of flowers, family members request guests contact the Steinke Funeral Home at (262) 248-2320 for charitable donation information.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

Chamber/Committee interviewed finalists The two finalists were interviewed again over a twoday period. Members of that committee were Stensland, who operates the Martin Group, Tammie Carstensen, general manager of Harbor Shores, Tom Hartz, owner of Simple Café, Steven J. Lois of Edward Jones Investment and Tom Hyslop, director of sales and marketing at Lake Lawn Resort. Also assisting was Kevin Fleming, head of the chamber’s retail committee and owner of Flemings. Stensland said the selection committee met Schaefer in a variety of settings including on a boat tour of Geneva Lake. The group was selected for its mix of personalities as well as their work experience, Stensland said. Schaefer’s affiliation with the Badger Games and his experience in working in a resort-oriented location like Wausau were seen as pluses that could be adapted to Lake Geneva, committee members said. The chamber and visitors bureau have made it known

that they’d like to help turn Lake Geneva into more of a year-round attraction. On its website, the Wausau Central Wisconsin Convention and Visitors Bureau promises “four seasons of outdoor recreation, a thriving arts community, entertaining festivals and events, diverse shopping and dining.” The bureau purchased the Badger State Games two months after the Wisconsin Sports Development Corporation announced the end of the Olympic-style games. And in 2011, readers of Wisconsin Trails magazine named Wausau the “Best Town for Outdoor Activities” in Wisconsin. The selection committee was also impressed with Schaefer’s analysis of the Chamber’s current budget. One of his references said he was “Good with crunching numbers.” Schaefer is also expected to help update the local chamber’s footprint in new media including the development of a Facebook page.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A

Kwik/Church looked at property a year ago “It simply makes sense to provide the opportunity to the plan commission to make a proper record and recommendation since they conducted the public hearing,” he added. Meanwhile, the council heard a few new comments about the Kwik Trip conditional use application during public comments. Two former council members spoke on the subject, one for and one against. Mary Jo Fesenmaier argued that the council should go ahead and reject Kwik Trip’s application. Fesenmaier said an earlier city council looked at that area as a development zone and planned to create a fifth tax increment finance (TIF) district at that section of Williams Street to encourage redevelopment. Tom Hartz, who owns Simple Café, 525 Broad St., said he believes the plan commission was in error to vote against the Kwik Trip conditional use request. “When we proposed our restaurant, nobody came forward and said ‘oh no, not another restaurant,’” Hartz said. Hartz said there are four restaurants within a block of his. They compete regularly among themselves and with all of the other restaurants in the city. “More businesses means better products and that makes Lake Geneva more attractive,” Hartz said. “My dream is that people will come to Lake Geneva, and only at the end of the day do they discover there’s a lake here.” Hartz said the gas stations in the area are well-run and well-maintained. He said he expects that those businesses near the pro-

“More businesses means better products and that makes Lake Geneva more attractive,” Simple owner Tom Hartz said. “My dream is that people will come to Lake Geneva, and only at the end of the day do they discover there’s a lake here.” posed Kwik Trip would survive and prosper. However, failure is always a risk in business, he added. Also at the meeting was Ned Sutherland. Sutherland, a member of Anchor Covenant Church, came to the city about a year ago and asked that the former Arrow Products building and its grounds at 630 Williams St. be rezoned as a planned unit development for a church. Sutherland told the council members that it was only later that the church elders realized that the cost of rehabilitating the old building would be prohibitive. Anchor will have a new permanent church building in the old Immanuel Lutheran Church building, after the Immanuel congregation moves to its new church on the south side of the city. Sutherland said he was disappointed to hear that the city plan commission had “turned down a chance to raze three old buildings” and replace it with a new $3 million business. Commissioners voting against Kwik Trip’s request were Kristen Olson, Cindy Flowers, Brian Poetzinger, John Gibbs and Hougen. Voting for were Doug Skates and Mayor Jim Connors.

CITY OF LAKE GENEVA RIVIERA SIDEWALK REPLACEMENT & 2014 SIDEWALK REPLACEMENT MISCELLANEOUS PROJECT NO. TST-13-04

LAKE GENEVA FIRE DEPARTMENT VEHICLE EXHAUST REMOVAL SYSTEM 730 MARSHALL STREET PROJECT NO. GBG-13-04

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

OFFICIAL NOTICE TO BIDDERS

OFFICIAL NOTICE TO BIDDERS

Sealed proposals will be accepted by the City of Lake Geneva in the City Clerk's office at 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, until Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. to remove and replace sidewalk, at the Riviera and various locations within the City of Lake Geneva, WI. GENERAL: Proposals must be sealed and submitted on the attached proposal form and returned clearly marked with date and time of opening. No undated, unsigned, or faxed proposals will be considered. Bid documents are available by calling the office of the Director of Public Works & Utilities, 262-248-2311, for pick-up at the Lake Geneva Utility Commission, 361 West Main Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Copies of bidding documents are available for viewing at the Commission's main offices or at the City Clerk's office, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Bidders shall complete the enclosed insurance questionnaire with proposal. Requirements are; Contractor shall furnish evidence of Workers Compensation, public liability and property damage insurance. Limits of insurance shall be as follows: Minimum amounts of $1,000,000 bodily injury and $1,000,000 property damage including both injury and property damage caused by vehicles and machinery. Successful bidder shall properly hold the City of Lake Geneva harmless from all damages occurring in any way by his acts or negligence, or that of his employees, agents or workers. A current Certificate of Insurance will be required of the successful vendor. LEGAL PROVISIONS: Letting of the work described herein is subject to the provisions of Sections 62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of the Wisconsin State Statutes and all applicable local, state and federal requirements pertaining to public works projects. PREVAILING WAGE RATES: This public works project is subject to the Wisconsin State Statutes which requires all Contractors and Subcontractors to comply with the prevailing wage rates, hours of labor and hourly basic pay rates in all trades contemplated as determined by the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development (DWD) for a single trade project with a total of $48,000 or more or a multiple-trade project total cost of $100,000 or more. Based upon the City's estimate of probable costs, the project cost is less than these thresholds. Therefore, compliance with a prevailing wage rate determination by the DWD is not required. If a Special Order of the Department of Workforce Development is required, it shall be obtained by the City and included in the final contract. The Contractor would then be obligated to compensate his workers per the order. BID REJECTION / ACCEPTANCE: The City of Lake Geneva reserves the right to accept the lowest responsible bid. The acceptance or rejection of any bid submitted is final and binding on all bidders without recourse by rejected bidders against the City. No Bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening of the Bids without the consent of the City. Published by authority of the City of Lake Geneva. BY ORDER OF :

JAMES CONNORS, MAYOR ARTIS ROESPIES, ACTING CITY CLERK

PREPARED BY:

DANIEL S. WINKLER, P.E. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES CITY OF LAKE GENEVA & LAKE GENEVA UTILITY COMMISSION 361 W. MAIN STREET LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147 (T) (262) 248-231

Sealed proposals will be accepted by the City of Lake Geneva in the City Clerk's office at 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, until Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. to provide and install a vehicle exhaust removal system in accordance with the attached plans and specifications, at the Lake Geneva Fire Department, 730 Marshall Street, Lake Geneva, WI. GENERAL: Proposals must be sealed and submitted on the attached proposal form and returned clearly marked with date and time of opening. No undated, unsigned, or faxed proposals will be considered. Bid documents are available by calling the office of the Director of Public Works & Utilities, 262-248-2311, for pickup at the Lake Geneva Utility Commission, 361 West Main Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Copies of bidding documents are available for viewing at the Commission's main offices or at the City Clerk's office, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Contractors may visit the Main Fire Station by appointment (262-248-6075). Bidders shall complete the enclosed insurance questionnaire with proposal. Requirements are; Contractor shall furnish evidence of Workers Compensation, public liability and property damage insurance. Limits of insurance shall be as follows: Minimum amounts of $1,000,000 bodily injury and $1,000,000 property damage including both injury and property damage caused by vehicles and machinery. Successful bidder shall properly hold the City of Lake Geneva harmless from all damages occurring in any way by his acts or negligence, or that of his employees, agents or workers. A current Certificate of Insurance will be required of the successful vendor. LEGAL PROVISIONS: Letting of the work described herein is subject to the provisions of Sections 62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of the Wisconsin State Statutes and all applicable local, state and federal requirements pertaining to public works projects. PREVAILING WAGE RATES: This public works project is subject to the Wisconsin State Statutes which requires all Contractors and Subcontractors to comply with the prevailing wage rates, hours of labor and hourly basic pay rates in all trades contemplated as determined by the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development (DWD) for a single trade project with a total of $48,000 or more or a multiple-trade project total cost of $100,000 or more. Based upon the City's estimate of probable costs, the project cost is less than these thresholds. Therefore, compliance with a prevailing wage rate determination by the DWD is not required. If a Special Order of the Department of Workforce Development is required, it shall be obtained by the City and included in the final contract. The Contractor would then be obligated to compensate his workers per the order. BID SECURITY: No Bid shall be received unless accompanied by a Certified Check, Bid Bond, Cashier's Check or Money Order equal to at least 5% of the total Bid, payable to the City of Lake Geneva as a guarantee that if his Bid is accepted, the Contractor will execute and file the Contract and the Insurance Certificates that are required by the Contract Documents within the time limit set by the City. CONTRACT SECURITY: Based upon the City of Lake Geneva's estimate of probable costs for this project being less than the thresholds for requiring the Contractor to pay prevailing wage rates, the requirements for the Contractor to provide performance and payment bonds is waived. BID REJECTION / ACCEPTANCE: The City of Lake Geneva reserves the right to accept the lowest responsible bid including or excluding bid alternates, at its discretion. The acceptance or rejection of any bid submitted is final and binding on all bidders without recourse by rejected bidders against the City. No Bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days after the opening of the Bids without the consent of the City. Published by authority of the City of Lake Geneva. BY ORDER OF:

JAMES CONNORS, MAYOR ARTIS ROESPIES, ACTING CITY CLERK

PREPARED BY:

DANIEL S. WINKLER, P.E. DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS & UTILITIES CITY OF LAKE GENEVA & LAKE GENEVA UTILITY COMMISSION 361 W. MAIN STREET LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147 (T) (262) 248-2311


October 31, 2013

The Regional News

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FROM PAGE 1A

Parking: Meters are illegal in North Dakota Parking users are kept moving on Main Street in Galena with a three-hour time limit, Moran said. However, the city does have some free lots, as well as paid lots to try to take some of the parking burden off the city streets. The city’s narrow streets, designed more for horse-and-buggy than horseless carriage, supports mostly parallel parking. That means fewer cars can park per city block than if the city could arrange angle parking. “We feel like we never had enough parking,” said Moran. Like Lake Geneva, during the offseason, Galena has a surplus of parking. but during the peak summer tourist season and during its three annual festivals, Galena’s population can temporarily swell to about 15,000, Moran said. There are three city parking lots in the downtown and another lot across the river. Private parking also helps takes the demand off the street, Moran said. The downtown DeSoto Hotel has a private parking structure open only to hotel guests and a few businesses that lease space there, he said. Two private parking lots are open to general parking and soak up some demand, Moran said. The private lots charge $10 for all-day parking. However, the owners of the lots also own a restaurant. Restaurant customers receive a voucher that reduces or even eliminates the parking charge, he said. Only one of Galena’s public lots charges, $5 a day and $1 an hour, Moran said. The two free downtown lots limit parking to three hours. Parking enforcement is done by a parttime parking control officer in the Galena Police Department, said Galena Police Chief Lori Huntington. Full-time police officers assist in parking enforcement, she said. Parking tickets are $15, Moran said. And that’s a major source of parking system revenue, he said. Moran said the system does generate enough to support itself. However, the city’s parking enforcement is done diplomatically. “Our downtown gets parkedup and sometimes it’s hard to follow the parking rules,” Moran said. A first violation earns warning ticket only. “That warning ticket has really helped,” Moran said. “There’s nothing like a parking ticket to scare people away.” Galena is also scheduled to become an Amtrak stop in 2015. Moran said he hopes that means more people will leave their cars behind and visit Galena via Amtrak. Although Galena abandoned a city-subsidized shuttle service several years ago because of costs, with the new Amtrak station, a shuttle service will make sense again, Moran said. And this time, the city may charge a nominal fee to use the shuttle. Moran said Galena has done no parking studies.

St. Charles, Mo. Population 65,794 St. Charles, in eastern Missouri, has found other ways to handle its parking population without resorting to meters, said Debra Aylsworth, director of public works. Aylsworth said that in her 15 years as a city employee, the city has not had metered parking. It also has other ways to pay for its parking system that may not be available in other states. The city has areas with designated twohour limit parking, but parking is largely unregulated, she said. “We have plenty of parking available,” Aylsworth said. Even at peak times, the city’s downtown business parking is usually at just 76 percent capacity, Aylsworth said. Some city streets, especially those near businesses, are time-limited, Aylsworth said. In addition, St. Charles has a parking lot adjacent to city hall and, in the business

district, a parking garage with 420 spaces spread out over three levels. Parking there costs $2 for all-day parking between 7 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Next year St. Charles will borrow $3 million for repairs to its 45-year-old parking garage, Aylesworth said. Aylsworth said the city finances its parking through its share of a county gas, road and bridge tax. St. Charles also imposes a half percent sales tax to helps fund parking, Aylsworth said.

Fargo, N.D. Population 105,500 Fargo, North Dakota’s largest city, has no metered parking because parking meters are illegal on North Dakota’s public rights of way, said Joe Nigg, a Fargo city planner. That’s right, parking meters on city streets are forbidden by state law in North Dakota. However, that doesn’t make Fargo a parking paradise, said Nigg. The city is in eastern North Dakota, on the border with Minnesota. “We have trouble handling downtown parking,” said Nigg. North Dakota’s growing petroleum industry is fueling population growth in Fargo, and finding new parking is difficult, he said. North Dakota’s anti-parking meter law has a long, convoluted history, Nigg said. What it boils down to is, North Dakota doesn’t have many large cities, and people in small towns don’t like to pay for parking, Nigg said. Told about Lake Geneva’s kiosk parking system, Nigg replied: “That’s where we need to be.” Told that the system is unpopular here, he replied: “You’re never going to make everyone happy, no matter what you do.” On-street, parking is timed. The time limits keep the traffic moving and prevents people from hogging parking spaces in the downtown business district all day. What’s more, at the end of the three hours, a person can’t just move down the block. To restart the three-hour parking, the car has to be moved to an entirely different block, Nigg said. A diagram on the Fargo website explains how that works. However, explaining the rules on the street can get complex, and it adds to the sign clutter downtown, Nigg said. If state law were changed, metered parking would help Fargo deal with limited-term parking without all of the misunderstanding, he said. Fargo has two parking structures, a three-level ramp near city hall with 250 spaces and a four-level ramp with 400 spaces on the southern fringe of the downtown area, Nigg said. What parking meters Fargo has are in that ramp, although all 20 of them will be torn out, because the demand for short-term parking there wasn’t that great. The spaces will then be rented out monthly like many of the other spaces in the ramp, said Nigg. In the downtown, residential parking permits are issued to qualifying residents. Permit fees are $25 a month, he said. The city also issues service vehicle permits for those mobile businesses that have to park near a work site, such as building contractors, pest control and locksmiths. Those permit fees vary, Nigg said. Fargo completed a parking study in 2012.

Laguna Beach, Calif. Population 22,723 Steve May, Laguna Beach director of public works, said the city has about 2,000 parking meters in its central business district and along the coastal highway. The city has had meters for about 30 years, he said. Rates are $1.25 an hour and some are $2 an hour. However, starting next July 1, the $1.25 meters will jump to $1.50 an hour, May said. Most of the meters are three hours maximum, some are one hour and some are 10 hours. Laguna Beach, a southwestern California coastal city and vacation destination, also uses off-street lots and a parking structure to handle parking.

“We’re in a continual process of study,” Steve May, Laguna Beach director of public works, said. “We’re looking at all different options for our parking system.” The city also has a remote parking lot and uses shuttles to bring visitors into the business district, May said. During city festivals, the city runs a free trolley service from there. The city also has two surface lots, one which charges $1.50 an hour. Another near the beach, charges $3 an hour. The city parking structure charges $1.50 an hour. Most downtown and city parking is controlled with permits. The city issues permits for shoppers, seniors, downtown residents and downtown business owners. Those permits cost about $30 a month, May said. The parking system has no problem paying for itself, in fact, the parking fund produces an overage of about $2 million a year, which goes to the general fund, May said. The city is also looking at building a new parking structure to supplement its existing garage. May said the estimated cost of a new multi-level structure is $40,000 per space. He said the new structure may not be as big as the city’s existing 30-year-old garage, but it will be at a different location. If there is a problem with Laguna Beach parking, it’s one that Lake Geneva residents might recognize. Parking meters along the beach area pushes beach users into the residential neighborhoods nearby. Parking in residential areas is free, May said. The encroachment by beachgoers into the residential areas has had neighbors asking the city to impose a permit parking system for residential areas. That problem is part of a parking study now in progress with the city of Laguna

FILE PHOTO/REGIONAL NEWS

IN FARGO, a parking kiosk like the ones in Lake Geneva would be illegal. However, at least one city official there said it would help with the city’s parking problems. Beach. In fact, the parking study process there never really ends. “We’re in a continual process of study,” May said. “We’re looking at all different options for our parking system.” The latest proposal being studied is demand pricing for parking, which would vary a space’s hourly cost depending on season and time of day, he said. At the close of interviews with the city officials in Galena and Fargo, however, those officials said that a parking problem is a good one to have. “It means there’s demand for downtown businesses,” said Fargo’s Joe Nigg. “An over-demand for parking is a problem every city should be happy to have.” “That’s an issue a city should be happy to have,” Galena’s Mark Moran also said. “It means you have a demand.”


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The Regional News

October 31, 2013

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Geneva Lake West Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Thursday, October 31, 2013 Serving Walworth, Fontana, Williams Bay and Walworth County

A Halloween story

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Big Foot dips into fund balance By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net

Things that go bump in the hallways PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH SCHAUF/REGIONAL NEWS

LINDA VAUGHN said her granddaughter was playing with blocks in her classroom when she saw a ghost. Vaughn’s granddaughter said the ghost patted her on her head and walked away.

Paranormal activities reported by teachers, administrators, at elementary school By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net WALWORTH — “No one else was here.” Linda Vaughn, a teacher at Walworth Elementary School, begins her ghost story like most scary stories start. “About seven and a half years ago, my husband and I came to school on a Sunday afternoon,” she said. “We were moving desks around. We had brought my 2 1/2 year old granddaughter with us. I set her up playing blocks.” Vaughn said she was at the school for only about an hour. “When we left, I got into the back seat with my granddaughter,” she said. “All of the sudden, my husband and I were talking about other things, and Hannah looked at me. She said, ‘Nama, that man at the school hit me on the head like this. Bonk.’” Vaughn said her granddaughter put her hand up to her own head where she’d been hit. “She made the gesture like an adult had patted her on the head,” Vaughn said of her granddaughter. “I said, ‘honey, there was no man at the school.’ She said, ‘Uh huh. The man at the school hit me on the head like this.’” Vaughn asked her granddaughter more about the man who had hit her. “Hannah said, ‘With you and granpy,’ and that she was playing with the blocks,” Vaughn said. “I asked if he was a good man or a bad man, and she said he was a good man.” Vaughn said she stopped asking questions about Hannah’s visit with the man, but her granddaughter wanted to keep talking about it. “The man at the school was waiting for you to come to the school, Hannah said to me,” she said. “I got big goose bumps. That little girl, she couldn’t have made that up. Hannah told me the man left the classroom after he hit her on the head.” Vaughn thinks her granddaughter actually saw a ghost at the school. “She saw something,” she said. “She brought it up when we weren’t even talking about the school. We had gotten maybe a mile out of Walworth. That look just came over her eyes like she was dazed and kind of thinking back to relate to me what had taken place.” Vaughn’s granddaughter, Hannah, is 10 years old, now. “There are times when you’re here alone (at the school) when you feel something, but it could be because we know all the stories,” she said. “It could be that we psych ourselves out.” Is the school haunted? “I’ve seen the ghost,” District Administrator Pam Knorr

said. “It was way early in the morning, around 4 a.m., when (Police Chief) Chris Severt and I were here checking the building after an alarm went off. I saw this shiny, shimmery object, and I told Chris, ‘I’m not going down (into the storage area).’” Knorr, who has been on medical leave since Oct. 4, shared her ghost story earlier this year. Currently, Principal Pam Larson is acting as interim district administrator in place of Knorr, and teacher Brent Wilson is acting principal. Larson said the ghost plays with her office supplies. PLEASE SEE GHOST PAGE 3B

WALWORTH — When Big Foot School Board members approached the budget for the 2013-14 school year, they wanted to have a little more wiggle room. In April, residents denied a referendum to allow the district to exceed its state-imposed levy limit. After the vote failed, the board had to cut from nearly every department in the school. The district will levy the maximum amount allowed by state law, which is an increase of $133,453 from last year. Last year, the property tax rate was $3.20 per $1,000 of assessed value. This year, it is $3.37 per $1,000 of assessed value. This means, a property owner will pay $337 per $100,000 of assessed value, about $17 more than last year. The district includes the villages of Walworth, Fontana and Sharon, and part of the towns of Delavan, Linn, Sharon and Walworth. Big Foot’s budget could only be balanced by using money from fund balance in four accounts to cover operating costs. The fund balance is typically saved as an emergency expense account for the district and used to secure lower loan ratings. Part of the total tax revenue of $7.8 million is for the community service fund which funds the recreation department. The state mandated a levy freeze on the community service fund, and the district’s levy for recreation will remain at $363,750. This spring, the district will make its last debt payment on the school renovations, and next year’s budget will see a reduction in debt service funding. PLEASE SEE BIG FOOT PAGE 3B

School raises taxes slightly By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH SCHAUF/REGIONAL NEWS

GHOSTS AT SCHOOL. Walworth Elementary School teachers have seen, heard or felt the presence of ghosts at the school.

FONTANA — Property owners in the Fontana School District will pay a slightly higher tax rate this year. Because of a slight increase in the levy limit and falling property values, the property tax rate will increase from $2.53 to $2.58 per $1,000 of assessed value to cover the additional levy of $14,406. If property values had not dropped, the same $100,000 house owner would pay about $6 more in taxes this year. This year, a home valued at $100,000 will pay about $258 in property taxes to the district. The district is one of several taxing bodies. Property values in the district have dropped about $27 million in the past year. The school district includes the village of Fontana and parts of the towns of Walworth and Delavan. During its annual board meeting, the school board approved a total budget of more than $3.6 million, about $200,000 more than last year’s budget. Board President Joe McHugh said McHugh the district is going in the right direction and has the support of the community. “I’ll just say that we’re doing good things here in Fontana,” he said. “Our scores are up, and we’re on the right track.” Property tax revenue will cover about 84 percent of the total budget. Revenue from other sources, including state aid, district to district transfers and student fees, will cover the remaining balance. Part of the district’s levy includes coverage for a community service fund. PLEASE SEE FONTANA PAGE 2B

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2B

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

GENEVA LAKE WEST

Gas stations have concerns with plan WALWORTH — Most conversations about the DOT’s plans for Highway 14 include the school and village boards. The school board has circulated petitions, written letters to elected officials and considered hiring a lobbyist to persuade the DOT to keep the highway away from the school. The village board has agreed to the DOT’s plan, though the board voted at least once that the preferred option was to have the highway bypass the village. There are more than those two voices in the fight, though. Melonie Blazier, a clerk at the Citgo gas station on Main Street in Walworth, said the DOT’s plan to route the highway closer to the school has pros and cons. “I understand that it is going to be close to the schoolhouse,” she said in a phone interview Oct. 28. “If the highway bypasses Walworth, every small business here, which is the majority of the town, will go belly up.” Blazier’s daughter currently attends Walworth Elementary School, whose administration has fought against proposed changes to the highway since 2009. “I own a home right down the road, and my daughter has been going to that school since she was 3 years old,” she said. “I do have concerns about it being close to the school, but I am also concerned about the business owners and the community going belly up.”

Area School Budgets

ES

By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net

$40,000 $ 36,

$35,000 Cost Per Student (Dollars)

Kenosha St.

222

$30,000 $25,000 $20,000 23 $16 ,

5

20 $16 ,

05 $19 ,

1 9 $10 ,7

$10,000

8

3 74 $11,7

Average WI District (2011)

Walworth Elementary

Sharon Elementary

Reek Elementary

Fontana Elementary

SOURCE: EREPUBLIC, SCHOOL BUDGET SUMMARIES

Big Foot High School

$5,000 $0

SARAH SCHAUF/REGIONAL NEWS

Teachers judged on effectiveness

cost per student

$15,000

WISCONSIN DOT-APPROVED HIGHWAY 14 PLAN

Main St.

Blazier said she worries about her own job if through-traffic was routed around the village on a highway bypass. “If they bypass us, we’re going to be a dead town,” she said. The owner of the Citgo station was not available for comment. Mohan Singh, who owns the BP station next to the Citgo on Main Street, is worried, too. “We will see reduced customers if the proposed change occurs,” he said. The plan creates a dead end street at the current intersection of Kenosha and Main streets. Singh said his gas station attracts customers from both highways 67 and 14 right now. “With the change, with that dead end, we will only get customers from one of the highways,” he said. “The intersection will also be farther away from the business, reducing customer traffic.” When the Regional News attempted to call Sammy’s restaurant, owners refused to comment. One of the proposed DOT plans would have eliminated angle parking in front of Sammy’s restaurant and reduced other parking available around the square to widen the turn lanes. To see photos of previously proposed highway plans through the village of Walworth and the approved plan, see this story online at www.lakegenevanews.net under Geneva Lake West.

By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net

SARAH SCHAUF/REGIONAL NEWS

WALWORTH — Under a new state mandate, Big Foot High School teachers will be judged on effectiveness. To start the effectiveness project, District Administrator Dorothy Kaufmann said all teachers will go through a training program this year. “It’s something that’s going to be required,” she said. “Everything goes into effect Sept. 1 next year.” Kaufmann said there are two training programs available, and a grant from the state will pay for the training. “There are two programs, one from the DPI ... and one from CESA 6,” she said. CESA stands for Cooperative Educational Service Agency, and the state is divided into 12 differ-

Skilled Nursing Care and Short-Term Rehabilitation Services

ent agencies. Big Foot is in CESA 2. According to the CESA 2 website, the agency acts as a liaison between school districts, the DPI and the federal Department of Education. Funding for the agency is split between the state and each supporting school district. Kaufmann said the CESA 6 training is approved by the state, and costs will be covered by the grant. “The cost is $80 per person trained, whichever model we use,” she said. “They give us the $80 per person and we give it right back (to the state). There is no out-of-pocket cost to the district for the training.”

In other news Referendum decision Big Foot board members plan to attend school board meetings at each of the four feeder elementary schools that send students to Big Foot. Board member Sue Pruessing said the board needed to decide soon if they wanted to add a referendum question on the

April ballot. The board has considered revising the failed referendum from the April 2013 ballot, which lost by 17 votes, to cover operational costs of the building. See a related story on the 2013-14 Big Foot budget on page 1B. Student achievement Principal Mike Hinske said he will be at the National FFA Convention this weekend where several Big Foot students will present research projects. Hinske said Big Foot’s FFA program has always done well in the past, and he expects the group to receive major recognition. Kaufmann congratulated all the student athletes for fall sports. She said the students’ work ethic on the team and in the classroom reflects well on the school. “We had a great fall season,” she said. “The boys cross country team is the conference champion for the first time since 2006. The girls finished second in conference ... football, our boys are conference champs for the seventh consecutive year.”

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

Fontana/Board approves salaries Mary Coss, district business manager, said this fund covers salaries for day care service. Coss said the state froze the amount districts can levy for this fund. “Our fund 80 is primarily a day care,” she said. “It’s funded through the taxpayer levy but also through the fees from parents who have their kids stay.” Coss said the funds in that account go only to the salary and benefits for the day care supervisor. The board also approved board salaries for themselves of $1,000. “I see no reason to increase that amount,” McHugh said. “It hasn’t changed in several years.”

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October 31, 2013

The Regional News

3B

GENEVA LAKE WEST

Fontana restructuring management By Jade Bolack JBolack@lakegenevanews.net FONTANA — It’s been two and a half weeks since Village Administrator Kelly Hayden resigned. The village board has a tentative plan to temporarily fill her position. Village President Arvid “Pete” Petersen said the board directed Village Attorney Dale Thorpe to draw up contracts for three separate positions — for an interim administrator, an interim treasurer and for Hayden. Petersen said Hayden is willing to help the village on a consulting basis after she leaves in early December. “Dale (Thorpe) is going to write up contracts for those positions, and the board will review them,” Petersen said.

“Nothing was offihe said. cially approved at the The board directed meeting except Kelly’s Thorpe to write a proresignation.” posed contract for Scott Village Clerk Dennis Vilona, a current member Martin said Joe Salitros, of the village’s finance former administrator for committee, to consult for the city of Delavan, sent the treasurer position. a letter of interest to the Currently, Hayden is board. both administrator and Salitros’ letter, dated treasurer, positions that Petersen Spadoni Hayden Oct. 18, states he is were combined in 2009. $50.” “aware that the process Spadoni said the vilTrustee George Spadoni said of recruitment, evaluation, seleclage needs to separate those posihe, Petersen and Thorpe spoke tions again. tion and hire of a new adminwith Salitros on Oct. 14 or 15. istrator could take months or “The joint positions haven’t “He’s fully qualified for that more,” and he wants to assist the been working,” he said. village until a new administrator position,” Spadoni said. “We need to re-establish “The board hasn’t met since is found. the positions as they were a few Kelly resigned, so this was the “For my services, I would years ago for the benefit of the first time it was presented at the citizens of Fontana. We need the expect to enter into an agreeboard. Joe (Salitros) is willing ment with the village that would administrator, the treasurer, to help us out. It’s to be deteroutline our mutual expectathe director of public works, mined how long he stays work- the police chief and the buildtions,” Salitros wrote. “My ing for us and the role he takes,” desired hourly rate of pay is ing inspector as separate posi-

tions.” The board discussed a possible interim public works director, but a decision was tabled. In 2012, Craig Workman, public works director, resigned. The village had Dennis Barr and Ron Adams, lead supervisors in the utilities and streets departments, serve as joint directors for most of 2013. In September, the board directed the public works committee to search again for a single director to take leadership over the department. The village board meets again Monday, though it’s not clear if the proposed contracts will be discussed. Petersen said he wasn’t sure if Thorpe would be done with the contracts in time, and negotiations will continue with the three considered for the positions.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

Big Foot/Some debt ending this year About 10 years ago, district voters approved a 10-year levy increase to pay for renovations that expanded the school. This levy amount won’t be included in next year’s school budget. The district also has nonreferendum debt in a loan from the state retirement trust fund, non-energy capital projects and refunding bonds. The current repayment schedule for all current debt ends in 2023. In recent months, the board has discussed asking voters again to increase the

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on the other side of the fire doors.” Other bumps and noises in the supposedly-empty school made Karedes’ next decision easy. “After that, I decided I’m not coming in on the weekends because it’s too scary,” she said. Larson But Karedes was forced back to school after hours. “My son was sick ... and I came in really late on a Sunday (to prep work for a sub),” Karedes said. “I needed to have some materials here for my students to work. Let me tell you, as I had to go through the computer lab area, it’s very dark, my heart was pounding. I was having memories of different things. It was very scary.” Brungraber has heard of similar experiences in the school. “On a Monday, one of our custodians, Craig Zener, came up to me and asked what I was doing in my room all weekend,” Brungraber said. “(Zener) said he’d heard boxes moving all weekend long, like flipping over and dragging. I told him I wasn’t in the building. He said, you had to have been there, there was so much noise.” Karedes said she doesn’t like to think about the possible ghosts. “It’s freaky, it’s spooky,” she said. “At night, when you come here, it sounds like there are doors closing and footsteps. We try not to think about it because it’s freaky.” Editor’s note: Interviews for this story were completed early in 2013.

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“I think the ghost plays with my scanner,” Larson said. “It would just turn on randomly when I was working on my computer. One day, I just said, out loud, ‘quit playing with my scanner,’ and it hasn’t happened since.” Knorr is currently on Knorr leave, and Larson is fi lling the administrator position. Other teachers report hearing noises when the school is supposed to be empty. Anne Karedes, a language arts teacher, said she’s heard footsteps in the empty hallways. “In my earlier teaching years, we would occasionally call each other to come in on weekends together,” Karedes said of fellow teacher Sue Brungraber. “Something happened that Mrs. Brungraber couldn’t come in. I went to my room to work. I heard footsteps. They were going up the ramp toward (Brungraber’s) room.” Karedes said she thought Brungraber had come to the school after all. “It was exactly where (Brungraber) would be,” she said. “I got up, went down and called for her. I thought, that’s strange. It happened a couple times.” After returning to her classroom, Karedes heard another noise. “The second time, I came back, I walked into my room, and the fire doors right outside of my room shut,” she said. “They’re on an electronic system. I was in my room when they shut. I didn’t walk by and bump them. (Brungraber’s) room is

TERRITORIAL ROAD

US HWY 14

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B

ATTENTION DRIVERS:

COUNTY HWY O

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH SCHAUF/REGIONAL NEWS

TEACHERS AND CUSTODIANS have reported hearing strange sounds in the hallways and in classrooms on weekends when no one else is in the building.

levy limit by referendum, though nothing has been decided. The board must submit referendum paperwork to the county and municipalities in the district in January for it to be on the April ballot. The April 2013 referendum question failed by 17 votes, and District Administrator Dorothy Kaufmann said that’s not a big number. In September, Kaufmann said the board should focus on informing more voters about the need for the increased levy.


4B

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

SUBMITTED BY CHARLES EBELING

COMING FROM THE MIST. Charles Ebeling was at the beach when he saw two paddle boarders appear from the mist. Ebeling said it was about 24 degrees at the time he shot this photo. SUBMITTED

AURORA LAKELAND MEDICAL CENTER volunteers judged the pumpkins that were carved by doctors and caregivers. Money was raised for various charities by people donating for the most creative, their favorite carver or a charity of their choice.

SUBMITTED

THE WALWORTH COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY, in conjunction with its recent Family History Fair, announced the winners of the essay contest for area middle school students. The topic was “My Favorite Ancestor.” Aaron Smith, Emily Faul and Nick Castro, all of Traver School, were winners of the contest. Smith received first while Faul and Castro were second and third, respectively. Cash prizes and framed certificates were presented to the winners. Honorable mention awards were presented to Maddi Triplett of Lake Geneva Middle School and James Nordenson, Nick Renda and Aubrey Siczkowycz of Traver. They are shown here (from left), Nordenson, Marita Magnuson, a teacher at Traver School, Aaron Smith, Emily Faul and Maddi Triplett.

SUBMITTED

JOANN WRIGHT, left, from Lilypots of Lake Geneva, presents Nancy Johnson with a fall arrangement specially designed for the Fontana Garden Club’s October meeting. Wright designed seven different arrangements that were raffled off for club members. Proceeds of the raffle were donated to a food pantry.

SUBMITTED

SUBMITTED

LAKE GENEVA SCHOOL DISTRICT 1 presented a Results Plus award to Terri Harrig, second from right, for her work with the READS program at Central-Denison School. She is shown with, from left, Superintendent Jim Gottinger, Pat Threlkeld and board member Marcie Hollmann.

SUBMITTED

WALWORTH COUNTY CRIME STOPPERS announced the winners of the 2013 bike give away drawing that is part of their exhibit at the Walworth County Fair. They were Kyra Springhorn, Sharon, and Ty Olsen, Antioch, Ill. The bikes were presented to the winners during the October Walworth County Crime Stoppers meeting by Walworth County Sheriff’s Office Crime Stoppers’ liaison Dep. Dan Nelson and Crime Stoppers’ treasurer, Steve Cordery. This year’s bikes were donated by Target of Lake Geneva. Crime Stoppers is a cooperative effort between law enforcement agencies, news media and the public to provide a safer place to live, work and play. For emergency situations call 911, but to report a crime anonymously, call (262) 723-2677; text CRIMES; or report online to www.tipsoft.com. All methods of submitting a tip are anonymous and callers are eligible to receive a cash reward. Crime Stoppers can also be found on Facebook. The picture includes (from left), Steve Cordery, Kyra Springhorn, Ty Olsen and Deputy Dan Nelson.

News You Can Share Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews

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TEEN KAITLYN JOLLY won a $25 gift certificate to Amazon. com after checking out at least ten books at the Lake Geneva Public Library in September. One adult, teen and child will win each month from September through December.

The Lake Geneva Regional News welcomes its readers to submit photos of charitable events, personal milestones and school activities for publication. We also accept unique photos of wildlife and nature. Photos must have a minimum 200 resolution. The photos must be in focus and have a natural color distribution. The Regional News may alter the color on photos and crop them. We use editorial discretion when reviewing pictures. The people in the pictures must be identified. Submitted pictures may also appear online at www.facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews. Please email photos to managing editor Robert Ireland at rireland@lakegenevanews.net. Readers can also bring pictures to the Regional News Office, 315 Broad St. Lake Geneva, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

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October 31, 2013

The Regional News

SUBMITTED

STAR CENTER SCHOOL teacher Jennifer Laffin, left, nominated Savannah Wheaton for her outstanding effort in the classroom, with other students and as a great example of good character, to receive an Achievement Plus Award from the Joint 1 School District. Star Center Principal Chiper Tennessen and board member Bea Dale are also shown.

5B

SUBMITTED

MARY JO FESENMAIER, second from right, nominated Tom Spellman, Robert Fesenmaier, Dona Palmer and Richard Malmin to receive Joint 1 School District Result Plus awards for their help in moving and organizing the new library at Eastview Elementary School. Also included in the photo is board member Bea Dale, third from left.

SUBMITTED

MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL JUNIOR HONORS SOCIETY received Achievement Plus Awards from Lake Geneva Schools. They assisted and volunteered their time at the Holiday Home Camp. Pictured are (from left), board member Barb Dinan, Carson Gundlach, Nicholas Stefen, Alexis Todd, Jackie Carper, Bryn Rodhe, Aryah Esquibel, Hailey Domski, Katelyn Guest and NJHS adviser and teacher Berta Martinez.

SUBMITTED

THE ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL at Stinebrink’s Piggy Wiggly store in Lake Geneva on Oct. 19 drew many visitors, including the famous Mr. Pig and the Weinermobile.

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6B

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

GENEVA LAKE WEST

Man gets probation for tavern burglaries By Robert Ireland RIreland@lakegenevanews.net ELKHORN — A convicted burglar, who broke into taverns in Genoa City and Lake Como, avoided a prison sentence after his defense attorney reached an agreement with prosecutors. Kory L. Myerson, 23, Harvard, was sentenced Oct. 24 to six years of probation, which includes 150 days in jail with workrelease privileges. As a condition of his probation, Myerson must pay more than $32,000 in restitution. Myerson “Mr. Myerson, it looks as though you are getting a second chance,” Judge David Reddy said. “You

need to realize this According to the “Mr. Myerson, it looks as though is probably your you are getting a second chance,” criminal complaint: last chance. If you On Jan. 16 at 2:38 get in trouble like Judge David Reddy said. “You need a.m., Genoa City this again, prison to realize this is probably your last police responded to is probably the only a silent alarm at 332 chance. If you get in trouble like option.” Fellows Road. this again, prison is probably the A five-year When an officer only option.” prison sentence folarrived, he could lowed by fives year hear scraping and of extended supervision was stayed and banging noises from inside of the tavern. imposed, which means Myerson will only The officer also saw an ATM that serve the prison sentence if he violates the appeared to have been pushed out of the terms of his probation. building. Assistant District Attorney Haley Rea A person was standing on the ATM. told Reddy the state accepted the plea The officer pointed his rifle at the agreement because it forces Myerson to person and demanded that the person pay restitution, and the possible prison stop, but the suspect fled. term is longer than what was recomOther law enforcement agencies and a mended by the presentence investigation K-9 unit were brought in to assist in the (PSI) report. search for the suspect. Myerson declined to comment during Police eventually found Myerson the hearing. inside a garage on Fellows Road. Inside

GENOA CITY POLICE REPORTS Village of Genoa City police recently reported the following incidents. n Police are investigating a burglary in which $900 was taken from a Walworth Street residence between Oct. 6 and 13. n Bryan B. Gile, 31, 249 Meadow Drive, was cited for operating while intoxicated and speeding Oct. 13 at 4:55 p.m. on Fellows Road at Highway H. Police stated he was driving 41 mph in a 25-mph zone. n Clayton R. Mieritz, 29, Round Lake,

Ill., was arrested for driving under the influence Oct. 20 at 2:31 a.m. on Highway 12. n Robert C. Lightbody, 38, 840 Hilltop Lane, was cited for disorderly conduct Oct. 8 at 5:35 p.m. after he reportedly was screaming at neighborhood children, using the “F word.” n Someone cut a window screen prior to Oct. 19 at 10:24 a.m. at a Wisconsin Street residence.

of his pockets police found a mask and a large amount of cash. Myerson also told police he hurt his ankle after he had slipped in the Nippersink Creek. On Jan. 15 at 5:30 a.m., police went to In the Drink for a report of a burglary. Video surveillance from the bar showed a person wearing a mask climbing over the bar with a hammer. The person in the video took two bottles of liquor and two cases of Red Bull from the basement of the bar. Myerson admitted to police that he had worn the mask the other night in Lake Como. He also said he had dropped a hammer at 332 Fellows. Police report that the hammer found at the Genoa City tavern matched the one in the video surveillance footage from the burglary at the In the Drink. The suspect in that burglary also appeared to be wearing the same mask found on Myerson.

Man gets five years for child porn files ELKHORN — A 35-year-old Racine man was sentenced Oct. 24 to five years in prison by Judge David Reddy for possession of child pornography. Tony J. Zeisse, 3433 Victorian Dr., also was sentenced to five years of extended supervision. Nine additional counts of possession of child pornography were dismissed but read into the record. When Zeisse was arrested, he was living in the town of Lyons. According to the criminal complaint: In July 2012, a Special Agent with the FBI was investigating child pornography being shared on peer-to-peer file sharing networks. Police identified one IP address that was sharing 57 files of investigative interest. FBI agents issued a subpoena on September 2012 to the Internet service provider for the user of the IP address. Through the subpoena, FBI agents linked the IP address to a home on Creek Side Drive, town of Lyons. The FBI agent reported that he was able to download six video files of young and or prepubescent children engaged in sexually explicit acts from the IP address that was

connected to the home on Creek Side Drive. On Oct. 16, FBI agents searched the home and met with Zeisse and his mother. Police located two computers in the basement. During the initial examination of a computer, FBI agents found Zeisse at least 250 files with filenames indicative of child pornography. When FBI agents interviewed Zeisse, he admitted that the room in the basement is his and so is the computer. He said he uses multiple peer-to-peer file sharing networks to search for child pornography. He also told FBI agents that he has collected child pornography on and off since high school and would periodically delete every thing before collecting again. He said he started his current collection about a year and a half ago. FBI agents searched the devices removed from Zeisse’s home and identified 477 still images and 61 movies of suspected child pornography.

Teen not guilty of sex assault ELKHORN — A Walworth Township teenager was found not guilty on Oct. 22 of second-degree sexual assault of a child. Aerian G. Ouska, 18, was found not guilty after the jury deliberated for one hour. His defense attorney, Joshua Klaff, said the trial began on Monday and

the not guilty verdict was reached at around noon on Tuesday. “There were probably some credibility issues in this case that the jury was concerned about,” Klaff said on Wednesday afternoon. Ouska was accused of forcing his hand down the pants of a 15-year-old girl,

according to the criminal complaint. At that time, Ouska was 17. Ouska faces two additional felony bail jumping charges after he allegedly violated the conditions of his bond. Klaff said those charges are still pending, and are scheduled for trial in January. The outcome of last week’s trial doesn’t have an affect on the bail jumping charges. According to the criminal complaint on the bail jumping charge: On Sept. 14, 2012, city of Delavan police met with the victim, who said while she was at school Ouska approached her about the case. Ouska handed the girl his cell phone and asked her to talk to his attorney. According to the criminal complaint on the other bail jumping charge: On Jan. 11, police responded to a home in the village of Walworth. When they arrived at the home they saw a man holding a towel to his lip. The man said he was punched by the brother of his girlfriend, Ouska. The man said he was going to go to the hospital to see if he needed stitches. Ouska told police the man confronted the woman about missing quarters from a change jar. Ouska said he tried to get between the two and said he was pushed backward. He said he then punched the man in the face.


October 31, 2013

The Regional News

7B

COURT REPORTS Man faces burglary charge ELKHORN — A 27-year-old West Allis man is accused of breaking into a home last November in the city of Lake Geneva. Brian M. Schultz has been charged with felony burglary. If convicted, he faces up to 12 1/2 years imprisonment and $25,000 in ďŹ nes. According to the criminal complaint: Police were dispatched to a home on Elm Street. The homeowner reported a window and an overhead garage door had been broken. She also reported that some of her belongings had been ried through. In the home, police saw blood on a light switch and on a door. On Feb. 21, West Allis police questioned Schultz, and during the questioning he admitted that he broke into the home. He said he left the home when he realized he was bleeding.

Man faces sixth drunken driving offense A 46-year-old Williams Bay man was arrested Aug. 10 for what is allegedly his sixth-offense drunken driving offense. If convicted, David J. Valley, faces up to six years imprisonment and $10,000 in ďŹ nes. He also faces a minimum sentence of six months in jail and $600 in ďŹ nes.

According to the criminal complaint: A witness called police to report a possible drunken driver. The ofďŹ cer found the vehicle and stopped it. The ofďŹ cer could smell alcohol on Valley’s breath. Valley failed ďŹ eld sobriety tests, and he couldn’t recite the alphabet. Valley has previous drunken driving convictions from June 25, 1994; July 3, 2000; Aug. 8, 2004; Jan. 22, 2007 and July 23, 2010. On Dec. 29, 2010, Valley was sentenced to three years of probation. A three-year prison sentence and three years of extended supervision was stayed and imposed. As a condition of his probation, he also had to serve sixth months in jail with workrelease privileges.

Lake Geneva man faces domestic abuse charge ELKHORN — A 22-year-old Lake Geneva man is accused of striking his ďŹ ancee and restricting her breathing by pressing his ďŹ st into her throat. Jensen L. Holwick, 3131 Lockwood Boulevard, faces a felony charge of strangulation. If convicted, he faces up to six-years imprisonment and $10,000 in ďŹ nes. He also faces misdemeanor charges of battery and disorderly conduct, both enhanced as domestic abuse incidents.

STATE NEWS DNR to close hunting zone MADISON (AP) — Wisconsin wildlife ofďŹ cials are poised to close another wolf hunting zone. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has divided the state into six wolf hunting zones. The agency plans to close the far northwestern Wisconsin zone at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The kill limit for the zone is 76 animals. Hunters had taken 72 as of late Tuesday afternoon. The agency shut down the zone that covers much of far northeastern Wisconsin last week after hunters killed one more wolf than the 28-animal limit. The hunt began Oct. 15 and will run until hunters reach the 251-wolf statewide kill limit or through the end of February, whichever comes ďŹ rst.

According to the criminal complaint: Police were called to the Nippersink resort for a report of a ďŹ ght. Police arrived and spoke to Holwick, who was intoxicated. Holwick said he had been hit four times by his ďŹ ancee. A portable Breathalyzer test showed Holwick’s blood alcohol level was 0.14 percent. The legal limit to drive is 0.08. The ďŹ ancee told police that she attended a wedding with Holwick, and the two were arguing about Howick’s drinking. Holwick reportedly told his ďŹ ance that he was going to his aunt’s room to get a beer, but his ďŹ ancee intervened and told Holwick he had enough to drink. The ďŹ ancee stood in front of a door, preventing Holwick from leaving the room. Holwick allegedly pushed his ďŹ ancee onto the bed, bent her legs into her chest and laid on top of her. Holwick is accused of putting his ďŹ st on the women’s throat, preventing her from breathing. He also allegedly punched her in the face multiple times.

Woman faces drug charges Police allegedly found nearly ďŹ ve ounces of marijuana in a 49-year-old South Beloit, Ill., woman’s vehicle after a trafďŹ c stop. Michele A. McGee has been charged

with possession with intent to deliver. If convicted, she faces up to 3 1/2 years imprisonment and $10,000 in ďŹ nes. She also faces a misdemeanor charge of possession of drug paraphernalia. According to the criminal complaint: On Oct. 7, police stopped a vehicle on East School Street west of Park Avenue. The driver, McGee, failed ďŹ eld sobriety tests and was arrested for driving under the inuence of a controlled substance. Police searched the vehicle and found 135.6 grams of marijuana.

Man gets probation, jail for cocaine A 35-year-old Burlington man was sentenced to three years of probation on Oct. 23 after he sold a little more than a gram of crack-cocaine to a police informant. Kevin E. Watson pleaded guilty to delivering cocaine as a second or subsequent offense. Watson was convicted in 2005 of possessing cocaine. As a condition of his probation, Watson must spend 180 days in the Walworth County jail with work-release privileges. According to the criminal complaint: On Nov. 9, 2012, Watson allegedly sold 1.05 grams of crack-cocaine to a conďŹ dential informant for $80 in the town of Geneva.

LAKE GENEVA POLICE REPORTS

Governor not concerned with election poll MIDDLETON (AP) — Gov. Scott Walker says he’s not concerned with a new poll showing his race for re-election is a dead heat roughly a year out from the election. Walker was asked Tuesday about the Marquette University Law School poll that shows Walker with 47 percent support compared with 45 percent for Democrat Mary Burke. That is within the poll’s 5 percentage point margin of error. Walker says, “We thought all along this was going to be a close race, just as it was in the past.� Walker says as the election gets closer voters will be presented with a clear contrast between him and whoever wins the Democratic nomination.

INFUSE

Oct. 16

Oct. 24

6:36 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer stopped a vehicle on Wells Street at Host Drive. Kyle J. Johnson, 35, Lake Geneva, was cited for speeding, 53 mph in a 25 mph zone and operating after suspension, as a second offense.

5:19 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer responded to a complaint of marijuana use in the 400 block of S. Edwards Boulevard. A Mount Morris, Ill., youth was later cited for possession of drug paraphernalia. He was released.

Oct. 17

5:30 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer conducted a trafďŹ c stop on Edwards Boulevard at Park Drive. Chelsey A. Blask, 24, Waterford, was cited for exceeding zones and posted limits for traveling 45 mph in a 30 mph zone and released. 8:17 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on Main at Curtis streets. Samuel J. Foster III, 26, was cited for operating without a valid license and released.

8:15 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer stopped a vehicle on Townline at Andria roads. Joseph R. Guagliardo, 27, Lake Geneva, was cited for speeding, 60 mph in a 25 mph zone.

Oct. 18 6:49 p.m.: OfďŹ cers went to the 1100 block of Grant Street for a report of a theft. OfďŹ cers referred charges to juvenile intake on a 16-year-old Lake Geneva boy for theft.

Oct. 19

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1:33 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer stopped a vehicle on S. Lakeshore Drive at South Street. Daniel Robert Collett, 24, Pell Lake, was cited for operating without a valid license, possession of THC and possession of drug paraphernalia. David Mathew Zeimet, 29, Twin Lakes, was cited for disorderly conduct. 7:19 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer went to the 300 block of Wrigley Drive for a man at a business that had already been warned to stay out of the business. William C. Bearder, 46, Lake Geneva, was cited for trespassing and disorderly conduct.

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1:38 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer was conducting patrol and cited Everett J. Colson, 26, Elkhorn, for disorderly conduct — public urination. 9:41 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer went to East Main Street at South Edwards Boulevard for a property damage complaint. Bruce A. Bruns, 42, Genoa City, for failure to notify police of an accident and released.

Oct. 21 1:47 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on W. Main at Broad streets. The driver, Christopher J. Landry Jr., 22, Oakwood Hills, Ill., was issued a citation for failure to wear a seat belt. 5:48 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on Townline Road at Hudson Trail. The driver, Tyler T. Shalek, 22, Lake Geneva, was cited for operating without a valid license.

Oct. 22 3:19 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on N. Edwards Boulevard at Park Drive. Timothy E. Griswold, Black Earth, was issued a citation for operating a vehicle without proof of insurance and released.

Oct. 23 7:21 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer responded to a trafďŹ c accident on Main at Maxwell streets.

Oct. 25 1:38 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on Broad at Dodge streets. Marvin L. Rea, 44, Gary, Ind., was cited for operating a vehicle without lamps lighted and was released. 5:20 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on Sheridan Springs Road at Interchange North. Albert L. Lorenzen, 52, Lake Geneva, was cited for nonregistration of a vehicle and was released. 7:30 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on N. Edwards Boulevard at Park Drive. Dragica Susanj, 43, Long Island, New York, was cited for exceeding speed zones and posted limits for traveling 56 mph in a 30 mph zone and was released.

Oct. 26 8:28 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on Dodge Street at Fremont Avenue. William R. Krien, 42, Burlington, was cited for exceeding zones and posted limits for traveling 38 mph in a 25 mph zone and was released. 2:03 p.m.: OfďŹ cers responded to the report of a theft in the 100 block of Geneva Square. Archie L. Drury, 71. Creal Springs, Ill. was cited for retail theft and was released. 9:19 p.m.: An ofďŹ cer made a trafďŹ c stop on S. Lake Shore Dr. at Maytag Road. Sari B. Flage, 18, New Richmond, was issued a citation for exceeding zones and posted limits for traveling 48 mph in a 25 mph zone and released. 10:14 p.m.: OfďŹ cers responded to the 1000 block of Wells Street for a report of a ďŹ ght. Nathaniel J. Davis, 22, Lake Geneva, was cited for disorderly conduct and conďŹ ned in the Walworth County jail.

Oct. 27 8:45 a.m.: An ofďŹ cer made trafďŹ c stop on Williams at Henry streets. The driver, a male juvenile, GreenďŹ eld, was cited for exceeding speed zones and posted limits and for traveling 41 mph in a 25 mph zone and released.

Incidents from previous weeks: July 18 An ofďŹ cer took a complaint for a worthless check. Upon investigating, Patricia M. Yakes, 46, Elkhorn, was cited for issuing worthless checks.

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The Regional News

October 31, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICES

TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD

TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD

TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 2013PR180 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH HAPP a/k/a ELIZABETH DOROTHY HAPP PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth August 24, 1918 and date of death March 12, 2013, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 270 Ridge Road, Walworth, Wisconsin 53184. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is January 17, 2014. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001, 1800 County Road NN Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085. Elizabeth Cheverie Deputy Probate Registrar October 11, 2013 Attorney David W. Schiltz P.O. Box 158 Lake Geneva WI 53147 262-248-9143 Bar Number 1000392 Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY Order Setting Time to Hear Petition for Administration and Deadline for Filing Claims (Formal Administration) Case No.13 PR 173 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DORIS M. VAIL A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: The decedent, with date of birth September 10, 1921 and date of death September 15, 2013 was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 356 Forest Drive, Williams Bay, WI 53191. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The petition be heard at the Walworth County Judicial Center, Probate Office, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085, before Circuit Court Commissioner Sheila T. Reiff, on 11/12/2013 at 10:30 a.m. You do not need to appear unless you object. The petition may be granted if there is no objection. 2. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is January 14, 2014. 3. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001, County Courthouse, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085. 4. Heirship will be determined at the hearing on petition for final judgment. 5. Publication of this notice is notice to any persons whose names or addresses are unknown. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 262-741-7014 at least 10 working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. BY THE COURT: Dela Race Circuit Court Commissioner October 7, 2013 John N. Clair, CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C. P.O. Box 445 Delavan, WI 53115 262-728-9196 Bar Number: 101952 Oct. 17, 24, 31, 2013

WALWORTH COUNTY Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 2013PR175 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DANIEL J. HANSEN D.O.D. 8-11-2011 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth November 14, 1919 and date of death August 11, 2011, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 521 Garrison Drive, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is January 15, 2014. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Probate, 1800 County Rd. NN, P.O. Box 1001, Elkhorn, WI, Room 2085. Wendy A. Esch Deputy Probate Registrar October 8, 2013 Attorney Jennifer L. Riemer 1624 Hobbs Drive Delavan, WI 53115 262-740-1971 Bar Number: 1030765 October 17, 24, 31, 2013

STATE OF WISCONSIN Town of Bloomfield Walworth County ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1087 JULY 1, 2013 An Ordinance repealing Section 3.07 and creating Chapter 30 of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code RE: Ordinance for the destruction of obsolete records authorized per Wis. Stats. 19.21 *.

This section and the retention periods of less than seven years have been reviewed and approved by the Wisconsin Public Records and Forms Board.

Clerk, Deputy Clerk or in his or her absence or disability or in case of vacancy, the Town Chairman, is hereby designated the legal custodian of all Town records. (2) Unless otherwise prohibited by law, the Town Clerk or the Clerk’s designee shall act as legal custodian for the Town Board and for any committees, commissions, boards or other authorities created by ordinance or resolution of the Town Board. (3) For every authority not specified in subs. (1) or (2), the authority’s chief administrative officer is the legal custodian for the authority, but the officer may designate an employee of his or her staff to act as the legal custodian. (4) Each legal custodian shall name a person to act as legal custodian in his or her absence or the absence of his or her designee. (5) The legal custodian shall have full legal power to render decisions and to carry out the duties of an authority under subch. II of Ch. 19, Wis. Stats., and this subchapter. The designation of a legal custodian does not affect the powers and duties of an authority under this section.

WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, WALWORTH COUNTY Order Setting Deadline for Filing a Claim (Formal Administration) Case No. 2013PR178 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF BETTY J. MEINEN A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: 1. The decedent, with date of birth January 16, 1929 and date of death September 18, 2013, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 1194 Center Street, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 2. All interested persons waived notice. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is January 16, 2014. 2. A claim must be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001 County Courthouse, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085. BY THE COURT: Dela Race Circuit Court Commissioner October 9, 2013 Nicholas A. Egert McCormack & Egert, S.C. 835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 262-248-6600 Bar No. 1056736 Oct. 17, 24, 31, 2013

WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, WALWORTH COUNTY Order Setting Deadline for Filing a Claim (Formal Administration) Case No. 2013PR177 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LARRY D.BAILLARGEON A petition for formal administration was filed. THE COURT FINDS: 1. The decedent, with date of birth October 6, 1957 and date of death October 5, 2013, was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of N1189 County Road H, Genoa City, WI 53128. 2. All interested persons waived notice. THE COURT ORDERS: 1. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is January 16, 2014. 2. A claim must be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001 County Courthouse, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085. BY THE COURT: Dela Race Circuit Court Commissioner October 9, 2013 Nicholas A. Egert McCormack & Egert, S.C. 835 Geneva Parkway North, Suite 1 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 262-248-6600 Bar No. 1056736 Oct. 17, 24, 31, 2013

WNAXLP

WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No. 13CV00086 FIRST COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ALLEN J. LACKOWSKI, DEBORAH A. LACKOWSKI, GENEVA NATIONAL COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC., GENEVA NATIONAL CONDOMINIUM MASTER ASSOCIATION, INC., and NATIONAL CITY BANK nb n/k/a PNC BANK a/k/a THE PNC FINANCIAL SERVICES GROUP, INC., Defendants. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 10, 2013 in the amount of $240,278.18 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: November 14, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash or certified funds, payable to the Clerk of Courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the Clerk of Courts in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold “as is” and subject to all liens and encumbrances. Purchaser to pay all transfer and recording fees and costs of any title evidence. PLACE: In the lobby of the Walworth County Law Enforcement Center, 1770 Co. Hwy. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Unit 18-05 in Geneva National Condominium No. 18, together with said unit’s undivided interest in the common elements (and the exclusive use of the limited common elements appurtenant to said unit) all in Geneva National Condominium No. 18, a condominium declared and existing under and by virtue of the Condominium Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin and recorded by a Declaration as such condominium in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Walworth County, Wisconsin, on May 30, 1990, in Vol. 488 of Records at pages 247 through 295, as Document No. 194851, said condominium being located in the Town of Geneva, County of Walworth, State of Wisconsin on the real estate described in said Declaration and incorporated herein by this reference thereto. Tax Key No. JGN 1800005 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1521 Geneva Club Drive Lake Geneva, WI 53147

NOTICES MUST BE PLACED BY 12 P.M. MONDAY

TO APPEAR IN THE

Attorney Edward F. Thompson State Bar No. 1013187 CLAIR LAW OFFICES, S.C. 617 E. Walworth Ave. P.O. Box 445 Delavan, WI 53115-0445 Phone: (262) 728-9196 Clair Law Offices, S.C. is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt. Oct. 17, 24, 31, 2013

WNAXLP

UPCOMING ISSUE For more information or to place a listing contact Sue p: 262-248-4444 f: 262-248-4476 e: sue@lakegenevanews.net

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 12 CV 36 Case Code No. 30404 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS INC., ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, 2007-2 Plaintiff Vs. ERIC MEINEL; SUSAN MEINEL; FIRST CITIZENS STATE BANK; O’LEARY PLUMBING & HEATING INC.; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC; CITIBANK NA; U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ND; LANDMARK CREDIT UNION; PORTFOLIO RECOVERY ASSOCIATES LLC.; GENEVA FAMILY DENTISTRY LLC; ADVANTAGE ASSET II INC.; MILWAUKEE CITY; LVNV FUNDING LLC; LAKE COMO BEACH PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 5, 2013, in the amount of $198,775.78, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: November 14, 2013 at 10:00 am TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale upon confirmation of the court. PLACE: WALWORTH COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT, LAW ENFORCEMENT CENTER 1770 COUNTY ROAD NN, ELKHORN, WI 53121 Property description: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE CITY OF LAKE GENEVA, COUNTY OF WALWORTH, STATE OF WISCONSIN, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOTS 4390, 4391,4392,4393,4394, BLOCK 76, IN LAKE COMO BEACH, TOGETHER WITH THE RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST OF THE PARTIES OF THE FIRST PART, IF ANY AND TO THAT PORTION OF THE ROAD OR ROADS IMMEDIATELY ADJOINING THE SAID PREMISES, AS DESIGNATED AND DELINEATED ON THE MAP ENTITLED “SECOND MAP OF LAKE COMO BEACH, WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN”, IN THE SOUTHWEST ¼ OF SECTION 22, NORTHWEST ¼ OF SECTION 27, AND THE NORTHEAST ¼, OF SECTION 28, ALL IN TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 17 EAST, AND RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTER OF DEEDS IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF WALWORTH, STATE OF WISCONSIN ON THE 1ST DAY OF MAY 1926. Tax Key No.: JLCB 00859 Property Address: N3250 CHERRY RD., LAKE GENEVA, WISCONSIN 53147 Benjamin A. Sparks State Bar No. 1092405 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Oct. 17, 24, 31, 2013

WNAXLP

DATED: October 8, 2013

LEGAL

WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE 11 A.M. FRIDAY

contact Sue at 262-248-4444 sue@lakegenevanews.net

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WALWORTH COUNTY NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Informal Administration) Case No. 13PR 185 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GEORGE A. LEEDLE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth June 7, 1928 and date of death Sept. 10, 2013 was domiciled in Walworth County, State of Wisconsin with a mailing address of N474 Armsby Rd., Lake Geneva, WI 53147. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is January 29, 2014. 5. A claim may be filed at the Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001, 1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085 Wendy A. Esch Deputy Probate Registrar October 22, 2013 Dennis R. Lynch Lloyd, Phenicie, Lynch, Kelly, Hotvedt & Terry, S.C. 432 Milwaukee Ave. Burlington, WI 53105 262-763-2451 Bar Number 1010613 Oct. 31, Nov. 7 & 14, 2013

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SECTION I – TITLE AND PURPOSE This ordinance is entitled the Town of Bloomfield Destruction of Obsolete Records Ordinance. The purpose of this ordinance is to provide the town officers of the Town of Bloomfield with the authority to destroy certain obsolete public records in possession of the Town of Bloomfield. SECTION II – AUTHORITY The Town Board of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, has the specific authority under s. 19.21 (4), Wis. stats., to manage and destroy obsolete public records in the possession of the Town of Bloomfield. SECTION III – ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE This ordinance, adopted by a majority of the town board on a roll call vote with a quorum present and voting and proper notice having been given, authorizes the powers and establishes the duties of the town officers of the Town of Bloomfield to manage and destroy obsolete public records in the possession of the Town of Bloomfield. THE TOWN BOARD OF THE TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN, DOES HEREBY REPEAL SECTION 3.07 AND CREATE CHAPTER 30 OF THE TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD MUNICIPAL CODE, AS FOLLOWS: “CHAPTER 30 PUBLIC RECORDS 30.01 PURPOSE The purpose of this chapter is to establish a Town records retention schedule and authorize destruction of Town records pursuant to the schedule on an annual basis. This chapter shall not be construed to authorize the destruction of any public record after a period less than prescribed by statute or state administrative rules. 30.02 RESERVED FOR RECORD RETENTION 30.03 DESTRUCTION OF OBSOLETE RECORDS 1) FINANCIAL RECORDS The following Town of Bloomfield town officers, pursuant to s. 19.21 (5), Wis. stats., may destroy the financial records, except utility records, of which they are the legal custodians and that are considered obsolete after completion of any required audit by the Bureau of Municipal Audit or an auditor licensed under Chapter 442 of the Wisconsin Statutes, but not less than seven years after payment or receipt of any sum involved in the particular transaction, unless a shorter period has been fixed by the State Public Records Board pursuant to s. 16.61 (3) (e), and then after such shorter period, as provided below, except that bonds and coupons after maturity may be destroyed after two years: a) Bank statements, deposit books, slips and stubs. b) Bonds and coupons after maturity. c) Canceled checks, duplicates and check stubs. d) License and permit applications, stubs and duplicates. e) Payrolls and other time and employment records of personnel included under the Wisconsin Retirement Fund. f) Receipt Forms. g) Special assessment records. h) Vouchers, requisitions, purchase orders and all other supporting documents pertaining thereto. 2) UTILITY RECORDS The Town of Bloomfield town officers, pursuant to s. 19.21 (5), Wis. stats., may destroy the following utility records of which they are the legal custodians and that are considered obsolete, after completion of any required audit by the Bureau of Municipal Audit or an auditor licensed under Chapter 442 of the Wisconsin Statutes, subject to state Public Service Commission regulations, but not less than seven years after the record was effective unless a shorter period has been fixed by the state Public Records Board pursuant to s.16.61 (3) (e), and then after such a shorter period, except that water stubs, receipts of current billings and customer’s ledgers may be destroyed after 2 years: a) b) c)

Contracts and papers relating thereto. Excavation permits. Inspection records.

3) OTHER RECORDS The Town of Bloomfield town officers, pursuant to s. 19.21 (5), Wis. stats., may destroy the following records of which they are the legal custodians and that are considered obsolete, but not less than 7 years after the record was effective unless another period has been set by statute, and then after such a period, or unless a shorter period has been fixed by the state Public Records Board pursuant to s. 16.61(3)(3) and then after such a shorter period: a) Assessment rolls and related records, including board of review minutes. b) Contracts and papers relating to contracts. c) Correspondence and communications. d) Financial reports other than annual financial reports. e) Insurance policies. f) Justice dockets. g) Oaths of office. h) Reports of boards, commissions, committees and officials duplicated in the council minutes. i) Resolutions and petitions, provided the text of the same appears in the official minutes. j) Election notices and proofs of publication, canceled voter registration cards, and Election materials as governed by State Statutes. k) Official bonds. l) Police records other than investigative records. 4) TAPE RECORDINGS Any tape recordings of a governmental meeting of the City may be destroyed, erased or reused no sooner than 90 days after the minutes of the meeting have been approved and published, if the purpose of the recording was to make minutes of the meeting. 5) DESTRUCTION AFTER REQUEST FOR INSPECTION No requested records may be destroyed until after the request is granted or 60 days after the request is denied. If an action is commenced under W.S.A. § 19.37, the requested record may not be destroyed until after a court order is issued and all appeals have been completed. See W.S.A. § 19.35(5). 6) DESTRUCTION PENDING LITIGATION No record subject to pending litigation shall be destroyed until the litigation is resolved. 7) REVIEW AND APPROVAL BY PUBLIC RECORDS AND FORMS BOARD.

a) Records Retention Schedules (RESERVED) b) Records Disposition Authorizations (RESERVED) 8) HISTORICAL SOCIETY NOTIFICATION Prior to the destruction of any public record described in Sections IV, V, or VI at least 60 days’ notice in writing shall be given to the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.” SECTION IV – SEVERABILITY If any provision of this ordinance or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity does not affect other provisions or applications of this ordinance that can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this ordinance are severable. SECTION V – EFFECTIVE DATE, CONSTRUCTION This ordinance is effective on publication or posting. This ordinance shall not be construed to authorize the destruction of any public record after a period less than prescribed by statute or state administrative rules. The town clerk shall properly post or publish this ordinance as required under s. 60.80, Wis. stats. Adopted this 1st day of JULY, 2003. [Signatures of town board Chairman] [Signatures of town board Supervisor] [Signatures of town board Supervisor] Attest: [Signature of town clerk] Oct. 31, 2013

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STATE OF WISCONSIN Town of Bloomfield Walworth County ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1089 AUGUST 5, 2013 An Ordinance amending Section 30.02 and creating Section 30.011 Public Records of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code RE: Records Retention Ordinance authorized per Wis. Stats. 19.21. SECTION I - TITLE AND PURPOSE This ordinance is entitled the Town of Bloomfield Public Records Ordinance. The purpose of this ordinance is to provide the Town officers of the Town of Bloomfield creating the authority to maintain public records in possession of the Town of Bloomfield. SECTION II - AUTHORITY The Town Board of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, has the specific authority under s. 19.21 (4), Wis. Stats., to manage public records in the possession of the Town of Bloomfield. SECTION III - ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE This ordinance, adopted by a majority of the Town Board on a roll call vote with a quorum present and voting and proper notice having been given, authorizes the powers and establishes the duties of the Town officers of the Town of Bloomfield to manage and destroy obsolete public records in the possession of the Town of Bloomfield. THE TOWN BOARD OF THE TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN, DOES HEREBY CREATE SECTION 30.011 AND AMEND SECTION 30.02 OF THE TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD MUNICIPAL CODE, AS FOLLOWS: “30.011 DEFINITIONS. DEFINITIONS. For the purposes of this section, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated: (1) AUTHORITY. Any of the following Town entities having custody of a Town record: an office, elected official, agency, board, commission, committee, council, department or public body corporate and politic created by constitution, law, ordinance, rule or order; or a formally constituted subunit of the foregoing, any court of law. (2) CUSTODIAN. That officer, department head, division head, or employee of the Town designated under §30.021 or otherwise responsible by law to keep and preserve any Town records on file, deposit or keep such records in his or her office, or is lawfully in possession or entitled to possession of such public records and who is required by this section to respond to requests for access to such records. (3) RECORD. Any material on which written, drawn, printed, spoken, visual or electromagnetic information is recorded or preserved, regardless of physical form or characteristics, which has been created or is being kept by an authority. “Record” includes, but is not limited to, handwritten, typed or printed pages, maps, charts, photographs, films, recordings, tapes (including computer tapes), and computer printouts. “Record” does not include drafts, notes, preliminary computations and like materials prepared for the originator’s personal use or prepared by the originator in the name of a person for whom the originator is working; materials which are purely the personal property of the custodian and have no relation to his or her office; materials to which access is limited by copyright, patent or bequest; and published materials in the possession of an authority other than a public library which are available for sale, or which are available for inspection at a public library. 30.02 RECORD RETENTION 30.020 DUTY TO MAINTAIN RECORDS DUTY TO MAINTAIN RECORDS. (1) Except as provided under §30.024, each officer and employee of the Town shall safely keep and preserve all records received from his or her predecessor or other persons and required by law to be filed, deposited or kept in his or her office or which are in the lawful possession or control of the officer or employee or his or her deputies, or to the possession or control of which he or she or they may be lawfully entitled as such officers or employees and as required under §19.21, Wis. Stat. (2) Upon the expiration of an officer’s term of office or an employee’s term of employment, or whenever the office or position of employment becomes vacant, each such officer or employee shall deliver to his or her successor all records then in his or her custody and the successor shall receipt therefore to the officer or employee, who shall file such receipt with the Town Clerk, If a vacancy occurs before a successor is selected or qualifies, such records shall be delivered to such successor upon the latter’s receipt. 30.021 LEGAL CUSTODIANS LEGAL CUSTODIANS. (1) The Town

30.022 PUBLIC ACCESS TO RECORDS PUBLIC ACCESS TO RECORDS. (1) Except as provided in §30.023, any requester has a right to inspect a record and to make or receive a copy of any records as provided in §19.35(1) Wis. Stats. (2) Records will be available for inspection and copying during all regular office hours for each authority which maintains regular business hours. (3) If regular office hours are not maintained at the location where records are kept, the records will be available for inspection and copying upon at least 48 hours advance notice of intent to inspect or copy. (4) A requester shall be permitted to use facilities comparable to those available to Town employees to inspect, copy or abstract a record. (5) The legal custodian may require supervision during inspection or may impose other reasonable restrictions on the manner of access to an original record if the record is irreplaceable or easily damaged. (6) A requester shall be charged a fee to defray the cost of locating and copying records as follows: (a) The cost of photocopying shall be the present, current per page cost as determined by the custodian. Such cost shall be calculated not to exceed the actual, necessary and direct cost of reproduction. (b) If the form of a written record does not permit copying, the actual and necessary cost of photographing and photographic processing shall be charged. (c) The actual full cost of providing a copy of other records not in printed form on paper, such as films, computer. printouts and audiotapes or videotapes, shall be charged. (d) If mailing or shipping is necessary, the actual cost thereof shall also be charged. (e) There shall be no charge for locating a record unless the actual cost therefore exceeds $50, in which case the actual cost shall be determined by the legal custodian and billed to the requester. (f) The legal custodian shall estimate the cost of all applicable fees and may require a cash deposit adequate to assure payment if such estimate exceeds $5. (g) Elected and appointed officials of the Town shall not be required to pay for public records they may reasonably require for the proper performance of their official duties. (h) The legal custodian may provide copies of a record without charge or at a reduced charge where he or she determines that waiver or reduction of the fee is in the public interest. (7) Pursuant to §19.34, Wis. Stats., and the guidelines therein listed, each authority shall adopt, prominently display and make available for inspection and copying at its offices, for the guidance of the public, a notice containing a description of its organization and the established times and places at which, the legal custodian from whom, and the methods whereby, the public may obtain information and access to records in its custody, make requests for records, or obtain copies of records, and the costs thereof. This subsection does not apply .to members of the Town Board. 30.023 ACCESS PROCEDURES ACCESS PROCEDURES. (1) A request to inspect or copy a record shall be made to the legal custodian. A request shall be deemed sufficient if it reasonably describes the requested record or the information requested. However, a request for a record without a reasonable limitation as to subject matter or length of time represented by the record does not constitute a sufficient request. A request may be made orally, but a request must be in writing before an action to enforce the request is commenced under §19.37, Wis. Stats. Except as provided below, no request may be refused because the person making the request is unwilling to be identified or to state the purpose of the request. No request may be refused because the request is received by mail, unless prepayment of a fee is required under §30.022(6)(f). A requester may be required to show acceptable identification whenever the requested record is kept at a private residence or whenever security reasons or federal law or regulations so require. (2) Each custodian, upon request for any record, shall, as soon as practicable without delay, either fill the request or notify the requester of the authority’s determination to deny the request in whole or in part and the reasons therefore. If the legal custodian, after conferring with the Town Attorney, determines that a written request is so general as to be unduly time consuming, the party making the request may first be required to itemize his or her request in a manner which would permit reasonable compliance. (3) A request for a record may be denied as provided in §30.024. If a request is made orally, the request may be denied orally unless a demand for a written statement of the reasons denying the request is made by the requester within 5 business days of the oral denial. If a written request is denied in whole or in part, the requester shall receive a written statement of the reasons for denying the request. Every written denial of a request shall inform the requester that if the request for the record was made in writing, the determination is subject to review upon petition for a writ of mandamus under §19.37(1), Wis. Stats., or upon application to the attorney general or a district attorney. 30.024 LIMITATIONS ON RIGHT TO ACCESS Access to records shall only be limited by relevant state and federal law. SECTION IV - SEVERABILITY If any provision of this ordinance or its application to any person or circumstance is held

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October 31, 2013

The Regional News

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PUBLIC NOTICES TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD

TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD

TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD

TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD

GENOA CITY PUBLIC NOTICES

VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD

is sought. (8) SEPARATE FUND ESTABLISHED. The Town shall establish and maintain a segregated, interest-bearing account for each category of impact fees collected by it. Such funds shall be accounted for separately from other funds of the Town. Impact fees and interest earned on impact fees may be expended only for capital costs for which the impact fees were imposed. (9) REFUND OF FEE. Any impact fee imposed and collected under this ordinance which is not expended for committed for expenditure within ten (10) years from the date the impact fee was paid shall be refunded to the current property owner upon which said impact fee was imposed. The Town Board has determined the ten-year period to be appropriate for planning and financing the selected public facilities for which the impact fees are imposed. (10) FEE REVIEW. The fee schedule set forth in this ordinance may be reviewed by the Town Board at any time as a result of changes in facility needs, inflation, revised cost estimates, capital improvements, changes in other funding sources and other relevant factors, and in accordance with the standards for impact fees in Section 66.0617(6) of the Wisconsin Statutes. (11) APPEAL. A person upon whom an impact fee is imposed, within fifteen (15) days of the imposition of the impact fee, may contest the amount, collection, or use of the impact fee by filing a written request with the Town Clerk describing the nature of said appeal, providing supporting documentation, and specifying the basis upon which the appeal is taken. At the next regular Town Board meeting, the Town Board shall notify the appealing party of the time and place of the Town Board meeting at which time the appealing party shall be given the opportunity to present additional information in support of the appeal. (12) SEVERABILITY. If any portion of this Section is declared illegal or invalid for any reason, that illegally or invalidity shall not affect the remaining legal and valid portions of this ordinance which shall remain in full force and effect.” Section Two: Pursuant to Section 66.0103 and 60.80(1) and (3), Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be effective the day after its publication subsequent to its adoption. Adopted this ___ day of September 2013. Town Chairman Attest: Town Clerk Public Hearing: September 09, 2013 Passed: September 09, 2013 Published: October 31, 2013 Oct. 31, 2013

of beginning; thence continue S 88°41’20” W 30.00 feet to the Southeast corner of Certified Survey Map No. 336, recorded in Volume 2, Page 113 of Walworth County Certified Survey Maps; thence N 01°25’52” W 172.46 feet to a found iron pipe marking the Northeast corner of said Certified Survey Map; thence S 88°39’22” W 215.23 feet to a found iron rod marking the Southeast corner of Certified Survey Map No. 3904, recorded in Volume 24, Page 6 of Walworth County Certified Survey Maps; thence N 01°18’40” W 290.00 feet to a found iron rod marking the Northeast corner of said Certified Survey Map No. 3904; thence N 88°41’20” E 245.23 feet; thence S 01°21’21” E 462.33 feet to the point of beginning, and containing 76,327 square feet or 1.752 acre(s) of land, more or less, FROM A-1 (Prime Agricultural Land District) TO A-5 (Agricultural-Rural Residential District) as shown on the proposed rezone area map located at the Town Clerk’s office. Pursuant to Sec. 66.0103, 61.50, and 985.02, Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be effective the day after its publication subsequent to its adoption. Adopted this 14th day of August 2013. Daniel Schoonover, Chairman Ken Monroe, Town Chairperson Attest: Cynthia Howard, Town Clerk Oct. 31, 2013

ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1088 Date: August 5, 2013 An ordinance to create Section 10.04(1)(q) of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code, Walworth County, Wisconsin, regarding lawn maintenance. Section One: The Town Board of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, does hereby ordain and create Section 10.04(1)(q) of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code to read as follows: (q) LAWN MAINTENANCE. All lawns on improved properties consisting of grass and/or weeds shall be kept cut to a height not to exceed twelve (12) inches. (i) Public policy. Overgrown lawns are an intermittent and recurring problem which shelter pests and vermin, aggravate health problems for people who have certain allergies or health conditions, detract from property values, and make neighborhoods less attractive to residents and prospective residents. (ii) Municipal enforcement. Due to the unique characteristics of this type of public nuisance, in addition to any other enforcement methods herein or otherwise allowed by law, the Town may also enter property and abate lawns that violate this ordinance by mowing them, without first seeking a court order, subject to the notice provision herein. Work preformed shall be by Town personal or contracted services at the discretion of the Town. (iii) Notice. The Town shall first notify the property owner and/or any person or legal entity causing the condition, by posting a notice at or near the property entrance, giving them ten (10) days to correct the condition, and stating that the Town will do so thereafter if they do not. (iv) Collection of abatement costs. Cost of the abated will be $100.00 for administrative costs per abatement plus actual cost of abatement. Unless the property owner and/or person or entity causing the condition pays the cost of abatement within twenty (20) days of notice of said cost, the Town may collect the cost of abatement as allowed by law, including as a special charge under Sec. 66.0627, Stats., or under Ch. 10.06, herein. Section Two: Pursuant to Sec. 66.0103 and 60.80(1) and (3), Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be effective the day after its publication subsequent to its adoption.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY WISCONSIN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held on Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. at Village Hall, 715 Walworth St. before the Plan Commission of the Village of Genoa City, Wisconsin to consider amending Zoning Ordinance 11-14-2013 Chapter 310 ZONING Sub-section 310-8 Word usage and definitions (B) Definitions: STRUCTURE of the Village Municipal Code. All interested parties in the above matter are invited to attend. The Village Planning Commission will be in session on Thursday, November 14th, 2013, at 6:30 p.m. at the Village Hall, 715 Walworth Street, Genoa City, Wisconsin to consider any objections that may have been filed and to hear all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 24th and 31st day of October, 2013. William Antti Chairman,Village Planning Commission Oct. 24 & 31, 2013

facilities including special assessments, special charges, land dedications, or fees in lieu of land dedication under Chapter 236, Wisconsin Statutes, or any other items of value. e) Shall be reduced to compensate for money received from the federal or state government specifically to provide or pay for the public facilities for which the impact fees are imposed. f) May not include amounts necessary to address existing deficiencies in public facilities. (5) COLLECTION. Impact fees shall be collected as follows: a) Impact fees will be collected in full by the Village Clerk from the property owner before a building permit is issued. b) Impact fees will also be collected when a building permit is issued if land is converted from existing residential units to additional residential units. (6) LOW-COST HOUSING. No exemptions shall be made on land development that provides for low-cost housing. (7) FEE SCHEDULE. Impact fees for public police, fire and rescue facilities will be collected for industrial, commercial, or institutional issues as the demand for public facilities are equally generated by these developments in the Village. Impact fees shall be based upon a residential equivalent unit (REU) with each separate dwelling unit equal to one (1) REU. Impact fees for industrial, commercial, or institutional development shall be based on the size of the development compared to new residential development. The average size of a new house is 2,000 square feet. The area of the new industrial, commercial, or institutional development shall be divided by 2,000 square feet to determine the number of REUs to be charged to the development. This number shall be left to the discretion of the Village of Bloomfield Building Inspector and may be reduced if appropriate, depending on the service requirements of the new development. The number of REU’s for residential properties shall be the number of separate dwelling units assigned by the Village of Bloomfield Building Inspector. New residential development shall be charged all three fees. The impact fees for each type of public facility are as follows: a) Capital costs for Parks and Open Space Systems, including construction: $908 per residential unit. Credit shall be given for the amount of any Park Fees previously paid to the Village of Bloomfield pursuant to Section 18.17 of the Municipal Code with respect to the lot or parcel for which a building permit is sought. b) Capital costs for the Police Department, including land and buildings: $516 per residential unit. Credit shall be given for the amount of any Police Department Fees previously paid to the Village of Bloomfield pursuant to Section 18.17 of the Municipal Code with respect to the lot or parcel for which a building permit is sought. c) Capital costs for the Fire and Rescue Department, including land and buildings: $773.00 per residential unit. Credit shall be given for the amount of any Fire and Rescue Department Fees previously paid to the Village of Bloomfield pursuant to Section 18.17 of the Municipal Code with respect to the lot or parcel for which a building permit is sought. (8) SEPARATE FUND ESTABLISHED. The Village shall establish and maintain a segregated, interest-bearing account for each category of impact fees collected by it. Such funds shall be accounted for separately from other funds of the Village. Impact fees and interest earned on impact fees may be expended only for capital costs for which the impact fees were imposed. (9) REFUND OF FEE. Any impact fee imposed and collected under this ordinance which is not expended for committed for expenditure within ten (10) years from the date the impact fee was paid shall be refunded to the current property owner upon which said impact fee was imposed. The Village Board has determined the ten-year period to be appropriate for planning and financing the selected public facilities for which the impact fees are imposed. (10) FEE REVIEW. The fee schedule set forth in this ordinance may be reviewed by the Village Board at any time as a result of changes in facility needs, inflation, revised cost estimates, capital improvements, changes in other funding sources and other relevant factors, and in accordance with the standards for impact fees in Section 66.0617(6) of the Wisconsin Statutes. (11) APPEAL. A person upon whom an impact fee is imposed, within fifteen (15) days of the imposition of the impact fee, may contest the amount, collection, or use of the impact fee by filing a written request with the Village Clerk describing the nature of said appeal, providing supporting documentation, and specifying the basis upon which the appeal is taken. At the next regular Village Board meeting, the Village Board shall notify the appealing party of the time and place of the Village Board meeting at which time the appealing party shall be given the opportunity to present additional information in support of the appeal. (12) SEVERABILITY. If any portion of this Section is declared illegal or invalid for any reason, that illegally or invalidity shall not affect the remaining legal and valid portions of this ordinance which shall remain in full force and effect.” Section Two: Pursuant to Section 66.0103 and 60.80(1) and (3), Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be effective the day after its publication subsequent to its adoption. Adopted this 09th day of September 2013. Village President Attest: Village Clerk

Continued from page 8 invalid, the invalidity does not affect other provisions or applications of this ordinance that can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this ordinance are severable. SECTION V - EFFECTIVE DATE, CONSTRUCTION This ordinance is effective on publication or posting. The Town clerk shall properly post or publish this ordinance as required under s. 61.50, Wis. Stats. Adopted this 5TH day of AUGUST, 2013. [Signatures of Town board Chairman] [Signatures of Town board Supervisor] [Signatures of Town board Supervisor] Attest: [Signature of Town clerk] Oct. 31, 2013

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ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1090 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 18.16 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING IMPACT FEES Amended Date: September 09, 2013 An ordinance to amend Section 18.16 of the Municipal Code of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin. The Town Board of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, does hereby ordain as follows: Section One: Section 18.16 of the Municipal Code of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin is hereby amended to read: “18.16 IMPACT FEES (1) PUBLIC FACILITIES ASSESSMENT. In accordance with Section 66.0617 of the Wisconsin Statutes, the Town of Bloomfield has prepared a needs assessment regarding selected public facilities for which impact fees may be imposed. A copy of the reports “Public Facilities Needs Assessment: Parks, Police, Fire and Rescue for the Town of Bloomfield” and “Needs Assessment Study for Park Impact Fee” are on file and available in the Clerk’s office. (2) DEFINITIONS. The definitions set forth in Section 66.0617 of the Wisconsin Statutes, and any amendments thereto are incorporated and made a part of this section as though fully set herein. (3) FEES. An impact fee shall be imposed with this ordinance and Section 66.0617 of the Wisconsin Statues by the Town of Bloomfield upon any person applying for a building period for residential construction with the Town of Bloomfield that results in an increase in the number of residential equivalent units in the Town of Bloomfield. An impact fee shall be charged for each additional residential equivalent unit resulting from the construction. (4) STANDARDS FOR FEE. In accord with Wisconsin Statutes, the Town of Bloomfield adopts the following standards for impact fees imposed under this ordinance. Impact fees adopted by the Town of Bloomfield: a) Shall bear a rational relationship to the need for new, expanded, or improved public facilities that are required to serve land development. b) May not exceed the proportionate share of the capital costs that are required to serve land development as compared to existing uses of land with the Town of Bloomfield. c) Shall be based upon the actual capital costs or reasonable estimates of capital costs for new, expanded, or improved public facilities. d) Shall be reduced to compensate for other capital costs imposed by the Town of Bloomfield with respect to land development to provide or pay for public facilities including special assessments, special charges, land dedications, or fees in lieu of land dedication under Chapter 236, Wisconsin Statutes, or any other items of value. e) Shall be reduced to compensate for money received from the federal or state government specifically to provide or pay for the public facilities for which the impact fees are imposed. f) May not include amounts necessary to address existing deficiencies in public facilities. (5) COLLECTION. Impact fees shall be collected as follows: a) Impact fees will be collected in full by the Town Clerk from the property owner before a building permit is issued. b) Impact fees will also be collected when a building permit is issued if land is converted from existing residential units to additional residential units. (6) LOW-COST HOUSING. No exemptions shall be made on land development that provides for low-cost housing. (7) FEE SCHEDULE. Impact fees for public police, fire and rescue facilities will be collected for industrial, commercial, or institutional issues as the demand for public facilities are equally generated by these developments in the Town. Impact fees shall be based upon a residential equivalent unit (REU) with each separate dwelling unit equal to one (1) REU. Impact fees for industrial, commercial, or institutional development shall be based on the size of the development compared to new residential development. The average size of a new house is 2,000 square feet. The area of the new industrial, commercial, or institutional development shall be divided by 2,000 square feet to determine the number of REUs to be charged to the development. This number shall be left to the discretion of the Town of Bloomfield Building Inspector and may be reduced if appropriate, depending on the service requirements of the new development. The number of REU’s for residential properties shall be the number of separate dwelling units assigned by the Town of Bloomfield Building Inspector. New residential development shall be charged all three fees. The impact fees for each type of public facility are as follows: a) Capital costs for Parks and Open Space Systems, including construction: $908 per residential unit. Credit shall be given for the amount of any Park Fees previously paid to the Town of Bloomfield pursuant to Section 18.17 of the Municipal Code with respect to the lot or parcel for which a building permit is sought. b) Capital costs for the Police Department, including land and buildings: $516 per residential unit. Credit shall be given for the amount of any Police Department Fees previously paid to the Town of Bloomfield pursuant to Section 18.17 of the Municipal Code with respect to the lot or parcel for which a building permit is sought. c) Capital costs for the Fire and Rescue Department, including land and buildings: $773.00 per residential unit. Credit shall be given for the amount of any Fire and Rescue Department Fees previously paid to the Town of Bloomfield pursuant to Section 18.17 of the Municipal Code with respect to the lot or parcel for which a building permit

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TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1091 Date: September 9, 2013 An ordinance to create Chapter 27, Division 15, Sections 27-180 through 27194 of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code, regulating telecommunications towers and related facilities. Section One: The Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin Board does hereby create Chapter 27, Division 15, Sections 27-180 through 27-194 of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code, a summary of which is as follows: The Town of Bloomfield is adopting an ordinance to regulate the installation, use and other regulatory aspects of telecommunications towers, antennas and related facilities, under its zoning code, to protect the public health, safety, convenience, general welfare and tax base. This ordinance regulates location, installation and removal, structural design, conditional use permits, zoning permits, updating of information, and the appeal process related to decisions about such facilities. The full text of Chapter 27, Division 15, Sections 27-180 through 27-194 is available at the Town of Bloomfield Town Hall. It may be obtained from the Town of Bloomfield Clerk. Section Two: Pursuant to Secs. 66.0103 and 61.50, Wis. Stats., this ordinance shall be effective the day after its publication subsequent to its adoption. Adopted this 9th day of September, 2013. Daniel Schoonover, Town Chairman Attest: Cynthia Howard, Town Clerk Public Hearing: September 9, 2013 Passed: September 9, 2013 Published: October 31, 2013 Oct. 31, 2013

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ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1085A ORDINANCE AMENDING THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD (Gifford) THE TOWN BOARD OF THE TOWN OF BLOOMFIELD DOES HEREBY ORDAIN AS FOLLOWS: That the Zoning Ordinance for the Town of Bloomfield, Wisconsin, is hereby amended by rezoning the following described property, a part of Twin Lakes Road, Town of Bloomfield - (tax parcel number MB2600002): A part of the Southeast ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of Section 26, Town 1 North, Range 18 East, Bloomfield Township, Walworth County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commence at the East ¼ corner of said Section 26; thence S 88°41’20” W 861.94 feet along the South line of the Northeast ¼ of said Section 26 to the point

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ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1084 Date: February 4, 2013 An ordinance to repeal and recreate Section 5.13 (2) and (3) of the Municipal Code of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, to repeal and recreate the Rates for Service. The Town Board of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, does hereby ordain as follows: Section One: Section 5.13(2) and (3) of the Municipal Code of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin is hereby created to read as follows: 5.13 CHARGES FOR RESCUE SERVICES. (2) DEFINITIONS. For the purposes of this section, the following words have the following meanings: (a) ALS means advanced life support. The prehospital and interfacility emergency medical care consisting of basic life support procedures and invasive lifesaving procedures including the placement of advance airway adjuncts, intravenous infusions, manual defibrillation, electrocardiogram interpretation, administration of approved drugs and other advanced skills identified in the Wisconsin scopes of practice as provided by DHS 110.04 Admin Code. (b) ALS Assessment is an assessment performed by an ALS crew as part of an emergency response that was necessary because the patient’s reported condition at the time of dispatch was such that only an ALS crew was qualified to perform the assessment. An ALS assessment does not necessarily result in a determination that the patient requires an ALS level of service. (c) ALS Intervention is a procedure that is in accordance with State and local laws, required to be done by an emergency medical technician-intermediate (EMTIntermediate) or EMT-Paramedic. (d) ALS level 1 is the transportation by ground ambulance vehicle and the provision of medically necessary supplies and services including the provision of an ALS assessment or at least one ALS intervention which can include invasive techniques such as IV therapy, intubation and/or other drug administration, defibrillation, and airway management. (e) ALS level 2 includes the transportation by ground ambulance vehicle and the provision of medically necessary supplies and services including (1) at least three separate administrations of one or more medications by intravenous push/bolus or by continuous infusion (excluding crystalloid fluids) or (2) ground ambulance transport, medically necessary supplies and services, and the provision of at least one of the ALS2 procedures listed below: 1. Manual defibrillation/ caridoversion; 2. Endotracheal intubation; 3. Central venous line; 4. Cardiac pacing; 5. Chest decompression; 6. Surgical airway; or 7. Intraosseous line (f) BLS means basic life support. The emergency medical care that is rendered to a sick, disabled or injured individual, based on signs, symptoms or complaints, prior to the individual’s hospitalization or while transporting the individual between health care facilities and that is limited to use of the knowledge, skills and techniques received from training required for licensure as an emergency medical technician — basic, or for certification as a first responder as defined by § 256.15 Wis. Stat. (g) Standby Service means an ambulance with two medical technicians, will locate themselves at a function or event and will remain dedicated to that event, and will not be available for other routine EMS calls in the area. Dedicated standbys are subject to the availability of “EMS” crews and resources, however, are subject to removal at the discretion of the acting chief for immediate life-threatening emergencies. (h) Treat/non-transport means any treatment performed by emergency medical technicians but no transportation is provided to a medical facility. On rare occasion these services will not be billed as the services provided were nominal. (3) RATES FOR SERVICES. T h e rates for medical/rescue services provided by the Bloomfield Genoa City Fire and Rescue shall be as follows: Service BLS ALS level 1

Resident Fee $550 $675

Non-Resident Fee $650 $800

ALS level 2 $800 $925 Mileage Charge (per mile) $15 $15 Treat/non-transport $100 $125 Standby service $75 $75 Section Two: Pursuant to Sec. 66.0103 and 60.80(1) and (3), Wis. Stats., this Ordinance shall be effective the day after its publication subsequent to its adoption. Adopted this 4th day of February, 2013. Dan Schoonover, Town Chairperson Attest: Cynthia Howard, Town Clerk Oct. 31, 2013

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Adopted this 5th day of August, 2013. Daniel Schoonover, Town Chairman Attest: Cynthia Howard, Town Clerk Oct. 31, 2013

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AT VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY, WISCONSIN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Public Hearing will be held on Thursday, November 14th, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. at Village Hall, 715 Walworth St. before the Planning Commission of the Village of Genoa City, Wisconsin on a rezone from A-1 (Agricultural District) to B-2 (Highway Business District) has been submitted by Mike Lazarus dba: Jortat LLC to the Village of Genoa City Planning Commission on the following described property: PARCEL # 62-4-119-303-0105 Lot 2 if CSM #2729 SW ¼ of Sec 30 in TWN 1 North of R 19 East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY; KENOSHA COUNTY, WI. All interested parties in the above matter are invited to attend. The Village Planning Commission will be in session on Thursday, November 14th, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. at the Village Hall, 715 Walworth Street, Genoa City, Wisconsin to consider any objections that may have been filed and to hear all persons desiring to be heard. Dated this 31st day of October, 2013 and 7th day of November 2013. William Antti, Chairperson, Village Planning Commission Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 2013

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ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-1086 Date: 05/06/2013 An ordinance to combine the office of Town Clerk and Town Treasurer, and to change same from an elected position to one appointed by the Town Board of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin. The Town Board of the Town of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, does hereby ordain as follows: Section One: Pursuant to Wis. Stats. § 60.30(1e)(a), the office of Town Clerk and Town Treasurer shall be combined and filled by appointment of a majority of the members-elect of the Town Board. Further, the term of office for the appointed position shall be set by the Town Board, but may not exceed three (3) years per §60.30(1e)(c). The Town Board may reappoint the officer for additional terms. However, removal by the Town Board during a given term of office may only be for “cause” as defined under § 17.001 and required by § 60.30(1e)(f). This ordinance is subject to approval by the Town electors in a referendum, which is hereby called by the Town Board at the next spring election date. The referendum question shall be: “Shall the person holding the combined office of Town Clerk/Treasurer in the Town of Bloomfield be appointed by the Town Board?” The salary of the appointed position shall be set by the Town Board and may not be reduced during the term of office. Section Two: In light of the Town Board’s action in Section one, herein, Section 1.02 (2) of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code shall be repealed; and Section 1.03 (4) of the Town of Bloomfield Municipal Code shall be repealed and recreated to read as follows: 1.03 APPOINTED OFFICIALS. OFFICIAL (4) Clerk/Treasurer HOW APPOINTED By Town Board TERM By contract Section three: This ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after the date of its Town Board passage, notice after passage per § 60.80 and also its referendum approval by the Town electors as required by § 60.30(1e)(b) Adopted this 6th day of May, 2013. Dan Schoonover Town Chairperson Attest: Cynthia Howard Town Clerk Oct. 31, 2013

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WILLIAMS BAY PUBLIC NOTICES OFFICIAL PUBLICATION VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that there will be a Public Hearing before the Plan Commission on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. at the Village Hall in Williams Bay, Wisconsin to consider the following: THE PETITION OF Anthony Bartnick for a Conditional Use Permit. TAX KEY NUMBER: WA772-3 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot- 3 STREET ADDRESS: 350 Geneva Street, Williams Bay The petitioner requests a Conditional Use Permit to install a 6 foot solid wall cedar fence with 1 foot top portion lattice work; situated on west side of property. In accordance with Ordinance Chapter 18.0809D(2)(a)(b) All persons, and their agents or attorneys will be given an opportunity to be heard in relation thereto. Jacqueline Hopkins Village Clerk Oct. 24 & 31, 2013

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VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Date: December 2, 2014 Time: 7:00 pm Place: Village of Bloomfield Village Hall N1100 Town Hall Road Pell Lake, WI 53157 Purpose: The Village Plan Commission has recommended to the Village Board a change to the Village Comprehensive Plan including the newly incorporated limits of the Village of Bloomfield into the Comprehensive Plan and further regulating when C-2 zoning would be permitted in the Village in the future. A copy of the proposed ordinance amending the Village Comprehensive Plan will be available in the Village Clerk’s office during normal business hours. Oct. 31, 2013

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VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-09 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 18.16 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING IMPACT FEES Amended Date: September 09, 2013 An ordinance to amend Section 18.16 of the Municipal Code of the Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin. The Village Board of the Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, does hereby ordain as follows: Section One: Section 18.16 of the Municipal Code of the Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin is hereby amended to read: “18.16 IMPACT FEES (1) PUBLIC FACILITIES ASSESSMENT. In accordance with Section 66.0617 of the Wisconsin Statutes, the Village of Bloomfield has prepared a needs assessment regarding selected public facilities for which impact fees may be imposed. A copy of the reports “Public Facilities Needs Assessment: Parks, Police, Fire and Rescue for the Village of Bloomfield” and “Needs Assessment Study for Park Impact Fee” are on file and available in the Clerk’s office. (2) DEFINITIONS. The definitions set forth in Section 66.0617 of the Wisconsin Statutes, and any amendments thereto are incorporated and made a part of this section as though fully set herein. (3) FEES. An impact fee shall be imposed with this ordinance and Section 66.0617 of the Wisconsin Statues by the Village of Bloomfield upon any person applying for a building period for residential construction with the Village of Bloomfield that results in an increase in the number of residential equivalent units in the Village of Bloomfield. An impact fee shall be charged for each additional residential equivalent unit resulting from the construction. (4) STANDARDS FOR FEE. In accord with Wisconsin Statutes, the Village of Bloomfield adopts the following standards for impact fees imposed under this ordinance. Impact fees adopted by the Village of Bloomfield: a) Shall bear a rational relationship to the need for new, expanded, or improved public facilities that are required to serve land development. b) May not exceed the proportionate share of the capital costs that are required to serve land development as compared to existing uses of land with the Village of Bloomfield. c) Shall be based upon the actual capital costs or reasonable estimates of capital costs for new, expanded, or improved public facilities. d) Shall be reduced to compensate for other capital costs imposed by the Village of Bloomfield with respect to land development to provide or pay for public

Public Hearing: September 09, 2013 Passed: September 09, 2013 Published: October 31, 2013 Oct. 31, 2013

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10B

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

PUBLIC NOTICES VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD

VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD

VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD

WALWORTH SCHOOL BOARD

WALWORTH SCHOOL BOARD

WALWORTH SCHOOL BOARD

STATE OF WISCONSIN Village of Bloomfield Walworth County ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-08 AUGUST 5, 2013

(3) If regular office hours are not maintained at the location where records are kept, the records will be available for inspection and copying upon at least 48 hours advance notice of intent to inspect or copy. (4) A requester shall be permitted to use facilities comparable to those available to Village employees to inspect, copy or abstract a record. (5) The legal custodian may require supervision during inspection or may impose other reasonable restrictions on the manner of access to an original record if the record is irreplaceable or easily damaged. (6) A requester shall be charged a fee to defray the cost of locating and copying records as follows: (a) The cost of photocopying shall be the present, current per page cost as determined by the custodian. Such cost shall be calcu¬lated not to exceed the actual, necessary and direct cost of reproduction. (b) If the form of a written record does not permit copying, the actual and necessary cost of photographing and photographic processing shall be charged. (c) The actual full cost of providing a copy of other records not in printed form on paper, such as films, computer. printouts and audiotapes or videotapes, shall be charged. (d) If mailing or shipping is necessary, the actual cost thereof shall also be charged. (e) There shall be no charge for locating a record unless the actual cost therefore exceeds $50, in which case the actual cost shall be determined by the legal custodian and billed to the requester. (f) The legal custodian shall estimate the cost of all applicable fees and may require a cash deposit adequate to assure payment if such estimate exceeds $5. (g) Elected and appointed officials of the Village shall not be required to pay for public records they may reasonably require for the proper performance of their official duties. (h) The legal custodian may provide copies of a record without charge or at a reduced charge where he or she determines that waiver or reduction of the fee is in the public interest. (7) Pursuant to §19.34, Wis. Stats., and the guidelines therein listed, each authority shall adopt, prominently display and make avail¬able for inspection and copying at its offices, for the guidance of the public, a notice containing a description of its organization and the established times and places at which, the legal custodian from whom, and the methods whereby, the public may obtain information and access to records in its custody, make requests for records, or obtain copies of records, and the costs thereof. This subsection does not apply to members of the Village Board.

ORDINANCE NO. 2013-O-10 Date: September 9, 2013 An ordinance to create Chapter 27, Division 15, Sections 27-180 through 27194 of the Village of Bloomfield Municipal Code, regulating telecommunications towers and related facilities. Section One: The Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin Board does hereby create Chapter 27, Division 15, Sections 27-180 through 27194 of the Village of Bloomfield Municipal Code, a summary of which is as follows: The Village of Bloomfield is adopting an ordinance to regulate the installation, use and other regulatory aspects of telecommunications towers, antennas and related facilities, under its zoning code, to protect the public health, safety, convenience, general welfare and tax base. This ordinance regulates location, installation and removal, structural design, conditional use permits, zoning permits, updating of information, and the appeal process related to decisions about such facilities. The full text of Chapter 27, Division 15, Sections 27-180 through 27-194 is available at the Village of Bloomfield Village Hall. It may be obtained from the Village of Bloomfield Clerk. Section Two: Pursuant to Secs. 66.0103 and 61.50, Wis. Stats., this ordinance shall be effective the day after its publication subsequent to its adoption. Adopted this 9th day of September Ken Monroe, Village President Attest: Cynthia Howard, Village Clerk Oct. 31, 2013

WALWORTH JT. DISTRICT #1 Walworth, Wisconsin 53184 REGULAR BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING Monday, September 30, 2013 MINUTES The meeting was called to order by Mrs. Kelly Freeman, President, at 5:32 P.M. Members in attendance included: Mr. Jacob Ries, Mrs. Mary Heyer, Mr. Richard Hildebrandt, and Dr. Valerie Schmitz. Also in attendance was Mrs. Pamela Knorr, District Administrator; Ms. Pamela Larson, Principal; and Ms. Karie Bourke, Business Administrative Assistant. Motion by Mr. Ries to adjourn to closed session pursuant to S19.85 (1)(e) deliberating or negotiating the purchasing of public properties, the investing of public funds, or conducting other specified business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons require a closed session responsibility. Re: WIT Negotiations and (1)(c) consideration of employment, promotion, compensation or performance evaluation data of any public employee which the governmental body has jurisdiction or exercises responsibility. Re: Individual Teacher Contracts and District Administrator’s Evaluation. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Roll call vote 5-0. The meeting was adjourned into closed session at 5:33 P.M. Mrs. Freeman reconvened the meeting back into open session at 7:25 P.M. Also in attendance were Mrs. Barbara Dade, Executive Secretary; Ms. Jade Bolack, Media Representative; two staff members; and one community member. 1. Pledge of Allegiance- The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance. 2. Approval of Minutes, Monthly Invoices, and Financial StatementsConsent motion by Mrs. Heyer to approve the open session meeting minutes from the meeting held on August 26, 2013, the special/closed session meeting minutes from September 3, 2013, and the special/closed session meeting minutes from September 9, 2013. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 5-0. Consent motion by Mr. Ries to approve the September invoices including general fund checks #51411-#51545 totaling $204,811.32, payroll checks #23590#23595 totaling $2,268.41, direct deposit checks #900010824-#900010971 totaling $182,783.03, and online payments #709#720 totaling $120,112.75. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 4-0. Mrs. Heyer abstained. 3. Communication from the Public- Ms. Jade Bolack, Lake Geneva Regional News Representative, questioned the scores of the latest state report card for Walworth Jt. District #1. Ms. Larson reviewed the importance to improve the scores along with future ways to implement

b. Approval of 2013-2014 Budget for Publishing Prior to the Annual MeetingMotion by Mr. Hildebrandt to approve the 2013-2014 Budget for Publishing Prior to the Annual Meeting. Second by Dr. Schmitz. Motion carried 5-0. c. Establish Date/Time of Annual Meeting- Motion by Mrs. Heyer to approve the Annual Meeting to be held on October 21, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. with the regular board meeting at 6:00 P.M. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 5-0. d. Use of District Facilities- Mrs. Knorr received two requests for the use of the district facilities by the Big Foot Pioneers 4-H Club for a banquet on November 11, 2013 and Immanuel United Church of Christ for the turkey dinner preparations for the church. Motion by Mr. Hildebrandt to approve the requests, as presented. Second by Mrs. Heyer. Motion carried 5-0. e. First Reading: Board Policies 167 and 656- Updated copies were emailed to the board members. f. Acceptance of EMC Rebate Check- Motion by Mr. Ries to accept the EMC rebate check in the amount of $554.00 to be deposited into the general fund. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 5-0. g. Letter to Julie Jenks with Copies Included- Motion by Mrs. Heyer to approve the letter be sent to Julie Jenks. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 5-0. h. Highway 14 Lobbyist/Assistance- The school lawyer suggested the board should think about hiring a lobbyist/assistance on the Highway 14 Project. Discussion ensued. A discussion of this item was tabled until added information regarding the lobbyist is investigated further. i. 2013-2015 Administrative Contracts- Motion by Mrs. Heyer to table the 2013-2015 Administrative Contracts until the October regular board meeting until the settlement of teacher contracts. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 5-0. j. Establish Grade 8 Graduation Date/Time- Motion by Mr. Ries to approve Friday, June 6, 2014 at 7:00 P.M. for the Grade 8 Graduation date and time. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 5-0. The open session was adjourned back into closed session by Mrs. Freeman, President, at 8:40 P.M. The next meeting will be held on Monday, October 21, 2013 at 6:00 P.M. Motion by Mr. Ries to adjourn the meeting. Second by Mrs. Heyer. Motion carried 5-0. The meeting was adjourned at 9:15 P.M.

at 5:13 P.M. Mrs. Freeman reconvened the meeting into open session at 7:30 P.M. 1. First Reading: Board Policies 424 and 444- Copies of these policies were distributed to the board members. 2. Medical Leave of AbsenceMotion by Mrs. Heyer to accept the medical leave, with deepest regret, of Mrs. Pamela Knorr, District Administrator. Every board members wishes Mrs. Knorr good health. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 4-0. Motion by Mrs. Heyer to request a letter be sent to parents, Big Foot Area School Boards, and all Big Foot Area School’s Administration regarding Mrs. Knorr’s medical leave. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 4-0. 3. Individual Teacher ContractsMotion by Mr. Hildebrandt to approve employee payback sick day compensation for two Individual Teacher Contracts. Second by Dr. Schmitz. Motion carried 4-0. 4. WIT Negotiations- Motion by Dr. Schmitz to approve WIT Contracts for 2012-2013 with step/lane movement, the 2013-2014 WIT Contracts with no step/lane movements, and the new extracurricular pay schedule. Second by Mrs. Heyer. Motion carried 4-0. 5. Interim District AdministratorMotion by Mr. Hildebrandt to approve the appointment of Ms. Pamela Larson as Interim District Administrator. Second by Dr. Schmitz. Motion carried 4-0.

An Ordinance amending Section 30.02 and creating Section 30.011 Public Records of the Village of Bloomfield Municipal Code RE: Records Retention Ordinance authorized per Wis. Stats. 19.21. SECTION I – TITLE AND PURPOSE This ordinance is entitled the Village of Bloomfield Public Records Ordinance. The purpose of this ordinance is to provide the village officers of the Village of Bloomfield creating the authority to maintain public records in possession of the Village of Bloomfield. SECTION II – AUTHORITY The Village Board of the Village of Bloomfield, Walworth County, Wisconsin, has the specific authority under s. 19.21 (4), Wis. Stats., to manage public records in the possession of the Village of Bloomfield. SECTION III – ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE This ordinance, adopted by a majority of the Village Board on a roll call vote with a quorum present and voting and proper notice having been given, authorizes the powers and establishes the duties of the Village officers of the Village of Bloomfield to manage and destroy obsolete public records in the possession of the Village of Bloomfield. THE VILLAGE BOARD OF THE VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD, WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN, DOES HEREBY CREATE SECTION 30.011 AND AMEND SECTION 30.02 OF THE VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD MUNICIPAL CODE, AS FOLLOWS: “30.011 DEFINITIONS. DEFINITIONS. For the purposes of this section, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated: (1) AUTHORITY. Any of the following Village entities having custody of a Village record: an office, elected official, agency, board, commission, committee, council, department or public body corporate and politic created by constitution, law, ordinance, rule or order; or a formally constituted subunit of the foregoing, any court of law. (2) CUSTODIAN. That officer, department head, division head, or employee of the Village designated under §30.021 or otherwise respon¬sible by law to keep and preserve any Village records on file, deposit or keep such records in his or her office, or is lawfully in possession or entitled to possession of such public records and who is required by this section to respond to requests for access to such records. (3) RECORD. Any material on which written, drawn, printed, spoken, visual or electromagnetic information is recorded or preserved, regardless of physical form or characteristics, which has been created or is being kept by an authority. “Record” includes, but is not limited to, handwritten, typed or printed pages, maps, charts, photographs, films, recordings, tapes (including computer tapes), and computer printouts. “Record” does not include drafts, notes, preliminary com¬putations and like materials prepared for the originator’s personal use or prepared by the originator in the name of a person for whom the originator is working; materials which are purely the personal property of the custodian and have no relation to his or her office; materials to which access is limited by copyright, patent or bequest; and published materials in the possession of an authority other than a public library which are available for sale, or which are available for inspection at a public library. 30.02 RECORD RETENTION 30.020 DUTY TO MAINTAIN RECORDS DUTY TO MAINTAIN RECORDS. (1) Except as provided under §30.024, each officer and employee of the Village shall safely keep and preserve all records received from his or her predecessor or other persons and required by law to be filed, deposited or kept in his or her office or which are in the lawful possession or control of the officer or employee or his or her deputies, or to the possession or control of which he or she or they may be lawfully entitled as such officers or employees and as required under §19.21, Wis. Stat. (2) Upon the expiration of an officer’s term of office or an employee’s term of employment, or whenever the office or position of employment becomes vacant, each such officer or employee shall deliver to his or her successor all records then in his or her custody and the successor shall receipt therefore to the officer or employee, who shall file such receipt with the Village Clerk, If a vacancy occurs before a successor is selected or qualifies, such records shall be delivered to such successor upon the latter’s receipt. 30.021 LEGAL CUSTODIANS LEGAL CUSTODIANS. (1) The Village Clerk, Deputy Clerk or in his or her absence or disability or in case of vacancy, the Village President, is hereby designated the legal custodian of all Village records. (2) Unless otherwise prohibited by law, the Village Clerk or the Clerk’s designee shall act as legal custodian for the Village Board and for any committees, commissions, boards or other authorities created by ordinance or resolution of the Village Board. (3) For every authority not specified in subs. (1) or (2), the authority’s chief administrative officer is the legal custodian for the authority, but the officer may designate an employee of his or her staff to act as the legal custodian. (4) Each legal custodian shall name a person to act as legal custodian in his or her absence or the absence of his or her designee. (5) The legal custodian shall have full legal power to render decisions and to carry out the duties of an authority under subch. II of Ch. 19, Wis. Stats., and this subchapter. The designation of a legal custodian does not affect the powers and duties of an authority under this section. 30.022 PUBLIC ACCESS TO RECORDS PUBLIC ACCESS TO RECORDS. (1) Except as provided in §30.023, any requester has a right to inspect a record and to make or receive a copy of any records as provided in §19.35(1) Wis. Stats. (2) Records will be available for inspection and copying during all regular office hours for each authority which maintains regular business hours.

30.023 ACCESS PROCEDURES ACCESS PROCEDURES. (1) A request to inspect or copy a record shall be made to the legal custodian. A request shall be deemed sufficient if it reasonably describes the requested record or the informa¬tion requested. However, a request for a record without a reasonable limitation as to subject matter or length of time represented by the record does not constitute a sufficient request. A request may be made orally, but a request must be in writing before an action to enforce the request is commenced under §19.37, Wis. Stats. Except as provided below, no request may be refused because the person making the request is unwilling to be identified or to state the purpose of the request. No request may be refused because the request is received by mail, unless prepayment of a fee is required under §30.022(6)(f). A requester may be required to show acceptable identification whenever the requested record is kept at a private residence or whenever security reasons or federal law or regulations so require. (2) Each custodian, upon request for any record, shall, as soon as practicable without delay, either fill the request or notify the requester of the authority’s determination to deny the request in whole or in part and the reasons therefore. If the legal custodian, after conferring with the Village Attorney, determines that a written request is so general as to be unduly time consuming, the party making the request may first be required to itemize his or her request in a manner which would permit reasonable compliance. (3) A request for a record may be denied as provided in §30.024. If a request is made orally, the request may be denied orally unless a demand for a written statement of the reasons denying the request is made by the requester within 5 business days of the oral denial. If a written request is denied in whole or in part, the requester shall receive a written statement of the reasons for denying the request. Every written denial of a request shall inform the requester that if the request for the record was made in writing, the determination is subject to review upon petition for a writ of mandamus under §19.37(1), Wis. Stats., or upon application to the attorney general or a district attorney.

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WALWORTH SCHOOL BOARD WALWORTH JOINT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO.1 Annual School District Meeting Walworth Elementary School Minutes, October 22, 2012 MINUTES The meeting was called to order by Mrs. Kelly Freeman, President, at 7:00 P.M. Members in attendance included: Mr. Patrick Hubertz, Mrs. Mary Heyer, Mrs. Margaret Hubertz, Mr. Jacob Ries, and Mr. Richard Hildebrandt. Also in attendance were Mrs. Pamela Knorr, District Administrator; Mrs. Pamela Larson, Principal; Ms. Karie Bourke, Business Administrative Assistant; Mrs. Barbara Dade, Executive Secretary; Ms. Jade Bolack, Media Representative; three staff members; one student; and three parents/community members. Mrs. Freeman welcomed everyone to the Annual Board meeting. 1. Election of Annual Meeting Chairman Person-Motion by Mr. Hubertz to elect Mrs. Freeman as the chairperson. Second by Mrs. Heyer. Motion carried 12-0. 2. Reading of the minutes of the last Annual Meeting -Motion by Mr. Hubertz to waive the reading of last year’s minutes and to approve, as written. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 12-0. 3. Auditor’s Report -Mrs. Heyer read the unaudited Auditor’s Report. Motion by Mrs. Hubertz to approve the unaudited Auditor’s Report, as presented. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 12-0. 4. Treasurer’s Report -Mr. Hildebrandt read the unaudited Treasurer’s Report, page #9, #10, and #11, as presented in the Annual Meeting handout. Motion by Mr. Gauger to approve the unaudited Treasurer’s Report, as presented. Second by Mrs. Hubertz. Motion carried 12-0. 5. Presentation of 2012-2013 Budget and Consideration of Resolution A Adoption of the Budget -Mrs. Knorr presented the proposed budget information on pages 12, 13, 14, & 15 of the Annual Meeting handout. Motion by Mrs. Hubertz to adopt the 2012-2013 total proposed budget in the amount of $5,399,414.00. Second by Mr. Gauger. Motion carried 120. 6. Presentation of Resolution B Adoption of Tax Levy -Mrs. Knorr presented page 17 from the Annual Meeting handout. Motion by Mr. Hubertz to adopt a tax levy of $2,133,916.00. Second by Mrs. Heyer. Motion carried 12-0. 7. Resolution C -Salaries of the Board of Education -Motion by Mrs. Hubertz to approve the yearly salary of the Board of Education to remain the same in the amount of $1 ,000.00 for the 2012-2013 school year. Second by Mrs. Dade. Motion carried 12-0. 8. Resolution 0 Disposal of Surplus Property -Motion by Mr. Hubertz to authorize disposal of surplus property. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 12-0. 9. Resolution E -Date and Hour of Future Annual Meetings -Motion by Mrs. Heyer that the date and hour of the annual meeting be determined at the discretion of the School Board. Second by Mr. Ries. Motion carried 12-0. Motion by Mr. Hubertz to adjourn the meeting. Second by Mrs. Knorr. Motion carried 12-0. The meeting was adjourned at 7:20 P.M. Minutes Prepared For: Mary Heyer, Clerk By: Barbara Dade, Executive Secretary Oct. 31, 2013

4. Reportsa. Amy Faul Request-Little Professors- Mrs. Amy Faul requested opening earlier to provide child care for the Early Release Days beginning in October, 2013 and lasting until the end of the school year. b. WASB Report- Mrs. Heyer reported the 2013 WASB Fall Regional Meeting will be held on October 23, 2013 at Elkhorn. c. Walworth History Committee Report- The Walworth History Committee has been busy updating the Walworth Jt. District #1 school history. d. YESS Task Force- Mrs. Freeman and Mrs. Heyer reported the YESS Task Force continues to carry forward to build a better family connection. e. Business Office Report- Mrs. Knorr and Ms. Bourke reviewed/distributed the 2013-2014 Third Budget Draft. f. President’s Update- Mrs. Freeman reviewed/discussed: 1) the renewal of the 2013-2014 District Goals; 2) a request for the number of families involved in Family Connections Program; 3) the visitation of State Representative Amy Loudenbeck on September 20, 2013. State Representative Amy Loudenbeck is aware of the closeness of Route 14 and the Walworth Jt. District #1; and 4) the request for Policy #424- Participation of Private School, Parochial School and Home-Based Educational Program Students in District Courses/Programs and Policy #444Interscholastic and Extracurricular Activities be sent back to the Board Policy Committee to be reviewed. g. Principal’s Report- Ms. Larson reviewed/discussed: 1) the Principal’s Report which was emailed to the board members; 2) the completion of the Summer School Report; and 3) the Safety Bulletin, dated September 17, 2013, was shared with staff, along with copies and meetings with the full staff. h. Administrator’s Report- Mrs. Knorr reviewed/distributed: 1) updated information regarding the Third Friday Enrollment Count and Enrollment History Chart; 2) the distribution of Damen Lopez’ books, “Turnaround Schools” and “No Excuses University”; 3) the Communication Committee agenda; and 4) the updated Summer School’s Report. 5. New Business a. Approval of Amy Faul’s Request for Early Releases- Motion by Mr. Hildebrandt to approve the Little Professor’s Request for Early Releases along with proof of insurance and license updated. Second by Mr. Ries. Motion carried 5-0.

Minutes Prepared For: Mary Heyer, Clerk By: Barbara Dade, Executive Secretary Oct. 31, 2013

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WALWORTH JOINT DISTRICT NO. 1 Walworth, Wisconsin 53184 Special Board of Education Meeting Monday, October 7, 2013 Minutes The meeting was called to order by Mrs. Linda Freeman, President, at 5:12 P.M. Members in attendance included: Mrs. Mary Heyer, Dr. Valerie Schmitz, and Mr. Richard Hildebrandt. Also in attendance included: Ms. Pamela Larson, Principal; and Ms. Karie Bourke, Business Administrative Assistant. Motion by Mrs. Heyer to adjourn the meeting into closed session pursuant to S19.85 (l) (e) deliberating or negotiating the purchasing of public properties, the investing of public funds, or conducting other specified business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons require a closed session responsibility. Re: WIT Negotiations and (l)(c) consideration of employment, promotion, compensation or performance evaluation data of any public employee which the governmental body has jurisdiction or exercises responsibility. Re: Individual Teacher Contracts, Administration Contracts. Second by Dr. Schmitz. Roll call vote 4-0. Mr. Jacob Ries was absent from the closed/open session meeting. The meeting was adjourned into closed session

6. Authorization of Signature Change at Walworth State Bank- Motion by Mrs. Heyer to authorize the approval of Ms. Pamela Larson to sign for wire transfers, petty cash deposits, and activity checks. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 4-0. Motion to adjourn by Dr. Schmitz. Second by Mr. Hildebrandt. Motion carried 4-0. The meeting was adjourned at 8:00 P.M. Minutes Prepared For: Linda Freeman, Board President By: Mary Heyer, Recording Secretary Oct. 31, 2013

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LEGAL NOTICE

DEADLINE 12 P.M. MONDAY

contact Sue at 262-248-4444 sue@lakegenevanews.net

Klemm Tank Lines, a highway subsidiary of the Kenan Advantage Group, is now seeking Class A CDL Drivers out of Milwaukee, WI. The hiring schedule will be local, home daily! Apply and immediately see the advantages of joining our driving team: Competitive pay, Excellent benefits, Paid training, Paid vacations & holidays, 401 K with company match And so much more! We require Class A CDL, 2 years recent, verifiable tractor-trailer experience, Tank & Hazmat endorsements (or ability to obtain) and a safe driving record. 800871-4581 for more information or apply online at TheKAG.com

TRAINING!!

TRAINING!!

TRAINING!! The #1 Real Estate organization in Wisconsin is searching for the right candidates to partner with the most rewarding and exciting business opportunity today. SHOREWEST REALTORS is now interviewing for our next training class. Contact John Tisdall at jtisdall@shorewest.com or call (262) 248-1020 today to learn more or to attend one of our career seminars.

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30.024 LIMITATIONS ON RIGHT TO ACCESS Access to records shall only be limited by relevant state and federal law. SECTION IV – SEVERABILITY If any provision of this ordinance or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the invalidity does not affect other provisions or applications of this ordinance that can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provisions of this ordinance are severable. SECTION V – EFFECTIVE DATE, CONSTRUCTION This ordinance is effective on publication or posting. The village clerk shall properly post or publish this ordinance as required under s. 61.50, Wis. Stats. Adopted this 5TH day of AUGUST, 2013. [Signatures of village board President] [Signatures of village board Trustee] [Signatures of village board Trustee] [Signatures of village board Trustee] [Signatures of village board Trustee] Attest: [Signature of village clerk] Oct.31, 2013

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VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN

CITY OF LAKE GENEVA

HELP WANTED The City of Lake Geneva is hiring for the full-time position of Administrative Assistant to the Building/Zoning Administrator. This position assists the Building/Zoning Administrator, Plan Commission and the Zoning Board of Appeals with a variety of tasks. The pay range for the position is $14 to $15 per hour and includes health, dental and retirement benefits. A complete job description can be obtained from City Hall, the City’s website or it can be e-mailed to you. Applications will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. Thursday, November 14. Applications, resumes and cover letter should be sent to: City Administrator 626 Geneva Street Lake Geneva, WI 53147 For more information, call (262) 248-3673, fax (262) 248-4715 or e-mail: djordan@cityoflakegeneva.com. The City of Lake Geneva is an equal opportunity employer.

Police Dispatcher The Lake Geneva Police Department is currently accepting applications for a part-time dispatcher. Lake Geneva provides dispatch services for police, fire and rescue for the City of Lake Geneva. Applicants must be able to work weekends, holidays and night hours. Qualifications will be provided with application. Application deadline is November 8, 2013, 5 P.M. Applications may be picked up at: Lake Geneva Police Department 626 Geneva Street. Lake Geneva, WI 53147 262-248-4455. Applications will be emailed upon request: Make your request to jfroggatt@genevaonline.com. Applications have to be submitted in person or mailed to the Lake Geneva Police Department. Applications returned by email will not be accepted. Lake Geneva is an EOE


October 31, 2013

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This is primarily a night job with some work on holidays and weekends. Send a resume and examples of your best work to

Let's Eat!

APPLES—Good variety, all hand picked (Honey crisp already sold out). Hours: 9am-6pm, Richards’ Orchards, 42350 N. Delany Rd., 1 mile N. of Rte. 173.

Human Resources Manager Daphne Ursu at dursu@kenoshanews.com or 5800 Seventh Ave., Kenosha, WI 53140 Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1022176

20

Help Wanted

100 WORKERS NEEDED Assemble crafts, wood items. Materials provided, To $480+ wk. Free Information pkg. 24 hr. 801-264-4992

ACCOUNTANT

The Kenosha News is looking for a career-minded individual to fill an opening for an entry-level accountant position with growth potential. Responsibilities will include financial statement preparation, budget development, capital asset record keeping, account analysis, and special projects. Attention to detail and accuracy are essential. The ideal candidate will have or will be pursuing completion of a bachelor’s degree in accounting, along with a working knowledge of Excel and Word, and excellent communication skills. If interested, send a letter of interest and resume to: Human Resources Kenosha News 5800 Seventh Avenue Kenosha, WI 53140 Application/resumes are also accepted at our Customer Care Counter.

The Kenosha News Circulation Department has an immediate need for a part-time person to assist with our night loading operation. These individuals will be responsible for assisting with paper cart movement, bundle loading and any other assistance our distribution center supervisors may assign. Work shifts would be on specific days each week from 2:00 a.m. to approximately 4:00 a.m. with operations taking place each day of the week. The right candidate will have the ability to lift bundles up to 50 pounds and negotiate rolling carts loaded with papers. A valid driver’s license and good driving record and knowledge of western Kenosha County are required. If interested, please send a letter of interest and resume to: Human Resources Kenosha News 5800 Seventh Avenue Kenosha, WI 53140 Applications/resumes are also accepted at our Customer Care counter. Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1023897

DRIVER TEAMS – Full-time Class A CDL team drivers wanted for national private carrier. Gurnee, IL domicile. 80K+ per driver, per year. Home weekends. No touch freight. Late model leased equipment. Excellent benefit package. Minimum 2 years experience plus good safety record. Call M-F, 8 AM - 2 PM, (888) 848-7557. Job Site ID#1023503

MANUFACTURING -- We are looking for candidates that have some manufacturing experience or entry level, but demonstrate mechanical aptitude and enjoy a fast-paced work environment. Immediate temp-to-hire openings for first or second shift plus plenty of overtime. Valve assembly, Manifold Assembly, Valve Tester, Honing, Combos Machine operator-Grinding OD & ID, center less Material Handler Roma Staffing & Management Systems 715 E. Golf Road, Suite 200A1 Schaumburg, IL Tel. 847-885-4871 MECHANICS (Diesel) — Great Pay / Benefits. APPLY www.durhamschoolservices.com, or stop by 1608 Oaks Road, Racine, WI 53406. 262-886-1312 Job Site ID#1023699

DRIVERS (SCHOOL BUS) Olson Transportation is hiring drivers for routes in Deerfield, Lake Bluff & Lake Forest Prior driving experience may qualify for higher pay. Must be 21 years of age or older. All candidates must pass a drug test and background check. Must pass a pre-employment physical. Health benefits available. Paid training. Apply in person: Ask for Kathy Burke 1134 N. Route 41, Gurnee, IL 60031 Ph. 847-336-0720. Job Site ID#1019842

• LEARN A NEW SKILL/PERFORM AMAZING FEATS • EARN EXTRA INCOME Here’s your chance to get all of your questions about Liberty’s Tax School answered. Take a look at our materials, meet the instructors and learn how knowing how to prepare taxes can benefit you. Explore all the job possibilities at Liberty. 262-358-6882 LIBERTY TAX SERVICE 800-658-1042 LibertyTax.com Job Site ID#1022771

TEACHER ASSISTANTS Wilmot, Twin Lakes West, Kenosha-Westosha Must have high school diploma, enjoy working with children with special needs. Hours vary depending student’s hours in school. Weekly pay, benefits, and cash bonuses. Go on line to apply; www.teachersoncall.com Click on: Apply On Line – Once you complete the application, a Staffing Coordinator will contact you for an interview. For assistance call toll free 1-800-713-4439. Job Site ID#1021540

AST Logistics LLC Post Office Box 82 Caledonia, WI 53108 *NO PHONE CALLS OR WALK INS PLEASE* Job Site ID#1022909

PACKAGER Good Pay, Good Benefits. SWING SHIFT REQUIRED Call 847-557-8452 Job Site ID#1023451

Training/Education

SENIOR CARE SERVICE PROVIDED — Bathing, meal prep, errands, Dr. appts, etc. Serving Lake and Kenosha County. 847-693-6382.

23

48

Local MUST be experienced & live in Waukegan/Kenosha area OTR – will train on Flatbed – Home EVERY week. Call Kim at 866-317-6556 x5 for details or apply online @ www.gypsumexpress.com Job Site ID#1022433 DRIVERS Wisco Transportation is looking for qualified OTR drivers. Good mileage pay. Paid empty miles. Benefits and sign-on bonus. Contact Wisco Transportation at: 262-723-2684. Job Site ID#1023720 FRONT DESK / MEDICAL BILLING Part/Full-time at medical clinic. Must be experienced. Fax resume to: 262-364-2400. Job Site ID#1023913

HOLIDAY BAZAAR St. Dismas Church, Sunset & McAree Waukegan, Sat., Nov. 2, 9am-8pm Sun., Nov. 3, 8am-1pm. Chicken dinner served Saturday 10am-7pm. Carry outs available. Bakery & needle work, floral, crafts, raffles & games.

50

HOME MAINTENANCE - Looking for person with 30 years experience in the trades to do light electrical, plumbing and carpentry on our single family homes. 10 +/- hours week. 815678-4771

MATTRESSES — Full $65. Queen $75. King $95. Like new, extra thick. 6224 22nd Ave. Drop-off avail. 262-496-6750. WANTED TO BUY — BUYING Gold & Silver coins - paper money - pocket & wrist watches - knifes - swords & military items & more! 262-497-6688 Joe

52 Recreation, Exercise & Sports 1978 LYMAN (fiberglass) 24 FT Biscayne model. 350 Cruisader Marine. Cuddy cabin, water and shore power, porta potty and V berths. $20,000. 630-308-5384 INDOOR BOAT STORAGE with free winterizing and wash, custom boat covers and upholstering, motor/drive repairs, buffing/waxing, Since 1963. AmericanMarineDelavan.Com 262-728-3453 WOODEN BOAT John Alden Design. Smaller version of Malabar Jr.. Built in 1929. Restored in 1989. 26 feet long. Extra’s included. $11,999. West Allis, WI www.woodenboat71@gmail.com

WHITE CAPS — 64th St., 4BR, 2.5BA, appliances included! Walking distance to Nash School/shopping. $1525/mo 262-705-0209 1 BEDROOM from $560 2 BEDROOM from $670 GAS FOR HEATING, COOKING AND HOT WATER INCLUDED 262-552-8365 WOOD CREEK APARTMENTS Mon.-Fri. 9-6; Sat. 10-4. Sunday by Appt. http://www.edwardrose.com/woodcreek

Supplies 62 Pets, & Services

Services

ZION—3 bedroom apartment for rent, Section 8 OK. No pets. Ph. 847-367-1085

92 Garage/Storage for Rent

21ST AVE., 6502 — 1 BR upper, appliances and gas included, tenants pay electric, lease required, no pets, $550 262-705-1334 58th Ave., 5505—3 BR, 1½ BA townhouse. Many closets, full private basement. $900. PH. 262-697-8066. 60TH ST., 1615 FREE UNDERGROUND PARKING FREE HEAT & HOT WATER! COMPLETELY REMODELED. 2 BR, $689. Elevator, underground parking, locked lobby, close to shopping & bus line. No smoking building. No pets. Ask for Everett,262-617-1104 63RD ST., 2921 — Upper 1 BR, $525 plus electric. Heat and water included. Ph. 262-653-9132

1 MONTH FREE www.professionalrealty.biz 262-552-9077 — Pet Friendly Apts.

1 BR RENT SPECIAL $595 CAMBRIDGE ON THE LAKE 614 15th PL. Kenosha Spacious! Includes appliances, A/C, heat & water. Private Beach. NO PETS. 262-308-8656

98 Residential For Sale CLOSE TO BUS LINE, SHOPPING AND LIBRARY — Must Sell 2 BR, 2 bath upper level condo with 1 car garage. Ph. (262)748-5058 LAKE GENEVA 2 Bedroom/2 bath first floor condominium on Lake Shore Drive. Washer/dryer, kitchen appliances included. New carpet throughout. Wood burning fireplace. Outside private patio. Secure key entry into building and to 1 car garage with storage. Maintained by experienced condo association. Call (312) 806-3308. $149,000

ABBEY SPRINGS EXTRA LARGE newly decorated home in country club community Nov. thru May 847-205-5122 or 847-924-2805 BRISTOL — 8401 198TH AVE., 1 & 2 BR APTS. $610-$660 per mo + security deposit. Clean, well maintained, quiet setting. No dogs please. Call 262-857-7558. KENOSHA REMODELED 2 BR APTS WALK TO BEACH & HARBOR PARK Starting at $650/mo. 847-235-7100

& Heavy 118 Trucks Equipment CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 4X4 2000 5.3L Reg. cab, 8-foot bed, with 8-foot Snow Way wireless plow, 110k miles, $5750 OBO. Call Mike 262-332-9287

LAKE GENEVA - 3 BD, 3 BA, 2-story condo at The Oaks. 2 living rms, 2 car gar. No pets, no smoking. $1500 mo. 262-248-6250 LAKE GENEVA 2 BD 2BA furnished, 1st floor condo, 3 mi west of downtown. Deck, grill, free laundry. No smoking, no pets, quiet building. $850 mo + min utilities. Short term lease, sec dep requir. 630-642-6456

Antiques, Classic 119 Cars & Parts PLYMOUTH 1941 - Special Deluxe, 4 door, runs and drives. $4,500. Ph. 262-537-2018

120 Automobiles

LAKE GENEVA 695 Wells St. Large 1 BD first floor APT. Utilities included. $750 mo. 262539-2436

CHRYSLER 2008 PT CRUISER TOURING EDITION $8,900 OBO — Great condition! Less than 44k miles. Ph. 262-729-2552

LAKE GENEVA Large modern DUPLEX. Ideal for seniors. 2 BD, 2 BA. heated basement, 2 car att garage, frpl, all appli., No pets, no smokers. Lease, sec. dep. $1200 mo + utilities. Avail Nov. 15. 262-248-2709

JEEP 2003 Wrangler $11,499 32k miles!! 4x4 5sp 4 cylinder, gold exterior is a Limited Edition Call 262-694-7920

LAKE GENEVA—Kitchenettes and sleeping rooms. Affordable. 262-248-4988. MOBILE HOME — 1784 Sheridan Rd. 2BR $495. No Pets. Security Deposit. Call 262891-7440.

PELL LAKE LARGE RANCH HOUSE 3 BD 1.5 BA, living room & large kitchen, laundry area, Ver y large family room w/fireplace. Breezeway, 2 car garage, extra large yard. Appliances incl. No dogs. $950 mo + sec. dep. Call 262-903-1946. or 262-279-6830 If no answer leave message.

84 Residential Rentals

STEEL BUILDING — At my Union Grove, WI home. Suitable for boat, motorhome, camper or car. Call 262-497-6176.

1128 ABODE MOTEL Sleeping rooms, Kitchenettes, Free wi-fi, Cable TV. Low Daily/Weekly Rates 847-872-3476

N. SIDE—Exec. 1100sqft 1 BR upper. Laundry, walk-in closet, deck, fenced yard. No smoking/pets $650+1/2 utility. 262-945-5407.

IF YOU USED THE BLOOD THINNER PRADAXA and suffered internal bleeding, hemorrhaging, required hospitalization or a loved one died while taking Pradaxa between October 2010 and the Present. You may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1800-535-5727

84 Residential Rentals

PONTIAC GRAND AM GT 2003. 3.4 L, black, sharp fast car, no dents or rust, runs great, tires great, $3500 obo. 262-818-3855 SCION TC 2005. Maroon. 107K, Auto, Remote start, Moonroof, AC, power windows. Great condition. $7950. Ph. 262-914-5232.

121 Vans & SUVs DODGE — 1997 Dodge Grand Caravan 128,000 miles Good condition $3000. obo 262-515-3206 or 262-694-7359 DODGE 2001 CARAVAN. Good Runner - Best Offer Ph. 262-657-3893.

84 Residential Rentals

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An Independent Contractor for KENOSHA NEWS

WINTHROP HARBOR—2 bedroom apartment. Fully updated, near schools, shopping, Metra & lakefront. $675. Call 224-637-4436

LAKE GENEVA 3 BD 1.5 BA TOWNHOUSE Avail. Dec. 1. Utilities not included. No water beds. No pets. $750 mo. 262-767-0829

COAT — Ladies size 10, 3/4 length genuine leather coat. Burgundy. Like - new. $100 obo. Call 262-279-5189.

Information

News Crew Promotions has part time positions available in the Kenosha area. We are looking for people to join our door-to-door sales team securing subscriptions.

CALL TODAY – START TOMORROW! 262-515-2739

Miscellaneous

FURNITURE — Desk. Dark Cherry Executive Style. Great Condition, 74L x 37W x 30H. Great Deal. $400. Ph. 847-774-7004.

SALES

Limited positions available – Flexible scheduling!

WAUKEGAN—clean furnished room for rent on bus line, FREE UTILITIES, $395 per month. Ph. 847-623-6119

1004 HARBOR MOTEL Efficiency Apt. Clean with Cable TV, internet, phone, refrigerator & microwave, Kitchenette, sleeping room. Daily/weekly rates. 847-872-5400

49 Rummage, Estate, Moving

RECEPTIONIST

Teens Welcome to Apply!

TREVOR — 2BR HOUSE with large deck and 2 car garage. No pets or smokers. $815/mo. Call 262-862-6022

10 NAZ MOTEL Effeciency apartment, Free HBO & WI-FI, Kitchenettes, Low Weekly & Daily Rates 847-746-1400

PET CREMATION SERVICES Pets are family too! Cremation services for your pets. Kenosha Funeral Services & Crematory. Ph. 262-652-1943 - 8226 Sheridan Rd.

84 Residential Rentals

2524 - 18TH STREET $670 - $750 HEAT INCLUDED! 262-551-7255

Home Grown!

APPLES & CIDER Jonagold, Jonathan, Winesap, Rome, Fortune, Tolman Sweet, Cortland Golds and Red Delicious. Anderson Farm Orchard, 43133 Green Bay Road, Zion. Open everyday thru 10/31, noon to 6 p.m. Beginning Nov. 1 noon - 5 p.m., Fri. Sat., Sun. or by appt. 847872-7004 or 708-436-2117

For doctors office, 30 hours per week. Must have prior office experience. People friendly and efficient. Send resume to: in8dc123@gmail.com Job Site ID#1023550

DRIVERS Needed, Flatbed

SHERIDAN RD., 1455-65 Kenosha, WI BAYSIDE APARTMENTS Phone: 262-551-8362 Large 1, 2 & 3 BR, $585.00, $685.00 & $795.00 Monthly. Includes: Heat & appliances. No pets. Escrow.

CALL FOR SUMMER SPECIAL Tree-Lined Community Near Bike Trail 1000 sq. ft., Balconies, Garages SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT 1805 BIRCH RD Kenosha, WI 53140 www.petrettiapartments.com

59 $100 and Under CHILD CARE FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED! 2-parent families over age 25, able to work with youth age 1017 & Empty Nesters/Retired Parents encouraged to Call 866-776-3760 or www.communitycareresources.com/pay-it-

ROOM FOR RENT — Harborside Room for rent . Private bath, kitchen, laundry access, WiFi, utilities. $450/mo. Ph. 608-572-0080.

1 & 2 BEDROOMS

GET ROOFED! All types of roofing & repairs. Free estimates. References 28 yrs exp. 262-764-0041

WAREHOUSE (LIGHT) AST Logistics is looking for help with packaging and labeling in a light warehouse setting. Both full and part time positions are available. Previous experience in a warehouse environment is preferred. College students are encouraged to apply. Please send work history to:

84 Residential Rentals

ROOFING

CRAFT & VENDOR FAIR—at Oak Crest Elementary School, 38550 N. Lewis Ave., Beach Park. Sat., Nov. 2, 9am-4pm.

22

CHAMP’S is looking for maintenance person part time. Call Chuck for info at 262-903-6172.

Barton Senior Residences of Zion is looking for compassionate and dependable CNAs to become part of our Barton family. You need to be able to work well in a team based environment, you must have a strong work ethic and be able to relate well to seniors. Stop in and fill out an application at 3500 Sheridan Rd., Zion, IL

TAX PREPARATION BECOME A LIBERTY TAX HERO JOB FAIR — OPEN HOUSE Friday at Noon 6221 22nd Avenue and Friday at 1:30pm at 5741 75th Street

LOADER ASSISTANT/ DRIVER

Equal Opportunity Employer Job Site ID#1023576

CNA

Wilmot, Twin Lakes West, Kenosha-Westosha Must have WI Teaching or Short Call License. Weekly pay, benefits, and cash bonuses. Fill out your application on line; www.teachersoncall.com. Click on: Apply On Line- Once you complete the application, a Staffing Coordinator will contact you for an interview. For assistance call toll free 1-800-713-4439. Job Site ID#1021544

FLOORING INSTALLATION Baumbach Flooring installs your carpet, vinyl and tile. 262-2456168

11B

24 Hr. Maintenance, easy access to the interstate, plus great local shopping

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7919 60th Ave. #103



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The Regional News

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Sports Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Thursday, October 31, 2013

Serving Badger, Big Foot & Williams Bay High Schools

C

WIAA PLAYOFFS Badger and Big Foot: How far will they go? BADGER

BIG FOOT

By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net

By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net

LAKE GENEVA — The Badger football team ground its way through Racine Horlick, Friday night, in a 16-7 victory that propelled the Badgers into the second round of the playoffs. The Badger offense put up subdued numbers: only 16 points 295 total yards compared to the 31 points and 344 yards it has averaged this season. Badger fullback Andrew Allen had a big day with 148 yards. Quarterback Collin Broderick ran for 45 yards, and threw for Allen only 20. Running back Matt Reynolds had two touchdowns but only 23 yards. Horlick displayed a stout defensive front that plugged up the middle of the field for large portions of the game. The Horlick linebackers and cornerbacks showed great speed and tenacity. “We had just a little bit of a transition period adjusting to their sets and certainly adjusting to their speed,” Badger head coach Matt Hensler said. “And once we did that I think our kids reacted very, very well.” Hensler sucked in Horlick’s linebackers with dive plays up the gut and set up a few big gains on roll-out tosses. There were weaknesses in Horlick’s defense and Badger exploited just enough of them to get ahead and stay ahead. But it was a hard-fought win and a tough defensive battle despite Badger’s explosive offensive production all season. “Offensively we showed signs all night,” Hensler said. “We just, you know, same old story, couple penalties and we put the ball on the ground, how many turnovers did we have?” Two. The Badgers had two turnovers, but the ball popped out of Badger hands five times. They recovered three dropped balls, but the two that slipped away limited scoring opportunities. The Badger’s struggled to score even when they held onto the ball, despite putting together drives that ate up a lot of clock and covered a lot of field in the third quarter. “We had a few more long drives that we didn’t just quite punch in, and that’s the stuff that we have to fix. But for what we accomplished, I’m happy. Survive and advance.” Badger defensive tackle Josh Doyle had a big impact. He recorded a key sack in the opening minutes of the second half.

WALWORTH — The Big Foot Chiefs opened up their offense against the University School of Milwaukee Wildcats, Friday night, in a crushing 44-6 playoff victory. The Chiefs are ranked No. 1 in Division IV and played like it against the Wildcats. Big Foot scored all 44 points in the first two quarters. The Chief’s offensive backfield combo of Brandon Hausner and Tim Long racked up Wedig huge numbers. Hausner had 141 yards and two touchdowns on just 10 carries. Long recorded 146 yards and three touchdowns on 15 carries. The Big Foot defense allowed only six points and 187 yards from the potent and talented Wildcat’s offense. University School’s star receiver Chris Cooper, who coming into Friday night’s game averaged 92 yards and 1.7 touchdowns per game, was held to 61 yards on just four catches against the Chiefs. The Wildcat’s feature running back Michael Tucker, who compiled more than 1,267 yards and 23 touchdowns this season was held to 8 yards on nine attempts with zero touchdowns. Their back-up running back Toriano Echols was only able to churn out 35 yards on 21 attempts. University School quarterback Zach Erickson split reps with Matthew Bach, and combined, the two were 8 for 18 for only 97 yards. With just over three minutes remaining in the second quarter, Echols was tackled for a safety on a play that started at the 3-yard line. Last week, Chiefs head coach Rodney Wedig predicted his team’s tough defense would define it in the playoffs. On Friday night, Big Foot’s defense performed as advertised, with added production from a clicking offense with a tough backfield. Wedig credited his defensive coaching staff for drawing up what he called “just a great game plan.” The defense focused on limiting Cooper’s role while at the same time playing disciplined gap control in the trenches. “All week we preached: OK we’re doing a lot of things coverage-wise definitely, but we can’t forget we have to take care of the run first,” Wedig said. “Our front seven just did an excellent job taking care of the run. We prepared well and our secondary also did well, but our big men up front really controlled the game and that was really the difference.”

PLEASE SEE BADGER PAGE 4C

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

QUARTERBACK COLLIN BRODERICK hands off the ball to fullback Andrew Allen, who ran for 148 yards during Friday’s win.

Badger vs. Marquette: Big Foot vs. Clinton: By the numbers At a glance By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net

By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net

Last Friday’s 16-7 win over Racine Horlick propelled Badger (8-2) into the second round of the WIAA playoffs. This Friday (7 p.m.), the Badgers will travel to Milwaukee County to take on the Marquette University High School Hilltoppers (8-2) at Hart Park. And it may be the Badger’s toughest match up yet.

Badger’s offensive scheme is not balanced. On average, the Badgers gain 301.9 yards on the ground and 42.8 in the air. On Friday night against Racine Horlick, the Badgers ran 57 running plays and 12 passing plays.

Big Foot head coach Rodney Wedig didn’t hesitate when asked about Friday’s matchup against the Clinton Cougars. The Chiefs defeated Clinton 42-12 on Sept. 27, but Wedig is prepared to face an improved Cougar team in the post-season. And one that carries with it a lot of emotional momentum. “They just won their first playoff game in school history,” Wedig said. “And they get to host it because the weird WIAA rules where, if you don’t host it in the first round you get to host it in the second round. “So, you know, it’s going to be an electric atmosphere.” Despite its four regular-season losses, Clinton has out scored opponents 319-234 this year.

PLEASE SEE NUMBERS PAGE 4C

PLEASE SEE GLANCE PAGE 3C

SEASON STATISTICS

SEASON STATISTICS

High-production offenses

POINTS FOR POINTS AGAINST YARDS PG RUSH YPG PASS YPG YARDS ALLOWED PG

BADGER 310 133 344.7 301.9 42.8 181.4

MUHS 326 164 426.5 170.7 255.8 283

BIG FOOT POINTS FOR 402 POINTS AGAINST 65 YARDS PG 401.4 RUSH YPG 290.4 PASS YPG 111 YARDS ALLOWED PG 158.3

CLINTON 319 234 321 238 83 326.7

PLEASE SEE BIG FOOT PAGE 3C

Big Foot volleyball advances in playoffs Lady Chiefs’ head coach Jen Koplitz to retire By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net The Big Foot girls volleyball team is still alive in the WIAA playoffs. The Lady Chiefs advanced to the state sectionals after wins on Thursday against Clinton High School and Saturday against the Jefferson Eagles. Big Foot defeated Clinton in three games: 25-23, 25-11, and 25-9. “Clinton has a good team, but they just couldn’t match our level of play,” said Lady Chiefs head coach Jen Koplitz. Clinton started strong with aggressive and emotional play, but were unable to overcome Big Foot’s consistent stateranked play. “You know we’re typically a slow starter,” Koplitz said. “And actually 16 of their points were our errors. So they only scored four points, we just; we had a lot of mistakes. Things that shouldn’t happen were happening.” The girls looked slow and hesitant in the first set.

“It was not our best game,” Koplitz said. But they eventually warmed up, and dominated the next two sets. Senior Amy Schryver compiled 22 kills and 14 diggs against Clinton. Freshman Kennedy Hehr and Senior Mikaela lagerhausen each had four aces. That momentum carried into Saturday’s game against Jefferson. The Lady Chiefs got into a groove against the Eagles. “That was the best we’ve played yet this year, you know we were just solid all around,” Koplitz said. “So I think we’re progressing nicely, I’m happy with (the way we played).” The team recorded 19 aces, 32 kills, four blocks and 52 digs. “Our offense ran smoothly and our defense was great and we served; we served them off the court, we had tons of aces.” Schryver and senior Mackenzie Long each had seven aces. “That’s not really usual,” Koplitz added. PLEASE SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE 4C

BEN STANLEY/REGIONAL NEWS

BIG FOOT JUNIOR Ali Mazur arches in the air while making a pass against Clinton Thursday night. The girls beat Clinton in three games.


2C

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

SPORTS

Badger equestrian team riding high Team is reserve state champion By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net The Badger High School Equestrian team was the Division C reserve state champion this year. They finished second out of 11 teams at the state meet on Oct. 20. The meet was set up by the Wisconsin Interscholastic Horsemanship Association (WIHA). Equestrian coach Gail Peteler started the Badger club five years ago, she said, and the WIHA has only been around for the past six years. The amount of competitive equestrian teams is growing in Wisconsin, Peteler said. Over the past five years, she has watched the state meets steadily grow in size. Teams are now split into 18 different districts (like conferences) in Wisconsin that are determined by location and team size. Each district has a meet, and the top two teams from each district qualify for the state meet. Badger finished first in District 1. At the state meet, teams compete within divisions that are determined by the size of each team. There are four divisions: A, B, C and D. Badger competed in Division C, which is for teams with 4-7 riders. Four Badger High School girls are on the equestrian team: seniors Melissa Schneider, Jessica Schmeig and Ashley Sanew and freshman Allison Gritzuk. Next year, Peteler will only have one girl left on the team. Gritzuk will still be able to compete, but she will drop down into Division D if she makes it to the state competition. “She would have to ride alone unless another girl, or a guy, came along,” Peteler said. In the WIHA, teams are co-ed – the horse equalizes the playing field, Peteler said. The horse also adds a complicated element to competition. Determining the strengths and weaknesses of each rider and each horse takes time. “You maximize your points by placing the child and the horse in the event that they’re best in,” Peteler said. “And riding is just like anything else, some people are good

JACQUIE GRITZUK/SUBMITTED

BADGER FRESHMAN ALLISON GRITZUK’S horse, Sparkle, slips around a corner. jumpers, some people are good runners, some horses are good jumpers; they have the same types of athletic abilities that people do. So you have to analyze that horse and analyze that rider and you have to figure out what event you can maximize your score in.”

There are 18 different competitions at the state meet, ranging from showing to jumping and racing. “It takes a lifetime to get good at,” Peteler said. “It’s like, well I can’t think of any sport that doesn’t take a lifetime to get good at. It’s like any other sport.”

Badger girls volleyball team loses in playoffs

BEN STANLEY/REGIONAL NEWS

BEN STANLEY/REGIONAL NEWS

BADGER SENIOR MEGAN WADSWORTH on the attack hits the ball between the arms of two Fort Atkinson defenders on Thursday night.

BADGER JUNIOR MCKINLEY VEITH winds up for a hit against Fort Atkinson, Thursday night, in the WIAA sectionals at Badger High School.

Girls come together as a team, Chironis said By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net The Badger girls volleyball team ended their season Saturday with a loss to defending state champion Burlington High School in round two of the state regional playoffs. Badger defeated Fort Atkinson in five games on Thursday night to advance to second round. Against Fort Atkinson, Badger lost the first game 2125, but won the next two 25-22 and again 25-22. Fort Atkinson tied it up in the fourth game with a 2325 win, but Badger won the fifth and final game 15-9. Badger Senior Megan Wadsworth had 22 kills and three blocks. Senior Autumn Mikrut had 38 assists and five aces. But Badger head coach Jenn Chironis thought the girls played better on Saturday, despite their loss. “Looking at the difference from Thursday to Saturday, I mean, to be honest we played much better volleyball Saturday night,” Chironis said. The Badger vs. Burlington statistics were not available at press time. The girls ground out a hard victory against Fort

Atkinson, but they couldn’t repeat their success against Burlington. Badger lost in three games 22-25, 12-25, and 21-25. “I couldn’t be more proud of the performance that we had,” Chironis said. “We had a lot of really close sets on Saturday and I think it was some of the best volleyball that our varsity team has played this year.” The girls finished their season 23-12 and Chironis said that this year, Badger is graduating five seniors: Autumn Mikrut, Beth Jones, Megan Wadsworth, Baily Wadsworth, and Chandler Carlson. Chironis said she expects the younger players to step up. Freshman Emma Pezza, Sophie Engerman and Victoria Hodkiewicz got post-season experience against Fort Atkinson and Burlington. Sophomore Stephanie Duewel, who was brought up from the junior varsity team for the playoffs, saw the floor for three rotations on Saturday. “We are graduating the heart and soul of our team,” Chironis said. “But I’m hopeful that our returning athletes are willing to step into those roles.” Chironis said that highs and lows are typical for a high school team, but overall she considers the season a success.

Volleyball glossary Attack ...any overhead contact of the ball designed to score Kill ........any attack that lands for a point Ace ........the serve lands untouched on the opponent’s side Dig ........a defensive player keeps an attack in play with a pass Block .....a player blocks the ball to the opposing team’s court leading directly to a point The girls were a unique team, she said. The seniors set a different tone this year and helped the younger players grow – the girls came together as a team more than past Badger squads. “I mean you look at those freshmen and even the seniors at the end of the season that I’m like, wow, I can’t believe how much they’ve improved,” Chironis said. “I look at (the seniors) like; you are what did that. Those repetitions at practice: you set an elite tone, you play elite volleyball, you are a role model for them.” “A lot of individuals have played Badger volleyball, and this year, they made a conscious effort to be a team and to be there for each other,” Chironis said.


October 31, 2013

The Regional News

3C

SPORTS

Badger boys cross country makes state Girls take third place at sectional meet Saturday By Ben Stanley sports@lakegenevanews.net The Badger boys cross country team took second place out of 12 teams at the WIAA state sectional meet, Saturday, and qualiďŹ ed for the team state meet for the ďŹ rst time in school history. The Badgers defeated Verona Area High School, ranked ninth in the state, at their own course and were beaten only by Madison LaFollete, ranked No. 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team showed tremendous poise,â&#x20AC;? Badger coach Mike Butscher said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were in fourth place at the mile and continued to move up throughout the race and were in second place by the two-mile.â&#x20AC;? All seven runners on the boys team ran what Butscher called â&#x20AC;&#x153;an inspired last mileâ&#x20AC;? that propelled the team into second place overall at the meet. Junior Alex Martinez ďŹ nished in third place with a time of 16:30. Sophomore Cody Sadikof ďŹ nished sixth and set a personal record with a time of 16:48. Senior co-captain Gavin Denecke ďŹ nished 14th with a time of 17:06. All seven Badger runners ďŹ nished in under 18 minutes for the ďŹ rst time all season. The boys had a team time of 1:25:29, their fastest time this season by far. The last time the boys ran at Verona on Sept. 7, they had a team time of 1:28:29. They shaved exactly three minutes off their team time in the past two months. The Badger girls ďŹ nished in third place at sectionals with a team time of 1:26:10 and did not qualify for the girls team state meet, despite a strong performance from Senior Elle Adams (second place overall) and Sophomore Kayla Wruk (eight place overall). Adams ran the 4k in 16:30 and Wruk had a time of 16:42. Adams, who has led the Badger girls all season long, qualiďŹ ed for the state individual meet. The boys team will travel to the Ridges Golf Course in Wisconsin Rapids this Saturday to compete in the state team meet. The race begins at 2:25 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are shooting for a sub 1:25 at state and see where that will put us,â&#x20AC;? Butscher said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The course is a little easier than the tough Verona Course, but the race is so much different.â&#x20AC;? Butscher said that since there will be more than 200 runners competing at state, it will be easy for the boys to get caught in trafďŹ c, which could hurt their overall time despite racing at an easier course. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be a great challenge and opportunity for our boys,â&#x20AC;? he said.

ROSS ADAMS/SUBMITTED

BADGER BOYS Cross Country team gather with coach Mike Butscher after taking second place at state sectionals. ROSS ADAMS/SUBMITTED

BADGER SENIOR ELLE ADAMS ďŹ nished second out of 80 girls at the sectional meet on Saturday with a time of 16:30 Adams qualiďŹ ed for the state individual meet on Nov. 2.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

Glance/Clinton has momentum after first playoff win

Big Foot/Wedig: team is different than previous years

The Cougars have thrown for 899 yards and held opposing quarterbacks to only 679. They have rushed for 2,618 yards and allowed a hefty 2,588. Clinton has managed to stay ahead of opponents statistically â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they are having a positive year according to the numbers, but are they having a great year? Big Foot is. The Chiefs are ranked No. 1 in Division IV for a reason. Big Foot has out scored opponents 40165 this season, and most of their opponents points have come in fourth quarter garbage time with the game already out of reach. The Chiefs have thrown for 1,110 yards and held offenses to 812. They have run for 2,904 yards and allowed only 771. Move the decimal one space to the left to get the game averages. The Chiefs have more than tripled the rushing production of opponents this season. But The Clinton team Big Foot will see on Friday night will be slightly different than the one they saw in September. Cougars running back Jacob Marchillo returned to the ďŹ eld three weeks ago after sustaining an injury on Aug. 30 that kept him out for the majority of the season. Wedig said that Marchillo might be the best running back in the conference. Already, he has made a signiďŹ cant impact on Clintonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense. In the three games Marchillo has started since he returned, he has gained 310 yards on 30 rushing attempts and scored six touchdowns. Last time these two teams met, Clinton only rushed for 56 yards. Wedig expects a much improved rushing attack from the Cougars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Marchillo) is that guy that can take any play and go the distance anywhere,â&#x20AC;? Wedig said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sprinter in track, you know; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a solid kid.â&#x20AC;?

Comparing Defenses Big Foot has won the total yardage battle against opponents. The Chiefs have gained 4,014 yards this season and allowed just 1,583. The Chiefs have recorded 21 sacks this season, led by the powerful rush of defensive end Collin Frederick, who has 8.5 sacks. Big Foot has 70 recorded tackles for losses, 12 interceptions and two recorded

the WIAA playoffs (Brodhead/Juda, Clinton). Clinton played four playoff teams in the regular season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Edgerton, Jefferson, Brodhead/Juda, Big Foot â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and lost to all of them. Three of those opponents advanced to the second round â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Edgerton, Brodhead/ Juda, Big Foot, â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and two of those teams played each other (Edgerton defeated Jefferson 31-24).

THOUGHTS FROM WEDIG

DAVE BAKER FOR THE REGIONAL NEWS

GUS WEDIG sprints to pay dirt on a 58-yard catch and run in Big Foots 63-0 win on Sept. 20 over Beloit Turner. Big Foot faces Clinton on Friday night. forced fumbles. The Chiefs have blocked two kicks and defensed 20 passes. The team has a total of 698 tackles. Opposing defenses have only tackled the Chiefs offensive players 321 times in comparison. Clinton has squeaked past opponents in production. The Cougars have out-gained opponents 3,517-yards to 3,267-yards. The Cougars have only eight sacks this season and 21 tackles for a loss. They have defensed only ďŹ ve passes. But the Clinton defense has come up with big plays. The Cougars have 12 interceptions this season and ďŹ ve forced fumbles. Clinton has out-tackled opponents 623-361.

Strength of Schedule The Chiefs and Cougars have faced many of the same opponents this season, but their performance in those match-ups are telling. Big Foot played three teams in the regular season that made the playoffs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Brodhead/Juda, Clinton, Evansville/Albany â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and defeated them all. Two of those opponents have advanced to the second round of

Staying calm in big games: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with a bunch of teen-age young men that sometimes, they, you know, when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re faced with situations that arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going well they try to do too much. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to avoid. Friday night, I mean, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have to withstand, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have a lot of emotions and everything on their side, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just going to have to withstand it and then just keep executing and do what we do best.â&#x20AC;? Playoff coaching philosophy: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Really, we just preach consistency, you know this time in the playoffs, no turnovers, you know, take care of the ball. We tell our quarterbacks and everybody, you know, live to see another down. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try to do too much. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a good kicker, a good punter, we can play ďŹ eld position. Kind of like the Brodhead game, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where it worked. It got to the point where, you know, our defense is playing super well, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no need to try to force the issue on offense. Lets just play defense and try to keep battling for ďŹ eld position and see what happens. I think that Brodhead really was great for us because it prepared us for what the playoffs are going to offer from here on out. Last year we were a team that could score from anywhere on the ďŹ eld quickly, but this year, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more of a grind-it-out team, and if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna grind it out and go on 15-16 play drives youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna need consistency, and, you know, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re talking about.â&#x20AC;? Defending Clintonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s option offense â&#x20AC;&#x153;I suppose the smart thing to do against an option team would be to control the ball, but I feel like our kids, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just so used to it, just so trained into them; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way we practice, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way we always play. If I all the sudden said: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;all right weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re slowing things down,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I think it would be detrimental to what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to do.â&#x20AC;?

Seven Chiefs players carried the ball for a total of 343 rushing yards. That level of production is only possible with a topnotch offensive line. Wedig said that last season, Big Footâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offense could score at will from anywhere on the field. This year he said his offense has been more of a grind-it-out squad with consistent 5-yard to 8-yard gains punctuated by occasional break-out plays. When compared to the Packerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steady and Big Foot powerful offensive perfordefeated mance on Sunday night, Clinton Wedig laughed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, 42-12 thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to in the do,â&#x20AC;? he said. regular But there is another difference with this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season. team, Wedig said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done in the offseason is we tweaked our defense a little bit and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s given us a little flexibility to disguise coverages,â&#x20AC;? Wedig said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know Chandler Hehr did a good job because sometimes weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d have him locked down on (Chris) Cooper and then roll coverage to help depending on the situation, so you know, again, it all came down to a great game plan and executing a game plan.â&#x20AC;? Wedig is coaching a team that can adapt quickly to different schemes and perform at the same high level. University School sported a very different offensive scheme than Big Foot typically saw during the regular season. Last week he compared the match-up to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big 10 school playing a school from Mountain West.â&#x20AC;? This Friday, Big Foot (10-0) will travel to Clinton High School (6-4) for a postseason rematch. Big Foot defeated Clinton 42-12 in the regular season. The Game starts at 7 p.m.

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The Regional News

October 31, 2013

FROM PAGE 1C

Numbers: Hilltoppers beat tough opponents The offense is designed to play to Badger’s strengths – a solid offensive line and a platoon of hard-running backs that wear down defensive fronts by the second half. And this approach has worked exceptionally well all season. But lack of offensive diversity could be a problem against the Hilltopper’s remarkably balanced approach and playmaking defense. Through 10 games, Marquette has averaged 170.7 rushing yards and 255.8 passing yards per game. The Hilltoppers have scored 25 passing and 20 rushing touchdowns. Badger has not played against an offense this season that has consistently run and passed the ball as well as the Hilltoppers. On the flip side, the Badger’s have one of the most potent running games in the state, and containing the edges on their option-style scheme has been a problem for opposing defenses all season.

Comparing defenses Marquette has a play-making defensive backfield that has snagged 11 interceptions and defensed 61 passes this season. Their defensive front has done well with 50 tackles for a loss and nine sacks recorded. But the Hilltoppers have allowed a fair amount of production on the ground. Opposing teams average 156.2 rushing yard per game against them. In comparison, Badger’s defense has recorded eight interceptions, 23 sacks and 45 tackles for a loss. Badger has allowed a meager 90.2 rushing yards per game and 91.2 passing yards. But until this point, Badger has not faced a quarterback or a receiving corps as talented as the Hilltopper’s.

Playmakers Marquette quarterback Charlie Greif has thrown for 2,527 yards and 25 touchdowns this season with only nine interceptions. He has completed 60 percent of his passes and earned a 10-game passer rating of 101.4. And he can run too. Greif has run for 470 yards and 11 touchdowns. Greif is second in the state for total passing yards, sixth in the state for touchdowns and fourth in the state for passing yards per game. He is one of the top five quarterbacks in the state. Greif’s favorite target, Mike Thompson, is eigth in the state with 916 receiving yards. And tied for seventh in the state with 50 receptions. Thompson averages 18.3 yards per reception, 101 yard per game and has nine touchdowns this season. This kind of offensive production distribution signifies flexibility in Marquette’s offensive backfield – they run the option as well, but lean on the pass and extending plays more than they rely on the run. Badger leans heavily in favor of running. For the Badgers, fullback Andrew Allen has run for 1,171 yards in 10 games. He averages 117.1 yards per game, and that number would be higher had he not left Badger’s final conference game against Elkhorn with an injury on the first drive.In reality, his game average is closer to 130 yards per game. Allen has scored 10 touchdowns and his hard-nosed running style has played a significant role in exhausting defensive linemen by the second half. Quarterback Collin Broderick has also been a major factor in Badger’s offensive success. Though his passing numbers have suffered because of his limited attempts, he has been a competent decision-maker during option plays. Though he did exhibit some hesitation during Friday

In the regular season, Badger played four teams that would go on to make the playoffs – Mukwonago, Waterford, Wilmot and Elkhorn – and defeated two of them. Of the four

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C

Badger/Tough defense earns victory

Volleyball/Koplitz’s final season as head coach

Doyle said the Horlick offensive lineman across from him attempted a reach block - Doyle was not lined up over him, and the offensive lineman had to slant to block him, which gave Doyle a little extra time. He read the block and beat the Horlick lineman around the edge. The quarterback was in sight. “He was scrambling a little bit,” Doyle said. “He faked the pass and he scrambled a little bit, and then I wrapped him up.” The sack forced a Horlick punt, which eventually led to a Badger field goal that put them ahead by two scores and added some extra second half security. “Our defense stepped up real, real big,” he said. With just under two minutes remaining in the game, Horlick lined up to kick a field goal. The kick would have cut the deficit to only 6 points and given them a chance to stay in the game with an onside kick. But Doyle busted through the down lineman and opened up a hole before the kick. He paved the way for linebacker Evan Gibson, who put his hands up and blocked the field goal attempt. The Badgers recovered. The game was sealed. “They’re good,” Doyle said of Horlick. “They’re a physical football team, but our defense played really, really good.”

JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

BADGER COACH Matt Hensler talks to his team after Friday night’s win.

night’s game against Racine Horlick, Broderick’s decisions have led to big plays. He has run for 481 yards and four touchdowns while throwing for 386 yards and four touchdowns this season.

Strength of schedule

play off teams the Badgers faced in regular season paly, only Mukwonago has advanced to the second round. Mukwonago defeated Badger in August. Marquette played five teams in the regular season that went on to make the playoffs – Menomonee Falls (ranked No. 5 in the state according to wissports.net week 8 coaches poll), Brookfield East, Sussex Hamilton, Brookfield Central, and Wisconsin Lutheran (Division II) – and defeated four of them. Sussex Hamilton and Wisconsin Lutheran remain in the WIAA playoffs.

Koplitz said that this is her final season as head coach for Big Foot after 11 seasons, seven conference championships and now four trips to state sectionals. Under Koplitz, the Lady Chiefs haven’t lost a conference match since 2008 – 52 straight wins. She will retire to spend more time with her family, Koplitz said, and she is very happy to go out on a positive note – this season’s team has far exceeded her expectations. She said the program’s successes have established an expectation of excellence that has given her players extra drive, despite losing two core players last year – a center who went on to play for a Division I school in college and a right side who plays in Division II – the girls have continued that tradition. Last year, the girls went 40-4, this year, the Lady Chiefs’ record is 37-5. “We haven’t really a taken a step back,” Koplitz said. “I think it’s one of those traditions … you know, it’s an expectation we have in the program. And I think when you perpetuate winning … there’s no other option.” The girls will play McFarland High School (27-9-1) on Thursday in the secBEN STANLEY/REGIONAL NEWS tional semifinals. The game starts at 7 BIG FOOT SENIOR Kristine Glade tips the ball over the net as a Clinton defender p.m. on a neutral court in Whitewater. prepares for a block.

SPORTS SHORTS Badger Athletic Director Wins Recognition Badger High School Athletic Director Jim Kluge was recently recognized as the Athletic Director of the Year by the Wisconsin Basketball Coaches Association.

Big Foot cross country JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS

ANDREW ALLEN side steps a defender during Friday’s game.

The Big Foot Chiefs boys cross country team finished first in the Rock Valley South this season, and the girls team finished second. The boys and girls teams did not advance to the state

meet, but Chiefs junior Fletcher Strahan, who placed second in the Rock Valley – South conference overall, qualified for the state individual meet in Whitewater this Saturday.

Williams Bay girls volleyball The Williams Bay girls volleyball team lost its final game of the season last Tuesday, Oct. 22. The girls lost 2426, 22-25 and 22-25, battling hard in each set but unable to come away with a victory.


October 31, 2013

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Community & Commentary Thursday, October 31, 2013

Lake Geneva REGIONAL NEWS

Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters

D

A season to celebrate, a reason for hope Derek Diehl is a builder. From 2008-2011 the onceproud Williams Bay football team didn’t record a single victory. They haven’t made the post-season since 2003. Last year, when the Bulldogs beat Kenosha Christian, the victory was minimized by naysayers who said they hadn’t beaten a real high school football team. Marquette basketball coach Al McGuire used to lineup winnable games in the preseason to build up the team’s confidence. Taking a page out of McGuire’s book, Diehl knew he needed to beat someone to start a winning tradition. When you’ve lost so much, any W is better than no W. When the Bulldogs beat Kenosha Christian again to open this season, doubts still lingered. Then they won their first conference game in five years by burying Johnson Creek 45-20. Then they won another conference game and, for awhile, led the division.

True, Diehl is blessed with There were a few games where he could a stud quarterback, the 230- have blamed the referees or injury or bad pound John Higgins, but it luck. Football is an emotional game and it’s took more than that to build difficult not to buy into those emotions. a team and still more to build Diehl refused. He didn’t want his team a tradition. making excuses, so he didn’t either. Higgins carried the load at I interviewed him after one emotional the beginning of the year, but game but Diehl measured his words — backas the season went on more ing the refs and refusing to point fingers. and more players got their A real powder keg exploded a few weeks names on the stat sheet. later when the crowd went nuts on a few Diehl’s kick coverage calls, but Diehl was man enough — after teams have been porous. That looking at the film — to acknowledge that may have lost them a few games or at least those calls were far from clear-cut, even if made them closer than necessary. the fans thought otherwise. But Diehl was playing freshmen on A team of young impressionable kids those squads. He could easily have had a plan. Give the “A team of young impressionable caved to negative freshmen experience emotions. But Diehl kids could easily have caved to — even if it was a led and they folnegative emotions. But Diehl led baptism of fire — and lowed. it’ll pay off in years to He wanted a and they followed.” come. team of class acts, not So why isn’t this whiners. column on the sports page? “We are not only teaching football,” Because Diehl’s building program is Diehl said at one point. “(We’re) teaching more than just about sports. the boys how to be good men.”

The Bulldogs ended up 4-5. A losing season, but three more victories than they had in the previous five years combined. Even in the last game of the season, after falling behind 22-7 in the third quarter, the Bulldogs fought back and Diehl almost pulled it out. Maybe next year. At least now there’s reason to look forward instead of behind. The Badger and Big Foot football teams made the playoffs again this year. We wish them luck, and I don’t mean to diminish their efforts in any way. But it’s nice to see that a group of new winners may be on the horizon. I’d like us to have the challenge of splitting our playoff coverage three ways instead of just two. Halverson is editor and general manager of the Regional News.

President should pay for vacation

Man can’t cope with loss, loses job, needs some help We are happy to announce we have matched the Richard Driehaus $30,000 Matching Grant. Once we receive the matching funds from Richard we will share where every penny was spent. Thank you to the Richard Driehaus Charitable Lead Trust and all of “You” for making this matching grant a success. We also have just received word that The Summertime Foundation has generously offered a $10,000 Matching Grant to begin immediately. Your donations will continue to be matched dollar for dollar, until we reach the $10,000 goal. Thank you to our generous matching grant donors and to all of “you” for your generous donations.

Dear W.C., I have a friend that is living in a trailer with two children. His wife died a few months ago from cancer. He recently lost his job. He was told he was let go because he missed too many days of work. He was, and still continues to be, extremely grief stricken. He needs a job to support his children and it would help his mind. He is a good father and trying his best to care for his children.

He just has not been able to get another job. I know they are behind in their lot rent and his utilities are being threatened for disconnection. I am hoping you can help him through these very trying times. Devoted friend Dear readers, I paid a visit to the father and children with their elderly friend who wrote the letter requesting help. The father’s phone was shut off so he did not know we were planning to check on him. It was noticeably dark inside, a tell tale sign of utility disconnection. I could see a Coleman lamp inside. He was very happy to see “I returned the his elderly friend and gave following week. The him a hug. He then turned to me as the friend introduced utilities were turned on. us. He looked surprised and The father had returned embarrassed when his friend to work, taking on explained who I was. He said, his new supervisor “Why did you ask him here? We don’t need any help. We position.” are just fine.” The friend said, “I have been so worried about you my friend. I couldn’t let you and the kids live like this. The Time Is Now to Help can help you. Please let us help.” The father had tears in his eyes as he held the door open for us to come in. PLEASE SEE TIME IS NOW PAGE 4D

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The United States recently reached a temporary resolution on its national debt crisis. We will revisit the same overwhelming problem again, in just a few short weeks. Which means we can look forward to a New Year without the happy. Consider this, then: $186,000. Time magazine reported that this is the cost to keep Air Force One aloft. For just one hour. The president took a “vacation” recently to Hawaii. This involved two round trips. Cost to the taxpayer? $10 million. Just a few weeks later the president took another “vacation” to Cape Cod, Mass., again using Air Force One. Cost? Nearly $1 million. When Queen Elizabeth visited the U.S. in 2007, she and Prince Phillip flew round-trip commercial on BOAC. Suggestion: Mr. Obama can take his vacation anytime he likes and travel however he pleases, so long as he can pay for it. The stress of being president led a former chief executive to use funds appropriated by Congress to build a retreat for the express purpose of providing a respite “If the Queen and from the affairs of state. Prince Phillip can fly He named it after his BOAC, Mr. Obama grandson, David. This camp is located in can surely find a western Maryland, just a more economical short helicopter ride from means of transport the White House. If this was good enough for his personal for President Eisenhower, travels. Unless, of it is most certainly good course, he is willing enough for this president. to pay the cost of Or any other, for that matter. using Air Force If the Queen and Prince One out of his own Phillip can fly BOAC, Mr. pocket.” Obama can surely find a more economical means of transport for his personal travels. Unless, of course, he is wiling to pay the cost of using Air Force One out of his own pocket. Since we live in a country that apparently has no idea how it is going to pay its bills, we desperately need to begin shifting our fiscal paradigm from profligacy to parsimony.

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The Regional News

October 31, 2013

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY LETTERS

Teachers could tell Article prompts memories of church value of referendum To the Editor: To the Editor: Much has been discussed, debated, and written about the Woods School Referendum. Many of the arguments made have been subject to opinion, misunderstandings, and misinformation. To simplify this issue for the voters of the Joint 4 School District who are trying to decide which way to vote, I would suggest that they simply visit Woods School during the school day. If that is not practical, please phone and ask for a teacher. Five minutes of your time should be sufficient to decide if this referendum represents a value to the students and families who live in Joint 4. Eric Chapman Woods School Board Treasurer

Say no to meters in Lake Geneva To the Editor: A good friend tells me LaGrange, Ill., had meters for years. They stopped people from shopping. They finally got rid of the meters. People came back. They built a 3-floor parking deck, more people came. They are now considering another deck! Lake Geneva, learn from LaGrange! No meters, more people. Chuck Ebeling Town of Walworth

Thanks for the warm welcome To the Editor: Thanks to Geneva Crossing for inviting the Lake Seniors to use the meeting room at the Highland Apartments. We are grateful for their kindness. The manager, Jan Peterson, has helped us move in with her warm, heartfelt welcome. We are enjoying our new home. All seniors are welcome to join us. We meet on the first and third Tuesdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Donna Rieners President, Lake Seniors Town of Lyons

LETTERS POLICY Letters to the Editor must be signed by the writer, include a phone number and address in order to be considered for publication in the Lake Geneva Regional News. No names will be withheld. Letters emailed to the Regional News must contain a telephone number and address so the writer can be reached. They should be sent to jhalverson@lakegenevannews.net. The Regional News reserves the right to edit letters. Letters that are libelous, vulgar or profane will not be published. Poetry also will not be published. All decisions regarding this letters policy are at the discretion of the editor. The deadline for submitting a letter for any given week is 5 p.m. Friday.

FROM THE FILES

Time flies Nov. 4, 1993

Nov. 6, 2003

The Badger High School varsity soccer team earned their third trip to the state tournament in four years with shoot-out victories over Janesville Craig and Kenosha Tremper to win sectionals. Prize winners in the Town of Linn Police Department Halloween party included Connor Pillman and Amy Stanfield, Kyle Polyock. New officers for the Star Center School Parents Organization include Secretary Sue Walker and President Marie Garvens. Denison University junior Dalton Waldeck is studying in Australia through Butler University for the fall semester. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Waldeck, Skylane Drive. Bob Sommers and Dolleen Brenton were winners in the Regional News football contest Oct. 28.

Steve and Jim Hay, Lake Geneva, built a working replica of the Wright brothers’ airplane engine to be put into a replica craft and flown to mark the 100th anniversary of the first flight in Kitty Hawk, N.C., in 1903. Outstanding parking fines in Lake Geneva exceeded $88,000. Among the children who took part in the Big Foot Homecoming parade were Evan Koniezcka, Taylor Hoover, Kirsten York and Nathan McIntyre. The Badger-Big FootWilliams Bay girls swim team claimed its third straight Southern Lakes Conference title with 395 points, defeating Milton. Elizabeth Venteicher appeared as the Statue of Liberty in the Williams Bay Elementary School Halloween parade.

It was certainly entertaining to read the Oct. 17, 2013, article about possible paranormal activities at St. Kilian’s Cemetery, which always have been fictional, likewise unproven. Sadly, the facts behind the final destruction of the church (a historic landmark building) are anything but entertaining. St. Killian’s was a great, small community church, built in 1858, in a quiet country setting, having regular weekly Sunday services, as well as baptisms, wedding and funerals into the early 1990s. Myself, my family and many related friends and their families attended many Masses there over the years, initially going back to the late 1960s, when we moved to our home on Bloomfield Road, about one mile away. Likewise, over the years we made several friends through St. Killian’s parish, a very integral part of the Lyons, Bloomfield and Lake Geneva communities. As parish churches in the 1980s and 1990s began to merge, downsize and/or were no longer used, as was the situation with St. Killian’s, a mission church with nearby St. Joseph’s parish in Lyons, the church was no longer needed for Masses. Years prior to closing, my dad, Dan Kavanaugh, happily donated approximately two acres of land from his adjoining Tuscany development to St. Killian’s, to use as the parish needed. Unfortunately, not being used the church was broken into throughout the years, mostly by various youth “as a fun thing to do,” as well as, at times, just outright vandalism and theft, stealing crucifixes and statues, breaking stained glass windows and defacing beautiful, historic grave monuments, some of which are solid iron, written in German. To help stop these occurrences, my

SUBMITTED BY PAT KAVENAUGH

ST. KILIAN’S was “a great, small community church,” before its passing, says letter writer Patrick Kavanaugh who provided this photo. Over the years, he has collected a variety of photos and information on the church. dad leased the church for a few years and would pay for and repair any damages caused by individuals trespassing. Parenthetically, as the lease came to an end, a small group, supposedly with the fiduciary responsibility of doing what’s best for the church, now wanted to burn it down. My dad offered a generous amount of cash to purchase the church, continue to maintain it, with the archdiocese having full discretion to use at any time for periodic Masses, weddings, funerals, etc. Equally important, he simply did not want to see such a beautiful, historic (1858) landmark building, with an abundance of great memories of past and existing communities, burned to the ground. Ironically too, neither did anyone we talked to since.

Unfortunately, on Saturday, May 11, 2002, 144 years of history went up in smoke for absolutely not valid reasons. I have maintained a variety of photos and information on St. Killian’s over the years, including impressive historical information as well as documentation and correspondence of my dad’s efforts to save the church. Likewise I am happy to share and/or converse with those interested. My dad recently passed away on Aug. 26, 2013. It’s peaceful to visit his gravesite knowing he’s near the location of a special building he tried to save. Sincerely, Patrick Kavanaugh Milwaukee patkavrealty@gmail.com

Media gives pass to Obama stumbles To the Editor: Never underestimate the power of the press/mainstream media. If they like you, you can get away with anything, but if they are not “with you” they can destroy you. Take, for example, some of the things Obama has gotten away with in the past five years. About four years ago Nidal Malik Hasan (a Muslim), killed 13 United States soldiers on an army base in Texas and wounded many others. They are finally putting him on trial, after many delays. The government will not classify his attack as terrorism but are referring to it as workplace violence! So, the families of the killed or wounded are not entitled to the benefits they should receive and the soldiers are not eligible for the Purple Heart. Where is the indignation from the press on this? Why in the world are we even having a trial — he has admitted doing it. Waste of time and money. Then there is Bengazi. Four U.S. citizens were killed, including a U.S. diplomat. They were in a United States Embassy, virtually undefended. They had requested more security three times but were denied by someone — who would that be — who is in charge of this department — could it be the Secretary of State? That would be Hillary Clinton, or would that be the President? The assault lasted eight hours, but the people who wanted to go in and try to save these people were told to “stand down.” We still don’t know who gave that order. There is a creed among soldiers and all service members — no man shall be left behind. In this case, they were ordered to leave them behind — by whom? Where are the families of these four? Why haven’t we heard anything from them after all this time? Makes you wonder. What if one of them had been your family member? Where would you be? So, the person who “misled” everyone about the reason for the attack on the embassy (that would be Susan Rice) has now been given the post of National Security Advisor. Who would believe anything she says? Nothing from the press on this either. Then we have the IRS. Now there is really something here we should all be afraid of. Just consider the power this one department has over your entire life. They can completely ruin your

life and there is nothing you can do thing done if you are working with about it. By the way, they really don’t someone who “will not negotiate.” like conservatives. This is supposed to His idea of negotiation — his example be a nonpolitical department. — if you are trying to buy a house and Not anymore. This is also the the seller won’t negotiate the way you department that will be running want him to, you would “burn the Obamacare — your health insurance. house down.” Now over the years I If that doesn’t give you cold chills, have been involved in many negotiawake up. Since they picked and chose tions with buyers and sellers, and no who would get preferential treatment one has ever threatened to “burn the with tax exempt status, think what house down.” Maybe that is the way they will do with health insurance things are done with Chicago commuand treatment for anyone who doesn’t nity organizers but not in my world. agree with Obama. By the way, they The media is still asking “when are still doing it. And, they are putting Obama found out about closing the the woman who was in charge of the memorials to the veterans.” You have IRS when all of the “investigations” got to be kidding. of conservative groups took place, in So, who do you think shut down charge of Obamacare. Frightening. the World War II Memorial and all of Then there is the NSA — listening the other memorials in Washington, in on our phone calls, reading emails D.C., barricaded them off and posted and just generally snooping into our armed guards to prevent veterans private life, and we have no idea of from access to their memorials? The who these people are. buck stops where? Right on the presSpeaking of which, we don’t hear ident’s desk. anything about the czars he has placed This action alone shows his utter in charge of who knows what over the and complete disdain for the veterpast five years either. Who are they, ans who fought for this country and what do they do and what are they the freedom that somehow allowed being paid? Obama to be elected as president. By By the way, where is the money the way, just in case anyone can forget, from the stimulus we “had” to do? there were more guards posted around Shovel ready jobs the memorials to — he chuckled “Take, for example, some of the keep the World about that one War II veterans — not so shovel things Obama has gotten away out than there with in the past five years.” ready, also, not were at Bengazi. funny. But it gets worse. Now, just for a minute, consider He has also stopped payments to the what the press would be saying if families of the veterans who have President Bush were in the White been killed — the payments they are House. entitled to and the families need to So, are we listening yet? Does any- sustain their families. Unforgivable. thing that is going on in Washington, I find it very interesting that whenD.C., and the rest of the country, at ever there are budget cuts anywhere, the instigation of Washington, make including schools, the things that get sense to you? cut are always designed to inflict the Saw a quote the other day, by none most pain on the people/taxpayers. other than Barack H. Obama, senator, The government has “furloughed” in March, 2006. Just a few sentences 800,000 — that’s right, eight hundred from that statement; “The fact that thousand — federal workers and we we are here today to debate raising haven’t imploded yet. Anyone think America’s debt limit is a sign of lead- that perhaps we have a few too many ership failure.” “Leadership means federal employees? ‘the buck stops here.’” Now that is one If you think things are bad now, statement that you have never heard just wait until Obama, the IRS and coming from the mouth of now Presi- the rest of his cronies are in charge of dent Obama. Nothing is his fault. your health care. That is 15 unelected Amazing. And, it would be better for people who are really going to decide you if you didn’t disagree with what- if you get the treatment you need — or ever Obama “decrees.” We now have just take a pill. another quote we can remember from God help us. this president. “I will not negotiate.” Nancy Swatek Now, it is a little difficult to get anyLake Geneva


October 31, 2013

The Regional News

3D

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY DEATH NOTICES

OBITUARIES

Mildred E. Bosworth, 85, Addison, Ill., and a longtime vacationer in Lake Geneva, died Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, at Golden Years in Walworth. Services were held at St. Paul Lutheran Church, Addison, on Friday, Oct. 25. The Humes Funeral Home assisted the family with the arrangements. Nancy

Swanson

Granholm,

Lake Geneva, died Oct. 3, 2013. A celebration of her life will be held Sunday, Nov. 3, at 2 p.m., at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, Lake Geneva. The family requests wearing bright colors rather than black to represent her bright and lively personality. Nancy was the mother of Lynn (Jim) Connors and Bruce Granholm and had five grandchildren, Ian, Cameron and Brenna Connors, Britt Granholm and Zander Zilly.

Gordon W. “Butch” Jacobson, 93, a lifelong resident of the Lake Geneva area, died Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, at Geneva Lake Manor Nursing Home in Lake Geneva. Services will be Friday, Nov. 1, at 10:30 a.m., in the chapel of the Derrick Funeral Home, Lake Geneva, with the Rev. David Strang, pastor of the First Congregational UCC in Lake Geneva, officiating. Burial in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lake Geneva. Visitation will be Thursday from 5 until 7 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of other expressions of sympathy, memorials are requested in Butch’s name to the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 715 Wisconsin St., Lake Geneva, WI, 53147. Dorothy A. Koehn Jirasek, 75, Morrison, Ill., died Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, at Prophets Riverview Good Samaritan Center, Prophetstown, Ill. Visitation was Saturday, Oct.26, at the Bosma-Renkes Funeral Home in Morrison. Cremation rites have been accorded. Marlene Pruessing, 87, Walworth, died Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, at Mercy Walworth Hospital following a long battle with Sjogren’s and lung diseases. Visitation will be Thursday, Oct., 31 at the Toynton Funeral Home in Walworth from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Funeral services will be Friday, Nov. 1 at 11 p.m. at Faith Lutheran Church in Walworth, with interment in the Walworth Cemetery. Memorials in her name may be made to the Faith Lutheran Church Building Fund.

Marlene Pruessing March 9, 1926 - Oct. 26, 2013 Marlene Pruessing, 87, Walworth, died Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, at Mercy Walworth Hospital following a long battle with Sjogren’s and lung diseases. She was born in Lafayette Township on March 9, 1926, the daughter of Otto A. and Ida Schmidt. She attended Plank Road and Jackson one room schools and graduated from Elkhorn High School in 1943. She worked as a nurse’s aide at the Walworth County Hospital until her marriage to Walter Pruessing on Dec 29, 1949. Following their marriage, they lived in New York for two years, returning to the Walworth area in 1951. She was an active member of the Girl Scouts, the Walworth Mothers’ Club and drove school bus for the Christianson Bus Company for many years. She was a charter member of Faith Lutheran Church in Walworth. Her volunteer activities included Meals on Wheels and the local food pantry. She also served on the Walworth Cemetery and election boards. She loved to knit and was especially known for her clowns. She was proud to be named Premiere Knitter of the Walworth County Fair for two years. She is survived by one brother, Donald Schmidt,Twin Lakes; her children, Gary (Lisa) Pruessing, Houston, Texas, Dave Pruessing, Murfreesboro, Tenn., and Bev Pruessing, Delavan; three grandchildren, Scott (Maria) Pruessing, Seattle, Wash., Rachel Pruessing, McLean, Va., and Lucas Pruessing, Murfreesboro; and many nieces nephews and dear friends. She was preceded in death by her parents; two infant brothers; and her husband of 47 years. Visitation will be Thursday, Oct., 31 at the Toynton Funeral Home in Walworth from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Funeral services will be Friday, Nov. 1 at 11 p.m. at Faith Lutheran Church in Walworth, with interment in the Walworth Cemetery. Memorials in her name may be made to the Faith Lutheran Church Building Fund.

HISTORY

Oak Hill Cemetery: A Lake Geneva gem that should not be overlooked Much more has been written about Pioneer Cemetery in Lake Geneva than about Oak Hill Cemetery. Perhaps this is understandable, given the fact that the Pioneer Cemetery is Lake Geneva’s oldest and historic cemetery, dating back to 1837 when it was first platted by Thomas McKaig, who surveyed and laid out the streets, alleys and lots of the tiny village of Geneva at the behest of Geneva’s seven founders. One of the best articles, if not the best article, about Oak Hill Cemetery was written by Lisa Schmelz and published in the autumn 2012 issue of At the Lake. The disparity between the number of articles in print about Pioneer Cemetery and the number of ones about Oak Hill Cemetery may be partially attributed to the fact that Oak Hill is at the far northern edge of the city, while Pioneer Cemetery is at its very center. Most tourists are unaware Oak Hill Cemetery exists; few have visited it. But this anomaly clearly warrants rectification. Argu-

ably, Oak Hill Cemetery is one of the most beautiful cemeteries in the United States, and it is very historic as well, despite being only 133 years old. In fact, having grown up in Lake Geneva, I had previously taken Oak Hill Cemetery for granted. Until I researched its history, I had no idea how historic it actually is. I have visited numerous beautiful and historic cemeteries throughout the United States, and in my opinion, there are only two which compare to Oak Hill. One is the famous Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge/Watertown, Mass.; the other is the magnificent Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, Mass., where

some of the most well-known American writers are buried on “Authors’ Ridge,” including Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau and Nathanial Hawthorne. While there are no famous writers buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Oak Hill is very much more than merely the cemetery of Lake Geneva. Because of its beauty and its proximity to the estates of wealthy Chicagoans ringing Geneva Lake’s shores, Oak Hill is, as Lisa Schmelz pointed out in her article, the final resting place of many of Chicago’s wealthiest and most significant 19th-century residents. Frank Chandler, Simeon B. Chapin, Nathaniel Sears, James H. Moore, Shelton Sturges, Henry Strong and Richard T. Crane are among the 19th and early 20th century Chicago movers and shakers buried in Oak Hill, as is Arthur Kaye, the owner of the 19th-century amusement park on Geneva Lake’ south shore where the Academy Estates are today. The Sears,

Chapin and Moore families have large mausoleums. One need only to drive into Oak Hill Cemetery and follow the winding roads that weave their way among the century-old oak trees that give the cemetery its name to appreciate the beauty of this hilly venue. The autumn is the best time to visit Oak Hill when the brown, red and gold oak tree leaves are ablaze with spectacular color. After the leaves have fallen, Lake Como is clearly visible to the northwest. The fact that Oak Hill Cemetery is located on the hills created by the retreating glacier 10,000 years ago that ring the northern limits of Lake Geneva makes the cemetery’s beauty even more impressive. The historic importance of Oak Hill Cemetery is underscored by the fact that here are buried at least 51 Civil War veterans, more than twice the number of Civil War veterans buried in the Pioneer Cemetery. PLEASE SEE QUINN PAGE 4D

Gordon W. “Butch” Jacobson Feb. 8, 1920 - Oct. 26, 2013 Gordon Walter Jacobson, 93, a lifelong resident of the Lake Geneva area, died Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, at Geneva Lake Manor Nursing Home in Lake Geneva. He was born on Feb. 8, 1920, in Bloomfield Township, the son of the late Frank and Emma Andresen Jacobson. He graduated from Lake Geneva High School with the class of 1939. He was a veteran of World War II, serving with the United States Army Air Corps. He had worked in management for Dean Foods in Memphis, Tenn., and Little Rock, Ark., for many years. After returning to Lake Geneva, he worked as a mail carrier for the Lake Geneva Post Office for many years. On Nov. 29, 1965, in Lake Geneva, he married Wilma Habecker Bailey. She died March 25, 2013. He was a talented gardener and won many blue ribbons at the Walworth County Fair. He was the first recipient of the Walworth County Senior Citizen Award. He also loved to play golf at the former Hillmoor Country Club in Lake Geneva. Butch is survived by two stepchildren, John “Ike” Bailey, Delavan, and Linda (David) Bailey Boilini; a grandson, Joseph Boilini; a sister, Margaret Peterson, Walworth; a sister-in-law, Betty Ely, Lady Lake, Fla.; a brother-in-law, Gunnar Peterson, Hudson; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by three sisters, Evelyn Hansen, Irene Peterson and Doris Williams. Services will be Friday, Nov. 1, at 10:30 a.m., in the chapel of the Derrick Funeral Home, Lake Geneva, with the Rev. David Strang, pastor of the First Congregational UCC in Lake Geneva, officiating. Burial in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lake Geneva. Visitation will be Thursday from 5 until 7 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of other expressions of sympathy, memorials are requested in Butch’s name to the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 715 Wisconsin St., Lake Geneva, WI, 53147. To sign the online guest registry, go to www.derrickfuneralhome.com.

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4D

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D

Time Is Now/Man gets job back, bills up-to-date The trailer was old, but I could see the father kept it tidy. The children were sitting at the table by the Coleman lamp doing homework. The children were happy to see the friend and ran to give him a hug. He had brought along a puzzle for them to share. They were overjoyed with the gift and thanked him. The father said, “Get your homework done first.” It was what a responsible parent would say. We sat to talk in the room next to the kitchen. It had a little light coming in from the windows. I explained to the father about The Time Is Now to Help and all of you who make our help possible. I told him how we help people who have fallen on hard times. He looked down at his hands and said, “I guess you could say we have fallen on hard times.” He started to get tears in his eyes. His pride fought them back. He explained the valiant fight his wife gave not to leave him and the children. After two years she lost her fight against cancer. Now, his tears fell freely. As he leaned over his knees, covering his eyes with his hands he said, “I was let go from my job of five years for missing so much work after my sweet, sweet wife died.” He paused, as he continued to sob and cry. I put my hand on his shoulder and consoled him. He regained himself and continued, “I have applied for other jobs but they are hard to get and there are very few opportunities. They shut our utilities off yesterday, I feel so lost.” I told him, “I know and that is why I am here. I am here to help you get back on your feet. You have to do this for your two children. They are counting on you.” I knew he needed encouragement to pick up the pieces and live again. His children had also suffered a terrible loss but they needed to know they still had a parent to lead them through life. We talked about his job loss and why it had happened. He admitted to not being able to get past his grief as quickly as everyone had expected. He said, “Everyone thought I could just go back to normal. I just couldn’t do it. I needed my own time to come to grips with losing my beloved wife. I loved her with all my heart. We were best friends, soul mates...” After this we went over his budget. I asked him if he was ready to get back to work and support his children. He shared how his children needed him after the loss of their mother. He said, “I could have forced myself to work then but my kids needed me. How could I send them to someone else when they needed me. It was important for us to spend those weeks with each other. No

one, especially my employer seemed to understand that.” I was impressed by how intuitive and helpful he was to his children’s needs during such a devastating time in their lives. They needed assistance with the past due lot rent and getting the utilities turned back on. I asked the father where he had worked. When he told me I was a little shocked. I knew the employer and he had a reputation of being a wonderful, caring person. I told him to excuse me and I went outside. I even had the employer’s cell phone number. When my phone call was answered with, “Hey! How are you?” I recognized the happy people person I knew. I explained to him the situation. My friend was appalled. The termination was handled by one of his supervisors, not him. He said, “Sal, I will call you right back.” I went inside to continue my visit. Twenty minutes later my phone rang. When I answered the voice on the other end said, “Sal, I was informed just now about the gentleman and his loss of his wife. He was let go heartlessly. Please give him my cell phone number to call me when he is ready to return. I also found out he was a great employee and capable of taking over as a Supervisor. Tell him the job is his!” I began to tear up. I profusely thanked him. He said, “No, thank you, and God bless all the work The Time Is Now does.” When I hung up I told the father everything. He stood up, looked at me with tears flowing again saying, “How can I ever thank you?” I told him, “Thank your friend here for our introduction and thank all of The Time Is Now to Help supporters for making our good works of God possible. “With that he gave his friend a tearful hug. Then he called out to his children, “Kids, we have good news!” The father and children were extremely grateful to all of us for our assistance. I returned the following week. The utilities were turned on. The father had returned to work, taking on his new supervisor position. He and the two children were going over to their elderly friend’s apartment for dinner. God bless all of you for once again, together, we helped those in desperate need. Health and happiness, God bless everyone, W.C./Sal

Please help Make checks payable to: The Time Is Now to Help P.O. Box 1 Lake Geneva, WI 53147 The Time Is Now to Help is a feder-

ally recognized 501(c)3 charitable organization licensed in Wisconsin and Illinois. You will receive a tax deductible, itemized thank you receipt showing how your donation provided assistance for the poverty stricken.

Furniture donations Please contact Love Inc. in Burlington for all your furniture, clothing and household item donations. Call (262) 763-2743 for more information or to schedule pick-up. We are no longer affiliated with Chris Ann’s Resale Shop.

Geneva Inn fundraiser Please join us Friday, Nov. 15, 2013, at the beautiful Geneva Inn Grandview Dining Room for a dinner benefitting The Time Is Now to Help. Geneva Inn will be providing door prizes. There will be an auction, and a good portion of your meal expense will be donated to The Time Is Now to Help to provide assistance to the poverty stricken. Sal will be present to share some of the good works we have been doing. Please call (262) 248-5690 to make your reservation between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. Geneva Inn is located at N2009 S. Lake Shore Dr., Lake Geneva.

Thank you The Summertime Foundation, Fox Charities, Matt Stracner, Lake Geneva Area Realty, Martin Group, John Stensland and Family, Mark and Julia Kiehl, Moelter Foundation, Thrivent Choice Program, Ray and Pam Ring, Lake Geneva Country Meats, Skips, Piggly Wiggly, Lakeland Trash Service, Michael Glass, Arlene Torrenga, Donald and Jean Cooper, Harriet Muskat, John and Violet Hotzfeld, Barbara Giovannoni, Sid and Patty Johnson, Lisa and K. Herner, Deborah and Michael Halverson, Merilyce O’Connell, Barbara Kufalk, W.C. Family Resource Center/ Food Pantry volunteers, and all the God loving volunteers of all our caring pantries, all of you who support The Time Is Now to Help donation boxes, and the businesses that allow our donation boxes. Anyone who would like a Time Is Now donation box in your business, please call (262) 249-7000.

James and Kathleen Smith in honor of Arlene Torrenga’s Birthday.

Memorials Jacquelyn Leedle in loving memory of George Leedle.

Please visit www.timeisnowtohelp.org.

Quinn/Oak Hill Cemetery gets overlooked location of the new cemetery. The co-chairman with James Simmons of the committee to establish the Oak Hill Cemetery was the Rev. C.A. Williams, who had operated a boarding school for young boys in his home on Main Street overlooking Geneva Lake, which eventually became the Victorian lodging that was torn down recently. A new structure is currently being constructed on the site. To design Oak Hill Cemetery, Simmons and Williams hired the famous landscape architect H.W.S. (Horace William Shaler) Cleveland (18141900), a protégé of Frederick Law Olmstead, who designed Central Park in New York City. Cleveland had played a key role in helping to design Graceland Cemetery in Chicago in 1870. In 1855, Cleveland had designed the famed Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord. He was a proponent of the

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REBECCA JEAN STEFANSKI AND MATTHEW JOHN DANKERT were married Sept. 28, 2013, at Crosspoint Community Church, Oconomowoc, with the Rev. Bryan Roe officiating. Becca is the daughter of David and Eileen Stefanski, Wales. Matt’s parents are Olivia and Paul Schanen, Waukesha, and Dennis and Sandy Dankert, Franklin. The matron of honor was Brittany Tripp, sister of the bride. Bridesmaids were Jackie Hutkowski, cousin of the bride, Lisa Kraker, Erin Ramczyk and Krista Samb, friends of the bride. Alyssa Gross was the bride’s personal attendant. Aliyah Katzenberg and Hazel Hutkowski, cousins of the bride, were flower girls. Craig Peterson, friend of the groom, was the best man. The groomsmen were Nicholas Stefanski, the bride’s brother, Ben Trevino, cousin of the groom, friends Dave Zielke and Ryan Custer, and George Johnson, brother-in-law of the groom. Ring bearers were Victor Trevino, cousin of the groom, and Alistair Olson, cousin of the bride. John Heckenkamp, the groom’s friend, and Kyle Tripp, brotherin-law of the bride, were the ushers. Guests were greeted by Ella Trevino, cousin of the groom. Their reception was at the Delafield Hotel. Playa del Carmen, Mexico, was the honeymoon destination. The bride graduated from Badger High School in 2004 and from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 2008, with a degree in interior architecture. She is employed at Brick and Mortar, Lake Geneva. The groom is a 1998 graduate of Waukesha West High School and MATC in 2008. His technical diploma is in electric power distribution and he is a lineman with we energies in West Allis. He was a member of the 82nd Airborne Division of the U.S. Army from 2003 to 2007 and had two deployments, one each in Iraq and Afghanistan. The couple resides in Oconomowoc.

Honoraries

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3D

There are today 7,494 people buried in Oak Hill Cemetery. Along the cemetery’s eastern fence was a “potter’s field” where indigent people were buried. On Feb. 26, 1880, a group of Geneva citizens, concerned that Pioneer Cemetery had reached its capacity, petitioned the village board to establish a new cemetery. A committee to pursue the matter was set up, chaired by the Geneva attorney James Simmons, who would write Annals of Lake Geneva 17 years later. Simmons would also found the Lake Geneva Public Library. Simmons’ committee’s report urging the establishment of a new cemetery was approved by the village board on March 18. On April 20, the village board authorized the purchase of 40 acres of land on the hills north of the village for $2,000. On May 17, the board gave its final approval to the

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENT

natural landscape philosophy. Possibly the philosophical underpinning of his natural landscape perspective was the influence on him of the transcendentalism of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. In an 1857 competition, his design for New York City’s Central Park lost out to his mentor Frederick Law Olmstead’s design. In addition to designing Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, much of Graceland Cemetery in Chicago and Oak Hill Cemetery in Lake Geneva, Cleveland went on to design the park system in Minneapolis, the campus of the University of Minnesota and the park system in Omaha, Neb.. Simmons and his committee were not disappointed. Very effectively using the oak-crested hills that ring the northern side of the village of Geneva, Cleveland designed a magnificent cemetery. Once Oak Hill was opened, many remains and tombstones were

moved from Pioneer Cemetery to Oak Hill, including those of Robert Wells Warren, one of Geneva’s seven founders. The tombstones that had once been in the Pioneer Cemetery are clearly evident in Oak Hill today by their age and type of stone. But for many residents of Lake Geneva today, Oak Hill Cemetery is much more than a beautiful, historic venue. It is the final resting place of their parents, grandparents and other relatives and friends. Moreover, it is where at some point in the future their remains will repose. Indeed, many residents may have experienced the same feelings that I did as they drove around the winding roads in Oak Hill looking at the names on the surrounding tombstones. Each time I drive around the cemetery I am struck by the fact that most of the residents of Lake Geneva that I knew in the 1940s and 1950s now repose in Oak Hill. It is as though the population of the city that I knew in the post-World War II era has

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COMMUNITY NOTE Spaghetti dinner fundraiser Nov. 1 To fund their centennial celebration, the Linn 4-H Club will host a spaghetti dinner at the Linn Presbyterian Church on Friday, Nov. 1. Dinner will be served from 5 to 8 p.m., or until sold out. The cost is $8 for adults, $5 for children ages 6 to 12, and children 5 and under are free.

FROM GENEVA LAKE: STORIES FROM THE SHORE

ARTHUR KEY and his wife started Kaye’s Park Resort. migrated north up Madison Street to the hills that overlook the city. To be sure, some of those I once knew now repose in St. Francis de Sales Cemetery and in other, smaller nearby cemeteries. But being familiar with the names on many of the tombstones in Oak Hill, it is inescapable that memories of a city that once was come flowing back in full flood. As I stand before the graves of my grandparents and uncle, and those of my aunt and her husband, those memories become all the more acute. I suspect that members of many previous generations of Lake Geneva residents have had a similar experience. The office at Oak Hill Cemetery is presided over by the genial Mickey Tolar. It is likely that no one has spent more time in Oak Hill over the past five decades than Mickey, followed by Jerry Steinke and

Dan Derrick. Both cemeteries are under the jurisdiction of the Lake Geneva Cemetery Commission, comprised of Clarence Read, Arlene Krohn and Sturg Taggart. The beautiful grounds of both the Oak Hill and Pioneer Cemeteries are expertly maintained by Lance and Clint Melancon and Ron Zink. Noted for its beauty and superb landscaping, Oak Hill Cemetery is also of significant historical importance. It truly warrants being placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Only nine cemeteries in Wisconsin are presently on the National Register. Oak Hill clearly deserves to be the 10th Wisconsin cemetery designated as a National Historic Place. Patrick Quinn is a Lake Geneva native who is University Archivist Emeritus at Northwestern University.


October 31, 2013

The Regional News

5D

RECIPES By Glenda Hill ghill@lakegenevanews.net

BEEF HUNGARIA

This is the time of year when the aroma of good food welcoming everyone home is especially appreciated. And when the aroma has been developing with no attention from the cook it is even more welcoming. Slow cookers present an unending variety of meals that will cook all day, providing an evening meal for great enjoyment. Beef Hungaria is the slow cooker version of a popular dish. It suggests browning the beef in lard, although olive oil or vegetable oil is probably a healthier choice. Onions, garlic, tomatoes, potatoes and green pepper are the vegetables. It calls for mild and hot paprika, providing the traditional ďŹ&#x201A;avor. Sour cream is added at the end of the cooking time. Fresh or frozen corn is the main ingredient for Southern Style Corn Soup. It cooks with onion and chicken broth for four hours, ready to serve with grilled cheese sandwiches and fruit for a light supper or after the game snack. Heavy sweet cream is added last. Old World Sauerkraut Supper includes apples, potatoes, bacon and caraway seeds with Polish or smoked sausage and the sauerkraut. It can cook up to nine hours on low or will be ďŹ nished in four hours on high. Serve it with rye bread of some sort and green beans or peas as a side vegetable. Starting with navy beans that get soaked overnight before cooking, Country-Style Bean Soup also has onion, carrots, celery, garlic and a meaty ham bone or ham hock in it. After cooking until almost tender, the beans are combined with the other ingredients and the soup cooks about eight hours. Serve it with freshly baked bread or sloppy joe sandwiches for a meal everyone will enjoy.

3 pounds stew beef, cut into 1-inch cubes 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 onions, diced 2 cloves garlic, diced 2 tomatoes, quartered 4 potatoes, cubed

OLD WORLD SAUERKRAUT DINNER

1 green pepper, diced 1 tablespoon mild paprika 1/2 teaspoon hot paprika 2 cups water Salt and pepper, to taste 1 cup sour cream

3 strips bacon, diced 1 1/2 tablespoons ďŹ&#x201A;our 2 large cans, or 1 bag, sauerkraut, drained 2 small potatoes, cubed 2 small apples, cubed

Fry bacon until crisp; remove from skillet and drain. Add ďŹ&#x201A;our to bacon drippings and blend well. Stir in sauerkraut; mix well. Place mixture in slow cooker; add all remaining ingredients; stir well. Cover and cook on low seven to nine hours on low, three to four hours on high.

Heat oil in large skillet and brown beef well on all sides; transfer to slow cooker. In same skillet, saute onions and garlic; add to slow cooker. Add all other ingredients, except sour cream, cover and cook on low eight to 10 hours, until meat is tender. Turn pot to high, add sour cream and cook 15 more minutes. Serves six.

COUNTRY-STYLE BEAN SOUP 1 1/2 cups small white beans, such as navy, soaked overnight 4 1/2 cups water 1 large onion, chopped ďŹ ne 2 carrots, peeled and shredded 1 stalk celery, chopped ďŹ ne

SOUTHERN STYLE CORN SOUP 4 tablespoons butter 1/2 onion, chopped 2 10-ounce packages frozen corn, thawed, or 5 cups fresh corn

3 tablespoons brown sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds 1 to 2 pounds Polish or smoked sausage, sliced 1/2 cup water

Salt 6 cups chicken broth 1/2 teaspoon white pepper 1 cup heavy sweet cream

Saute onion in butter in skillet until translucent; transfer all to slow cooker. Add other ingredients, except cream; cover and cook on low four hours. Stir in cream, heat on high about 10 minutes. Serves eight.

CORRECTION: The recipe column last week included an incomplete recipe. Its title and contents are corrected here. STEAK WITH PEPPERS AND TOMATOES 4 tablespoons margarine or butter; 1 1/2 lbs. sirloin steak, cut into 1-inch Melt margarine in large skillet over medium heat. Brown meat; remove from cubes; 2 green peppers, cut into strips; 2 tomatoes, chopped; 1 teaspoon pan and keep warm. Add peppers, tomatoes, oregano, Worcestershire sauce, dried oregano; 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce; 1/2 teaspoon salt; 1/8 salt and pepper. Cook ďŹ ve minutes or until peppers are softened. Return meat teaspoon black pepper; Italian bread, cut 1-inch thick to skillet and cook two to three minutes. Serve over bread slices. Serves four.

3 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 bay leaf 1 meaty ham bone or ham hock 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups water Finely chopped parsley

Drain soaking water from beans. Return to pot; cover with water and simmer in saucepan one and one-half hours, until almost tender. Transfer to slow cooker. In frying pan, saute onion, carrots and celery in oil until limp; add with garlic, bay leaf, ham bone, salt and two cups water to cooker. Cover and cook on low six to eight hours. Ladle into soup bowls, garnish with parsley. Makes eight servings. Note: Beans can be prepared the night before cooking. Leave them in the saucepan in the refrigerator, then bring up to a boil before proceeding with the recipe.

SPOTLIGHT ON LOCAL BUSINESSES BUSINESS DIRECTORY

  -%2#9 -%2#97!,7/24( (/304)!, -%$)#!,#%.4%2 (IGHWAYSAND,AKE'ENEVA 7)

  



WWW-ERCY(EALTH3YSTEMORG

A+ Graphics 98 E. Main St., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 248-4100 At The Lake House Lake Como, WI (262) 903-6636 Bomb Shelle Beauty Boutique 706 Geneva St., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 249-8950 Geneva Crossing Senior Community Curtis St. & Townline Rd., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 248-4558 Geneva Lake Dream Homes 908 S. Wells St., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 249-0009 â&#x20AC;˘ (262) 275-6253 Geneva Lake Manor 211 S. Curtis St., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 248-3145 Germaineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fashion & Bridal 719 W. Main St., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 249-0551 Lake Geneva Opticians 801 Main St., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 248-6687 Master Services (262) 248-2103 Masterson StafďŹ ng 1417 Racine St., Delavan, WI (262) 740-1300 Mercy Health HWY 50 & HWY 67, Lake Geneva, WI (262) 245-0535 Ritaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wells Street Salon 800 Wells St., Lake Geneva, WI (262) 248-3970 Sherwood Lodge 116 Cherry St., WIlliams Bay, WI (262) 245-7320 Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Brew 9 S. Wisconsin St., Elkhorn, WI (262) 729-3001 Spinal Rehabilitation Clinic of Lake Geneva 800 Geneva Pkwy. N., Suite 102, Lake Geneva, WI (262) 248-4105 Verlo Mattress Factory Store 2462 HWY 120, Lake Geneva, WI (262) 249-0420 West 20 Ranch & Saddle W4812 HWY 20, East Troy, WI (262) 642-4272

SHERWOOD LODGE

Assisted Living With Style Complete line of supplies for making your own quality beer and wine at home 116 Cherry Street â&#x20AC;˘ Williams Bay, WI 262.245.7320g

- Walworth Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only walk-in humidor - The Finest Premium Cigars

www.sherwoodlodgeseniorliving.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Best Home Brew Store in Walworth Countyâ&#x20AC;?

For more information and to schedule a personal tour, call or visit today Deb Huebscher - Director of Tenant Services Email: dhuebscher@ricemanagement.com

HOURS: Tuesday-Friday Saturday

10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

9 S. Wisconsin Street â&#x20AC;˘ Elkhorn, WI 262.729.3001

Craig Slapinski, D.C.

Becky Friedrichs, D.C.

No Referral Needed 800 GENEVA PARKWAY N. SUITE 102 â&#x20AC;˘ LAKE GENEVA, WI (262) 248â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4105 â&#x20AC;˘ WWW.SPINALREHABANDCHIROCENTER.COM

ARE YOU IN PAIN?

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(262) 249-0420

*See Store for Details â&#x20AC;˘ www.verlo.com


6D

The Regional News

October 31, 2013

SPOTLIGHT ON LOCAL BUSINESSES Masterson Staffing Solutions 1417 Racine Street, Unit E, Delavan (262) 740-1300

Whether it is Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall, At The Lake House is the perfect gift of memories for your family or close group of friends. Things are just that...“things.” But memories and time spent together are forever.

To Reserve Call Mary (262) 903-6636

STOREWIDE INVENTORY SALE! Every Dress in Store is Discounted Bridal Dresses Starting at $49.00

How many years in business? 45 years; Delavan Branch opened in 2011.

Gift Certificates Available! maryking@wi.rr.com AtTheLakehouse.com

Your hosts, Andy and Mary, built At The Lake House in 2010 to provide a complete vacation home for every family without the cost and maintenance associated with owning such a dream home.

Bomb Shelle Beauty Boutique Let Us Come To You!

Theme Parties • Spray Tan Parties Feathers • Tween Parties Eyelash Extensions • Glitter Tattoos Clothing • Spray Tan

(262) 249-8950

w

Owner’s name: Masterson Family Delavan Branch Managers: Ryan Dreger and Molly Brahm Business Development Manager: Doug Clayburg

706 Geneva St. • Lake Geneva, WI ellebeautyboutique.co ww.bombsh m

The Highlands • The Terraces Arbor Village • Village Glen Visit today! 262-248-4558 Active Senior Living, Assisted Living & Memory Care Curtis Street & Townline Road www.genevacrossing.com

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

FEATURED HOME OF THE WEEK

507 Sommerfield Dr. (Prairie View) Beautiful Open Design Ranch Now Available @ $274,900 (262) 249-0009 (262) 275-6253 908 S. Wells Street, Lake Geneva, WI 53147

www.genevalakedreamhomes.com

Building Homes For Now & For the Future!

What services or products are your specialties? Providing skilled and qualified talent in temporary, temp-to-hire, direct hire, payrolling, on-site services, and specialized services. Describe your typical customers or clientele: Our clients range from several industries including light industrial and manufacturing, office, technical, and professional. Clients partner with Masterson so that we may find and provide qualified employees for their needs. What is the compliment you hear most about the way you run your business? Our ability to customize our strategies and services to each individual client. No two customers are alike. That’s why we custom-design strategies and implement procedures for each and every one of our client relationships. This process grows and evolves with the dynamics of our customers’ business needs. This comprehensive discovery delivers insights and a working blueprint that ensures stability and optimal performance. Many of our clients tell us this process defines our value and differentiates Masterson as a true extension of your business.

719 West Main St. Lake Geneva 262.249.0551 • www.germainesbridal.com OPEN DAILY 11 A.M.-5 P.M. • SUNDAY 12 P.M.-4 P.M. After Hours Appointments Available

Lake Geneva OPTICIANS

See what you’ve been missing! CONTEMPORARY STYLES TRADITIONAL SERVICE Suzy Reinholm • Jack Reinholm p: 262.248.6687 fax: 262.248.9068 801 Main Street Lake Geneva, WI 53147 lakegenevaoptician@sbcglobal.net COUPON

Drain Cleaning • Replacements 262-248-2103

$25 OFF Your Next Service Visit Not good with any other offer. Exp 1/10/14 “We’re the Good Guys Your Friends Told You About” TM

www.masterserviceslg.com What is the most unique service/ product that you offer? Customization of strategies, procedures, and services to fit each individual client and fulfill their needs What is the key factor that makes this business rewarding for you? Providing quality employees to our clients to assist with their needs and demands as well as helping employees find jobs that match their skillsets are the most rewarding aspects of this business.

Now Hiring 1st and 2nd shift opportunities LOCATED AT:

1417 Racine St. Delavan, WI 53115 Masterson Staffing Solutions is now recruiting for employment opportunities in Southeastern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois. Interested applicants should call to schedule an appointment to apply in person with a Masterson Staffing Solutions representative. Any questions please call (262) 740-1300. PLEASE BRING PROOF OF EMPLOYMENT ELIGIBILITY.


Oct. 31, 2013, edition  
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